Page 1


Picture yourself as the

Editor The Metro State Board of Student Media is accepting applications for the 2008–2009 editor of the award winning student literary & arts magazine. This is a paid position. The editor is responsible for the content and design of the magazine. Duties include soliciting student work, managing the staff and production of the magazine. This position begins fall semester 2008. View the most recent Metrosphere online at www.mscd.edu/~msphere.

Deadline: April 15, 2008

• English, Journalism, Technical Communications or Art major/minor. • Enrolled in at least 6 credit hours at Metro State. • Maintain a 3.0 or above GPA. • Experience with publications, including computer layout and design, is a major consideration in the selection process.

ver letter. • Résumé with co de report or gra t • Most recen official transcript. ommendation. • Two letters of rec • Samples of work.

dent Media MSCD Board of Stu y, TIV 313 rle Hu rah Attn: Debo x 57, Bo or mail to Campus 62 33 PO Box 17 362 Denver, CO 80217-3


Get immersed in your work?

Work as the

Editor The Metro State Board of Student Media is accepting applications for the 2008–2009 editor of the award winning student literary & arts magazine. This is a paid position. The editor is responsible for the content and design of the magazine. Duties include soliciting student work, managing the staff and production of the magazine. This position begins fall semester 2008. View the most recent Metrosphere online at www.mscd.edu/~msphere.

Deadline: April 15, 2008

• English, Journalism, Technical Communications or Art major/minor. • Enrolled in at least 6 credit hours at Metro State. • Maintain a 3.0 or above GPA. • Experience with publications, including computer layout and design, is a major consideration in the selection process.

ver letter. • Résumé with co de report or • Most recent gra t. rip nsc tra l cia offi ommendation. • Two letters of rec rk. wo • Samples of

dent Media MSCD Board of Stu y, TIV 313 rle Hu Attn: Deborah x 57, Bo us mp Ca to il or ma PO Box 173362 362 Denver, CO 80217-3


Does art become you? Become the

Editor The Metro State Board of Student Media is accepting applications for the 2008–2009 editor of the award winning student literary & arts magazine. This is a paid position. The editor is responsible for the content and design of the magazine. Duties include soliciting student work, managing the staff and production of the magazine. This position begins fall semester 2008. View the most recent Metrosphere online at www.mscd.edu/~msphere.

Deadline: April 15, 2008


Does ink run through your veins? Let it bleed as the

Editor The Metro State Board of Student Media is accepting applications for the 2008–2009 editor of the award winning student literary & arts magazine. This is a paid position. The editor is responsible for the content and design of the magazine. Duties include soliciting student work, managing the staff and production of the magazine. This position begins fall semester 2008. View the most recent Metrosphere online at www.mscd.edu/~msphere.

Deadline: April 15, 2008

• English, Journalism, Technical Communications or Art major/minor. • Enrolled in at least 6 credit hours at Metro State. • Maintain a 3.0 or above GPA. • Experience with publications, including computer layout and design, is a major consideration in the selection process.

ver letter. • Résumé with co de report or • Most recent gra t. rip nsc tra l officia ommendation. rec of s ter let o • Tw • Samples of work.

dent Media MSCD Board of Stu y, TIV 313 rle Attn: Deborah Hu x 57, Bo us mp Ca or mail to PO Box 173362 362 Denver, CO 80217-3


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2008

NEWS

State agency puts up new job-hunt website information on the website about experience that you have had,” Cosgrove said. Gary Green, a professor of rural sociology in economic BY JULIA HOLL and workforce development News Reporter at the University of Wisconsin, has mixed feelings The Department of about the new website, Workforce Development saying that most find jobs is changing things up a bit through informal contacts, to develop the connection allowing for an exchange of between job seekers and more information. employers with an updated “On the one hand, online website. “Anyone can use this, searches can’t hurt,” Green On the new website, whether they are just said. “I know of several job seekers can search for undergraduate students who potential jobs, and employers out of high schoool, have found jobs this way. It can search for potential provides them with a wider employees. just graduating from search strategy and gets This new addition along their information out to more with the “easy résumé tool,” college...” employers.” a fill-in-the-blank system Cosgrove said though with all the information it may help with the needed to put on a résumé, Howard Cosgrove unemployment rate in are two of the new features of Spokesperson Wisconsin, the intent of the the updated DWD website. Department of DWD’s website update is to DWD spokesperson Howard Cosgrove described Workforce become more modern. Additional features, the array of people who have Development such as video vignettes of a use for the site. what certain jobs entail, are “Anyone can use this, scheduled to be added in whether they are just out of December. Updating is set high school, just graduating regarding experience. “Most employers are to continue throughout the from college or looking to get back into the workforce after looking for an employee next couple of years with technological they have been out of it for a for a specific position, so it continued is beneficial to include all innovations. few years,” Cosgrove said.

