{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

School of Architecture Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Avenue College of Fine Arts 201 Pittsburgh, PA 15213

2019

EX-CHANGE is a year-end show and publication celebrating the work of the SoA from first year to PhD. Inaugurated in fall 2017, EX-CHANGE is an ongoing opportunity to shine new light on the SoA programs and position the work within larger questions of research and practice.

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

EX-CHANGE 2019


EX-CHANGE was a year-end exhibition organized by the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture Studio Committee on May 6–7, 2019. Stephen R. Lee, SoA Professor & Head Sarah Rafson, Editor Stefan Gruber, Curatorial Concept & Exhibition Design Sarah Rafson & Akhil Badjatia, Co-Directors Denise Mieskowski, Development Maddi Johnson, Curatorial Assistant Juan Aranda, Design Assistant Lukas Hermann, Web Design Assistant Ilana Curtis/Point Line Projects, Project Assistant Photography: Jai Sawkar, Lake Lewis, and Joanne Chui Meredith Marsh, Marketing & Communications Manager Kristen Frambes, Director, Alumni & Professional Relationships David Koltas, Business Manager & Assistant Head Erica Oman, Academic Advisor Darlene Covington-Davis, Graduate Program Coordinator Robert J. Armitage, Computing Administrator Brian Staley, IT & Media Center Associate EX-CHANGE Crew: Mariana Alberola, Aadya Bhartia, Angela Castellano, Madeline Cotton, Fallon Creech, Takumi Davis, Veronica Hernandez Garrido, Yuxin Huang, Anjali Kanodia, Vishaka Nayak, Mohammed Rahman, Yashwitha Maram Reddy, Steven Sontag, Louis Suarez, Ellen Zhu

i

2019 EX-CHANGE Editorial Fellows: Cassandra Howard & Christoph Eckrich Dedicated to the students who follow. We hope you take this platform to new and interesting places. We would like to thank the many people who have made this publication possible. First and foremost, the students, faculty and staff who contributed time, effort and (some) tears to the EX-CHANGE 2019 year-end exhibition and celebration. EX-CHANGE would not be possible without the support of our sponsors: Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, DesignGroup, Front Studio and GBBN. We’d like to particularly thank Meredith Marsh and Erica Oman for their help gathering and collating information. A huge thank you to Dave Koltas, Diana Martin, Brian Staley, Bob Armitage and Kristen Frambes for their help with the publication and the exhibition. A warm thank you also to Ilana Curtis, Natasha Tabachnikoff and Point Line Projects for allowing us to use their office, and occasionally their time. The summer editorial team would like to thank to the large and fantastic spring 2019 curatorial team, driven by a concept developed by Stefan Gruber and expertly implemented by Akhil Badjatia. A considerable thank you goes out to Sarah Rafson whose guidance has been instrumental in both endeavors. And to Stephen Lee, without whose continued support and encouragement this project would not exist.


1


EX-CHANGE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 2019


CONTENTS 6

EDITORIAL NOTE Christoph Eckrich & Cassandra Howard

8 INTRODUCTION Mary-Lou Arscott 10

REFLECTIONS FROM THE HEAD Stephen R. Lee

14

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch) Bachelor of Arts in Architecture (B.A.)

CORE STUDIOS 16 Foundation I: Critical Cyborg 22 Foundation II 30 Elaboration I: Grow Collective 36 Elaboration II 44 Integration I: Environment, Form and Feedback 50 Integration II: Advanced Construction Studio

ADVANCED SYNTHESIS OPTION STUDIOS 60 High_Rise: “Untitled” 2018 64 SOLID: The Rise of Timber? 68 Density+Complexity: Sustainable Megastructure 72 Re-Purposing Architecture: Standard Underground Cable Co. 76 Freespace: Serving Humanity 80 DE_CONSTRUCTING BLIGHT 84 RE_CONSTRUCTING AUTHENTICITY 88 BrainHub: Harnessing the Technology that Helps the World Explore Brain and Behavior 92 Low-Relief: The Virtual and Material Cultures of Architectural Deceit 96 Acupuncture Urbanism: Urban Collaboratory Studio 100 Identity & Making: The American Mashup 104 Line, Plane, Volume & Time: FourDimensional Architecture—World Trade Center Performing Arts Center


108

112 120

Birth Rights: Connecting the Built Environment to Maternal and Infant Care in Vulnerable Populations in Pittsburgh Thesis & Independent Projects

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 122 Master of Architecture (M.Arch) 128 Master of Urban Design (MUD) 140 Master of Advanced Architectural Design (MAAD) 142 M.S. & PhD in Computational Design (MSCD/PhD-CD) 146 Master of Science in Sustainable Design (MSSD) 150 M.S. & PhD in Building Performance & Diagnostics (MSBPD/PhD-BPD) 156 M.S. & PhD in Architecture– Engineering–Construction Management (MSAECM/PhD-AECM)

