Page 1

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

A College Heights Herald Special Edition • Summer 2007 • Section A

C Y M K

VIEW of thesection HillA

Cover photos by Daniel Houghton, Greg Barnette, Jake Stevens, Scott McIntyre and Evan Sisley

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

A College Heights Herald Special Edition • Summer 2007 • Section B

C Y M K

VIEW of the Hill

section B

Cover photos by Daniel Houghton, Greg Barnette, Jake Stevens, Scott McIntyre, Jordan Pendely, Nathan Morgan and Joy Lewis

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

PAGE 2A

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: The computer lab in Mass Media and Technology Hall is open 24 hours.

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

PAGE 2B

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Western offers 88 academic majors and 57 academic minors.

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

Forensics recognized globally By Elizabeth Worster Herald reporter

For some students, the deciding factor for enrolling in Western is the forensics team. Glendale sophomore Rachel Wigginton came to Western because of the forensics team. She said her experience on the team will help her become a better communicator. “It is not every day you can join a team that would win nationals two years in a row,” Wigginton said. Ten members of Western’s forensic team won its seventh consecutive International Championship on March 21, in Argentina. Western students took eight first place finishes, five second place finishes, seven third place finishes, three fourth place finishes, five fifth place finishes and one sixth. This year, the team has also

taken home its 16th straight Kentucky Forensics Association State Championship and third American Forensic Association National Individual Events Tournament. The team has been on Western’s campus since 1906, and 50 to 55 students currently compete regularly on the team. Judy Woodring, forensics director and communication instructor, took over the team in 1989. Before that, there was no team for 10 years. Woodring said students must have high grades, do well in classes, have high test scores and do well on interviews in front of a panel of judges to join the forensics team. The forensics team has won competitions each year. Wigginton said the program draws people who want to be

on a team. “You have to have pride in what you do, and we’re very proud of Western,” Wigginton said. Symsonia junior Maggie Waid also came to Western because of the forensics team. “Every year is a new team,” she said. “We do things differently every year, and there are different things to motivate each other. We try not to compare the new team to the old one.” Graduate students coach different areas of the team. Most of them are Western graduates who were on the team. Tyler Billman, a graduate student from Harrisburg, Ill., has been coaching for two years. “Success is a by-product of hard work and determination,” he said. “It is more than winning rounds; it’s about the learning process.”

what to put in your dorm fridge By Heather Ryan Herald reporter

Dorm room refrigerators are small. When you come to college, you have to realize that amount of food your mom buys at home won’t fit in your fridge and won’t be eaten before it spoils. So below are some tips for using the fridge to its fullest potential: 1. Buy a pint or half gallon of milk instead of a gallon — it won’t fit and you won’t be able to drink it that quickly. 2. Don’t buy many frozen dinners. They won’t fit in the tiny freezer. 3. Buy a half carton of eggs instead of a whole carton. 4. Buy the mini sodas instead of fullsize cans. 5. If you want fresh fruits and vegetables, buy the precut smaller portions rather than a whole bag of apples or oranges.

C Y M K

6. Instead of a ton of bottled water, get a water filter pitcher. 7. Buy as many dry goods that can stay outside the fridge as possible. 8. Yogurt and pudding cups are great snacks that can fit just about anywhere. 9. Buy smaller packs of lunch meat and cheese that hold only enough for a few sandwiches at a time. 10. Before you buy groceries, think about what you will eat before it expires, and what will spoil. There is no sense in wasting money, especially on a college student budget.

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

PAGE 3A

QUICK HIT: Students can get free admission to all home athletic events with a student ID.

From the

who you should know

President

By Susie Laun Herald reporter

When different problems occur on campus, it’s important to have the right connections. Here is a list of people to know.

Welcome to Western Kentucky University and to the WKU family. You made a great choice. I encourage you to catch the energy which flows through the campus. No one just attends Western, everyone who enrolls becomes a part of the Western spirit. WKU is an exciting place to be with multiple learning opportunities. The faculty and staff will allow you to achieve your intellectual and social goals. We are proud of WKU’s vast array of highly credentialed scholars, a broad range of academic programs of national and international distinction, and the finest of students. Additionally, we are a leader in providing current instructional technology to further enrich your WKU experience. All of this is offered on a campus well known for its distinctive architectural and natural character. State-of-the-art academic facilities, well appointed residence halls, and new campus restaurants all mean a high quality of campus life for you.

GARY RANSDELL

BARBARA BURCH

JEANNE JOHNSON

He oversees everything that goes on at Western. He is leading the state’s fastest growing university through a dramatic transformation from a university of regional importance to a leading American university with international reach.

She is the chief academic officer and responsible for overseeing the goals and directions for academic development including instruction, research, public service and related support offices and a strong advocate of student engagement.

She oversees what goes on in the Student Government Association, which represents students on campus to administrators and various committees.

President

Provost

Student Government Association President

HOWARD BAILEY Associate Vice President of Student Affairs and Development

He is also the dean of student life. He is in charge of student development at Western, and investigates Greek alcohol violations.

ROY BIGGERS Dining Services

You cannot get a better education anywhere than you will get at Western Kentucky University. We are pleased and honored to provide this lifechanging learning opportunity for you. I challenge you to become fully engaged in a rich kaleidoscope of WKU learning opportunities.

Biggers oversees all the dining areas on campus.

We are glad that you are here and that you are now an important part of this campus community. You will enhance the grand traditions of this special university. Enjoy WKU.

CHARLEY PRIDE Director of Student Activities and Organizations

BRIAN KUSTER Director of Housing and Residence Life

He oversees all things pertaining to HRL, such as issues about room assignments and roommates.

He oversees events and all organizations on campus and is in charge of looking into possible alcohol violations in Greek houses.

Counseling and Testing Center

Students can meet with counselors about problems that they have. The center helps with personal and educational development. You can schedule an appointment at 745-3159.

Gary A. Ransdell President

Source: Western’s Web site

Hair & Tanning Salon

For Men & Women

Experienced Cosmetologists: Codie Bennett Holly Carter

Located on ground floor at Bates Runner next to the Bate Shop

Monday-Thursday 10am-8pm Friday 10am-5pm Saturday 10am-4pm For an appointment call: (270) 745-6155 walk-ins welcome

N-Style’s Full Service Salon Provides: • 7 Tanning Beds • A Variety of Professional Hair Care Products • A Variety of Professional Tanning Lotions

Call us to purchase gift bags or tanning packages for any occasion. (Hair Care products, Chi-Irons, Various Lotions, etc...)

We accept Big Red Dollars, Mastercard, Visa and personal checks.

Getting a great tan and trim doesn’t mean you have to leave campus. C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

QUICK HIT: Western’s first president was Henry Hardin Cherry. Cherry Hall, at the top of the Hill, bears his name.

PAGE 3B

how to get involved By Corey Paul Herald reporter

Greg Barnette/Herald Louisville senior Tarah McCarty cheers with other members of Phi Mu sorority during Bid Day. During the annual Greek event, sororities welcomed new members.

Joining Greek organizations helps students make friends By Nina Bosken Herald reporter

Union sophomore Diane DeRosaReynolds came to Western without high school friends. She decided to join Kappa Delta sorority to meet people. “It’s the place where I felt at home,” she said. DeRosa-Reynolds is part of the 10-12 percent of the main campus undergraduate population that are Greek. The Greek community has 1,200 active members, about 600 to 650 women and 500 to 550 men, said Charley Pride, director of student activities and organizations. Students get the opportunity to make friends and get involved on campus and the community through Greek life, Pride said. Yet Greek life also means a set of obligations and standards members must meet. Pride said he recommends that stu-

C Y M K

dents go Greek because it offers a variety of experiences such as leadership, service and social opportunities. “It brings all these in one package,” he said. DeRosa-Reynolds was the KD secretary from 2005 to 2006 and she is currently the Panhellenic Council president. Panhellenic Council is the council of the sororities at Western. She said that she met a lot of great Greek women in her dorm freshman year. She likes being Panhellenic president because she can represent all Greek women. “I felt that through Panhellenic president I could not only represent my sorority, but all these extraordinary women,” she said. She said she wouldn’t have met as many of the people she did if she weren’t Greek. She said she’s met people in all different majors and organizations.

“It’s having someone in your classes that you can always sit by because you have that common interest of being Greek,” she said. Franklin senior Andrew Rash has been in Sigma Nu since his sophomore year. He said he joined to have more opportunities in college. He said he wasn’t getting the most out of his Western experience during his freshman year. Rash was the president his junior year. He said it was challenging trying to get everyone on the same page. “I don’t care if it’s five people or 100, people are gonna think differently,” he said. Rash said being in a fraternity helped him keep his grades up. He said that most Greek organizations have academic requirements for the members, like study hours and minimum grade point averages.

C Y M K

Yet going Greek isn’t for everyone, Pride said. Greek organizations have dues members pay. They also have standards and rules. For example, some chapters require that members dress up for meetings or that they don’t drink alcohol wearing their letters. Louisville freshman Kristin Richardson isn’t Greek. She said she’s met all her friends through classes and her dorm. “A lot of people say it’s like paying for friends and I have my own friends,” she said. Michael Gee, a junior from Oak Ridge, Tenn., isn’t Greek either. He’s in the dance company and he said he made most of his friends through the theatre department. “I’m not against people being in fraternities or anything, it’s just not really my thing,” he said.

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

A number of organizations await students on the Hill. Some are sports or recreational. Some are religious. Some are departmental. Some are Greek organizations. Others are simply an outlet for students to exercise their hobbies. A few clubs and organizations include the Horticulture Club, business organizations such as Students in Free Enterprise and publications such as the Herald and the Talisman. Western is also home to several sports teams and an award-winning forensics team. Other organizations include an array of intramural sports, sororities and fraternities and clubs such as the Campus Activity Board. Social networks like Facebook and MySpace can also help students get involved. Joining an organization is beneficial for a variety of reasons. Students who are organizationally involved graduate at a higher rate than those who are not, Student Activities Director Charley Pride said. Organizations also provide a network of friends and possible references for future jobs or internship opportunities. “A lot of people that don’t get involved don’t make connections, or go home all the time and end up leaving,” Pride said. In the first two weeks of this semester, Western will promote these groups through booths, speakers and fliers at the MASTER Plan and Welcome Back Western programs. Both will detail organizations and offer contacts for joining. The student activities office can offer guidance to students that don’t attend the events. Its office is at Downing University.