DWD site aims to connect employers with seekers online

All types of jobs, from accounting to marketing, are posted on the website. Job seekers and employers can search key words to find the right jobs or people that they are looking for. Cosgrove explained that the search tool works better with the use of specific information

Logo, from page 1

The bookstore and athletic apparel stores will each be designated a specific amount of time to gradually “phase out” all merchandise containing the old logo. “I don’t think there will be any problems because student bodies like fresh, new looks,” Anson said. “The addition of the new element will give a new image for Washburn. We embrace and welcome the change.” Nagy described the purpose of the negotiations as an effort to protect the integrity of Wisconsin’s prized “W” logo. “Nothing really works in that linear fashion,” Nagy said. “Various times we expressed the view, Washburn expressed its

Washburn’s. Washburn University agreed to modify its logo by adding a graphic detail to the symbol. Options include the university name or a representation of “Ichabod,” Washburn’s mascot. Washburn director of university relations Dena Anson said with legal action there is “a lot of exchange back and forth,” and it’s not always an immediate situation. “We have a graphic artist working on it right now,” Anson said. “Hopefully, it will be finished within a few days.” Once the new logo is finalized, Washburn will undergo a transition period.

view, and we would have a conversation.” However, what led to the lawsuit was an overall lack of significant progress. “Both sides thought that we had made some progress toward the issue of concern, and over time it seemed that we were not truly making that progress,” Nagy said. Had UW abandoned the effort to protect its logo, Nagy said UW runs the risk of not being able to protect it in the future. Nagy said the lawsuit, filed in February, was a last resort, calling it “the least desirable method next to doing nothing.” “It’s expensive, it’s uncertain, and it’s not always the most useful method,” Nagy said.

THE BADGER HERALD, PAGE 5


NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2008

THE BADGER HERALD, PAGE 7A

CHANCELLOR: Wiley looks back From page 1A The team of Shalala, thenprovost David Ward and Wiley have led the university in succession for over 20 years. In 1989, Shalala, Ward and Wiley developed a strategic plan for the university, a plan that serves as one of Wiley’s top accomplishments and one that helped the university “survive” in the 1990s. “We didn’t have a good way to set priorities, make decisions — and by a good way I mean a scientifically justifiable, rigorous, datadriven process the way businesses had done it,” Wiley said. “Without that, there’s no way we’d be No. 2 in the country today in research and have an improved graduation rate, improved time-to-degree over what we had 20 years ago.” Throughout his morethan-30 years at UW, Wiley has continually emphasized the importance of research, particularly in today’s era. Decades ago, some of the nation’s top corporations had strong research divisions. Today, many of those have since disintegrated. “To the extent that the economy today was born in those industrial research labs, the economy of tomorrow, the one you’re going to live in, is being born in university research labs,” Wiley said. “That part of our mission is very important to an extent that the public at large and elected officials haven’t grasped.”

“I don’t believe this is the time in the institution’s history where we need a right angle turn or a U-turn, a dramatic change in direction.” John Wiley Chancellor UW-Madison Wiley will also keep an eye on the East Campus renovation project after he steps down, a project he is particularly proud of and is credited for helping make a reality. Balancing the books At the top of the list of challenges the next chancellor faces: dealing with the state’s “fiscal crisis,” Wiley said. And part of that involves communicating with state lawmakers. “There were three really problematic legislators that I did have a lot of difficulties, and one or two that sometimes joined with them,” Wiley said. “But the rest of the Legislature, through good times and bad, I had very good relations with all the rest of them.” Those three “problematic legislators” were Republicans Stephen Nass, Scott Suder and Robin Kreibich. “I would say that he was a political chancellor,” Suder said of Wiley. “He was unabashed at criticizing the Legislature, and I certainly didn’t agree with a lot of his comments.” However, when Wiley started as chancellor in 2001, UW-Madison’s in-state tuition sat at just over $4,000. In six years, that figure increased to $6,330. Wiley says the figure is high but not unacceptable. Through internal calculations — taking into account the average job college graduates obtain and other benefits