162

BEYOND THE STUDIO

180

LECTURE SERIES

182

2018–19 NEWS

196

CURATORIAL NOTE Stefan Gruber

198 CREDITS

EX-CHANGE, May 4–5, 2019


EDITORIAL NOTE CASSANDRA HOWARD & CHRISTOPH ECKRICH 2018–19 EX-CHANGE EDITORIAL FELLOWS & B.ARCH 2021

The crux of nesting the School of Architecture within a prestigious College of Fine Arts—itself operating inside a high-powered research university—is that on any given day, there is too wide a range of production for any one person to take stock of it all. From deep and profound studio projects, to insightful essays, delicate building details and awe-inspiring interactive media installations, at the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) School of Architecture (SoA) it is a recurring challenge for students, faculty and staff to see more than a slice of the fearless invention and speculation happening simultaneously. In May 2019, the third iteration of the EX-CHANGE year-end show was another attempt to aggregate and present the breadth and depth of work produced over the past year. As a new tradition at the SoA, the exhibition and publication are still works in progress, changing and evolving every year. This year, the curatorial team took a two-pronged approach to the predicament. The faculty-led team produced a highly curated exhibit to draw people in, which they coupled with a more extensive student-produced publication. In tandem, these initiatives have sought to reveal as much of the inventive work bubbling out of our school to as wide an audience as possible. In this third EX-CHANGE publication we have more than doubled the page count of the previous edition, and even so we have only been able to include a fraction of what we would have liked. The painstaking process of selecting work fell largely on the shoulders of faculty, and we are extremely grateful for their care and attention. We are proud of the collective effort the publication brings to light.

6

This is the first time the responsibility of editing EX-CHANGE has been entrusted to students. The two of us have just finished our sixth semester and, inspired by the efforts of our peers, we are excited to head into the Advanced Synthesis Option Studios (ASOS) curriculum this fall. We are extremely grateful to the school for the opportunity, quite anxious about navigating through uncharted territory and particularly excited to pave the way for others to follow. Giving students the agency to promote their own institution is vital to an authentic result. We’ve quickly been learning all the accoutrements of editing a publication, and growing our appreciation for all our fellow students have accomplished throughout the year. Despite the many changes underway, we hope this issue of EXCHANGE marks the start of a mutually beneficial tradition, fostering a discourse and interchange between the student body, faculty and staff. The 2018-19 school year also marks the onset of a period of great change at the SoA. We are excited to welcome the influx of new minds and talents, saddened by the departure of seasoned and experienced faculty and on the edge of our seats as the search for a new Head of School churns into motion. These reminiscences, conversations and writings have been a joy for us to collect—we hope you glean just as much from reading them. We envision this publication as a means to reflect on what was, and as a springboard to speculate about what can be. It is meant to encapsulate both the production of the school this year and articulate its driving ethos in one cohesive package. This publication has the capacity to inspire both members of the SoA community and any casual reader flipping through its pages. We hope you take some meaningful reflection away, or at least spend a while looking at the pretty pictures.


INTRODUCTION MARY-LOU ARSCOTT STUDIO PROFESSOR & ASSOCIATE HEAD

The 2018-19 academic year at the SoA played out against an unbelievable world. Trade wars waged on and off at whim, U.S. sanctions proved murderous for whole nations and just around the corner in Squirrel Hill, violence found its way into sacred space at the Tree of Life synagogue. Crisis in Venezuela followed Iraq as a human tragedy, while wealth became ever more concentrated worldwide. Climate change accelerated, destabilizing all forms of life. Ever-fewer organisms have access to clean air, water and shelter. Human rights continue to be threatened as we’re increasingly constrained from demonstrating peacefully, performing religious practices, identifying with our chosen gender or sexuality and from establishing chosen family structures. What has all this to do with architectural education? Everything. The privilege of practicing architecture brings with it the responsibility of bearing witness to the interests of all terrestrial beings. At CMU, we are in a rare place of privilege. We are fortunate to have Spike Wolff construct a highly critical lecture series each semester. In October we heard Eyal Weizman describe in uncomfortable detail the crimes and injustices the Forensic Architecture studio uses the tools of our profession to solve. As a profession, architecture is often called upon to build bunkers for the powerful. Beatriz Colomina’s 1991 essay, “Domesticity at War,” brilliantly analyzed the significance of 1960’s fallout shelters. As part of the lecture series this fall, she challenged us with ideas from her book co-authored with Mark Wigley, Are We Human?: Notes on an Archaeology of Design. It wasn’t only the lecture series that offered a breadth of voices from around the world to Pittsburgh. The serendipity of Pittsburgh serving as the location for the 107th Annual Meeting of the Associate Collegiate Schools of Architecture combined with perceptive insights of its 8

