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annual A nnouncing ourst! Fake Ad Conte wi nner, to ou r Ju ne Cong ratu lations

Julia Pratt

Winner will receive two free burritos from Rio Wraps. Try to find the fake advertisement in this week’s paper and throughout the month. If you think you’ve found it, e-mail your name, the page number of the ad and the ad caption to dailydisplay@gmail.com (subject: fake ad contest). One winner will be chosen at the end of each month and will be contacted by e-mail.


Nuclear Physics Mini-Course Meets one hour, once a week, three weeks 8 credits

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Have lonely socks that are missing their partner?

Bring them to the Third Annual Sock Swap Meet at the Michigan Union! Find missing matches and trade for a sense of wholeness in your drawer, but more importantly, in your life! For more information, email sockswapmeet@gmail.com


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THE BASICS

STUDENT LIFE

SOCIAL LIFE

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GETTING AROUND

The Daily OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

The Student Voice Since 1891

The Daily is now accepting applications for its new writer training program for fall quarter. This 10-week program, designed to allow writers to be a part of a fastpaced journalism team, will feature weekly training

www.bicyclecenterofseattle.com CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE AND OUR STORE FOR HOT DEALS - Road bikes, BMX, hybrid, mountain bikes: new &used as well as accessories - Full bicycle maintenance facility on site. Our factory-authorized service department is set-up to perform just about every imaginable bike repair, as well as preventative and routine maintenance.

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sessions with guest speakers and oneon-one edits with the development editor of The Daily. If interested, please come to Communications 132 to pick up an application. Applications are due Sept. 12 at 5 p.m. For more information, e-mail: development@ thedaily. washington.edu. Writers will be expected to take on several stories

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throughout the quarter. Journalism experience is a plus, but not required. UW students need to be registered for at least 6 credits to participate. Permanent employment is not guaranteed.

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B16 » THERE & BACK |

Biking at UW

Pump It Up

View Seattle from two wheels

ummer is an excellent time to explore Seattle by bike. Situated near quirky Fremont and pristine Green Lake, the University of Washington is an ideal launching point for a biking expedition. For the less intrepid, biking can simply be an alternative to navigating campus on foot. Whether you’re tentative about cycling, a seasoned cyclist or somewhere in between, here are some of the basics for successful biking at the UW.

Getting Into Gear

Located a couple blocks from Lander Hall on Boat Street and Brooklyn Avenue Northeast, Recycled Cycles is a popular place to buy used and new bicycles. For approximately $200, you can purchase a decent pair of wheels. “Their staff is super friendly and they have one of the wider selections of bikes,” said Taylor Leischman, member of the Husky Cycling Club. Alternatively, Performance Bicycle on Northeast 45th Street and Roosevelt Way Northeast sells and repairs a large variety of bikes. The bicycle store Fluidride caters to mountain bikers. In addition to exclusively selling mountain bikes, they offer biking lessons and host the Fluidride Cup.

Getting low on air? If you purchased your bike at Recycled Cycles, they’ll fill your tires for free. “Their mechanic shop does everything from change a flat tire to overhaul an entire bike and they are typically pretty quick about it,” said Leischman. The student-run ASUW Bike Shop also specializes in biking accessories. They furnish equipment for students to perform their own repairs and provide an on-hand mechanic if do-it-yourself repairs go awry. Prices range from $3.69 for a tube replacement to $50 for a full tune-up. Buying your own pump or other repair gear is another option for the do-it-yourself type. There are also plenty of other bicycle stores within a few milesof campus.

Trekking the Burke-Gilman

For a quick jaunt, the Burke-Gilman trail allows easy access to local destinations. Linking North and South campus, the trail provides an easy commute to Husky Stadium and the IMA virtually free from cars and intersections. What’s more, the trail extends well beyond the UW. “It provides a cross-section of a large part of our city’s personality,” said Daniel Koski-Karell, president of the Husky Cycling Club. The westerly route stretches to Gas Works Park, where abandoned, rusty reservoirs stand sentry to a magnificent view of downtown Seattle and Lake Union on a clear day. Further down the trail is the Fremont District, infamous for such funky features as the Fremont troll and Lenin statue. Fremont also has its share of delectable eateries. To the east, the Burke-Gilman Trail traverses University Village and reaches all the way north to Bothell. It encompasses a dispersion of beaches and parks along the way.

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Precautions

With bicycle theft rampant, it’s important to take some basic steps to prevent robbery. First, buy a sturdy U-lock. The bike racks scattered throughout campus are designed so that the U-lock can be looped through a bike’s front wheel and frame. That way, your only liability will be your back wheel. Second, go down to the Police Station on Boat Road and register your bike. They will give you a sticker to put in a conspicuous place in order to deter burglars from absconding with your ride. Finally, remember while riding on the road, the same laws that apply to vehicle drivers apply to cyclists. — Sara Grimes Bike Shops http://recycledcycles.com http://performancebike.com http://fluidride.com/ Repairs http://depts.washington.edu/asuwbike UW Police Department www.washington.edu/admin/police/prevention/bikereg.html Burke-Gilman Map http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/Parks/BurkeGilman/bgtrail.htm Seattle Biking Map http://www.metrokc.gov/kcdot/roads/bike/maps/4.pdf Husky Cycling Club http://www.huskycycling.net/

The Daily OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

The Student Voice Since 1891

The Daily is now accepting applications for its new writer

training program

for fall quarter. This 10-week program, designed to allow writers to be a part of a fast-

paced journalism team, will feature *VIITIVWSREPWEHWJSVWXYHIRXW

%W[IPPEWJVIIPSWX JSYRHXI\XFSSOWEHWERHWLSYXSYXW 7EPIW8IEQ 'SQQYRMGEXMSRW&PHK 9RMZIVWMX]SJ;EWLMRKXSR GPEWWMJMIHW$XLIHEMP][EWLMRKXSRIHY

 

The Daily OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

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weekly training sessions with guest speakers and one-on-one edits with the development editor of The Daily. If interested, please come to Communications 132 to pick up an application. Applications are due Sept. 12 at 5 p.m. For more information, e-mail: development@thedaily. washington.edu. Writers will be expected to take on several stories throughout the quarter. Journalism experience is a plus, but not required. UW students need to be registered

for at least 6 credis to participate.