of obtaining a university diploma — Wiley determined the average value of a UW degree is around $500,000. “Is $7,000 per year too much to pay for something that’s worth about half a million to you and half a million to the state? Well, probably not,” he said. Still, Wiley said the state needs to do its part as well. “I do think we should constantly be thinking about that balance and trying to make sure the state’s paying its fair share, the students and their families paying their fair share and that we have enough financial aid to make sure families who simply cannot pay that get help with need-based scholarships,” he said. Wiley said the state is not pulling its weight with funding right now, a point to which Suder disagreed. “The last budget was, I would argue, very generous to UW,” he said. “They received more money than they ever have before, and they continue to authorize more money for salaries for their top officials. I don’t understand how some UW officials continue to argue it’s never enough.” Regent David Walsh, who previously served as president of the board of regents, said the next chancellor will face the ongoing challenge of wisely spending the university’s valuable resources. Weathering the storm Wiley has faced criticism over the years from the state Legislature — the three aforementioned Republicans in particular — regarding wasteful spending. While Wiley admitted that upon completing an audit, someone would find areas of waste, most of them are “spits in the ocean.” “Would you find areas where we’re wasting money? Yes, absolutely,” Wiley said. “Would you find areas where you think we’re not spending enough, where we should be spending more? Yes, absolutely. There’d be lots of both, and most of them are judgment calls.” Suder criticized UW for paying administrators too much and has commonly called for UW to live within their means. “Sure, they’re always right when they say we have to live within our means, and we try to,” Wiley said. “And they’re right when they say there’s waste and inefficiency. Yes, there is. But it’s very, very tiny, and it’s nowhere near the magnitude that would cope with $10 and $20 and $30 million budget cuts.” Wiley also offered his two cents on the Associated Students of Madison’s performance this year, urging students to be sympathetic. “I think student government on this campus needs some serious support from students,” Wiley said. “I think they need to be cut a little slack; it’s a hard job they do. They work hard at it; they take it seriously; they get yelled at.” With turnout below 10 percent for student elections, Wiley said student ignorance and lack of publicity are both contributing factors to the serious lack of interest. Overall, though, Wiley said ASM is essential because many important financial decisions on campus need to come from a student voice. Wiley said he always approved all ASM recommendations unless they were illegal. “They do, for better or worse, represent all students in important ways,” he said. “And I wish more students voted; I wish more students took it seriously. I think we’d be better off if they did.”

But one of the biggest controversies under Wiley came when the university was brought under fire for accusing former vice chancellor Paul Barrows of harassing two female UW employees. A university committee eventually found no convincing evidence of the harassment. After beginning legal efforts to clear his name, Barrows settled with the university in June 2007 for $135,000. Barrows, who is black, charged Wiley with accusations of racism during the ordeal. He told The Badger Herald last year he plans on writing a book detailing his life story, including his take on the ordeal with UW. Wiley, though, does not think Barrows will actually write it. “It’s behind all of us, including Paul, and I’d be very surprised if he wrote a book,” Wiley said. “But it would not be on my top 10 list.” Praise him As Wiley steps down, officials within the UW System said he leaves a mark that spreads beyond just the Madison campus. “Not only has he been a very successful leader on the Madison campus, he’s been a leader among all the chancellors,” UW Board of Regents President Mark Bradley said. “He’s been very generous in thinking about how the Madison campus can support the two-year colleges, for example.” Under Wiley’s watch, UW-Madison has expanded its Connections program, allowing students to attend a two-year UW College, maintain a 2.0 GPA, obtain necessary credits and be automatically enrolled at UWMadison for their junior year. “He’s a scientist who, as a leader of all disciplines as chancellor, has had a very healthy appreciation for what that total undergraduate experience is supposed to be about,” Bradley added. Fundraising has also played a big role in Wiley’s tenure, as the chancellor says he must raise about $1 million each day to keep up. Bradley said he values Wiley’s appreciation of private funding’s impact on the university. Walsh said Wiley “had a vision and executed on it.” “He’s been a great leader: dedicated, understanding and sensitive to significant issues and responding to students,” Walsh said. Even Suder, who exchanged disagreements with Wiley over the years, called the outgoing chancellor a “tenacious” leader. “He was formidable in terms of the role he took on for the UW,” Suder said. “I don’t think he had a particularly good relationship with the Legislature as a result.” The future Wiley’s departure from Bascom represents the end of the Shalala-Ward-Wiley era. While some may welcome the change, the university has grown considerably in the last two decades. In the next year, the university will be up for reaccreditation, charging the campus with developing its next 10-year plan. While Wiley said he will not comment on the chancellor search process itself, he would like to see the next chancellor keep the university on the general track it has been on. “I don’t believe this is the time in the institution’s history where we need a right angle turn or a U-turn, a dramatic change in direction,” he said. “I think most things are going very, very well.”