organizing committee—SoA faculty Jeremy Ficca along with Grace La and Amy Kulper—challenged and provoked the SoA through wide-ranging critical conversations in the conference sessions, an exquisite exhibition designed by Ficca and inspiring lectures by Toshiki Mori and Pritzker Prize-winning Chinese architects Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu. It is not insignificant that this cornucopia is the background against which our creative work is registered. It is evident across each of the SoA research centers, studios and seminars that work is emerging with an insatiable curiosity. Whilst feeling convinced of one set of ideas we need to both share those ideas and try to understand differing perspectives. The efforts of the inter·punct collective are key to this intersectional attitude, and reinforced by insightful, informal and intimate Back2Front discussions that invite students and faculty to analyse lectures. There is a broad network of ideas embodied in the SoA educational framework where we enact, instruct and propose a synthetic preparation for architectural practice in a shifting profession. In May, EX-CHANGE was a strategic gathering of evidence of this approach, promoting dialogue between many methodologies. The organizers of this exhibition, Sarah Rafson, Akhil Badjatia and Stefan Gruber brought together work from across the school in a model city, cinematheque and drawings. The breadth of work was startling. My perspective was grounded in the experimental work arising from the new fall 2018 first year syllabus I taught for the first time. My students’ structures that supported colonies of fragile creatures found resonance with the intricate systems drawings of bio-mediating forms by third-year undergraduate students in Dana Cupkova’s Environment, Form and Feedback, and found depth in the wool-clad exercise that emerged from Annie Rantilla’s Birth Rights Advanced Synthesis Option Studio. In each studio on view in the EX-CHANGE exhibition and reproduced in this publication I see risks being taken, design in service of a profound questioning, each producing lyrical results. Conflict and conversation are necessarily enacted together. Our discipline and schools of architecture are vital stages for these performances. We have to recognize that to nurture new ideas we need to build a culture that supports a safe space for experimentation and for rigorous critique. Students, faculty and friends, take note and be curious about the activities in the next room and pages that follow.


9


REFLECTIONS FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL STEPHEN R. LEE PROFESSOR & HEAD OF SCHOOL

IN CONVERSATION WITH CASSANDRA HOWARD & CHRISTOPH ECKRICH

The Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture was established more than 115 years ago, and Stephen Lee has been a driving force in shaping its trajectory. He is a LEED-accredited professional and provides sustainable design consulting services for institutional and commercial clients in Europe, Asia, Canada and the United States, and co-founder/partner emeritus at TAI + LEE, Architects PC in Pittsburgh. As he looks towards his 12th and final year as head of school—making his one of the longest terms in the school’s history— Lee reflects on the global, pedagogical and architectural shifts the SoA has seen over the last 50 years.

You’ve been a part of this institution for an impressive amount of time. What was the school was like when you began as a student?

In 1971, Postmodernism was just picking up speed, but the schools were really slow to catch up. Most schools had a completely dogmatic modernist approach, and ours was no different. My wife and business partner Yoko Tai started her B.Arch in 1968, and I started in ‘71. We both graduated from Carnegie Mellon, although Yoko began at Carnegie Institute of Technology before the merger with the Mellon Institute. Yoko’s class had a lot of battles with the department head at the time, a dogmatic modernist, Paul Schweikher. The students

10

protested Schweikher, as he wasn’t listening to their needs. Delbert Highlands was selected as the new department head. I have always thought of him as a mystic. Students split into two camps around Delbert—many (like me) idolized him and the others despised him—there was no middle ground. He would come in everyday to our first year lectures in Doherty Hall 2315 with those big slate tables, wearing the exact same clothes: a blue chambray shirt, brown knitted tie, khaki pants and desert boots. He would look at everybody, not say a word, and then take out a pack of unfiltered Pall Mall cigarettes. He would pound them down for five minutes, unwrap the foil, take one out, look at it, put it in his mouth, take an Ohio Blue Tip Strike Anywhere match, strike it on the inside of the slate table and cup it. The sulfur would burn off and go straight into his eyes, and it would take at least five minutes of blinking to clear them out before he could start the lecture. I went to see Delbert in January 1972, because he gave me a D in my very first studio. I said, “Hey, I’ve never gotten a grade below an A in my life, what’s the deal?” He responded, “I didn’t fail you, did I?” Delbert would never say, “You should keep going,” so that was as close to a sign as I would get. Out of the 64 of us that started, I was one of seven that graduated in four years. What I learned from my time with Delbert as a student and as a colleague was the importance of people, place and time in creating architecture. During my time as a student, Delbert hired Jorge Silvetti and Rodolfo Machado, who went on after CMU to create their celebrated firm in Cambridge, Mass. For me, it was an amazing time at the SoA because we had a mix of local practitioners, energy efficiency advocates, early computational design researchers and emerging talents like Machado and Silvetti. My mentor, Volker Hartkopf, gave me multiple opportunities to embrace an international outlook—building ice houses in January 1973 in Fargo, ND (Fargo wasn’t international but it might as well have been), living with his parents so I could work in a small architectural practice in Stuttgart, building refugee structures in Guatemala, competing in the UIA World Student Competition in Madrid and demonstrating our approach to refugee housing at the UN World Conference on Human Habitation in Vancouver. My UIA competition partner, John Whitney, and I won the UIA prize of the Soviet Union and traveled through the USSR for three weeks with our tour (KGB) guide from Moscow to Leningrad to Kiev and all the way east to Tashkent and Samarkand on the historic Silk Road. The


highlight of the UN World Conference on Human Habitation was spending quality time with Bucky Fuller. Everyone there was an acolyte of his, constantly surrounding him, asking if he would come to see their work.