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

PAGE 4A

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Students can sign up to get a free copy of Western’s yearbook, the Talisman.

what to bring

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

topfive

freshman follies

Don’t forget these necessities on the Hill By Stephanie Keene Herald reporter

A new journey is about to begin. As you make your way to Western to become a Hilltopper, there are several things you need from home to help you along the way. Obviously, you’ll need the basics: *microwave *mini-refrigerator *TV *clothes *socks *underwear *food *pots/pans *utensils *money/debit card *book bag *paper *pencils *folders *toothbrush

*hangers *cups *pillows *blanket *sheets *towels *wash cloths *cell phone charger *computer *alarm clock *watch *checkbook *Social Security card *insurance card

But what about those sort of obscure items students often forget to bring? Here’s a list of the most important, but commonly forgotten, items you’ll need to survive your years on the Hill. *shower caddy *surge protector *laundry detergent *rain boots *acne cream *sewing kit *toilet paper *first aid kit *home mementos *hair dryer *Febreeze *clothes hamper *umbrella *toothbrush holder *medicine *desk lamp *shower shoes *flashlight *quarters for laundry *storage crates *headphones *full-length mirror *small marker board *stuffed animals *iron *calendar *ironing board *camera Now that you know the necessities you need for college, get ready for the most enjoyable time of your life. Welcome to the Hill.

C Y M K

Reporter gives advice on avoiding embarrassing moments By Joey Leslie Herald reporter

When jumping over the crevice between high school and college, freshmen should allow certain things to plummet into the abyss below — namely the belief that they might skip that whole “silly freshman” thing and blend in with the seasoned Toppers. When it comes to freshman follies, most any upperclassman will tell you they’ve been there, done that and burned their MASTER Plan T-shirt in effigy. But it doesn’t have to be so bad. Here are the top five ways to avoid being a freshman flop.

1

Take your big red lanyard and shove it — into your backpack, of course. The lanyard is functional. It’s free. It’s a beacon of school spiritedness. And during the first weeks of the semester, it will swing from the neck of hundreds of freshmen. But this scarlet letter lets everyone know that its bearer is unacquainted with Western’s anatomy, or should I say, topography. Enjoy your free gift, but don’t swing it in a circle, repeatedly wrapping it around your finger as you walk. Unless you want people to

C Y M K

know you’re a simple-minded freshman — and everything, even your key chain, is a toy.

2

Fret not about wardrobe malfunctions. This particular section may come a little late since most freshmen have already gone shopping with their mommies for back-to-school clothes. But, unlike high school, not everyone on the Hill is a ‘Crombie crony. It’s OK to come to class sporting the latest fashions from the Greenwood Mall, but it isn’t necessary. Sometimes, it’s even OK to wear sweat pants and a T-shirt. (This stipulation excludes your MASTER Plan T-shirt and in no way includes Crocs, regardless of how comfortable they may be.) College is about becoming comfortable in your own skin, so stop hiding behind brand names. Besides, you can sleep a lot later if you don’t have to calculate your ensemble.

3

Get buns of steel to beat the Hill. Western rookies often underestimate the distance and incline that lie between any two points on campus. This is a mistake that often may lead to sprinting to make

it to class on time. Seasoned Hill climbers, having developed endurance and buns of steel, know to allow ample time to mosey to class and rarely show up late or out of breath — unless for a different reason. But freshmen often lack the gluteal capacity to move effortlessly about the Hill. They may appear fatigued, out of breath and disgruntled. To avoid falling prey to the terrain, consider packing a light snack and a bottle of water with you and leave 10 solid minutes before you think you should. You might also want to focus on your lower body strength when working out. And when you do find yourself running late, don’t freak. Do as the upperclassmen and show up late rather than sweaty.

4

Don’t forget the Nina, the Pinta and … the other one. Christopher Columbus, the chap who is known for discovering the Americas, was one cool guy with his maps and his ships. But when a freshman meanders about campus with his or her nose in a map, trying to discern between Guthrie Bell Tower and — wait, is that a sundial? — nobody thinks it’s

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

cool. In fact, it’s sad and a bit annoying if you happen to be walking behind the unsure explorer. Schedule a day to locate all of your classes before school starts. Push yourself, as Chris did, to not only find your America, but go inside and locate the very classroom you’ll be snoozing in, because the layout of some buildings is a bit tricky.

5

Remember what makes time fly. Midway through freshman year, boredom sets in for many students who think their four years will never end. After all, high school definitely didn’t whiz by. But, if high school didn’t meet your expectations, college will – if you follow these rules. In the next four (or so) years, you’re going to see new things, meet wild characters and discover yourself. You’ll make good choices and you’ll screw up. You might dance on table tops and then cry in your front yard – or even pass out in it. You might fall in love. Whatever happens, enjoy the journey and don’t wish away your college days. Once it’s over you’ll wonder how you made it so far without ever looking back.

C Y M K


C Y M K

PAGE 4B

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Western sits approximately 125 feet above downtown Bowling Green.

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

what life’s like

Nathan Weber/Herald (Above) Owensboro freshman Will Henness serves to a friend during a tennis match at the courts on Avenue of Champions. Jake Stevens/Herald (Far right) Elizabethtown sophomore Rachel Wigginton gets ahead in her studies so finals aren’t so stressful. Greg Barnette/Herald (Right) Sophomore middle hitter Megan Argabright celebrates with her teammates after a win over South Alabama.

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

PAGE 5A

QUICK HIT: Students get discounts with WKU ID all over Bowling Green. It never hurts to ask.

Don’t let laundry be a dirty task By Michael hall Herald reporter

For those of us accustomed to having our parents do everything for us, college life can be a rude awakening. The normal things we take for granted, such as having dinner set out for us, having someone look after us when we’re sick and doing our ironing and laundry are all things we must learn to do ourselves. Laundry is especially a big pain, as it’s something most of us will have to deal with once a week. Or at least we should. When doing laundry, the first important thing to remember is to bring a lot of quarters. On campus, a wash in one of the washing machines costs $1, while drying costs 75 cents. If you spend $1.75 and wash

your clothes each of the 12 weeks per semester, you’re likely to need about $21 in quarters per semester, so it’s probably necessary to bring about $45 worth per school year, just in case you need to do any extra laundry. If you choose to do your laundry off campus, there are plenty of other options in town, as Bowling Green has many laundry services. One such service, The Laundry Basket on Morgantown Road charges anywhere from $4.50 to $5 per load and provides everything from detergent to bleach and dryer sheets. Folding is also included within the charge, if desired. These prices and services are comparable to most other services you might find in town. The second thing you must remember when doing laundry is to

bring detergent and dryer sheets. Laundry detergent is necessary for the washing process, while dryer sheets can be thrown in the dryer with your load to help reduce the clinginess and static of your clothing. These items typically run anywhere from $7.07 for Liquid Tide detergent to $3.49 for brand-name dryer sheets at Wal-Mart. Bleach can be purchased separately, but is often included in a lot of detergents. As with most cases, generic brands are cheaper. After you have all the necessary items for doing your laundry, you can begin the process by loading your clothes in the machine. Though some find it necessary to separate the whites from the colors, you can typically load them together and be safe – if your colors have previously been washed.

After putting the detergent in, add the quarters and choose either the colors or whites options at the top of the machine. If mixing them together, colors is probably your best option. A load of laundry typically takes about 26 minutes to go through its cycle. Following this, you will want to load your clothes into the dryer and place a single dryer sheet inside. Select the option that best suits your need. Typically the whites and colors options will suffice. Remember to check clothing tags to see if any clothing shouldn’t be dried in the dryer. Drying usually takes about 60 minutes. When this is finished, place your freshly dried laundry into the basket and fold. That’s about all there is to it.

where to wash your clothes Local laundromats Bryce’s Bypass Laundromat 909 U.S. Highway 31-W Bypass cLean rite Laundromat 2201 Stonehenge Ave. the Laundry Basket 420 Morgantown Road the sugar mapLe square Laundry 1347 Ky. 185 poinciana Laundry & tanning 3411 Louisville Road three springs Wash and tan 535 Three Springs Road

WKU Health Services

139 Academic Complex (next to Guthrie Bell Tower) • 1906 College Heights Blvd. • Bowling Green, Kentucky • 42101

Hours of Operation

Services Offered

Monday-Thursday 8:00am - 4:30pm Friday 10:00am - 4:30pm Summer Closing Time is 4:00pm

* Urgent Care, Walk-ins and Appointments Available * • Internal Medicine; Allen Redden, M.D. • Family Medicine; Patricia Blewett, M.D. • Nurse Practitioner; Eve Main, ARNP (part-time/per diem) • Pharmaceutical Dispensary • Laboratory • Allergy Clinic • X-Ray • EKG

• Men’s & Women’s Health • Sports Medicine/Injury • Physicals • Immunizations • Travel Clinic • STD Screenings/Treatment • Insurance Filing/Billing • Health Education & Promotion • Health Resource Center

New Location Coming Soon

For more information or to schedule an appointment please call: 270-745-5641 Or visit our website at: http://www.wku.edu/healthservices/

Fully Furnished Utilities Included in Rent Free Cable Walking Distance to Campus

846-1000

1909 Creason St. • Off University Blvd. (Next to Campus) C Y

C Y

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

QUICK HIT: Basketball coach E. A. Diddle started the red towel tradition by carrying one in each of the 1,062 games he coached.

Counseling and testing center offers variety of services By Will Cravens Herald reporter

For students who are struggling or wanting to take one of the many exams to get college credit or pursue higher education, Western’s Counseling and Testing Center, 409 Potter Hall, offers many services. Individual and group counseling is provided to help develop better coping strategies, resolve conflicts and handle crisis situations. Typical concerns include: •College adjustment •Decision-making •Relationship concerns •Problem habits/behaviors •Intimacy •Anxiety •Life-planning •Identity •Depression

•Sexual assault •Eating disorders Presentations, workshops and seminars are given when requested. Information, techniques and skills are provided on a variety of topics, such as: •Relationship-building •Study skills •Test anxiety •Stress management •Career education •Eating disorders •Sexual assault awareness •Suicide prevention •Dating violence Consultation is provided to administrators, faculty, staff, students and parents. Call 270-7453159 to request a consultation or

e-mail your question or concern to counseling.services@wku.edu. An on-call person is at the center from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For after hours help you may call the Lifeskills, Inc. Help Line at 800-223-8913. Also offered is a collection of online counseling pamphlets and online screenings for depression, alcohol and eating disorders. The center offers a single location for taking exams that the university requires students to take such as the: •American College Test (National Exam) •Math Placement Exam •Chemistry Placement Exam Also offered are exams that may need to taken in preparation for fur-

ther education such as the: •Graduate Record Exam (GRE) •Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) •Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) •Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) •Miller Analogies Test (MAT) Other exams available include the: •College Level Examination Program (CLEP) •National Teacher’s Exam (NTE/Praxis) •State Merit Exams For a comprehensive list and more information, visit the Counseling & Testing Center’s Web site through the WKU student page.