Permanent employment is not guaranteed.


THE BASICS

SEATTLE

THE NEIGHBORS

Mark your calendar

FOR FUN

GREEK WEEK

Every May, Greek Week brings together the UW’s fraternities and sororities to compete for the title of Greek Week champions. Some events are fun, including volleyball tournaments, team trivia, waterslide relays and a car cramming competition that stuffs as many participants as possible into a car. Other events, such as blood and clothing drives, are service-based.

Check out these annual events

RELAY FOR LIFE

Grab a group of friends and camp out in Husky Stadium overnight to raise money to help fight cancer. Take turns walking, jogging or running around the track in this spring event. In 2008, the 174 UW teams raised $272,919.83 for the American Cancer Society.

HOMECOMING

The trees on campus turn into a brilliant orange and gold and as if on cue, UW students begin to turn purple and gold for Homecoming weekend. Homecoming begins Oct. 12 with the Dawg Dash as thousands of students gather to run or walk through the beautiful UW campus together. Other events include carnivals, competitions and games. The main event is the homecoming football game; this year the Huskies will take on Oregon State. Tickets for the game are $30. It’s the time of year when purple, gold, crimson and gray can be seen everywhere together. The two largest universities in Washington, UW and WSU, meet together on the football field in a contest designed to prove that Huskies are superior to Cougars. The annual game is century-old tradition that draws out the pride and spirit of each team. This year’s game falls on Nov. 22 in WSU’s hometown of Pullman, Wash. Dawgs can take the Husky Express Bus for $35 or carpool over the mountains with friends. For information on how to purchase tickets for the Apple Cup, visit the Husky Ticket Information Web site.

Photo by John McLellan | Participants from fraternities and sororities Alpha Xi Delta, Sigma Chi and Pi Kappa Pi are assisted into a car in this year’s Greek Week Car Cram.

U-DISTRICT STREET FAIR

The annual University District Street Fair fills the Ave, featuring mostly local crafts, music, arts and food. Street performers entertain with feats of strength (the classic tearing of phonebooks) and show off their agility skills through juggling. First started during the Vietnam War to lighten community tension, the Street Fair has now transformed into a weekend of fun and celebration. The fair usually begins the third weekend of May.

APPLE CUP

Think you can take a better photo?

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

BITE OF ASIA

Photo by Trevor Klein | Senior running back Louis Rankin sprints a kickoff back to the Cougar end zone, scoring the first Husky points only 15 seconds after the start of the 2007 Apple Cup.

During spring quarter, booths filled with tasty Asian cuisine fill the HUB lawn. Sold at cheap prices, the tasty treats include cuisines from countries such as the Philippines, Thailand, China, Korea and Vietnam. Many of the booths are staffed by student organizations and cater food from local restaurants to provide UW students with an array of ethnic foods usually unavailable in the campus cafeterias. — Joy Yagi

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The Daily is looking for new photographers. Send in samples of your work to : photo@thedaily. washington.edu. In order to be eligible to work at The Daily for fall, winter and spring quarters, you must be enrolled in at least six undergraduate credits or five graduate credits. Thank you for your interest.

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The Student Voice Since 1891

Please recycle this paper

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The Daily OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

The Student Voice Since 1891

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The Daily OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

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THE BASICS

SEATTLE

THE NEIGHBORS

FOR FUN

» C13

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Taking a break

The four best parks near the U-District take pride in being a Seattleite because having been born and raised in this great city, I think I know at least a little about the best parks to check out on a sunny (yet partly cloudy with scattered showers) day. — Kristin Okinaka

The Daily OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

The Student Voice Since 1891

Green Lake Green Lake Park is near campus and therefore easily accessible by bus or bike. You can walk around the lake, which is a 2.8-mile loop. There are also many facilities, including basketball and tennis courts as well as a community center with an indoor pool.

Green Lake Park 7201 E. Green Lake Dr.

The Goods » On a sunny day, rent a paddleboat for an hour. » There are many restaurants and cafés nearby the park. » The park is a great place for people-watching. You are sure to see hundreds of joggers, bikers, swimmers and beachgoers on a warm, sunny weekend afternoon.

Metro route 48 The Olympic Sculpture Park is located downtown next to the waterfront. The park provides an open space where visitors can walk around and enjoy views of the Olympic Mountains, Puget Sound and the Space Needle while also perusing displays of outdoor art.

Olympic Sculpture Park

The Goods » The park opened in January 2007. » The Seattle Art Museum chose to preserve downtown Seattle’s last undeveloped waterfront property by creating the nine-acre park.

TM

Metro route 30 or 74

2901 Western Ave.

Discovery Park is a great place to go for a run. The park runs right along Puget Sound, offering fantastic views of the Cascades and Olympics. The Goods » The 534-acre park is the largest in Seattle. » The park has much to offer with many marked paths to explore as well as protected tidal beaches, open meadows and seaside cliffs.

Discovery Park

Metro route 31, then 33 or 24

3801 W. Government Way Gas Works Park, on the north side of Lake Union, used to be a plant to manufacture gas from coal but now is a park that includes picnic shelters, a children’s barn play area and the remnants of the old factory.

Gas Works Park 2101 N. Northlake Way

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The Goods » On top of a grassy hill, the centerpiece of the park, you can catch a picturesque view of downtown Seattle. » On the Fourth of July, local residents pack into the park to watch fireworks above Lake Union.

10 – 20 minute bike ride on the Burke-Gilman Trail

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View from Gas Works Park

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The Daily OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

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NEWS

T HE DAILY P ENNSY LVANI AN

High food prices hit nation, area Some take drastic steps: If it fits in a pocket, “I’m taking it,” says one student By KATIE KARAS Staff Writer karaskl@dailypennsylvanian.com

As food pr ices increase nationw ide, students a nd West Philadelpia residents are feeling the strain on their purse strings. The pr ice of many food staples, including milk, eggs and bread, rose drastically in 2007, resulting in higher prices at grocery stores and restaurants. Overall, the average price of food rose at a rate of 5.3 percent for 2007 through the month of November, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In compar ison, food prices rose just 2.4 percent during 2006. The price of eggs rose by more than 36 percent from D e c e m b e r 2 0 0 6 t o 2 0 0 7.