You had lots of experience abroad. Has international study always been a focus of the school, or were you an exception as a student?

In the 1970s, Carnegie Mellon was a regional school. The adjunct faculty were mostly local architects, and most of the tenured faculty when I started were also local architects. Delbert started the trajectory of making the school more international through strategic faculty hires. In the undergraduate program there were no international students. It was all people from the region or at furthest Metropolitan New York. I think there were three of us from Buffalo in a class of 60. I’ve been particularly interested in finding every possible way as department head that we can become more international in our outlook. In 2014, Yoko and I created the Global Studio Fund to find a way to support travel for our students and faculty to different parts of the world in a studio context. The world no longer starts and ends in Western Pennsylvania; if we don’t expose our students to an international outlook in meaningful ways, I think we’re doing them a real disservice. One of the reasons I chose Carnegie Mellon as a highschool student was that it was the only four-year Bachelor of Architecture program in the United States. I finished my first year and then the NAAB review happened and said what the school was doing was impossible. Delbert, the mystic, was not willing to give up on this four-year idea, so they instituted something called “level review.” There were four levels to complete your degree; a level could take as little as one semester or as many as five semesters to complete. When you felt you had completed all the learning objectives for a level, you would apply to the next level and the professors would review your work—they would admit you, or not.

Have you witnessed any significant pedagogical shifts in your time at the SoA?

After many years the school realized that they couldn’t, in all sincerity, advertise a four-year

program if only a fraction of people got through in that time frame, so the five-year curriculum was reintroduced. When Ömer Akin became head in 1981, the ten-studio sequence was formalized: form, space, composition, materials, site, structures, occupancy, systems integration, urban lab and then whatever you wanted for the tenth semester. The rigidity of this fixed ten-semester studio sequence did not align with the careers in which I saw our graduates engage. When I became department head, it took me more than three years to break through the inertia and convince members of the faculty that people graduating with an architecture degree are not all going to sit in an architecture office all day and design buildings. A studio-based education builds design-thinking skills that can be applied in multiple career opportunities. Eventually, these conversations led to the creation of the three-plus-two curriculum—Core Six + Advanced Synthesis Option Studios. It was an excellent new design challenge for me. If you can get an M.Arch degree with three years of design, why not do a three-year B.Arch degree, and then once you’ve completed the six core studios, you can go on and pursue whatever you’d like. If students find something they’re interested in, they can go further in depth or just spread the deck and take on things that interest them more broadly. I think this curriculum is perfectly suited to our school because we sit in such a multifaceted university that excels in so many different areas. The idea of creating this system was to provide students with a degree of determinism and a path that they would want to follow. Also, when I started as head, seven of the ten fixed studios were coordinated by adjuncts. Today, because of our new hires and the creation of the studio professor positions, everyone coordinating the Core Six studios are full-time faculty and a majority of the options studios are taught by full time faculty. I’m really proud to have figured out the financial puzzle to make sure that the school can hire people with a mutual understanding of a long-term commitment.

How has the school’s attitude towards design shifted since you were a student?

We have always been a “formfinding,” rather than “form-making” school. We’re very analytical in our approach to design, we look at shaping forces—gravity, ecology, context, human needs, etc.—as a way of creating a design proposal to 11


meet a particular need. We don’t design buildings as formal images and try to fit the uses as an afterthought. My priority in faculty hiring was the degree to which a candidate fundamentally understood our positioning on this. Technology has changed things as well. People that know how to use computational tools often have no clue about how to put a building together. Offices constantly struggle between hiring someone fresh out of school that has experience with these tools but doesn’t understand tectonics, or hiring an older candidate and hoping they can understand the potential of the tools and connect with the younger generation. The biggest challenge for the new head is figuring out how to make the connections for students between computational tools and building technologies.

Your last year as head coincides with the retirement of several faculty members. What does the future trajectory of the school look like at this pivotal moment?