PAGE 5B

how to deal with stress WAYS TO REDUCE STRESS

•Become aware of your own reactions to stress. •Focus on your good qualities and accomplishments. •Reinforce positive self-statements. •Recognize and accept your limits. •Avoid unnecessary competition. •Set realistic goals. •Set priorities. •Talk with friends or someone your trust about worries/problems.

WAYS TO LIMIT STRESS

•Develop assertive behaviors. •Get a hobby or two. Relax and have fun. •Exercise regularly. •Eat a balanced diet daily. •Practice relaxation techniques. For example, whenever you feel tense, slowly breathe in and out for several minutes. Source: Counseling and Testing Center

Advising helps keep students on right track By Chris Byrne Herald reporter

Picking classes can be difficult for new students, but advisers can relieve some stress while browsing Western’s class list. Ellen Bonaguro, director of the Academic Advising and Retention Center and associate professor in the communication department, said advising is all about establishing a relationship between the students and their adviser. “If we can teach students to be better advisees, then we hope they will seek out their advisers on their own,” she said. “And not just for advising, we want them to go to their advisers with any problems they have.” Bonaguro said there are two types of advisers on campus. There are regular faculty members that sometimes advise students, and there are also professional advisers who are able to see students most of the day. Professional advisers such as LySandra Bowles, advising associate in the School of Journalism and Broadcasting, can see as many as 300 students in a semester. Despite the number of students, Bowles said she is able to keep organized by making appointments online with AdvisorTrac, a Web-based advising management tool. Bowles also said advising doesn’t take very long at all, especially if students come prepared. Handouts at the Academic Advising and Retention Center give several recommendations. The handouts say students should review degree programs, come with a list of courses they plan to take and the information about the courses, and check to make sure

there are no holds on their record. The professional advisers and Academic Advising and Retention Center take some of the pressure off of faculty advisers. Assistant Economics Professor Brian Strow said he only has to advise four or five students now, compared to when he used to see 15 to 20. Strow said he never has problems scheduling meetings with people now. Bonaguro said students are assigned advisers based on their major. Each department handles advising differently, and some don’t have professional advisers. Generally, undeclared students get peer advising in the Academic Advising and Retention Center. Other undeclared students are divided by college professional advisers. Although there is a system to assign advisers, students can almost always request to change advisers. Nathan Edwards, a freshman from Henderson, said advising hasn’t really been helpful to him. Edwards said he could get along without it. Owensboro senior CiCi Kuegel said she once felt the same way, but she has changed her mind. “I thought it was useless when I was a freshman, but advising really matters whenever you get to the end,” Kuegel said. Students with any questions concerning advising can visit their personal adviser or the Academic Advising and Retention Center located in the Downing University Center, Room A330. Students can also e-mail center employees at academic. advising@wku.edu or call them at (270)745-5065.

when to visit academic advising or the learning center ACADEMIC ADVISING AND RETENTION CENTER

Housed in the new Student Success Center in the Downing University Center (DUC), the Academic Advising and Retention Center are the folks you’ll visit when you can’t figure out if that class you took for general education is going to count for category E or C. They’re also helpful in understanding the “how-tos” and the “whys” of scheduling your classes. Additionally, it’s the place to go if you need to change your major, minor or adviser. Aside from your adviser, turn to them when you’re confused about your academics.

THE LEARNING CENTER

You visit the Learning Center when you need to know how to get an A in your history class. TLC’s tutoring staff consists of highly successful students who serve as peer tutors in many different subjects, from sociology to Japanese. You can find the help you need in almost any subject. And, best of all, it’s absolutely free. Show up anytime during regular hours and receive help in specific content areas or simply learn how to improve your study skills. You’re encouraged to make individual appointments for tutoring sessions. The center also houses an academics-only computer lab as well as small, private rooms for you or your small groups from class to study.

C Y

C Y

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y


C Y M K

C Y M K

PAGE 6A

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Administrators serve students free breakfast on the Monday of finals week at Fresh Food Company in DUC.

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

what life’s like

Nathan Morgan/Herald (Top left) Amanda Brock (left), a sophomore from Naperville, Ill., and Chelsea Morlock (right), a sophomore from Pendleton, Ind., celebrate with recently engaged Kinsley Gregory, a sophomore from Gallatin, Tenn., during Bid Day. All members of Chi Omega sorority, the women traditionally have a candlelight service on Bid Day and wait for someone to blow out the candle and announce their marriage plans. John Perkins/Herald (Top right) Junior linebacker Andre Lewis stretches with the rest of the team during practice at Smith Stadium. Jake Stevens/Herald (Bottom left) Lily Meisner, right, a freshman from Taos, N.M., juggles a soccer ball while waiting for Ana Carinena, a sophomore from Calabasas, Calif., to tie her shoe. Meisner graduated high school early to come to Western and play soccer. Scott McIntyre/Herald (Bottom right) From left to right, K.J. Austin-Bruce, Montez Phillips, Branson Holly and Montaze Trumbo hop on stage during the intermission of the Miss Omega Pageant on April 4 at DUC Theater.

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

PAGE 6B

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

QUICK HIT: The WKU Police Department provides an escort service from dusk to dawn. Call 270-745-2548 for services.

SUMMER 2007

how to stay active INTRAMURALS

Jordan Pendley/Herald Louisville senior Erin Bruenderman is a nursing major and tries to maintain good health with daily runs at the Preston Center. “If it’s nice enough outside, I run at Preston Miller Park,” Bruenderman said.

Preston Center helps keep students in shape By Christina Howerton Herald reporter

Freshmen can really get connected to campus life by using the Preston Center, the on-campus gym, said Jennifer Franklin, Preston Center coordinator. “There is always something going on at Preston to get involved with,” she said. “It is a great place to workout, relieve stress, meet new people and have a great time.” The Preston Center is a health and fitness center on campus. All students are members at Preston Center if they have a student ID. It features a weight room, a gym, multiple basketball courts, racquetball courts, a dance studio, a running track and a swimming pool. The Preston Center also houses faculty/staff and student locker rooms, a Health

C Y M K

and Fitness Lab, an Outdoor Recreation Adventure Center, a pro-shop, and the Intramural – Recreational Sports Office. Here are some things to do in the Preston Center: •Workout in the weight room. It has an array of weights and exercise machines. You can watch TV while working out. •Make friends while playing basketball or racquetball. Patrons can rent equipment at the control desk with a student ID. •Go to a fitness class. Classes such as Awesome Abs, Rock Bottoms and Yoga are held in the dance studio. •Check out the activities that are hosted by the Outdoor Recreation Adventure Center. They have kayaking, caving and backpacking.

OUTDOOR RECREATION ADVENTURE CENTER

Western Kentucky University has a long and proud tradition of exciting and innovative intramural activities dating back 60 years. The intramural staff is devoted to making WKU intramurals safe, fun, and fair. Our mission is to involve as many people from the WKU community as possible through a wide range of intramural sports/events. To this end, the Intramural staff is always searching for events that are fun and will challenge the WKU community. The Hattie L. Preston Intramural Sports Complex is located on the corner of Campbell Lane and Industrial Drive. The complex is comprised of 24 acres that has been developed to create a state of the art outdoor sports facility. On these 24 acres are four softball fields, seven flag football fields, two soccer fields, two lacrosse fields and one rugby field.

ORAC offers a variety of outdoor programs for students and faculty/staff for a minimal cost. These include the following programs: adventure trips, outdoor equipment rental, skills clinics, outdoor resource library, adventure challenges and team building. ORAC is located in the Preston Health and Activities Center just across from the first basketball court. You must have a valid WKU student ID to gain access to the Preston Center. Adventure trip sign-ups are on a firstcome, first serve basis. All you need to do is sign up for a trip or to obtain more information about a trip is to stop by the ORAC during open hours and ask. Trip/ clinic sign-ups will begin Jan. 29 for all spring and summer programs and will remain open until they are full. Source: www.wku.edu/IMRec/

how to stay healthy

•In the Health and Fitness Lab get a basic fitness assessment and learn things such as your body fat percentage. You can also get a personal trainer. The Health and Fitness Lab is staffed by allied health and fitness professionals. •Join an intramural sport team or sport club. Some options include volleyball, soccer and rugby. The Preston Center is open Monday through Thursday from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. The swimming pool and weight room close 30 minutes prior to facility closing time. The Health and Fitness Lab is open from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Fridays.

WKU Health Services

WKU Health Services is a full service primary care center dedicated to providing students, faculty, staff, and their dependents with quality medical care and health promotion services. These services are necessary to regain, maintain, promote and improve their optimal health status, in support of the academic mission of the University. Hours of Operation: 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Monday – Thursday and 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Friday; Summer closing hour is 4 p.m. Location: In the L.Y. Lancaster Wing of Academic Complex, the end

C Y M K

closest to the Guthrie Bell Tower. Enter through the front doors facing Tate Page Hall. To reduce your wait time, please call in advance and schedule an appointment at 270-745-5641. Patients can be seen on a walk in basis if immediate or urgent care is needed. For more information visit our Web site: www.wku.edu/healthservices/ or email at: wkuhealthservices@wku.edu or call 270-745-5641. Insurance and billings email address: healthservicesbillings@wku.edu or call 270-7455034.

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

Source: WKU Health Services

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

PAGE 7A

QUICK HIT: Check postings in the Preston Center to find out about intramurals.

how to get around

Main campus map

*Building nicknames in parentheses.

1 The Visitor Center in the Kentucky Museum 2 Rodes-Harlin Hall 3 McCormack Hall 4 Gilbert Hall 5 Heating Plant 6 Facilities Management, parking structure 1 and Public Safety Building 7 Diddle Arena 8 Parking structure 2 9 Smith Stadium 10 Tennis courts 11 Denes Field 12 Supply-Services Building 13 Jones Jaggers Hall 14 Zacharias Hall 15 Meredith Hall

16 Keen Hall 17 Pearce-Ford Tower (PFT) 18 Poland Hall 19 Barnes-Campbell Hall 20 Bemis Lawrence Hall 21 Raymond B. Preston Health and Activities Center 22 Tate Page Hall 23 Mass Media & Technology Hall (Mammoth) 24 Guthrie Tower 25 Academic Complex 26 Downing University Center (DUC)

27 Minton Hall 28 Chill Water Plant 29 Southwest Hall 30 Northeast Hall 31 Bates-Runner Hall 32 Grise Hall 33 McLean Hall 34 Schneider Hall 35 Wetherby Administration Building 36 Craig Alumni Center and Foundation Building 37 Felts Log House 38 Potter Hall 39 Amphitheatre and Colonnade 40 Ivan Wilson Center for Fine Arts (FAC) 41 Cravens Graduate Center and Library 42 Helm Library 43 Garrett Center 44 Van Meter Hall 45 Gordon Wilson Hall 46 Rock House 47 Honors Center

48 Cherry Hall 49 Faculty House 50 Science and Technology Hall 51 Diddle Park 52 Industrial Education Building 53 International Center 54 Women’s Studies Center 55 Environmental Sciences and Technology Building (EST) 56 Greenhouses 57 Center for Engineering and Biological Sciences 58 Snell Hall 59 Hardin Planetarium 60 Thompson Complex (Central Wing) 61 Thompson Complex (North Wing) 62 President’s Home 63 Faculty Center for Excellence in Teaching 64 Region Two Service Center 65 South Campus, Bowling Green Community College, Materials Characterization Center

3032 Louisville Road 782-1900

2037 Russellville Road 782-5551

www.vettecityliquors.com Two locations to serve you

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: The first WKU uniform to bear the Hilltopper nickname was worn in 1927.