Bread prices increased by 12.6 percent . And some students have ex pressed outrage at the higher prices they face at local grocery stores. An Engineering sophomore who did not want his name to be used has resorted to thievery from the Fresh Grocer at 40th and Walnut streets to beat the price increases. “If I think it’s overpriced and it fits in my pocket, I’m taking it,” he said. “I’m not paying $7 for a thimble-sized bottle of oregano.” Other shoppers, like Julie Micca, who lives on the 4200 block of Chestnut Street with her husband and two children, have taken less extreme measures. Micca, who shops at Supreme Supermarket on 43rd and Walnut streets, said she now clips coupons before going grocery shopping and looks for the cheapest item, rather than brand names. “Instead of shopping with a menu in mind for the week, I base my dinners on what’s on sale,” she said. Local restaurants are also trying to cope with the price jump. R ose L i , who i s a manager at Cosi on 36th and Walnut Streets, said the restaurant has been forced to raise prices by a small amount in re-

sponse to the more expensive cost of ingredients, especially milk. Despite the price increases, Business Services spokeswoman Barbara Lea-Kruger said students should not worry that their meal plans will become more expensive this school year. “Penn Dining is committed to maintaining pr ices in all locations, includ ing retail locations, for the remainder of the school year,” she said. Lea-Kruger did not say if any Penn Dining price increases would occur after this year. Penn Dining’s partnership with Aramark, a dining-management ser vice, prevents short-term market f luctuations f rom i mpacti ng the price of meal plans. National brands on campus, however, such as Subway and Chick-Fil-A, may adjust their prices in response to changes in food costs. Last year’s price increases have been precipitated by a number of international and domestic factors, explained Political Science professor Mary Summers , who teaches a class called The Politics of Food. “ We’ve based a n ent i re food system on cheap corn and cheap soybeans f rom g o v e r n m e n t s u b s i d i e s ,” Summers said, adding that gover n ment promot ion of using cor n in biof uels has a lt e r e d t h at s y st e m a nd cont r ibut ed t o food-pr ice increases.

Priscilla des Gachons /DP Photo Illustration

T HURSDAY, J ANUARY 17, 2008 P AGE 5

“CURE” My ad - March 30, 2007

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Putting Penn to Paper

Become a memb er of the most highly rated staff on campus

RA GA GA RA INFORMATION SESSIONS Thursday, January 17 at 7:00pm Harrison College House, Seminar Room M- 20

GA ONLY SESSIONS: Tuesday, February 5 at 7:30pm

Apply Online Today Ear lier applic ation dates for y our convenienc e!

Under grads in the Classes of 2009 & 2010 are eligible for RA positions and graduate students are eligible for GA positions in the College Houses

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Wednesday, March 19 at 8:00pm Graduate Student Center, Room 305

www.collegehouses.upenn.edu

The Zell/Lurie Real Estate Center at Wharton

Questions? Writ e us a t gainf o@pobox or call 898.5551

Seventh Annual

Real Estate Career Fair Friday, January 18, 2008 Bodek Lounge, Houston Hall 3417 Spruce Street 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Open to all students, undergraduate and graduate, who are interested in real estate. Meet dozens of professionals in all areas of the industry: development, finance, management, and more.

Also a great opportunity to find summer intern or full-time positions in real estate. For more information, please contact Ron Smith: smithrk@wharton.upenn.edu

215-746-4709


T HE DAILY P ENNSY LVANI AN

P AGE A8 F RIDAY, J ANUARY 18, 2008

NEWSWIRE

DOW JONES INDUSTRIAL AVERAGE Close: 12,159.21 High: 12,517.61 ▼ 306.95 Low: 12,125.56

S&P 500 Close: 1,333.25 ▼ 39.95

NASDAQ Close: 2,346.90 ▼ 47.69

Sitter charged with murder

NEW YORK

Connecticut cops accuse a babysitter of abusing and murdering a one-year-old

NYSE acquires rival New Orleans police Am. Stock Exchange move headquarters

By DAVE COLLINS The Associated Press

Julie Adkins-Gasque never worried when she spotted a fresh bruise on her one-yearold son. He just played rough with the baby sitter’s son, she thought. Yet there was the working mom yesterday, burying her boy, Elijah Gasque, in a snow-covered rural cemetery and trying to understand how he wound up with a fractured skull in the care of the 25-year-old sitter, Yalines Torres. “What, did he cry too much for her? I don’t know why she would do it,” Adkins-Gasque said after the funeral. “I’m angry. I’m confused. I’m blank sometimes. I miss my son.” A judge in Hartford arraigned Torres on a murder charge yesterday and set her bail at $1 million in the child’s death last weekend. Torres told investigators his head smacked a door frame as she ran around with him slung over her shoulder in a sleeping bag.

A family friend, May ra Velazquez, said she was stunned by the arrest. “She’s a good mother,” Velazquez said. “She takes care of her kids.” Adkins-Gasque, 23, said she met Torres two months ago through a friend and asked her to watch her son as much as five days a week. She noticed fresh bruises on him four or five times, but she said Torres told her Elijah sometimes fought with her son over toys. “I thought she was letting her son get out of control,” AdkinsGasque said. “I thought that’s just the way it was.” Last Thursday, Elijah came home with a fresh bruise on his forehead, his mother said. But she left her son with at Torres’ apartment in Hartford again Friday because she had to work and couldn’t find or afford a different sitter. According to a police report, Torres called Adkins-Gasque at Bob Child/AP Photo her job at a fast-food restaurant that night and told her that Yalines Torres, the babysitter, sits in her arraignment for the murder of the 18-month old child that was in her care. Elijah had a seizure.