I want the newest faculty members (the future of the school) to take control of the place. Probably my proudest accomplishment is the amazing faculty we’ve hired during my tenure as head. These are really talented people that respect the legacy of the school but have their own distinct ideas. My style of management, just like running the studio, is to put a structure in place and coordinate, but allow everybody to pursue their own directions. They should have the biggest voice in selecting the new head, they’re going to be here for another 40 years. When my appointment as head is over I’ll return to the ranks of tenured faculty. I need to reinvent what I want to do, so I’m re-engaging with the design-build program this fall despite still being head, to get that ball rolling. I’m trying to keep a completely open mind about what direction the school takes and not prejudice the process. I think people have really taken to the idea that the three focuses of the SoA are cities, computation, and sustainability. The hires that I’ve been making are not intended to be in any one of those silos, but are rather intended to to work collaboratively bringing their individual strengths to the table to build synergy in all our design and research activities.

12

My real hope for the next department head is that they will have that same commitment to design studios. Yes, you need to bring a specialty along if you want to get tenured or do major research, but your first and foremost focus is on studio. It all works from there.

How did EX-CHANGE come about, and what are your hopes for what it might become?

Since time immemorial we’ve been trying to figure out a way to turn the end of the semester into a celebration so students don’t walk away after critiques saying “Argh, that was a terrible experience!” However, we also rely heavily on final reviews to do our grading. It became clear to me that trying to mix those two is inappropriate. How could we structure a dual purpose event to mark the end of the semester? I had one successful attempt in the past that informed my thinking for EX-CHANGE. In spring 2011, the Advanced Construction Studio had the privilege of a visiting professor from Giessen, Germany named Nicholas Zieske. His project was a cultural point at the Carrie Furnace. At the end of the semester, we created a public show in the Pump House at the Waterfront and invited faculty, students, and citizens from the Mon Valley. Prior to the show, we did our reviews thirty feet below the river, it was really scary to be down there; dark, damp, hoping these walls could hold back the river. Every student got two boards of four-by-eight pink XPS foam. One was to contain the narrative about the studio project, the other displayed the plans, wall sections and technical details about each project. This was one way of doing it; in the final submission requirements we had one board that told the story of the project and one that was technical. The idea was we could then use the narrative portion to directly translate the studio into an exhibit. EX-CHANGE came out of the same fundamental desire to have a party that the students didn’t have to stress about, unless you were hired as part of the curatorial team. We’re thinking about merging it with the thesis show in the future, perhaps taking some weight off their shoulders as well. My one criticism is this: I know it was part of the intent this year to keep the exhibition lean, spare and elegant. Let’s make it bigger!


Above: Lee (second from right) testing a bamboo space frame for refugee housing in Bangladesh as a B.Arch thesis student. Shown with classmates Steve Kurpiewski, Rich Behr, Bruce Cohen and Victor Schwartz. Right: Lee speaking in 2019 as head of school.

13


CORE STUDIOS


FOUNDATION I CRITICAL CYBORG This course introduces modes of architectural thinking, methods of work and scales of operation. The studio aims to develop a critical practice which considers materiality, virtuality, time and space. The studio acts in a rhizomic manner, forming interlocking groups to expand creative cross-connections between students. In this way, the studio develops its own language and shares a set of discoveries both conceptual and material. The courses Architecture in the Arts, Digital Media and Analogue Media were integrated with studio. Each contributed towards the intellectual framework of the semester. Woodshop skills were taught during studio time. The focus for the Critical Cyborg studio was Carrie Furnace in Rankin, Pa., which acted as inspiration, prompt and design location for an assignment asking students to design a prosthetic for two bodies. Each project had a different time register, scale and primary material. All projects used the lens of time to examine forces of spatial transformation. STUDENTS Aadya Bhartia, Yael Canaan, Angela Castellano, Bradley Castiglia, Emily Chan, Max Chen, Qiushi Chen, Sean Chen, Thomas Chen, James Choi, Seyoung Choo, Nicholas Coppula, Madeline Cotton, Zach Fan, Jason Garwood, Giulia Giampapa, Margeaux Gould, Amal Jafrani, Vivian JiaJia, Xiaoyu Kang, Anjali Kanodia, Rachel Kim, Susie Kim, Mari Kubota, Jackson Lacey, June Lee, Lake Lewis, Taehyun Lim, Melinda Looney, Carson Michaelis, Katherine Peppas, Meghan Pisarcik, Andy Qiu, Lydia Randall, Amyas Ryan, Ankitha Vasudev, Natalie Waldram, Jenny Wang, Nicholas Wong, Xuyang Wu, Claire Xu, Robert Yang, Yi Yang, Yizhu Yang, Zongtian Yang, Franklin Zhu, Xiaojie Zou

16

INSTRUCTORS Coordinator Mary-Lou Arscott Instructors Akhil Badjatia Talia Perry Leo Liu Sarah Rafson Manuel Rodriguez Shop Director Jon Holmes Programs B.A. B.Arch