C Y M K

PAGE 7B

Experience the world with study abroad By Katie Brandenburg Herald reporter

The freshmen 15 might make it harder for students to wriggle into that perfect pair of jeans. But many students can find the perfect fit when it comes to a study abroad program, said Reed Vesey, director of study abroad and global learning. “It’s exactly about finding the right fit, some combination of what they’re comfortable with,” Vesey said of helping students choose a travel program. Elements such as location, academic needs and length of the trip affect which programs students are interested in and comfortable with, he said. The first thing freshmen should do when considering a study abroad program is think what they want to get out of it, Vesey said. Those interested can contact the study abroad office by phone or e-mail, he said. They can also look for information on the study abroad Web site at www.wku.edu/studyabroad. John Petersen, director of

international programs and projects, said there hasn’t been an emphasis on encouraging freshmen to study abroad in the past, but there will be more focus on that in the future. If students get excited about study abroad early on, they will be more likely to travel later in their career, Petersen said. He said it might be best for freshmen who study abroad to go to countries where English is widely spoken. But that isn’t true for everyone, he said. The important thing is to tailor each program to each student. There are three ways students can study abroad, Vesey said. They can study through a consortium, through an exchange program with a foreign university or through a program led by Western faculty. A consortium is a group of universities from across the country or the state that partner to create mostly short-term study abroad opportunities, he said. Western is part of two consortia, Vesey said. They are

the Kentucky Institute for International Studies and the Cooperative Center for Study Abroad. Associate Economics Professor Daniel Myers has been leading Western students on study abroad trips since 1998. He has visited countries such as Belgium, Spain and Mexico to teach about business practices in those countries. Myers said his programs have accommodated freshmen to help them study abroad by creating hybrid programs that focus on language study. That’s because many of the programs are upper-level classes, he said. Myers said study abroad can help enhance students’ education. “The world is becoming more and more global every day, and if you want to be competitive you need to know something about the world,” Myers said. “You need to understand how people around the world are different, but more importantly, how people around the world are the same.”

what you need to know about study abroad How much does it cost to study abroad? It depends. Each program has different costs that must be considered. In many instances, studying abroad is much more cost effective than being a tourist, and you receive academic credit as well. Do I need a passport? Yes. In many countries a passport is all that is required. However, in some countries a visa is also required. Please check with your chosen program regarding visa requirements. Can I study abroad if I am a freshman? A senior? In most cases, yes. Every program is different, but there is no best time to study abroad. Previous WKU students have been able to study abroad the summer before their freshman year as well as after graduation. You can never start too early and it’s never too late to go.

ΣΑΕ

Named Best Fraternity on Campus the last years in a row!

3

www.kybeta.com

Sigma alpha epsilon

th

August 27 -31

st

RUSH

Source: http://www.wku.edu/studyabroad/students/faq.html

The True Gentlemen

President: Dan Casagrande

daniel.casagrande@wku.edu

Phone: 502.298.1623

Come visit us during rush at our new house! 300 East 14th Street C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

PAGE 8A

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Big Red, Western’s mascot, made his debut in the fall of 1979. He was designed by alumnus Ralph Carey.

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

C Y M K


C Y M K

PAGE 8A

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Western is the fastest growing university in Kentucky.

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Keep up with your Student ID. You can’t get back into your dorm without it.

C Y M K

PAGE 9A

Evan Sisley/Herald Fort Knox freshman Kirstin Sacundus, left, and her roommate, San Antonio freshman Meghan Rhineheart, both nursing students, get dressed prior to leaving campus to hang out with friends. “The dorm rooms are what you make of them. At first the rooms are like jail cells, but after you settle in it is more homey,” Sacundus said.

Ground rules can help roommate understanding By Susie Laun Herald reporter

Most people never have to share a room with a complete stranger. And then they get to college. Housing and Residence Life tries to help establish ways to help new roommates forge good, or at least cordial, relationships. HRL Director Brian Kuster said new roommates are given a roommate contract to fill out together. The contract is meant as a way for new roommates to establish ground rules, Kuster said. Roommates can write their own policies on things such as quiet hours, visitation and belongings, he said.

Discussing issues and making rules will help new roommates learn to communicate openly, according to the Web site www. collegeboard. com. Students living together for the first time need to be willing to compromise, the Web site said. It’s going to be difficult to agree on everything, but mutual respect is needed to help roommates get along, it said. It’s important to be respectful, Lexington sophomore Beth Pope said.

“But don’t let them walk all over you,” she said. Pope said she knew her roommate before they lived together but they still have arguments. “ I t ’ s kind of aggravating,” she said. “Her boyfriend’s there all the time.” Disputes between roommates are common, but dealing with the situation before feelings are hurt is important. Pope said she and her roommate still get along well, despite minor disagreements.

Discussing issues and making rules will help new roommates learn to communicate openly, according to the Web site www.collegeboard.com.

Come check out our large selection of the North Face and other quality lines we carry or visit us on our website www.natsoutdoor.com

Housing and Residence Life The Department of Housing and Residence Life is located at 18 Southwest Hall. There are 15 dorms — two for men, five for women and eight coed. Each hall is staffed with professional hall directors, as well as resident assistants who live in the halls and act as peer counselors, leaders, troubleshooters, policy enforcers and friends for residents of each hall.

Men’s halls:

•Barnes-Campbell Hall – nine floors •Keen Hall – seven floors and four floors located in two wings

Women’s halls:

•Bemis Lawrence Hall – nine floors •Gilbert Hall – four floors •Poland Hall – nine floors •Meredith Hall – houses four sororities

•Rodes-Harlin – nine floors

Coed halls:

•Bates-Runner Hall – three floors •McCormack Hall – six floors •McLean Hall - three floors •Northeast Hall – three floors •Pearce-Ford Tower – 27 floors •Minton Hall – 10 floors •Southeast Hall – three floors •Zacharias Hall – three floors To apply for housing, each student needs to submit an application and a $150 deposit. All students with fewer than 60 hours are required to live on campus. Any cancellations received prior to the beginning of each semester are subject to a cancellation charge. Canceling the agreement anytime during the academic year while maintaining full-time enrollment will result in forfeiture of the deposit, and a $750 termination fee. You may be asking yourself,

“Why do I, as a freshman, have to live in a dorm?” Living in a dorm will provide a completely new dimension to your educational and social experience and you will develop your friendships and memories of a lifetime. Your dorm will not only be a place to grow but a place to relax and call home. Your room will have access to Western’s 43 station cable TV service, a data outlet for access to the Internet, e-mail, Western’s library, CD-Rom software and local telephone services at no charge. If you desire to have long distance service in your room, just dial 745-5466. Western offers a long distance program for 10 cents a minute, 24 hours a day. Each dorm has U.S. Postal Services daily, with the exception of Sundays and holidays.

Simone Moro, Courmayeur, Italy. Photo: Scott Markewitz

Source: HRL

who to call

Numbers parents need to know

C Y M K

Human Resources

270-745-2071

Housing and Residence Life

270-745-4359

University Relations

270-745-2348

Campus Police

270-745-2548

Office of the Registrar

270-745-3351

Office of Billings and Receivables

270-745-6351

Student Financial Assistance

270-745-2755

Office of the Bursar

270-745-6381

Student Employment

270-745-5513

University Bookstore

270-745-5336

Career Services Center

270-745-3095

Counseling and Testing Center

270-745-3159

Office of Diversity Programs

270-745-5066

Office of International Programs

270-745-4857

BACKPACKS • BICYCLES • CAMPING • CANOE HIKING BOOTS • RUNNING • SKATEBOARD SKIS • SPORTSWEAR • SWIMMING

Hartland on Scottsville Road, 1121 Wilkinson Trace (270) 842-6211 C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

QUICK HIT: To join the honors program you need to have at least a 3.5 high school GPA and a composite ACT score of 25.

what you should know Campus Activities Board

The Campus Activities Board’s primary purpose is to propose, plan and present a variety of activities and programs designed to serve the cultural, educational and social interests of all students. Members have the responsibility of planning and implementing programs in the area of contemporary music, lectures, recreation, multi-cultural events. For more information about “CAB” or to join, stop by their office in the Downing University Center, call at 74525809 or visit the Web at http://www.wku.edu/cab.

Campus Post Office

The university operates a post office located on the first floor of the Downing University Center. The Post Office is open 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, except when the university is closed. The university Post Office offers the same services as any other United States Post Office, except CODs and passports. Other services offered by the Post Office include a fax service and packaging center.

PAGE 9B

Students clean up at dental clinic By Katie Brandenburg Herald reporter

Some Western students use molars and bicuspids instead of textbooks and flash cards to prepare for final exams. Western annually opens its dental hygiene clinic. The clinic is located in Academic Complex, Room 223. The clinic was full on Wednesday morning, and more patients waited outside. Students in blue scrubs and masks leaned over patients, subtly moving their water picks and brushes to loosen plaque and bear it away with a slurping sound. Brooke Cox, a senior from Hendersonville, Tenn., stood back while Barbara Bush, an allied health associate professor, approved her work, and Cox began cleaning her work space. “I’ve just always had an attraction to teeth,” Cox said.

Check Cashing Service

“That’s the first thing I notice about people.” This is Cox’s second semester working at the clinic, but she still remembers her first patient. “It was scary, a little intimidating,” Cox said. “You just sort of wonder, ‘Am I ready for this?’ It amazes you how much you accomplish.” The clinic provides a full range of preventative dental services from students in the dental hygiene program, said Lynn Austin, head of the allied health and dental hygiene department. The clinic is part of Western’s dental hygiene program. Services such as teeth cleaning, X-rays and sealants are available to students for $15 and to non-students for $20, Clinic Office Assistant Tammy Liscomb said. Similar services at a regu-

lar dentist’s office would cost approximately $150 to $200, Liscomb said. William Emase, a secondyear graduate student from Kitale, Kenya, said he came to the clinic because it was cheap and convenient to his schedule. He said he was confident the students working on his teeth would do a good job. “Students can give good attention because they’re practicing and they want to make it perfect,” Emase said. Bush, who coordinates students’ schedules and oversees second-year students’ work in the clinic, said students are graded on every procedure they perform on a scale of mastery or non-mastery. “It’s almost like the patients are treated twice,” Bush said. Students must treat 20 patients during their second semester in the clinic, she said.