CELEBRATING ACHIEVEMENTS

JAKE NAUGHTON/Herald photo

People celebrated the Wisconsin Union’s progress in developing the new Union South and resolving conflicts with employees on Wednesday night.

FINALISTS: 3 candidates have UW ties From page 1A university. “I worked at UW, so I really have an understanding of what it stands for and what its values are,” Mulcahy said. “I also have, over that course, (gained) extensive experience in most, if not all of the domains that would be relevant to the types of roles and responsibilities the chancellor has.” Blank said her experience at other higher education institutions such as Princeton University, Northwestern University and the University of Michigan have prepared her for the role of chancellor at UW. She said since universities are unique institutions, it is very important to know “something

about the people that are there.” “I understand something about how universities work and particularly how faculty thinks and how students think,” Blank said. Blank said what attracts her to Wisconsin is the combination of the university’s reputation and outreach the campus makes to the “larger community.” And though Martin is attracted to the prestige of the university, she said one thing that draws her to UW is the spirit and sense of humor of the students on campus. The candidates will come to campus to meet with faculty, staff, classified staff, students and community members in an open-forum setting before they meet with the special Board of

Regents committee, chaired by Regent David Walsh. According to UW System spokesperson David Giroux, the special committee will begin discussions after the interviews and present their recommendation to UW System President Kevin Reilly, who will offer the position to the finalist. Giroux said Reilly plans to present the next chancellor of UW at the June 5 Board of Regents meeting. Public forums will take place with candidates from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in Memorial Union, and student forums will be held from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the Red Gym next Monday through Thursday. Sandefur was unavailable for comment as of press time.


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2008

NEWS

THE BADGER HERALD

Student organizations to oppose constitution Coalition petitions to defeat ASM’s current plan for reorganizing BY

RACHEL VESCO News Reporter

A coalition of student organizations is expressing concern regarding the Associated Students of Madison’s new constitution, saying it poses a threat to student interests. Before the constitution can be presented to students in a special election in February, it must be approved by the ASM Student Council at two consecutive meetings. The Student Council already approved it Dec. 3 and will look at it for its second approval this evening. According to a press release by the coalition, if their demands aren’t met during today’s meeting, they plan to begin a “Vote No” campaign with members of their organization against the new constitution. The coalition of organizations has two main concerns regarding the proposed constitution — including the addition of the executive position to the constitution, which they believe is too powerful — as well

as the protection of student organizations under the new constitution. “I have concerns about how much power the executive branch will have regarding appointments to the finance committee and in the grassroots committees,” said Brad Schmock, finance coordinator of the Promoting Awareness Victim Empowerment organization on campus. ASM Constitutional Chair Jeff Wright said he believes that, as a whole, the constitution is a step in the right direction. “It provides for clearer lines of accountability and responsibility, and it ensures that the deliberative body is more invested in the activities of student government,” Wright said. “It does come with tradeoffs, however, with one being that the processes of ASM may become more politicized.” In order to help solve these problems, ASM has limited executive power by shifting the finance appointments to the senate and removed the senate’s ability to be the only body in charge of shared governance appointments. Student organizations have

also expressed concern regarding the changes to the notifications given to General Student Service Fund organizations. According to Chynna Haas, president of the Working Class Student Union and support service coordinator at the Campus Women’s Center, both of which are endorsing the petition, these changes are a major cause for concern. “The original language of the constitution gave groups two months’ notice if there were going to be changes in their funding. In the new constitution, they removed the language and put them into the bylaws of the organization,” Haas said. “The bylaws aren’t going to be available to students when the constitution is called to referendum because they won’t be ready.” Currently, the coalition of student organizations against the new constitution is circulating a petition online. Representatives from various student organizations including Sex Out Loud, Engineers Without Borders, the Multicultural Student Organization and others have all signed the petition thus far.