Filipino nurses may face criminal charges By FRANK ELTMAN

risk: Prosecutors hit them with criminal charges for allegedly jeopardizing the lives of termiFor months, the nurses com- nally ill children they were in plained that they were subject charge of watching. to demeaning and unfair workThe 10 nurses and the ating conditions — not what they torney who advised them were were promised when they came charged with conspiracy and to America from the Philip- child endangerment in what pines in search of a better life. defense lawyers say is an unSo they abruptly quit. precedented use of criminal But in doing so, they put law in a labor dispute. If conmore than their careers at victed of the misdemeanor ofThe Associated Press

fenses, they face up to a year in jail on each of 13 counts, and could lose their nursing licenses and be deported. The case has unfolded against the backdrop of a chronic nursing shortage in the United States. All of the defendants were from the Philippines, which exported 120,000 nurses last year. One defendant was a doctor back home and a top scorer on

the country’s medical board exams, but decided it was more lucrative to be a nurse in the United States. Others had respectable medical jobs back home and viewed their work in New York as a dream come true. “Coming to the United States is like the fulfillment of your nursing career,” said Maria Theresa Ramos, who arrived on Long Island in 2004.

NATIONAL BRIEFING LOUISIANA

NEW YORK CIT Y (AP) — The New York Stock Exchange agreed yesterday to buy the American Stock Exchange, ending a once intense rivalry that began in colonial times when brokers traded in outdoor markets. Both exchanges have battled for corporate listings and bragging rights since the early 1900s, with their trading floors just a short walk away from one another in Lower Manhattan. Newspapers around the country all listed the stock swings on the nation’s two dominant markets, until investors began paying more attention in the 1990s to technology issues on the upstart Nasdaq Stock Market. Their evolution took a very different path — with the Big Board forming N YSE Euronext to become the world’s first trans-Atlantic exchange.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — After a trying year of more than 200 murders and a rise in crime, at least police once again have a permanent place to call home. The New Orleans Police Department, which has operated out of trailers in the 2½ years since Hurricane Katrina, dedicated a renovated headquarters yesterday that brings its major components back under one roof. Crime has become a leading concern for local government and business leaders trying to attract investment, boost tourism and reassure residents that the city is on the mend. The move to a permanent headquarters coincides with what Mayor Ray Nagin believes is a crucial time in the city’s recovery. It “sends the signal that the criminal justice system is back,” he said.

ILLINOIS

TEXAS

Warrant issued to U.S. fugitives flee, seek sender of text escape execution CHICAGO (A P) — Authorities investigating the disappearance of a former suburban Chicago police officer’s wife have obtained a warrant seeking information to identify who sent a racy text message to her cell phone. Drew Peterson’s attorney, Joel Brodsky, said yesterday that a message sent to Stacy Peterson’s cell phone in September shows she was having an affair and lends credence to Drew Peterson’s contention she left him for another man. “This is obviously sent by a lover of Stacy prior to her disappearance. Drew did not send it,” Brodsky said.

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — A drug dealer who gunned down a deputy during a traffic stop in Southern California. A man in Arizona who killed his exgirlfriend’s parents and brother and snatched his children. A man who suffocated his baby daughter and left her body in a toolbag on an expressway overpass near Chicago. Ordinarily, these would be death penalty cases. But these men fled to Mexico, thereby escaping execution. The reason: Mexico refuses to send anyone back to the United States unless the U.S. gives assurances it won’t seek the death penalty.

“Menorah Lighting”

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Putting Penn to Paper


P AGE B4 F RIDAY, J ANUARY 18, 2008

SPORTS

T HE DAILY P ENNSY LVANI AN

QUAKERSGAMEDAY PENN-ST. JOE’S WHEN: Tomorrow, 7:30 p.m. WHERE: The Palestra TELEVISION: CN8 RADIO: None

■ THE RECORD ALL-TIME RECORD: St. Joe’s leads, 43-33. The Hawks won an 84-74 decision at the Palestra last year, using a punishing inside game to take over down the stretch.

5-10

9-5

■ THE EDGE The Quakers face off against the Hawks — who’s got the advantage?

OFFENSE: No question here. The Hawks average nearly 75 points per game; when the Quakers aren’t turning it over, they can’t seem to shoot. Advantage: ST. JOE’S REBOUNDING: St. Joe’s has three solid rebounders in Pat Calathes, Ahmad Nivins and Rob Ferguson. Penn doesn’t have that depth up front. Advantage: ST. JOE’S DEFENSE: St. Joe’s has a defensive specialist in Ferguson, but the Quakers have been better on defense of late. Advantage: PENN COACHING: Phil Martelli is a demigod in the Big 5 and his team is overachieving; Glen MIller hasn’t gotten much out of his older players. Advantage: ST. JOE’S OVERALL: This is a game St. Joe’s has to have if it wants to snag a coveted at-large bid. If Harrison Gaines’ (possible) return can mix things up, Penn has a shot. But don’t count on it. Advantage: ST. JOE’S

THEY SAID IT Cameron Lewis Penn forward

“We know that we’re not gonna outscore people, so we have to get stops.”

Lewis: Nivins double-team in gameplan M. HOOPS from page B1 good so it’s going to be a team effort to keep them off the glass,” Lewis said. “We’ll probably run some double teams at Nivins, I imagine.” The University of Massachusetts found out what can happen if Nivins is left oneon-one deep in the post. Last week, he lit up the Minutemen for 31 points and 12 rebounds. The Quakers’ improvement may suit them against Nivins and Calathes, but it was Penn’s lack of ability to stop guards getting in the lane that was its downfall on Tuesday. “We allowed too much penetration off the dribble,” Penn coach Glen Miller said of his team’s 62-58 loss. “And our big guys overreacted and stepped up too high, which led to some easy baskets down low.” But at least the Red and Blue may not have to deal with starting point guard Tasheed Carr, who has averaged 11.8 points per game. The junior sprained his ankle Monday night and didn’t make the trip for the Hawks’ game at Charlotte Wednesday. He is listed as questionable for tomorrow’s game. Also questionable is one of Penn’s point guards, Harrison Gaines . The freshman — who missed several games over winter break — re-injured his hamstring in the win over NJIT and sat out the loss against La Salle. Miller was not sure yesterday if Gaines would be able to practice, but said it was still a possibility that he would get some playing time tomorrow. In the games that he did play, Gaines was inconsistent

David Wang/DP File Photo

Kevin Egee drives against the Hawks’ Ahmad Nivins at the Palestra last season. This year, the 6-foot-10 Nivins is second on St. Joe’s with 14.6 points per game. Egee, meanwhile, has struggled, with just 25 points on .233 shooting in 14 contests. but managed to spark the Quakers. He also did a good job of taking care of the ball, something unexpected for a freshman. Whether Gaines returns or not, the Quakers’ point guard play will have to improve. Backups Kevin Egee and Aron Cohen have not stepped up, and Penn has averaged nearly 19 turnovers per game — far too many if the Quakers hope to stay with the Hawks. “We don’t have much margin for error, so we can’t have turnovers,” Miller said.