Participation in the clinic is a requirement for graduation from the dental hygiene program, Liscomb said. Students work in the clinic their last three semesters in the program, she said. The clinic prepares students to take board exams with a written and live-patient component, Liscomb said. Students spend the first semester working on each other and plastic models of teeth before they start working with patients, she said. The program has only 26 students because the clinic has limited space, Liscomb said. More than 500 patients used the clinic last year, Liscomb said. The clinic has been at Western since 1972, Austin said. “It’s just a wonderful resource to have here on campus,” Austin said. “The services are top-notch.”

Two types of personal checks (maximum $50) may be cashed by the University Cashier’s Office on the second floor of Potter Hall. • The check may be written by the student and made payable to Western or by the Student’s parents and made payable to the student or Western. • WKU student payroll checks in any amount. Checks may be cashed from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday except the last week of the semester, at 208 Potter Hall. Student I.D. required for check cashing services.

Community College

Students looking for a small college atmosphere with individual attention, convenient hours and classes and programs designed to fit their needs and interests often choose to begin their college experience at Bowling Green Community College located on the WKU South Campus, 2355 Nashville Road. Bowling Green Community College also provides opportunities for those in the community who have never attended college, want to come back after dropping out, would like to get an associates degree before entering a four-year program, want to update their training or want to take some classes for personal enrichment. For additional information, please visit the Community College at 2355 Nashville Road or call 780-2550.

Dental Hygiene Clinic

The dental hygiene program is administered by the allied health department with the primary purpose of educating professional dental hygienists. Through this program the students provide dental health education and preventive services to Western students, faculty and staff. The service includes examination of the mouth, dental prophylaxis (cleaning and polishing of teeth), dental X-rays, and applications of fluoride and dental sealants. Clinic hours vary from semester to semester and the clinic is closed from the end of the spring semester through September and the Christmas holidays. Presently, the clinic will be open September 18 with appointment times at 8:30 am and 1 p.m., Mondays and Wednesdays only. The clinic is in the Academic Complex, Room 223. Call the Dental Hygiene Clinic for an appointment at 745-2426.

Financial Assistance

The office of Student Financial Assistance helps academically capable students get resources to enable them to meet their educational goals. Although it is the responsibility of the student and his or her family to pay for an education, Western is committed to assisting its students with the financial burden. In fact, more than half of all Western students receive some sort of financial aid through programs including scholarships, grants, loans and part-time employment. • Merit scholarships, Tuition Incentive Programs and Alumni Grants are available to qualifying students. Students can also do a national scholarship search through www.fastweb.com. Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) administers KEES for Kentucky high school graduates. Information is available at www.kheaa.com. • Grants are free money that is not paid back. There are various grant programs that are need based, including Pell, CAP and SEOG. Students must file a FAFSA. • Loans. Low interest student and parent loans are borrowed money that must be repaid. Students are advised to borrow only what is absolutely necessary. If Federal Stafford student and parent loans are not sufficient to cover the cost of tuition, housing, meals and books, students may apply for alternative loans. A list of approved lenders is available at www.wku.edu/finaid. Look under ‘Financial Aid Programs, Loans, Alternative Loan Programs.’ Students must file a FAFSA. • Student Employment programs provide job opportunities. Students must file a FAFSA and be approved for on-campus employment. A list of jobs is posted (and updated) at www.wku. edu/finaid current job vacancies. Contact the Financial Aid Office at 270-745-2755 or visit www.wku.edu/finaid. Questions may also be emailed to fa.questions@wku.edu.

Office of International Programs

The Office of International Programs, located at 1536 State St., welcomes and assists international students by addressing their many and diverse needs through advising and programming. Once students have arrived on campus, OIP offers orientation workshops and programming to promote acculturation, adaptation, and personal adjustment to WKU and Bowling Green. OIP works as a liaison with several government agencies and advises students on matters related to maintaining/changing immigration status, transferring to/from WKU, student/scholar visa issues, and work authorization. Students are encouraged to become acquainted with OIP and its staff and to participate in those activities sponsored by OIP. Please visit our Web site at oip.wku.edu.

C Y M K

The Christian Faculty and Staff Fellowship welcomes you to a great year at Western Kentucky University. Among the many valuable resources you may have at WKU are spiritual resources. The faculty and staff listed below are just a few of the many Christian educators at WKU. We invite you to use your college years as time to explore and deepen your spiritual life as well as your intellectual and social lives. Dr. Richard Aldridge Accounting

Twyla Harris Mathematics

Dr. Rick Shannon Economics & Marketing

Carol Alicie Academic Advising

Judy Hatcher Registrar’s Office

Carnetta Skipworth Chemistry - BGCC

Norma Barkman Administrative Computing

Belinda Higgenbotham Controller’s Office

Donald Smith Alumni Relations

Jeff Baynham Alumni Relations

Gary Hughes Communication

Linda Smith Controller’s Office

Dr. Daniel Biles Mathematics

LaDonna Hunton Office of the Provost

Dr. Donald Speer Music

Dr. Lauren Bland Communication Disorders

Dr. Harold Little Accounting

Dr. John Spraker Mathematics

Dr. Dawn Bolton Academic Affairs

Sue Lynn McDaniel Library Special Collections

Dr. Joseph Stokes Mathematics

Jane Brantley Mathematics

Heather Nicklies University Bookstore

Jackie Bretz Talisman/Journalism

Dr. Thomas Noser Economics & Marketing

Dr. Jim Stone Educational Administration, Leadership, and Research

Dr. Marilyn Brookman Extended Campus-Owensboro

Linda Oldham Public Television

Amanda Brooks Chemistry

Dr. Robert Otto Teacher Education

Cathie Bryant College of Education

Manon Pardue DELO

Dr. Larry Caillouet Communication

Dr. Rhonda Patterson Biology - BGCC

Alice Lee Cannon University Bookstore

Dr. Kay Payne Communication

Dr. James Chappell Political Science

Gaye Pearl College of Education

Dr. Darwin Dahl Chemistry

Dr. Les Pesterfield Chemistry

Mike Dale Academic Affairs

Betsy Pierce Counseling and Testing

Dr. Randy Deere Physical Education

Patsy Powell Teacher Education

Lee Emanuel Mathematics - BGCC

Sgt. Ricky Powell WKU Police

Stacey Gish Communication

Dr. Sylvia Pulliam Computer Science

Tony Glisson Human Resources

Greg Purpus Academic Advising

Dr. Vijay Golla Public Health

Beth Rountree Mathematics-BGCC

Donna Gregory Counseling and Testing

Dr. Kevin Schmaltz Engineering

Becky Tabor Allied Health & Human Services Dr. Joseph Trafton Philosophy & Religion Paula Trafton History Dr. Richard Troutman History Kathy Trulock WKU Health Services Dr. Chuck Wainright Public Health Dr. Wanda Weidemann Mathematics Kenneth Whitley Allied Health Dr. Sharon Whitlock PE & Recreation Dr. Dale Wicklander Communication Dr. Stacy Wilson Engineering Dr. Larry Winn Communication Dr. Andrew Wulff Geography and Geology Qian Yuan Computer Science

Remember, you may be far from home, but you’re never far from God.

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


PAGE 10A

QUICK HIT: If you need to get to the top of the Hill quick, don’t bet on the Grise elevator; it’s one of the slowest on campus.

CHERRY HALL

THOMPSON COMPLEX

Trekking

HILL

the

By Michael hall Herald reporter

Sharp throngs of seething pain shot through my left and right shins as I made my way up the Hill. My brain, ignoring my buckling knees, my raspy panting and my swollen feet, seemed to give testament to the sensation I had felt on my earlier trek, crying out in torment, “Keep it up, keep it up! Just a little more to go!” Then, finally, success. Day one of the walking experiment was over. In a recent article published by MSNBC, “Do sprawling suburbs make us fat?”, it was asked whether a lack of walking was responsible for American obesity. I decided to test some of the benefits of walking on myself. People in many other cultures in the world walk most places. Even in Manhattan, N.Y., more than 75 percent of the residents do not have cars, according to the latest U.S. Census.

PEARCE-FORD TOWER

CREASON LOT

THE VALLEY

PEARCE FORD TOWER

In the experiment, I walked everywhere the first day, drove the second and went about my normal routine the third. The results of the trial defied my expectations.

Day One

I shunned my car, going about my normal routine from Pearce-Ford Tower. I did nothing out of the ordinary for much of the afternoon, but I did manage a very long trek from the top of the Hill to the Goodwill store on the 31-W Bypass to pick out a costume for a theme party. I found myself to be surprisingly energized by the end of it, in spite of it being a very long walk, and that I was nearly out of breath. Total distance walked — 3.8 miles.

Day Two

THE VALLEY

I won’t lie — my second day didn’t prove to be any less inordinately than the first. I did manage to catch a ride

SUMMER 2007

MINTON HALL

CHERRY HALL

Photos by Daniel Houghton/Herald Illustration by Jan Diehm/Herald

with friends everywhere I went, severely cutting down on my walking. I found myself to be more sluggish, even tired, unlike the high energy I had felt from the first day. I also felt stiff, and caught myself dozing off between breaks. Total distance walked — 0.25 miles.

Day Three

I walked up the Hill to the Herald office in Garrett Center, continued routines from previous days and drove only to run some errands. I noted no special differences in my energy than I usually would on normal days. However, I did feel more energetic in comparison to the previous day and didn’t need an afternoon nap. Total distance walked — 1.8 miles. Although this experiment was just for fun, I drew from it some very real conclusions. Walking gives a person a lot more energy than it expends. I burned 261 and 126 calories from

walking on the first and third days, respectively, and only burned 17 calories on the second. An average person typically burns 156 calories in 40 minutes of walking each working day, adding up to 780 calories per week. It takes burning 3,500 calories to lose one pound, said Laura Hall, Preston Center exercise coordinator. Walking on an uphill incline would increase the calories burned at Western, Hall said. “Walking on an incline is very good exercise,” Hall said. “Your heart rate is increased, and you lose more calories than you would walking on flat land. It’s just a great idea to maintain health and vitality.” So, when it comes to the Hill, why not just suck it up and do it, Glasgow sophomore Mary Grace Brooks said. “Walking is a lot easier than driving around to find parking,” Brooks said. “It just makes more sense. Plus, you can’t beat the exercise.”