Melinda Looney + Jason Garwood

Cody Chen + Andy Qiu

Zach Fan + James Choi

Rachel Kim + Taeyun Lim

Thomas Chen Rachel Kim

17


Student Name

18

Lake Lewis + Amyas Ryan


Meghan Pisarcik

The Affluence has existed since the conception of life on Earth, some 3.8 billion years ago. Consequently, they are highly in-tune to the ecosystem in which they inhabit. Their primary purpose in life is to herd and guard the rivers, tributaries and streams of the Earth. When it comes to consumption, Affluences do not eat, they only drink every few weeks from the waterways they guard. Affluences are asexual beings who can only produce offspring once in their lifetime. To reproduce, the Affluence must make the pilgrimage to the origin of a river. As a result, many Affluences are born in the mountains and glaciers amongst the young rivers. Once reaching the river’s head, the Affluence spends a decade absorbing the freshly melted streams until they consume enough to produce a copy of themselves. Affluences’ appearances can vary greatly depending on the area they inhabit and the nature of the waterway they patrol. Accordingly, the largest known Affluences are ancient specimens spotted traversing rivers such as the Amazon, the Nile, the Yangtze and the Mississippi. They were once considered immortal, however since the outset of human life on the planet, the Affluence has been known to die of illness or grief. Starting in the mid-eighteenth century, coinciding with the Industrial Revolution, a man-made disease known as Effluence began to perpetrate the population of Affluences. Since then, it has taken a devastating toll on the population; there are only an estimated 50 Affluences left in the wild. Affluences contract Effluence when they consume a high level of pollution. Once contracted, Effluence is fatal. In recent years, infected Affluences attempt to reach the nearest ocean, presumably as a final resting place, though many perish during the journey. Some Affluences die of grief over the destruction of their waters before contracting the disease. Meghan Pisarcik

Top left to bottom right; Andy Qiu, Cody Chen, Natalie Waldron, Nick Coppola, Jerry Yang, Zach Fen, Carson Michaelis, Lesley Yan, Rachel Kim, Thomas Chen, Vivian Jia.

Meghan Pisarcik

19


fly

w

g

critical cyborg

The final assignment of the semester involved the design of an urban habitat for a colony of creatures: bat, bee, butterfly, crow, frog, pigeon, puffin, silkworm, squirrel or swallow. Each arcology was parasitically supported by an existing structure in a city. Teams of five students became experts in each creature, researching the life cycle, biology, behavior, climate and symbiotic relationships of their species. The structures they proposed were critiqued based on their ingenuity and potential to comment, disrupt and integrate into a human-dominated realm. Students composed fictitious texts from the subjectivity of a creature in their colony. (See examples for the Mourning Cloak Butterfly on p. 17.) Above: icon drawings tabulated for each group in rows. From top: BAT (Aadya Bhartia, James Choi, Jason Garwood, Tony Yang, Seyoung Choo), BEE (Angela Castellano, Cody Chen, Anjali, Kanodia, Lydia Randall, Jerry Yang), BUTTERFLY (Lesley Yang, Claire Xu, Nicholas Wong, Franklin Zhu, Amyas Ryan), CROW (Bradley Catiglia, Xiaojie Zou, Madeline Cotton, Andy Qiu, Suzie Kim) and FROG (Margaux Gould, Larry Yang, Vivian Jia, Jackson Lacey).

20


4.4 critical cyborg

p

Franklin Zhu

We woke when the first ray of sunlight pierced through the narrow fringes of the

walls. It’s a new day, but not a new life. Countless time, we fly around within the We woke when the first ray of sunlight pierced through the narrow fringes of the walls. It’s a space, exploiting our constrained territory. It’s an endless cycle of life and death new day, but not a new life. Forwithin the countless wetyrants flew ofaround the space, exploiting the walls. Wetime, are the this land,within the prisoners of this chamber. our constrained territory. It’s an Everything endless cycle life and death withinWell, the mostly walls.everything. We are the remainsofconstant within this space. We circle around the strange, foreign beingremains who tried constant to reach us.within The air this shifted. tyrants of this land, the prisoners of this chamber. Everything became ecstatic. The the space was lively.foreign We foresaw future. It’s only space. Well, mostly everything.We We circled around strange, beingthewho tried to a matter of time.ecstatic. With an unintentional slipwas and an ear-piercing scream, reach up to us. The air shifted. We became The space lively. Because wewe stared heartlessly as the man fell into the abyss. Our silent and crazy giggling foresaw the future. It’s only a matter of time. With an unintentional slip and an ear-piercing resounded in the space. “Pity, today’s show ended quickly,” we thought as we scream, we stared heartlessly as the fell into the abyss. OurClaire silentXuand crazy flutteredman and waited patiently for the next. (Carson City,giggling CA) resounded in the space. “Pity, today’s show ended quickly,” we thought as we fluttered and I am a Xu, caterpillar. I act on instinct have no thoughts other than survival. waited patiently for the next. Claire (Carson City, CA,and USA)