“We have to change sides of the floor more on offense and just be efficient with our passing.” Yet the biggest obstacle the Penn needs to overcome may be its own collective mentality. The disappointment of the season has taken its toll on the team. “I think guys are a little down right now, maybe lacking a little confidence,” captain Brian Grandieri said. “I think we definitely can beat [the Hawks] and I hope guys understand we can.”

Standings Big 5

Overall

Last 5

Villanova

3-0

12-3

3-2

La Salle

1-1

6-9

2-3

St. Joseph’s

0-0

9-5

4-1

Temple

0-1

7-8

2-3

PENN

0-2

5-10

2-3

“Phlying Through Philly” My photograph, published March 20, 2007

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Putting Penn to Paper


NEWS

T HE DAILY P ENNSY LVANI AN

W EDNESDAY, J ANUARY 23, 2008 P AGE 11

Hundred-year-old Quad fence well into restoration process Penn Facilities works with Philly to ensure historical accuracy during construction By RACHEL BAYE Staff Writer rdbaye@dailypennsylvanian.com

The restoration of the fence surrounding the Quadrangle has faced many hurdles as Facilities and Real Estate Ser vices work to maintain historical accuracy. The fence, which has surrounded the Quad since the first phase of its construction in 1880, is “historically significant,” Facilities interim managing director Mariette Buchman said. Both the fence and the Quad itself are historic landmarks officially recognized by the cit y of Philadelphia. The project was star ted late last sumVideo me r a nd i s projected to Go online for be completed video of the no later than Quad fence graduation. construction. “This is a project that Facilities and Business Services have had their eye on for a number of years,” said Buchman. Facilities has been careful to arrange the construction schedule so that students feel minimal disruption. For example, no construction was done during reading days or finals last semester. Still, many students have

Too early to say effects of self-disclosure HIRING from page 1 ment of new faculty members” is something that the Senate Faculty committee is examining, Provost Ron Daniels said. While the prospect of a selfdisclosure policy discouraging candidates from applying for a faculty position at Penn remains a concern, there is little evidence to suggest it would. Whether self-disclosure will effect the University’s ability to recruit new faculty would be “speculative,” Faculty Sen-

complained about construction noises disrupting their early morning sleep. College freshman and Ware College House resident Tzvetomir Peev said that last semester he was often awoken as early as seven or eight in the morning. But for the most part, students are tolerant of the construction. “I wish it wasn’t there,” said Fisher-Hassenfeld resident and Engineering and Wharton freshman Issei Suzuki, “but it’s not that big of a problem.” The fence is composed of brick, topped by limestone caps. Wrought iron emerges from the limestone. Buchman explained that too much of the fence was deteriorating, so they needed to restore it. But she added that they are trying to use as much of the original materials as possible to remain historically accurate. “We counted on being able to reuse some of it,” Buchman said. “We were able to salvage enough brick to do the front face all the way around the Quad,” said David Pancoe, Facilities project manager for the fence. However, he added that on the back of the fence they substituted newer bricks that matched the color of the older ones.

ate Chairman Larry Gladney said. “There exist other colleges with self-disclosure policies, but we don’t have the information,” on its recruiting impact, he added. The University of Wisconsin instated a self-disclosure and background-check policy for potential faculty members last spring, after the university discovered that three professors were convicted felons. Wisconsin also considered the issue of faculty recruitment before requiring disclosure and background checks, but says the policy is too new to evaluate its effect. “It remains too early to tell” whether the policy impacts the recruitment of faculty, University of Wisconsin-Madison Hu-

Buchman explained that because of its historical significance, every minute detail of its restoration had to be approved by the city. “We complete a small sec-

man Resources Director Mark Walters said. The extent to which faculty recruitment may be affected at Penn hinges on the decisions made by the Faculty Senate on how the issue will be handled. “It’s hard to know whether this will have a negative effect on recruitment,” said Jonathan Knight, director of the department of Academic Freedom, Tenure and Governance for the American Association of University Professors. “But it all depends on what you’re being asked to sign and how the administration administers it.”

b

Online Go online to see an interactive crime map.

tion and then cannot proceed until we receive this approval,” Business Services spokeswoman Barbara Lea-Kruger wrote in an e-mail. Since the Quad was con-

structed in three sections — with three different colors of mortar — Pancoe had to use the same three colors of mortar in different parts of the fence.

“You apply the latest techn o l o g y,” s a i d Un i v e r s it y Landscape architect Bob Lundgren, “but you really have to match exactly what the building looks like.”

Used books can cause the prices of texts to rise TEXTBOOKS from page 1 to trends in bundling textbooks with supplements, such as CDs and workbooks, and releasing frequent new editions. Some critics say such extras and revisions are unnecessary. But publishers say they are responding to demand. Hildebrand said that book supplements expand classroom

capabilities and improve performance despite their high cost. And some professors have totally done away with textbooks. Statistics professor Paul Shaman said he began opting for faculty-produced packets and online notes instead of books about 20 years ago. “My motivation was I couldn’t find a textbook that I liked,” Shaman said. “It had the added ben-

efit of lower cost.” Lea-Kruger and Row said professors can help students save money by ordering books early, which allows time for stores to make used versions available. Row added that today’s textbook business causes headaches for all sides. “It’s not like anybody’s making a killing,” he said. “It’s an all-out war where everybody is losing.”