THOMPSON COMPLEX PFT to THOMPSON 0.797 miles CREASON LOT to THE VALLEY 0.636 miles MINTON HALL to CHERRY HALL 0.261 miles PFT to CHERRY HALL 0.648 miles CAMPUS LOOP 1.675 miles


PAGE 10B

QUICK HIT: Western’s fight song is titled “Stand Up and Cheer.”

SUMMER 2007

where to park

Transportation

A number of transportation services are provided to students on and off campus, all buses are ADA accessible and services are fare free. These programs are designed to reduce the need to bring a personal vehicle to campus by providing transportation not only on campus but off-campus as well. Specific details about each service described below, including routes and schedules are posted at the Parking and Transportation services Web site www.wku. edu/transportation. Day Bus Service – From 7:20 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Friday a number of buses transport faculty, staff and students across campus. In general, buses run every 8-10 minutes depending on the time of day. Students attending classes at Bowling Green Community college can take the bus to south campus from the main campus. An on-campus circulator is available to take students to the top of the hill. Evening Bus Service – From 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday an evening route is available to students. This route covers campus, south campus, park and ride parking

lots, and near by off campus business areas including Walmart, Greenwood Mall, Great Escape Movie Theatre at Greenwood Mall and Barnes & Noble. Provide-A-Ride – An on demand ride home is available from 10 p.m. until 2 a.m. Monday through Saturday. This service is sponsored in part by the Student Government Association and is intended to provide a safe ride home late at night. The fare is free within the defined service area with a current WKU ID. Out of State Travel – During scheduled class breaks, shuttle service to the Nashville Airport or Greyhound Bus Station will be provided at a discount to students. Disability Transportation – While all buses are accessible, a para-transit van is available to students with disabilities for scheduled pick-ups and drop-offs on campus. Further information is available at the departmental Web site. Off Campus Transit – Bowling Green Public Transit provides transportation off campus, including para-transit services. A fare must be paid to ride this service. For more details, visit http://www.casoky.org/transportation.shtlm

Parking

The Parking and Transportation Services department manages parking resources on campus. If you bring a personal vehicle to campus, you are required to register your vehicle with the Parking and Transportation Department. Specific details about permit fees and sales dates are available at the departmental Web site, www.wku.edu/transportation In general, if you are living on campus, you have the choice of a Housing zone or Campbell Lane Park and Ride zone permit. If you are living off-campus, you have the choice of a Commuter zone or Campbell Lane Park and Ride zone permit. The Mimosa lot, located across the street from Mass Media & Technology Hall and the Regents Avenue Gated lot require a Faculty/Staff permit from 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and any other type of University permit from 4:30-10 p.m. All other Faculty/Staff lots are enforced 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Residential permit zones are enforced 24 hours a day. Commuter zones are enforced

from 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Campbell Lane Park and Ride permits are valid in All Permit Zones and Commuter zones on the main campus after 2 p.m., except for Parking Structure 2. At this time, more permits are sold than there are parking spaces so a permit does not guarantee that a parking space will be available. In addition, lots may be reserved at any time for use during special events or during construction or maintenance projects. A WKU disability permit is required to utilize the disability parking spaces on campus. Registration is through the Parking and Transportation Department. A current state issued disability placard issued to the driver is needed for registration. If you have any questions about parking at WKU, please ask the Parking and Transportation Services office. Any other source may be unreliable. You may also visit Parking and Transportation Services online at http://www.wku.edu/transportation.


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: You can also access the College Heights Herald online at wkuherald.com.

C Y M K

PAGE 11A

Events keep students busy throughout the year By Michael Hall Herald reporter

Annual events are a huge part of Western’s culture and add to the overall flavor of the college experience. The events range from Greek-based activities to field parties, concerts and pageants. Homecoming is the first noteworthy event of the year, occurring sometime in late October. During this time, alumni return to campus to show off their Western pride. Greeks also show their colors in a variety of ways, designing floats for the annual float parade, creating banners and participating in a variety of games. The event usually revolves around a football game and there’s a large cookout and tailgate party. Another annual event is Valleypalooza. This event occurs at the end of the school year, in the area of campus known as the Valley, the little quad with Gilbert, Rodes-Harlin and McCormack halls. Sponsored by five resident hall councils and funded by the Campus Activities Board, Residence Hall Association and Housing and Residence Life, the event includes a barbeque dinner, music and games. Competitions range from pie eating to water balloon contests. Basically, it’s the last hoorah before finals. Miss Black Western is another spring tradition on campus. Hosted by the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, the

event has roots dating back 36 years. As in most pageants, the contestants grace the stage in their finest, answer questions and show off their skills in a choreographed dance. The winner receives a book scholarship, bouquet, trophy, crown and title. The Miss Omega Pageant is another event unique to Western that began last year. This plussized event gives nontraditional beauties a chance to strut their stuff on stage. Greek Week is the last major event of the year, and incorporates the greatest amount of activities. Kicking off with Spring Sing, a singing and dancing competition among fraternities and sororities, the week also includes the Greek Olympics, highlighted by a tug-of-war game. At the end of the week, the reigning fraternity and sorority chapters are crowned the victors, and can maintain bragging rights for the rest of the year. A noncampus event sponsored by Western’s main radio station, Revolution 91.7, is Mayhem in the Square. This event typically features 10 bands, ranging from punk to indie to progressive rock and hip hop. This event occurs every spring in the square downtown, the event attracts around 400 to 500 people. These are just a few of the many events Western hosts throughout the year.

Homecoming is the first noteworthy event of the year, occurring sometime in late October.

A noncampus event sponsored by Western’s main radio station, Revolution 91.7, is Mayhem in the Square.

Scott McIntyre/Herald (Above) Nashville freshman Ty Palms, left, dances along with Louisville junior Jessica Sutherland during the introduction of the Miss Omega Pageant in DUC Theater. Greg Barnette/Herald (Right) From right, Bowling Green freshman Liz Grant, Buffalo freshman Whitney Brooks and Trenton sophomore Merritt Cole cheer during Tug. Tug is the finale of Greek Week, an annual celebration of fraternities and sororities.

where to find local media WKYU-88.9 FM is Western’s Public Radio, providing music, news and public affairs programs 24 hours a day to two-thirds of the Commonwealth. Web site: www.wkyufm.org. Western’s Public Television Service, WKYU-PBS, provides a variety of informative and educational programs. Channel 24 also broadcasts Hilltopper and Lady Topper basketball games. The offices and studios are located in the Robert Cochran wing of the Academic Complex. Web site: www.wkyu.org. The College Heights Herald is Western’s twice-weekly student newspaper. It is published on Tuesdays and Thursdays during the school year. The newspaper is delivered to about 60 campus and off-campus locations. It is produced by students through the Office of Student Publications. The newspaper’s Web site, www. wkuherald.com, provides breaking news and special features of interest to the campus community. The Talisman is Western’s official yearbook. It is free to all full-time students. Students may reserve a yearbook by going to TopNet between October and March. Arrangements may be made on TopNet to receive a yearbook by mail. WWHR-91.7 FM delivers a commercial-free mix of progressive music that follows the national charts of the College Music Journal and then expands the rotation to address local tastes. Revolution 91.7 recalls the founding artists of college radio while exposing the contemporary underground. In addition, WWHR-FM features news, sports and genre-specific programming. Also available online at www.revolution.fm. The station is managed and staffed by students with faculty oversight. Full Effect is an online magazine that features essays, creative nonfiction pieces, photo stories, feature writing assignments, articles, artwork and more. The publication especially seeks submissions that highlight issues that affect college students or that students should be aware of. Full Effect is looking for staff and contributors. Source: Western’s Web site.

what to watch on TV 2 — NBC 3 — Fox 4 — MNT 5 — CBS 6 — ABC 7 — PBS 8 — PBS 9 — ESPN 10 — ESPN 2 11 — History Channel 12 — Residence Life Channel 17 — CNN 18 — C-SPAN 19 — Sci-Fi 20 — A&E 21 — BET

C Y

22 — Lifetime 23 — Nickelodeon 24 — TBS 25 — WGN 26 — TNT 27 — USA 28 — MTV 29 — CMT 30 — VH-1 31 — The Weather Channel 32 — SCOLA #1 33 — SCOLA #2 34 — SCOLA #3 35 — CW 36 — E! 37 — Comedy Central

38 — Discovery Channel 39 — Disney 40 — Spike TV 41 — TLC 42 — AMC 43 — CNN Headline News 44 — C-SPAN 2 45 — Bravo 46 — Cartoon Network 47 — mtvU 50 — WWHR Three more channels will be selected and added by June. Source: Office of Residence Life

C Y

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Western’s alma mater was originally written by 16-year old Mary Frances Bradley as a poem for a 1924 contest.

C Y M K

PAGE 11B

Cherry Hall, pictured here, and Guthrie Bell Tower house the bells that are heard across the Hill. The bells in Cherry Hall are controlled electronically by what Herb Hess, electronic and TV technician, calls the “world’s largest MP3 player.” Guthrie Tower has real bells.

Bells note music, time across WKU campus By Susie Laun Herald reporter

Steep steps in a spiral staircase lead to an empty room in the cupola of Cherry Hall. On the roof of Cherry Hall, there are no bells, only speakers and event lights. These speakers are hooked up to what Herb Hess, electronic and TV technician, calls the “world’s largest MP3 player.” The system is located in a little closet on the third floor of Cherry Hall and plays the music and chimes that are heard between classes and at the top of each hour. The tunes are controlled by two Western employees who want to bring history and music to the Hill. There are real bells in Guthrie Tower that play programmed music. John Osborne, vice president of campus services and facilities, chooses the music that is played from Cherry Hall. Osborne said he remembered hearing the music when he was a student in the 1960s. He wanted to bring it back when he came to work at Western.

C Y

The music selections come from books that include different genres of music, he said. “When it had Beatles selections, I couldn’t resist. I had to put those in there,” he said. Students have perked their ears to the Beatles and other familiar bands more frequently during the past year because Osborne said he expanded the music library to play those songs and keep others from being overplayed. He can also program special songs. On Derby Day, he plays “My Old Kentucky Home.” Hess said he knows most of the songs played at Cherry Hall, where he makes sure the equipment works. But he’s not as familiar with those at Guthrie. “The Bell Tower plays ‘Take Me Out To The Ballgame.’ That’s the only one I recognize,” he said. Hess, along with Supervisor of Electronics Greg Lake, go up Guthrie once each year to grease the 47 bells. They occasionally must go inside the tower to fix a bell if it becomes off tune. They climb up a five-story spiral staircase and a 25-foot

ladder to get to the bells. Music Department Head Mitzi Groom said she’s been picking the music since Guthrie was built in 2002. Most of the music comes from digital cards that are programmed into the chimes, but Groom said she plays some live. She said she counts on her ear for music to play the bells. When students hear music coming from the chimes for as long as 30 minutes, it could be her in the Academic Complex playing music from a keyboard that’s hooked up to the chimes. Groom is training Scottsville junior Megan Wheat to play the bells. Wheat has played the bells before, but she’ll play the graduate commencement in May as her first event. Wheat said playing the bells is difficult because there’s a delay from when she plays a note on the keyboard and it reaches the bells. It can also be difficult because chimes play extra notes, and Wheat and Groom had to learn to slow their playing so that it sounds the way it’s supposed to, Groom said.