Leaves taste good. Lots of branches. Ample space for cocooning. I’m in a glass box with well-ventilated air and I’m writhing around with a couple dozen of my I am a caterpillar. I act on instinct and have no thoughts other than survival. Leaves taste siblings. Humans occasionally check up on us, replace leaves, branches and good. Lots of branches. Ample space I’m inof the a glass with well-ventilated whatnot,for andcocooning. clean the surfaces boxes box periodically. When I turn into aair and I’m writhing around with a couple of myaround siblings. Humans occasionally check up I’ll on butterfly, dozen I will be flying and eating the sap that’s also inside this box. probably want to fly toclean other the boxessurfaces connectedoftothe this one (which are inaccessible us, replace leaves, branches and whatnot, and boxes periodically. caterpillars). I like myand life. There space to flyalso and climb around, When I turn into a butterfly, I willtobe flying around eatingis ample the sap that’s inside this because I reallyconnected don’t care about the space I’m in (I can in butterfly cages box. I’ll probably want to fly to other boxes to this one (which aresurvive inaccessible that are 2x2x2 feet). I don’t need to worry of dying of disease because the boxes to caterpillars). I like my life. There is ample space to fly and climb around, because I really are disinfected and I live in a controlled environment. I can’t think. My brain is the don’t care about the space I’m in survive butterfly are(Vancouver, 2x2x2 feet). I don’t size(I ofcan a grain of salt.inLife is good. cages Nicholasthat Wong BC, Canada)

collective noun - flutter

BUTTERFLY Mourning Cloak _Nymphalis antiopa

need to worry of dying of disease because the boxes are disinfected and I live in a controlled I noticeisa the cluster of those lookoflike me,Life the same wing shape and color. I environment. I can’t think. My ‘brain’ size of a that grain salt. is good. Nicholas land on the same surface as them. The surface I just landed on is noticeably Wong, (Vancouver, BC, Canada) warmer, as well as the air around the surface. The corners formed by the surfaces are excellent shelter, it will allow me to hibernate and be protected

I notice a cluster of those that look me,This thesurface sameiswing and color. land from like the cold. black,shape which reminds me of Ithe tree barks that I on the same surface as them. The surface I just landed on is noticeably warmer, asbecause well asthe use to camouflage from my prey. I have decided to hibernate here is gettingformed drastically for the pastare few excellent days. Roosting here, Iitnow the air around the surface. The air corners bycolder the surfaces shelter, willwant to go somewhere cooler. Nearby black surfaces, therewhich is a white surface allow me to hibernate and be protected from the cold. Thisthesurface is black, reminds is noticeably cooler. there, II notice cross pattern of this structure me of the tree barks that I use tothatcamouflage from Flying my preys. havethe decided to hibernate will provide an excellent method to lose my prey if I’m chased. The breeze just here because the air is getting drastically colder for the past few days. Roosting here, I carried scents of nectar and sap, the scent is strong, so the source must be now want to go somewhere cooler. Nearby theeggs black is awill white that nearby. If I lay my on asurfaces, tree nearby,there my larvae have surface a safe place to is noticeably cooler. Flying there, I notice thethey cross pattern of this will hibernate when develop. Franklin Zhustructure (Seattle, WA) provide an excellent method to lose my prey if I’m chased. The breeze just carried scents of We typically the trees our nearby. habitat, asIfthat is where we layon ouraeggs nectar and sap, the scent is strong, so theprefer source mustasbe I lay my eggs tree just below the buds of new leaves in the spring. We also feed off the flowing sap nearby, my larvae will have a safe place to hibernate when they develop. Franklin Zhu, once we come out of our winter hibernation. However, the new structure provides (Seattle, WA, USA) us more protection. We have ample space to hibernate all year, and all of the artificial branches give us places to hide, play, and escape from predators. This place is perfect for us because it is right by the park, so if we ever need to eat or lay eggs, we can fly across the street. Amyas Ryan (San Francisco, CA)

21


FOUNDATION II The study of architecture is a complicated one. What is architecture? If you ask any number of architects, each response would be different and equally appropriate. Why are the responses so different? That’s a long discussion, one that will take a lifetime to understand for those committed to mastering the “presence” of architecture.

INSTRUCTORS

The spring semester develops architectural instinct. The studio focuses on how to evaluate an architectural idea(s) through analysis, representation and application. The semester starts with a series of projects that introduce timeless compositional methods that architects consider when designing a memorable piece of architecture. These themes do not necessarily provide answers on what to do, but offer ways for a designer to start a career in architecture: how to work within it, how to build upon it, and how to critically appreciate the architectural works one is introduced to. Our advice to the young architect is to be curious, be humble, and to work hard.