“Closing in on degrees of separation” My design, published April 5, 2007

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CRIME LOG Burglary Jan. 15 — A male student reported that an unknown suspect entered his secured home on the 400 block of 41st Street and removed electronic gaming equipment at about 9:45 a.m. Theft Jan. 14 — A female student reported that an unknown suspect broke her vehicle’s passenger side window and removed an I-pod from her cup holder on the 200 block of 41st St. at about 10 p.m. Jan. 14 — A female University employee reported that an unknown suspect entered her unsecured vehicle and took her purse from the parking garage located at 40th and Walnut Streets at about 9 a.m. Jan. 14 — Steven Scott, 36, of the 2400 block of Catherine Street, was arrested after a female student reported that she observed an offender break her vehicle’s rear window and remove a laptop from the back seat on the 3600 block of Chestnut Street at about 3:55 p.m. Jan. 15 — A male student reported that an unknown suspect removed his computer from a secured room in Meyerson Hall, located at 210 S. 34th St. Jan. 15 — Currency was reported to have been taken from two copy-card vending machines in the Schattner Building, located at 240 S. 40th St., at about 2:30 p.m. Jan. 16 — A male employee reported that an unknown suspect removed both rims and tires from his unsecured bicycle by Stemmler Hall, located at 3450 Hamilton Walk, between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Jan. 16 — A female University employee reported that an unknown suspect removed her unattended purse from an unsecured room at the Laboratory for Research and Structure of Matter, located at 3231

Carmela Aquino/DP Senior Photographer

The historic brick fence outside the Quad is currently being restored by the University. Strict efforts have been made to ensure that the construction complies with city requirements for restoring historic sites. Noise has been an issue for Quad residents.

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Walnut St., at about 3:50 p.m. Jan. 17 — Two females unaffiliated with the university reported that their unattended purses were taken from a windowsill at Cavanaughs, located at 119 S. 39th St., at about 2 a.m. Jan. 17 — A male employee reported that an unknown suspect removed clothing items from an unsecured locker room and electronic items from an unsecured media room in the Palestra, located at 220 S. 32nd St., at about 11:20 a.m. Narcotics Jan. 15 — Ahrmand Drake, 26, unaffiliated with the university, was arrested by Penn police for being in possession of a green leafy substance within his vehicle. -Elizabeth Rubin

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Putting Penn to Paper


SPORTS

T HE DAILY P ENNSY LVANI AN

S ATURDAY, J UNE 7, 2008 — N EW S TUDENT I SSUE P AGE B5

Imperfect, outdated — and the main draw

T

here are over 250 races at this year’s Penn Relays, but you ought to focus on a two-foot pool of water. The crowd starts forming when they pour the first drop. It’ll balloon into the thousands. (Get there early. There’re only so many seats around a puddle.) Not sold? Sure, you’re laughing now. By the end of day one, you’ll have watched 10 hours of races. Most of them have names like “High School Girls Championship of America 4x400-meter Suburban Group A, Subheat C.” If you’re not pining for something different, you’re either lying or being paid not to. Or both. Besides, there’s more. In front of the puddle stands - wait for it - a three-foot hurdle. Thrilling, I know.

Five laps in, a man who could once clear the puddle may be getting his heels wet. The trough is sloped from deep to shallow, swimmingpool style. It creates a reward structure: The more distance needed. you cover with your leap, the *** less grimy water you have to The race is really a giant thrash your way out of. accident. A 19th-century For the weary runner, it’s cross-country course at Oxno metaphor: you find yourford led runners over stone self in deeper and deeper. walls and small creeks. The Guys burn out. They obstacles just happened to stumble. They drop two, three catch on. Athletic facilities have improved since then, but minutes back, or drop out entirely. A few may slip in the apparently nobody’s told the water, victims of the crowd’s NCAA or the Olympics. chant: “Fall! Fall! Fall!” No surprise, then, that it’s And this ain’t the 100-methe bastard child of track ters. They are running, sloshevents. At many schools, ing and jumping for eight it’s the domain of those who to nine minutes, minimum. couldn’t crack it at 5,000 or Usually more. When the bell 10,000 meters. The steeplechase demands for the final lap sounds, some real versatility: a jumper’s technique, a distance runner’s endurance, a middle distance runner’s pace. But few high schools even run it, so *** few recruits come ready for it. The steeplechase really is Penn’s best steeplechaser, that simple. It’s 3,000 meters - Alejandro Shepard, was no just over seven laps, with five exception. He learned from hurdles per lap. The puddle, watching the Olympics on TV. or “pit,” sits right after the “I pretty much went to lap’s last hurdle. Ideally, run- coach [Charlie] Powell and ners propel off the hurdle and said ‘I’d like to give the steefly over the puddle. plechase a shot.’ And he said Only the springiest suc‘sure.’” ceed; most are destined for a Shepard has since come wet landing. within three seconds of an Fans encourage the latter. NCAA regional qualifying As the runners approach, the time. crowd begins a monotonic But like Shepard, many of chant. The pack gets closer; the guys in tomorrow evethe fans get louder. When the ning’s lineup were not dreamleaders hit the hurdle, the ing of the steeplechase when noise reaches a deafening they signed up for track. crescendo, like the opening Inexperienced runners in kickoff in football. “Ohhhhha treacherous event: sounds OH!!” like a tailor-made disaster. Dozens of cleats return to In truth, nothing could be Earth. Splashing ensues, a better. photographer’s dream. The gallery - probably as involved *** as it will be all weekend If we wanted people to play roars its approval. the right notes every time, we Most of it, anyway. A would stay home and listen to spectator at this month’s Beethoven. Penn Invitational was unThe steeplechase is not impressed. “That’s all it is?” Beethoven. It is Slipknot: she asked, assessing her loud, chaotic, visceral - and cell phone camera’s blurry extremely compelling. output. Put up enough hurdles, and That’s all it is. Nothing else even the best athletes fatigue.

SEBASTIEN ANGEL

don’t look like they can even make it to a hurdle, let alone jump one. That’s why the crowd surrounding that puddle is so big and the opening-kickoff roar so loud. For the first time all day, the Relays will offer something that’s not quite so polished: A bunch of guys stumbling around a track, looking decidedly imperfect, pushing themselves beyond the limit. Besides, it’s steeplechase! None of them even knows what the limit is.

www.dailypennsylvanian.com

Sebastien Angel, Mass. Acadmey of Math and Sciences ‘05, is a rising senior Political Science major from Worcester, Mass., and is former Sports Editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian. His e-mail address is angelsd@dailypennsylvanian.com.