C Y

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y


PAGE 12A

QUICK HIT: It’s a good idea to purchase a flash drive. You can’t save your documents in the computer lab without it.

Extra meals included in dining options By Michael Casagrande Herald reporter

Tiara White is one of the more than 5,000 Western students who swipe a Big Red ID card before eating. White, of Louisville, along with nearly every other Western freshman, is required to buy a meal plan that costs a minimum of $896 each semester for 10 meals each week. She chose to spend $1,037 for 14 meals a week, but she said she regrets the decision because at least three meals go unused each week. Unused meals each week are forfeited, but they aren’t totally wasted. Dining services policy anticipates a certain number of missed meals, and alternate dining options are on the rise across the state. A missed-meal factor accounts for the number of meals students are expected to miss each week or month. Dining Services takes the average number of meals missed into account when setting meal plan prices. Prices would be much higher

Dana Rieber/Herald Left to right, Morganfield junior Rachel Carrier, Morgantown sophomore Leeann Phelps and Sturgis sophomore Brittany Harper listen to ringtones on their cell phones while eating at Downing University Center.

Meal plans offer some healthy options Herald

SUMMER 2007

staff report

When she’s looking for a snack, Brittany Wingfield steers away from fruit. Instead, she grabs a muffin or a bag of chips from one of the campus eateries. The Louisville freshman said that’s because of the cost of those items. “To just get fresh fruit as a snack is expensive,” Wingfield said. Some officials say the higher cost of fresh food options might deter students from picking them on a regular basis. Roy Biggers, district manager of ARAMARK food services, said portable healthy foods, such as individual yogurts, cost more money because they aren’t bought in bulk and are more expensive to buy. Prices are set by doing comparison shopping three times a year, Biggers said. Higher costs can stem from the extra labor involved in cutting fruit and assembling salads, said Danita Kelley, an associate professor of consumer and family sciences. Another reason could be the lower demand for healthy foods, said Karen Mason, an assistant professor of consumer and family sciences. High demand for fast, fried foods means they can be bought in bulk for a lower price. Lower demand for fruits and salads means fewer are purchased, which drives up rates. “Ultimately, students want goodtasting food,” Mason said. “Fat tastes good.”

get your news

Eating healthy on a college cam- Kim said. “My freshman year, I gained pus can be a challenge, but there are 30 to 40 pounds.” Fred Mildner, senior food services less expensive options available, Kelley director, said Dining Services launched said. Such options include choosing baked a campaign in January encouraging stuchips instead of fried chips, leaving fatty dents to make healthy choices. He said there are many options for condiments off sandwiches and avoiding eating healthy. Dining services has been white sauces, Mason said. cooking with oil with zero trans fats for Getting a meal plan can offer limited more than a year, Mildner said. choices without meat for some vegetarDining services and the Student ians and international students. Government Association collaborated to Fort Campbell freshman Jenna Smith get milk added to the meal plan during is required to have a meal plan. the spring semester, the Herald previShe said it’s difficult to ously reported. They also got rid of time restrictions eat as a vegetarian because tied to when meals could of the limited choices availbe used. able to her. A new meal plan option It costs Smith $2 extra at will include yogurt, a piece certain locations for meals of fruit or a granola bar, and on her plan that accommoa bottle of water, Biggers date her diet. said. Wal-Mart Assistant “We try to be ahead of the Manager Jessica Glenn said curve,” Biggers said. “Try vegetarian students can get not to wait until something more choices at grocery comes and bites you.” stores because of the more Some students benefit —Karen Mason diverse selections. from or adjust to the change Assistant Professor, Consumer of eating on campus, while Junior Doo-Yong Kim and Family Sciences others gain weight. and sophomore Hana Lee, Mason said most students both from Seoul, South don’t eat properly because Korea, get their meals of their schedules. through Big Red dollars. “Students work. They have class. Most international students don’t use meal plans because their food choices They do other things. And they tend to are limited by the diet they maintain, look for convenient, fast food,” Mason said. Kim said. Mason advises students to pack He said the price of food on campus is worth it, but the food’s health content healthy snacks such as fruit, vegetables and pretzels when they know they’ll be isn’t good for them. “The calories are more than our food,” too busy to eat properly.

“Students work. They have class. They do other things. And they tend to look for convenient, fast food.”

@

wkuherald.com

if students were expected to eat all of the meals they paid for, Auxillary Services Director Gary Meszaros said. Students can also buy Dining Dollars and Big Red Dollars, but they don’t count toward the freshman requirement. Dining Dollars users receive discounts every time the dollars are spent at campus restaurants and convenience stores. There are new plans in the works to allow Big Red Dollars at off-campus restaurants and businesses through The CBOARD Group, Inc., the Herald previously reported. Those plans have stalled because of difficulties CBOARD has had with developing technology for the necessary card readers. The plan would allow card holders to spend Big Red or Meal Plan Dollars almost anywhere, since it would run through the VISA/Mastercard system of debit and credit card readers, he said. Since 2003, Western students have been able to use Big Red Dollars and Dining Dollars at Domino’s Pizza by submitting their student ID numbers.

where to eat

Red Zone: Monday - Thursday: 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Friday: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday: 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday: 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.

The Fresh Food Company: Monday - Friday: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday - Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Downing University Center Food Court: Monday - Thursday: 7 a.m. to midnight Friday: 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday: noon. to 8 p.m. Sunday: 1 p.m. to midnight

DUC Subway: Sunday - Wednesday: 10 a.m. to midnight Thursday - Saturday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Garrett Subway: Monday - Thursday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday - Sunday: Closed

Garrett Food Court: Monday - Friday: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday - Sunday: Closed *Not all on campus eateries are included in this list. Source: Western Dining Web site.

College Heights Herald Student News. Faculty News. Alumni News. All News.

Newspapers are available in various academic and administrative buildings around campus and several off campus locations.


PAGE 12B

QUICK HIT: Western’s student body is 60.3 percent female and 39.7 percent male.

SUMMER 2007

Cuteness, ambiguity catapult Big Red to national stardom By Corey Paul Herald reporter

Greg Barnette/Herald Big Red entertains fans during a Lady Toppers basketball game.

BIG RED BY THE NUMBERS

6 63 1979 2006

Number of students who don the Big Red costume

Number of students who have been Big Red since 1979

Year Big Red debuted

Year Big Red placed in the top four in the Capital One Bowl “Mascot of the Year” competition

Joan Krenzin was amazed that the little girl, who looked about 3 years old, wasn’t crying. Instead of bawling, the girl took the hand of Big Red and looked calmly at his large, googly eyes. Krenzin, a sociology professor, consulted her friend Betsy Shoenfelt, a psychology professor a few rows away. “Did you see that girl go off with Big Red not crying?” Krenzin asked. Big Red is, after all, a monster, Krenzin said she thought. But Shoenfelt told her that Big Red’s big eyes, his high forehead, his large mouth and even his color have a psychological effect of making him seem nurturing to children. In other words, Big Red is cute. And cute equals comfortable. None of the six students who don the Big Red costume remembered the encounter Krenzin and Shoenfelt witnessed. “It happens about twenty times a game,” said Gef Cherwak, a Bowling Green senior who’s played Big Red for three years. Western’s mascot is a source of identity for the university. He entertains crowds at games and at community events. His picture on merchandise brings in millions of dollars of revenue. “A lot of people, when they think of Bowling Green, think of Big Red and Western,” said Paula Davids, an athletic marketing assistant and the adviser

to Western’s mascot program. Big Red’s been recognized nationally too. He’s appeared in commercials on ESPN and been on NBC’s “Deal or No Deal.” He’s been in a children’s book. He also placed in the top four in the 2006 Capital One Bowl “Mascot of the Year” competition. Roy Yarbrough, a professor of sports management at California University of Pennsylvania who judged the 2006 Capital One Bowl competition, ranks Big Red as one of ten most recognizable mascots and the fourth best mascot in the country. “It’s always easy to pick Big — Red because of his appeal,” Yarbrough said. “He just looks goofy.” Big Red is popular because he is fun, huggable and lovable, Yarbrough said. “He’s not like Donald Duck,” Yarbrough said. “Donald is very aggressive; that’s why kids come up and kick him.” Lovability was intended in Big Red’s design, creator Ralph Carey said. Mobility for the actor inside Big Red and visibility were also features Carey had in mind. Big Red’s beginnings lie in a 1979 conversation between Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity brothers about replacing the current mascot at the time. That was Mr. Hilltopper, a man in a tuxedo and top hat. Carey met with Ron Beck,

an SAE faculty liaison, and President Gary Ransdell, who in 1979 was the SAE adviser and an employee in alumni affairs. Carey shelved some his first ideas, including one of a bear in a sweater. Then came the idea Big Red. A blob. Or a blood clot. Or the embodiment of Western spirit. Or whatever the audience thinks. The ambiguity was intentional, Carey said. “What if we did something that can’t be placed anywhere as anything?” Carey remembered thinking. “It’s not a gorilla, not a person. It’s free of any baggage.” Paula Davids Well, Big Red mascot adviser isn’t a monster, said Professor Brian McFadden, an expert on monsters in literature at Texas Tech University. Monsters play on social taboos, peoples’ fears of not being able to control the things they rely on or fears for their physical safety, McFadden said. Monsters come from a general fear of the unknown. Big Red is an unknown, but not out of control or physically scary. Big Red is round and soft, making him seem less dangerous than pointy creatures, like the Green Goblin from SpiderMan comic books, McFadden said. Carey wanted a costume that allowed energetic movement, with facial features that allowed emotional versatil-

“A lot of people, when they think of Bowling Green, think of Big Red and Western.”

ity. He focused his efforts on making an animated character, whose features allowed him to adapt to a crowd. “I wanted him to get down on one knee an hug a kid one minute, eat someone’s purse and run away the next,” Carey said. He also wanted the new mascot to be a surprise. After about a month of tailoring Big Red out of aluminum, foam, felt and plastic tubing, Carey debuted as Big Red at a home basketball game on Dec. 1, 1979. The crowd loved him. Big Red won the “Key to the Spirit” award at the Universal cheerleading competition for three consecutive years after his conception. Since, there have been about 63 Big Reds, Davids said. Big Red is smaller now. He has a nose now, bigger eyes and “WKU” on his chest. But fans, especially children, still flock to the character, who remains a cartoonish, energetic furball, said Brandenburg junior J.D. Menser, another student who has played Big Red for three years. Some children throw fits when Big Red approaches them, so actors have to know when to back off, Menser said. He said they fear being approached by a stranger more than the character, though, and usually seem to like Big Red from a distance. Cherwak agreed. “All little kids are going to be scared of a wildcat or a pirate or a colonel, or a gator, but who’s going to be afraid of a lovable furball?” Cherwak said.