ANDREW SCHORR/Herald photo

Three ASM members explain changes to the book swap at a press conference.

Expansion of book swap set up for next semester According to Tiernan, the textbook swap was created while he was an intern with the committee in spring 2008. He BY AMELIA VORPAHL said the committee has since College Reporter decided to make it a semiannual sale due to its success. John Skic, intern with the The Associated Students of Madison’s Academic Affairs committee, said the swap was Committee announced it will created to battle the rising costs hold a textbook swap for three of attending the university, days this January, taking a including increasing tuition different format from the one- rates. “The cost of textbooks is day swap it typically holds. According to Academic rising exponentially,” Skic Affairs Chair Chris Tiernan, said. “We wanted to create a the swap this semester will market for students to buy and run from Jan. 18 to Jan. 20. sell textbooks and eliminate the He said the committee will profit-generating middleman.” According to committee sell students’ textbooks for 30 percent less than what they intern Lin Weeks, the swap’s are sold for at the University three-day span is a change from the previous semester’s Bookstore. “We’re addressing the event, which took place for difficulties found by students only one day. “This will allow more who are trying to buy and sell books by creating this market students to participate and for the event to run more for students,” Tiernan said.

ASM exchange aims to save students on textbook transaction

seamlessly than it has in the past,” Weeks said. Skic agreed the extended time period for the swap will be beneficial for students. “We found this time constraint reduced the amount of students we could help,” Skic said. “We decided this semester to increase the amount of time to three days.” Weeks said students will be able to drop off their textbooks Jan. 18 and the swap volunteers will spend that day categorizing and organizing the books. Students will be able to come and buy textbooks they need for a reduced cost Jan. 19. Students will then be able to come by and pick up their unsold textbooks and money from the volunteers Jan. 20. “It’s made by students for students,” Weeks said. “We want to improve the quality of life for students at Madison.”


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2008

NEWS

THE BADGER HERALD, PAGE 3

State funding of UW lagging Study says college allocation increase below K-12 pattern BY JACQUELYN

RYBERG

College Editor

JEFF SCHORFHEIDE/Herald photo

The Association of Zoos and Aquariums gave a nod to Madison’s Henry Vilas Zoo, just outside the UW campus.

Vilas Zoo picks up accreditation Nod gives keepers better shot at aiding endangered species BY

MEGHAN MAGINOT News Reporter

Madison’s Henry Vilas Zoo will have a better chance to aid endangered species after receiving recognition once again from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums on Tuesday. The AZA hosts a hearing twice each year to determine which zoos and aquariums receive accreditation. “It is a real privilege to be an AZA accredited zoo,” said Vilas Zoo Director Jim Hubing. Accreditation does not provide additional funding for zoos but provides connections for sharing resources with other accredited zoos, Hubing said, adding the economic gain of having access to

animals they would not previously had access to is immeasurable. “All zoos that are accredited band together to help endangered species,” Hubing said. “Unfortunately the number of endangered animals rises each year.” One way they combat extinction is by breeding species of animals from different accredited zoos. Zoos can submit written applications to be accredited every five years. Hubing said the problem is the standards to receive accreditation go up every cycle. According to Hubing, the Henry Vilas Zoo has been accredited since the 1970s when the AZA began accrediting. However, the standards of not only animal care but visitor experience have risen considerably since the 1970s, making it much more of a challenge for today’s

zoos. “Accreditation is a roadmap for success for a zoo committed to animal care,” said Steve Feldman, AZA senior vice president of communications. Many of the largest zoos in Wisconsin such as the Milwaukee County Zoo are accredited, Feldman said, adding that there is no size requirement for a zoo to be recognized. “You don’t have to be big; you just have to do things right,” Feldman said. Feldman added being accredited holds more than just a title — it lets the public know the zoo they are visiting is a great place. Students studying biology or environmental studies have oppurtunites to either volunteer or get involved in conservation at the zoo. Conservation is also a large part of the zoo; although admission to the zoo is

VAN HOLLEN: GOP denies fault From page 1 a state agency isn’t doing its job.” The Government Accountability Board was supposed to be in compliance with HAVA starting in January 2002. However, it received a continuance from the federal government to be ready by January 2006. Two-and-a-half years later, the board has now created its database but is still not in compliance, according to Kukowski. “We just want to end this and make sure what our intentions and goals are clear, and it’s kind of getting lost,” Kukowski said.