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C Y M K

C Y M K

April 10, 2008

from page

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His conversion was a slow process because he had apprehension about going to hell. He believes in an afterlife, so that eased him into the new faith. But Gillock still goes to church with his family occasionally out of respect for his former faith and family members. They also respect his decision to switch to a religion that fits his beliefs more. “I have an appreciation for nature and want to respect it,” he said. “So I wanted a religion that was more natural, and in more of a natural element.” Wiccan followers don’t have set rules. They choose what works for them spiritually, unless it harms others, as Wiccans are strong believers in karma, according to www. wicca.com. Wiccans believe in two main higher powers, Lord and Lady, that show both male and female forms of divinity. Wicca is an earth-based religion that is open-minded to all forms of life and celebrate diversity and considers all to be children of the same mother. Eric Bain-Selbo, head of the philosophy and religion department, said many people change their religions because they question prior beliefs formed through childhood. “The religion switch has a lot to do with the matter of community,” Bain-Selbo said. “It can be seen as one goes through the educational system because people ask more questions. When you’re in college, you can question things more deeply.”

Gillock questioned his own how to handle and I needed Christian faith once he learned help,” he said. “I love reading more about Paganism. He said the scripture. God is your way, that most of the rituals that your life and your direction.” Christians perform were taken Bain-Selbo said that religion from early Paganism and other switches also occur in society religious traditions and altered because of the need to have choice to fit a Christian message. and freedom. Religion seems to “I found out that Christmas be a “consumer product.” came from another holiday, “Religion seems to be prodYule, but they twisted the details uct and can be purchased whenand said it was Jesus’ birthday,” ever,” he said. “It is like when he said. “Things you buy Wonder like that made Bread and you me realize that I find another type couldn’t relate to of bread you like. that anymore.” You do not have The religion a strong connecswitch can also be tion to that bread, attributed to the so you can pursocial mobility chase the other.” of society, BainHumans are Selbo said. not narrowly Jiaqi Li, a graddefined by their uate student from religious beliefs Shenyang, China, and can make made a convera switch eassion from atheism ily in a society to Christianity that is increasafter moving to ingly secular and Bowling Green. scientific. This And like Gillock, may explain the found beliefs that drop of a religion fit him better. altogether, Bain“I would go Selbo said. to the temples in Gillock will China and talk to never forget his — Chip Gillock childhood relimonks, but I did Franklin sophomore gion and has not feel I could have that life,” Li respect for other said. “I used to be easily tempt- faiths. Yet he doesn’t miss the ed by money, sex and power, rules and won’t turn back. but now I do not need those “I think back on my life things, and I can help more before Wicca and I don’t miss people feel comfort.” that part of my life that much,” Li converted to Christianity he said. “(Christianity) was how once he joined the Baptist I was raised, therefore I respect Campus Ministry to meet more that faith and I am glad to have people. A few of his friends told the support of my friends and him about Christ and he felt family that understand that my comforted by the fundamentals conversion is much more me.” of Christianity. “I was going through things Reach Jill Erwin in my life that I didn’t know at diversions@chherald.com.

“I think back on my life before Wicca and I don’t miss that part of my life that much. (Christianity) was how I was raised, therefore I respect that faith and I am glad to have the support of my friends and family that understand that my conversion is much more me.”

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College Heights Herald

Faith Continued

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CAMPUS LIFE

Students learn from Emmy-winning filmmakers STEVIE MATTOS Herald reporter The 14th annual Film and Video Festival attracted producers, college students and high school students to the Mass Media and Technology Hall auditorium this week to watch cuttingedge and fresh films created by Emmy-winning filmmakers and students. The four-day film and video festival, hosted by the School of Journalism and Broadcasting, brings filmmakers and Western students together to show a variety of films ranging from comedy and documentaries to experimental films, short films and music videos. High school students from Tennessee and Kentucky also participated in their own version of the festival that ended Wednesday. Their films were screened the week before by senior broadcasting students and then showcased. The finalists came to Western on Wednesday to receive awards

for their work. Lexington senior Jon Peacock attended on Tuesday to see “Uncounted,” a film about uncounted votes during the presidential election, produced by Nashville filmmaker David Earnhardt. Peacock said that it was good that other filmmakers came to showcase their work. “It gives you a sense that people more than students are out here doing stuff like that,” Peacock said. “And no matter what you do, there’s career opportunities for you.” Ronald DeMarse, assistant professor of journalism and broadcasting and who helped organize the festival, brought in speakers. Filmmakers who were former Western students, or had connections to Western, were invited to share their films, he said. DeMarse thinks that the film festival is a great chance for students to show off their work as well. “It seems like Hollywood or a film industry profession is

unattainable,” DeMarse said. “But it shows that we can do this stuff.” Hunter Curry, a junior from Georgetown, Ind., helped promote the festival. Curry thinks that the festival is a great avenue for students to be creative. “I think through this industry we can express things in a different way as an art form,” Curry said. “I think it’s more about the creation thing.” Curry also thinks the reason why students submit their films is more than just to get noticed. “Now that we’re more grown up, we don’t have time to imagine like kids do,” he said. “It’s good for students to imagine and create.” The awards ceremony is at 7 p.m. tonight in the Mass Media and Technology Hall auditorium. The short films that are nominated will be shown and door prizes will be given out before the ceremony begins. Reach Stevie Mattos at news@chherald.com.

Herald

news. features. sports. photo. design. advertising. online. Applications are available in the Adams-Whitaker Student Publications Center Applications are due April 25.

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Innocence If walls could talk:

