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Virtual Environments (ENVS 10008) Module Two: Design - Week 6 Catherine Mei Min Woo 562729 Semester 2/2012 Group 13


Module 1: Natural Process: Death “Death” Occurs when a living organism/cell permanently terminates the biological functions that sustain the living organism The process whereby biological changes occur after reaching maturity is known as senescence/biological aging Structrual rigidity of plants reduce and cause them to appear limp/wilt due to structural changes caused by aging Humans experience the same structual changes to their bone and muscle structure

Figure 1.1

When an organism dies and lose structural control, gravity pulls them towards the earths surface, forcing cantelivering organisms to ‘bend’ downwards

Figure 1.2

Figure 2.1

Figure 2.2 Figure 1.1-1.2: Diagram of a wilting plant and the curvature that is found to exist in the organisms death, which is also seen in Figure 2.1-2.3: whereby the same pattern exists in other organisms eg. Humans.

Figure 2.3


Module 1: Natural Process: Death “Death� The curvature of dead/dying organisms is the primary structure that makes up the design by this theme The basic composition of the structure would focus on capturing the curvature of a dead/dying organism The pattern is further derived from dead/ dying organisms through the analysis of decomposition of organic matter Principles of paneling suggest creating seemingly random patterns through a systematic process, may be able to successfully translate the desired pattern onto the design

Figure 1.1

Precidents include decaying organic matter as well as facade mesh/screen patterns found in contemporary architecture in locations such as Pittsburgh

Figure 1.2

Figure 2.1

Figure 2.2 Figure 1.1-1.2: Images of existing architectural structures that make use of patterns Figure 2.1-2.3: further examples of decaying organisms and the patterns created

Figure 2.3


Module 1: Natural Process: Death Headpiece Inspired by the psychological ties connected to the process of death and the physical curvature of dead/dying organisms Death can be precieved as a looming shadow and unavoidable, hence ominous and threatening

Figure 3.1 Figure 3.1: Illustrates the difference in psychological perception towards the process of death. Both are contrasting as one can be considered a “looming/ominous” event that is physically represented as a shadow whereas it can also be uplifting and bright, like a lantern

The idea of shadows brings about interesting pattern centric possibilities for shadowing of the headpiece Death can also be precieved as the last stage of mortal enlightenment, hence ties into the lantern concept By adapting the curvature to the headpiece, traditional headpieces eg. hats can be reinterpreted into more elaborate deisgns and patterns for this task

Figure 5.1

Figure 4.1 Figure 4.1: indicates how the curvature can be reinterpreted as a “looming” or cantelivering structure, which allows the posibilitiy of creating “looming shadows” to tie in with the theme while creating opportunities for pattern implication

Figure 5.2

Figure 5.3

Figure 5.1-5.3: Examples of how the curvature can be adapted into the headpiece as inspired from the headpieces as pictured on the left


Trial 1 Death The tehnique used for contouring the model is known as tracing non-parallel sectional slices. This technique is useful for non-parallel sections, such as the proposed model for the lantern. However, this technique failed due to several factors: The countours were outlined cut cut inappropriately in relation to the irregular shape of the model, hence the incompatible geometry caused the translation into Rhino unsuccessful. The reference images for tracing were also inappropriate due to incorrcet contouring Inappropriate contouring caused the model to lose its shape and resulting in the rendering of the unique curvature to be inaccurate.

Attempt of sectioning/ contouring the model from the bottom up. Sections have beel laid out according to their position as they would be placed as a complete model


Trial 2 Death The tehnique used for contouring the model is known as tracing profile curves. This technique is useful for translating curvature of the modeled image into Rhino. Partial rendering of the model with this technique was successful. However, this technique failed due to several factors: Tracing of the profile curves proved challenging as the imgaes were in 2D. In the attempt to create 3D surfaces, estimation based on the reference images alone proved difficult and hence, resulting in the deformed nature of the curvatures. Inappropriate contouring caused the model to lose its shape and resulting in the rendering of the unique curvature to be inaccurate.