The next court date is set for today, when Judge Maryann Sumi will decide on the motions to intervene by both the Democratic and Republican parties of Wisconsin, as well as the motion to disqualify the attorney general from the case, as brought about by the Government Accountability Board. Government Accountability Board attorney Lester Pines explained Van Hollen should be disqualified because at the time of the suit he was representing the board in three other lawsuits. “The board’s position is that it is a current client of the attorney general and that

when you are a current client, a lawyer cannot sue a current client unless the client consents to be sued,” Pines said. “The board was neither asked nor did it give its consent to be sued.” However, Department of Justice spokesperson William Cosh disagrees, saying the rules are not same for attorneys general as they are for regular attorneys. “There is no legal reason why he should be disqualified,” Cosh said. “While a private attorney is ordinarily from suing a current client, that does not and never has applied to nation’s attorney general when they sue as prosecutors.”

free, every time a patron purchases a zoo membership a lot of funding goes towards conservation. Both Hubing and Feldman said conservation is one of the most important factors for accreditation. A zoo first receives six inches’ worth of paperwork to apply for accreditation that must be completed over a period of six months. After the paperwork is received, a team comes into the zoo and writes a report, Hubing said. The zoo then has the following four weeks to come up with a response to the written report from the AZA. All of these proceedings must then appear before a commission. Finally, there is a hearing in which the zoo finds out if it fulfills the standards. If the zoo has met all of the AZA requirements, it receives accreditation.

A study released Tuesday revealed state funding for the University of Wisconsin over the past 25 years has doubled, but it also found that universities and colleges are still not receiving as much as K-12 schools. The study was conducted by the Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance, a nonpartisan publicpolicy research firm. The study showed between 1983 and 2007, state aid and tax credits for preliminary and secondary schools rose 320 percent, but funding for the University of Wisconsin System only rose 99 percent. According to Chuck Pruitt, Board of Regents vice president, because K-12 education is funded by both state funding and property taxes, there is a lot of pressure for the state to increase its funding and decrease the amount of money property taxpayers must pay. “The political pressure comes not only from students and parents who send their kids to K-12 but also from property tax payers,” Pruitt said. The information for the study came from two sources — the annual state fiscal reports and a research organization that publishes comparative appropriation figures for the country, according to Todd Berry, Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance president. Berry added the decision to conduct the research stemmed from his desire to establish more accurate data concerning state funding, often times misconstrued because of bantering between the UW System and the Legislature. “Given the little bit of titfor-tat that has been going on between the university and the state, since I often read things that are not correct, I thought it would be useful to recap the numbers of the state’s annual fiscal report,” Berry said. According to David Giroux, UW System spokesperson, state universities and colleges need to make a case to the Legislature that higher education is the “way out of these economic times.” “We need to increase the

number of college-educated [citizens], grow per capita incomes and grow the high end jobs that will employ more college educated graduates in Wisconsin,” Giroux said. While Giroux said the state investment in higher education is not keeping pace with other state funded entities, he added the reason for the lag in funding is due to the Legislature’s inability to focus directly on higher education funding. “We are slipping, but I don’t think that’s been a conscious decision. It’s the fact of a very challenging time and conflicting priorities,” Giroux said. According to Pruitt, the UW System, specifically UW-Madison, has done an “extraordinary” job of getting additional money from other sources such as endowments, financial aid and research dollars to keep tuition low when state funding is cut. “I think everybody is working 24/7 to do that,” Pruitt said. “But I do not think there is any substitute for strong state support. It’s about trying to provide a general source of revenue that can be used for what the university needs. … Relying on other funds comes with strings attached.”

“We are slipping, but I don’t think it’s been a conscious decision.” David Giroux Spokesperson UW System

Giroux added students can also play a “prominent” role in helping to make sure the Legislature stays focused on funding for higher education institutions in the state. “Lately, we hear students more and more focused on value. There is concern about reputation, ability to retain faculty. … I think students are becoming more and more sophisticated,” Giroux said. “They are becoming very effective advocates.”


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