Continued

from page

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With the progress came a price increase to four cents in 1942. Mack wrote: “We are very sorry to have to go up on the price, but the war is making the price of paper go up a lot.” As World War II escalated, the paper ended. The last issue went out on Sept. 12, 1942. “I’m surprised it lasted as long as it did,” Mack said. “I was getting the money, the graham crackers and the Milky Way bars.” Mack still loves graham crackers and Milky Way bars, he said. He used some of the money from the Tom-Tom to buy a receiver and transmitter at an appliance store in Nashville. “Mack would sit and listen to the radio,” Dick said. “He brags about listening to Hitler.” Mack became fascinated with languages and world leaders. “My mother would always ask me, ‘When do you get tired of listening to that bull?’” Mack said. And he continued to come up with business ideas, Dick said. “My father told me, ‘You do have all four brain cells operating,’” Mack said. Beginning in 1946, Mack showed movies in different locations and auditoriums. He’d rent black and white films, pop popcorn beforehand, set up a screen and a projector and sell tickets. “The people loved it,” Dick said. Mack called it the traveling movie. From this plan, Dick said Mack came up with the idea of the drive-in theater. But it didn’t go anywhere. “Mack always took the lead,” Dick said. “He could have been a multimillionaire.” But it wasn’t the money that drove Mack. “My father told me, ‘You gotta work for your money,’ and I said, ‘How?’ He said, ‘Whatever you want,’” Mack said. Mack had the ideas, Dick said. Dick visits him once every two weeks. Last year, Dick visited Mottley in Albertville and stayed a couple of nights. “We reminisced, we ate,” Dick said. “They made a reservation at a motel for me, but when I got there, I found out they had already paid for it, too. We went out to eat the next night and I told the waiter, ‘Bring me the bill.’ It turned out (Mottley’s son) Joe had already paid for it in advance.” Their friendship has endured, as does their fondness for the simple things in life. “And as I was leaving Albertville, Mottley gave me some tomatoes that he had picked himself the day before,” Dick said. “And he apologized because some of them might not be as good as when they were picked. But some of them were still good.” Reach Ryan W. Hunton at news@chherald.com.

Family renovates historical home on State Street

shows the 15-year-old house on the left. State Street was a dirt road. Across the street, Many houses that line the where the Bell South building streets leading to the down- stands behind sidewalk, there town square have history. were once trees and yards. Some are barely standing It’s one of a few houses to tell it. still standing today, George On Chestnut Street, St. Morris said. It’s a quality James Apartments will be house. closed soon for mass renovaThe framing and the floor tion. are built out of poplar and Some are still going red oak, hardwoods. George strong. Morris said houses today At 1149 State St., the dark are usually built out of softred brick, two-story Victorian wood plywood, of pine and house stands with a porch and spruce. a balcony wrapping around “The cost of materials to the right. An octagonal tower reproduce this house makes it with bay windows is on the difficult,” he said. left. Above the attic is a green The house is a historic steel roof. landmark of Bowling Green. The house was built in 1890 The Morris’ have won by T.C. Mitchell. His name awards for their work — the and the year are engraved into Jean Thomason Award for the red brick beside the front Historic Restoration and the door. Operation Pride Award. This is the house that the Outside of the house, Jane Lee family lived in from Morris is an office assistant 1934 to 1940. Dick Lee, 77, in the Career Services Center published a newspaper there at Western; George Morris about 70 years ago with his is a self-employed contractor brother and his friend. specializing in historic restoIt was called The Tom- ration, which explains why Tom. they moved into the house 12 The hectoyears ago. graph that they “We wanted used was in this house, but the front hall, it wasn’t in the beside the parmarket,” George lor. Morris said. Now there Despite its stais a barristus, George Morris ter bookcase. said a customer at George and his antique shop Jane Morris live — George Morris told him to conand work inside homeowner tact Lena Ellis, the the house. previous owner. “Jane and I When he did, wanted to do a Ellis told him that historic restoration,” George the couple that was going to Morris said. buy it canceled. Moving “one room at a “It was kind of like fate time,” the Morris’ have gut- put us in this house,” George ted, rebuilt, painted and wall- Morris said. papered. It can take up to When George and Jane five months to finish a single Morris first moved in, he said room, Jane Morris said. they were on “the 10-year George Morris said that plan.” over the years, he and Jane “Now we’re on the ‘15have learned how to divide year plan,’” he said. the tasks. George Morris said the George Morris does the condition was what contracconstruction work and heavy tors call “elegant squalor.” lifting. “It was worn out,” he said. “I want to modernize and But George and Jane fix it up while keeping the Morris said they have come a look,” he said. long way. They hope to have Jane Morris does the paint- the house done in three years. ing and stenciling. When they finish the house, She said she wants to Jane Morris said they will put reinvent the house’s original up an iron fence in the front Victorian style, so she stencils and back yards, like it used remnants of the wall design to have. before. “Then we will just enjoy it The Morris’ have gathered for a while,” George Morris pictures and memorabilia from said. past owners and decorated the parlor. Reach Ryan W. Hunton One postcard from 1905 at news@chherald.com. RYAN W. HUNTON Herald reporter

AARON BORTON/Herald

The childhood home of Mack and Dick Lee, where the Tom-Tom was printed.

Mack Lee, 13, 1149 State St., created a paper of his own, The Tom-Tom.

“It was kind of like fate put us in this house.”

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5:00 PM on Monday, April 14th Diddle Arena Main Floor

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life in

Brownsville

42210

Brownsville, located in Edmonson County, is a 30-minute drive from Bowling Green. Our photographer documented small town life in this community of 1,200 people over a period of six weeks.

Photos by NATHAN MORGAN

(Top right) Charlie Caspar, 11, of Joppa, Ala., lays with his new helper dog, which he and his mother, Ginny Patterson, traveled to Brownsville to get from trainer Tammy Staten. Caspar, who has mild autism, will use the dog to help him stay on track and not wander away from his home. (Above left) Girls from Brownsville Missionary Baptist Church participate in an Easter egg hunt at their church following the service. Community events are a big part of the entertainment for Brownsville. (Above right) Located on the west side of Mammoth Cave National Park, Brownsville offers many outdoor activities to residents and visitors. During the warmer months, Brownsville gets tourists from the park who visit their stores and restaurants, which is easily noticed in this rural town of only 1,200. (Left) Retired janitor Dale Smith fishes for muskie on the Green River. Smith credits the fish’s elusiveness to why he has not caught one in more than a year. However, this doesn’t discourage him. Smith still comes out for a couple of hours every morning to try and catch a muskie.

(Above middle) Former Edmonson County attorney and self-proclaimed mountain man, “Natty Bumppo,” moved to Brownsville more than 30 years ago from Chicago, seeking a simpler way of life. Bumppo built his own home and law office at the top of a hill outside of town. Although he no longer works for the county, he still practices law privately. (Above) Dakota Roff, a student at Brownsville’s 5/6 Center, participates in the school’s second annual life-sized chess tournament. The event, which was started by Stephanie Raymer, a sixth grade math teacher at the school, was designed to get the kids more interested in chess.

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