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

PAGE 13A

QUICK HIT: Parking and Transportation Services is located between Campbell Lot and South Campus.

the off-Campus bookstores university textbook and supply

Welcomes you to

WesteRN! Need a few extra bucks? A little jingle in your pocket?

UTS will give you

$10 off your purchase!

Don’t check

YES for

buying books thru MASTER PLANyou will pay

TOO MUCH!

University Textbook & Supply

SAVE TEN DOLLARS

This coupon is worth $10.00 off on any $100 minimum purchase of used textbooks for the 2007-08 school year.

You have enough stuff to worry about,

Limited time TEN 783-0687

Across from McCormack and The Registry 111 Old Morgantown Rd

let US worry about your books!

SAVE MONEY and avoid the rush!

SAVE TEN DOLLARS!

ReseRve youR textbooks today! WHO: YOU (come on, it’s time to be that “responsible” adult you’ve heard about) WHAT: By reserving your textbooks TODAY you will have FIRST SHOT at all Used

Textbooks.

e r a e Wher

WHEN: NOW! WHERE: Fill out the form below and return by mail, call, fax, or e-mail your reservation.

McCormack Hall

• Pick up your books by Sunday, August 26th 10am-5pm. All we need is you in the store, tell us your name, and we’ll bring you your reserved books. Simple huh?

University Blvd.

COURSE #

SECTION #

PROFESSOR

_________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

University Textbook & Supply

Old Morgantown Road

Section #’s are VERY important. We will not be able to process your reservation without section #’s DEPT

Parking Structure

Avenue of Champions

WHY: Used Books are 25% less than new books, provided subject to availability. Plus

we’re friendly, reliable and CHEAP! (hint: you can spend more money on what YOU really want)

?

d e t a c we lo

The Registry

_________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

This form will put you in the drawing for a $250 Book Giveaway

Name: ______________________________ Address: ____________________________ _____________________________________ Phone number: _______________________ E-mail: _______________________________

at UTS! Drawing is August 25, 2007.

University Textbook and Supply 111 Old Morgantown Road Bowling Green, KY 42101 (270)783-0687 fax (270) 783-8981 utextbooksupply@bellsouth.net

C Y

C Y

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: 45 of the 50 states plus two US territories are represented at Western.

C Y M K

PAGE 13B

Don’t delay: Fast reports help police a crime, Casas said. “I’ve gotten a few where Michael Christian wasn’t people say they just didn’t have worried when he noticed his the time,” Casas said. “I guess bike missing from a bike rack some people are more careless on Aug. 28 in front of Pearce- than others.” Ford Tower. Marion junior Jeanne In fact, Christian, a freshman Johnson waited three days after from Portland, Tenn., waited she noticed on Sept. 10 that her more than a week to report the parking permit had been stolen theft to campus police. from her car. “Well really, I waited “There are several reasons I because it really doesn’t matter. waited,” she said. “One being I have a truck here,” Christian that I didn’t really notice.” said. Johnson said her activity in The bike’s value is $125, but several campus organizations Christian said he’s made it difficult for not concerned. her to find the time Waiting days to report the theft. to report a crime Johnson wanted is fairly common to check with her among Western roommates before students, said Capt. she reported a crime Mike Dowell, directo see if they had — Rafael Casas taken the permit. tor of communicacrime prevention officer tions for campus Other students police. want to make sure Most people report incidents that an infraction has been comimmediately or the day after- mitted before they report it. wards, Dowell said. But many Calhoun senior Mallory wait several days to contact Hudson waited until Sept. 12 campus police. to report that her wallet, which “We ask them why they wait contained $159 in cash and all the time, and we get a vari- property, was stolen on Sept. 7. ety of answers,” Dowell said. “I wanted to see if other Students often say they’re people in my class had found too busy, or they don’t think the it,” Hudson said. “I didn’t want offenses are a big deal, Dowell to allege something if it had said. never been stolen.” There could be many reaThe problem with waiting to sons why students wait to report report an incident is that as time crimes, and it depends on the passes, the crime is less likely individual, he said. to be resolved, Dowell said. Rafael Casas, the crime “Things that happen need prevention officer for campus to be reported as soon as pospolice, is familiar with many sible,” Dowell said. “By reportexcuses. ing them, we get a clearer picSome students don’t realize ture of a suspicious area, and anything is missing until days we can direct our patrol to help after it’s gone. Others wait until combat that problem.” their parents tell them to report The sooner offenses are B y A. L a y n e S t a c k h o u s e Herald reporter

Jake Stevens/Herald Western Police assistant shift commander David Skinner, standing at left, talks to Colleen West, standing at right, as Warren Central High School students (left) Keenan Lay a ninth grader, and Timothy Lum, a 10th grader pass time with a Rubik’s cube in the Downing University Center. “He’s one of my buds, he cool,” said West, a Nashville senior. “All of the cops here have done a great job.” Skinner has worked for the WKU Police for four years.

what safety services are on campus WKU Police

WKU Police is located on the ground level of Parking Structure 1 next to Diddle Arena. WKU Police is a full service police organization available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The WKU Police consist of four divisions, patrol, investigation, communications/staff services and professional development. The 24-hour phone number is 745-2548.

Escort Services

There may be occasions when you have a night class or want to visit a friend across campus after dark. Play it safe and don’t walk alone at night. The Student Escort Service is an on campus service provided for the protection of visitors, faculty, staff, and students. The WKU Police or a Police Explorer will provide an escort to campus locations from dusk till dawn. Call 745-3333 or 745-2548 to request an escort.

C Y

“I guess some people are more careless than others.”

C Y

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

reported, the sooner campus police can address individual crimes and detect patterns, Dowell said. Christian and Johnson both said they would have reported the crimes immediately if the property stolen from them was more significant and expensive. Underreporting minor infractions, especially small property crimes, is a national trend, Assistant Sociology Professor Jerry Daday said. Many people don’t have the incentive to report crimes because they don’t think they’ll be solved, Daday said. “They don’t think the police will be able to do anything,” he said. “A lot of people just have the belief that it’s not worth it.”

Some reasons people don’t report crimes immediately: • Not having enough time • Belief that the police can’t resolve the issue • The insurance deductible is greater than the value of the property • The aggravation of filling out paperwork • It’s embarrassing • Belief that the crime is too trivial • Not caring about what happened

C Y


C Y M K

C Y M K

PAGE 14A

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: Western’s Web site, wku.edu, is a good source for what’s going on around campus.

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

what life’s like

Greg Barnette/Herald (Above) Nashville senior Adrian Simmons directs Amazing Tones of Joy in the Baptist Campus Ministry to prepare for an upcoming concert. Sarah Dudik/Herald (Top right) Bob Cannon of Fredericksburg, Va., throws a putter at the Bowling Green Amateur Disc Golf Championships at Ephram White Park on Sunday. Patrick Smith/Herald (Right) Lexington junior Alex Hargrove, center, passes out informational fliers to students passing by during the Students Opposing Silence protest Tuesday afternoon in between Downing University Center and Guthrie Bell Tower.

www.collegeparkweb.com

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

PAGE 14B

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

QUICK HIT: There were 18,685 students at Western for the fall 2006 semester.

what life’s like

Jared M. Holder/Herald (Top left) Western dance students dance to the “Cell Block Tango” from the musical “Chicago” on Sunday afternoon at Gordon Wilson Hall Theatre. The concert, called “The Autumn Dance Project,” was organized and choreographed by students. Jordan Pendley/Herald (Top right) Warren East Middle School student Janos Briscoe, right, challenged Louisville sophomore Alford Beck to a wrestling match on Saturday. Beck’s organization, Black Men of Western, started a semester-long program to show minority middle school students the benefits of college. Jake Stevens/Herald (Middle left) Valley Station sophomore Megan Crow and John Laux, a freshman from Melbourne, Fla., attempt to open an elevator door in Pearce-Ford Tower after being stuck for about 30 minutes. Shannon Zirkle/Herald (Middle right) Washington freshman Stephanie Mattos and Bowling Green freshman Stephen Tabor get into a snowball fight outside Helm-Cravens Library. “We just met an hour ago. Now we’re like friends forever, BFFs,” Mattos said.

99¢

Shannon Zirkle/Herald (Bottom left) Members of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity turn the back of a pickup truck into a pool. The Sig Eps drove around campus listening to Jimmy Buffet and waving to everyone.

SUPER VALUE MEAL

1am OPEN TILL

1633 US 31W Bypass West C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K


C Y M K

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: US News and World Report ranked Western as a first tier university among Universities Masters—South.

C Y M K

PAGE 15B

what dates you should know 2007-2008 ACADEMIC CALENDAR FALL SEMESTER 2007

Classes Begin Labor Day (no classes) Fall Break Second Bi-Term Begins Thanksgiving Holiday Final Examinations Commencement

WINTER TERM 2008 Classes Begin Finals

SPRING SEMESTER 2008

MLK (no classes) Classes Begin Spring Break Second Bi-Term Begins Final Examinations Commencement Weekend

Monday, August 27 Monday, September 3 Thursday and Friday, October 4-5 Wednesday, October 17 Wednesday - Friday, November 21-23 Monday - Friday, December 10-14 Saturday, December 15

Wednesday, January 2 Friday, January 18

Monday, January 21 Tuesday, January 22 Monday - Friday, March 10-14 Monday, March 17 Monday - Friday, May 5-9 Friday, Saturday, May 9-10

SUMMER TERM 2008 May Session

Classes Begin Memorial Day (no classes) Final Examinations

First 5-Week Session

Classes Begin 3-Week Course Final Examinations Independence Day (no classes)

Second 5-Week Session

Classes Begin 3-Week Course Final Examinations

C Y

Monday, May 12 Monday, May 26 Friday, May 30

Monday, June 2 Monday, June 16 - Thursday, July 3 Thursday, July 3 Friday, July 4

Monday, July 7 Monday, July 7 - Friday, July 25 Thursday, August 7

C Y

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y


C Y M K

C Y M K

PAGE 16B

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

QUICK HIT: The highest degree Western offers in a Cooperative Doctoral.

C Y M K

C Y M K

CYAN MEGENTA YELLOW BLACK

C Y M K

SUMMER 2007

C Y M K

2008-2d-4  

2008 CNBAM Awards

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you