Attempted sectioning of the model to build the key components separately. The model has been divided into the left flank, top flank and right flank in purple, red and blue respectively.


Trial 2 Death

Left flank

Top flank and Spine

Right flank

Individual process diagrams of the construction of each separate components of the model. The left and right flanks (Left) constructed separately based on tracing methods, while the upper flank and spine (Right) constructed together based on tracing methods.


Paper Prototypes Headpiece

Death

Wire mesh prototype

Paper prototype: simplified for panelling


Design Alternatives Headpiece

Death

Design 1: Sketches and clay model

Design 2: Inspired by previously proposed design, and intergrated into the second design


Trial 3 Death The tehnique used for contouring the model is known as tracing non-sectional curves. This technique is useful for translating unique curvature of the modeled image into Rhino. Translation of the model with this technique was successful. However, this technique met with some difficulties: Joining points at a common point (eg, end point of the curvature) Lofting proved to be complicated, as the contours were not even and hence caused irregularities. Inappropriate contouring caused the model to lose its shape and resulting in the rendering of the unique curvature to be inaccurate.

Attempted sectioning of the model to build the key components separately. The model has been divided into the left flank, top flank and right flank in purple, red and blue respectively.


Trial 3 Death

Rendered model as seen from orthographic views. The models are contrasted with white and black backgrounds respectively for varied emphaiss of curvature and structure under different circumstances.


Trial 3 Death

Perspective views of the rendered model. The models are contrasted with white and black backgrounds respectively for varied emphaiss of curvature and structure under different circumstances.


Trial 3 Death

Different densities of panelling as seen white and black backgrounds respectively for varied emphaiss of curvature and structure under different circumstances.


Reflection Death Theories presented through the lectures and readings such as the lecture delivered by Alex Selenitsch about form and matter was very engaging, as he focused on the importance of composition, the idea of form and matter, as well as how to combine existing elements to create something new.  The reading by Scheurer and Stehling (2011) was more inclined towards exploring the relationship between mathematics and computation, and the process and break down of how computational programs can be used to materialize design. The key difference between ‘abstraction’ and ‘reduction’ is that ‘abstraction’ is a more complex process of simplifying an object, whereas ‘reduction’ is the more direct/clear cut removal of access/anomalies. In relation to the Poling reading, this is a more detailed and rigid break down of how to go about simplifying designs. ‘Parameter space’ influences the design in terms of flexibility, if well defined, the computer can generate successful manifestations, whereas because of imposing limits, it also hinders the ability of the designers to expand the design. Understanding the methods of which such computer programs operate can prove to be extremely useful tools in designing and logically materializing the lanterns, as well as using different methods, as stated by Selenitch in the lecture, of organizing and creating compositions to formulate good designs for the lantern. Upon reflecting the importance of material and computation in the design of structures, Fleischmann et al. (2012) approached design derived from the principles of the marriage of these two seemingly separate concepts of computerization from week 3, composition in Week 4, and how they combine to become an entirely separate entity that embodies all 3 of these aspects of (cont.)


Reflection Death (cont.) design. The key idea expressed through the lecture and the reading is the union of the aspects of form, material, and structure to create something that is derived from its essence, which is its behavior. This relationship in regards to materials can be derived from both natural and built forms. An example of natural forms would be vegetation, which are comprised of various cells which serve different functions based on their physical and chemical make up. Such material influences the function of the subject, eg, green leaves consisting of chlorophyl (green pigment) and varying exposed surface areas serve as light absorption sites for photosynthesis to take place and synthesize nutrients, whereas brown barks consist of dead cells and build up in layers to provide structural support for the subject. In built forms, the composition of the material directly effects it’s attributes, eg. timber, which is more malleable compared to steel. The significance of this weeks focus was to draw different perspectives from looking at the same thing, which has become a driving force for the design process of the lantern. The only complication is mastering the technology given to fully utilize as a tool. Therefore, through the understanding of the significance of these concepts has drawn emphasis from abstract design to physical materialization of the model, and hence driven further interaction and practice towards mastering Rhino as a tool for this process to go through.


Virtual Environments Module 2: Week 6