Shop Director Jon Holmes

STUDENTS Aadya Bhartia, Yael Canaan, Angela Castellano, Bradley Castiglia, Emily Chan, Max Chen, Qiushi Chen, Sean Chen, Thomas Chen, James Choi, Seyoung Choo, Nicholas Coppula, Madeline Cotton, Zach Fan, Jason Garwood, Giulia Giampapa, Margeaux Gould, Amal Jafrani, Vivian JiaJia, Xiaoyu Kang, Anjali Kanodia, Rachel Kim, Susie Kim, Mari Kubota, Jackson Lacey, June Lee, Lake Lewis, Taehyun Lim, Melinda Looney, Carson Michaelis, Katherine Peppas, Meghan Pisarcik, Andy Qiu, Lydia Randall, Amyas Ryan, Ankitha Vasudev, Natalie Waldram, Jenny Wang, Nicholas Wong, Xuyang Wu, Claire Xu, Robert Yang, Yi Yang, Yizhu Yang, Zongtian Yang, Franklin Zhu, Xiaojie Zou

22

Coordinator Gerard Damiani Instructors Chris Minnerely Andrew Moss Talia Perry José Pertierra-Arrojo

Program B.A. B.Arch


Max Chen

23


COMPRESSION / RELEASE

REPETITION

A

A B

A B

B A

B A

A B

A B

B A

B A

A B

A B

A B

B A

RHYTHM

Madeline Cotton

24


Jackson Lacey

25


Original Planes

Anti-Frontalism

A balanced relationship of unequal parts

Final Design

Planes can be pushed into the infinite A balanced relastionship of unequal parts

Franklin Zhu

In contrast with frontalism, born out of a static conception of life, the new architecture will reach a great richness by developing in and time.

Meghan Pisarcik

0’

Instead of symmetry, the new architecture proposed: The new architecture

2’

4’

8’

Colour is one of the means to render visible the harmony of the different architectural parts...He organizes aesthetically

Franklin Zhu

26


Nicholas Coppula

Angela Castellano

27


Max Chen / 62.123 DIGITAL MEDIA II / ASSIGNMENT 1 - 4 Chiaroscuro Chamber

4

Main View of Room

5

4

A A DYA B H A R T

62.123 DIGITAL MEDIA II / ASSIGNMENT 3. GENERAT

Additional coursework by first-year B.A. and B.Arch students. Digital Media I, F18, Eddy Man Kim (1); Drawing I, F18, Douglas Cooper (2); Architecture and the Arts, F18, Kai Gutschow (3); Digital Media II, S19, Eddy Man Kim (4); Drawing II, S19, Douglas Cooper (5) 1.Final Design Variations / 2.Perspective (Building Scale) / 3.Perspective (Furniture Scale) 28

4


ANDY QIU 62.123 DIGITAL MEDIA II /

ASSIGNMENT 2. MODELING

5

1

3

NICHOLAS WONG 62.123 DIGITAL MEDIA II / ASSIGNMENT 3. GENERATION

4

Anjali Kanodia

62-122

Digital Media I

1 STYLIZED DRAWING

4

5

Nick Wong / 62.123 DIGITAL MEDIA II / ASSIGNMENT 1 - 4 Chiaroscuro Chamber Main View of Room

1 5 29


ELABORATION I

GROW COLLECTIVE Grow Collective: Architectural Interventions in Urban Agriculture is the third in a series of six core design studios that immerse students in the fundamental principles of architectural design. This studio elaborates on these architectural fundamentals by exploring spatial responses to the increased presence of urban agriculture in post-industrial cities. Grow Collective encourages students to consider how architecture participates in the ecological, infrastructural and social systems operating in our cities today. The studio explores the relationship between thinking and doing in three projects framed by four guiding themes: enclosure, systems, making and collaboration. For the first project, teams of five students design and build a hoop house for the Edible Garden at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Utilizing a highly constrained material palate, students create a functional greenhouse for a garden bed that extends the Pittsburgh growing season into the winter. Projects are developed through modeling, prototyping and construction drawings. Students build and install their final hoop houses at Phipps. The second studio project asks students to leverage architectural design to advocate for new modes of food growth, distribution and education in Pittsburgh neighborhoods. Through the design of The Grow Collective Center for Urban Agriculture, a new piece of public infrastructure that serves as a hub supporting urban gardening and farming activity in Pittsburgh, students work with an array of constraints, material affordances and client preferences to move beyond mere problem solving and consider how building and landscape interact and shape an urban neighborhood.

INSTRUCTORS Coordinator Jonathan Kline Instructors Nicolas Azel Lori Fitzgerald JosĂŠ Pertierra Brian Peters Benjamin Saks Shop Director Jon Holmes Terry Hritz Program B.A. B.Arch

Hoop House Construction

Hoop House Construction

STUDENTS Clover Chau, Amanda Cheng, Kimberlyn Cho, Joanne Chui, Aditi Dhabalia, Juhi Dhanesha, Emily Edlich, Victor Eraslan, Emma Father, Steven Fei, Isabella Giammatteo, Paul Greenway, Jenna Guo, Ammar Hassonjee, Adam He, Lukas Hermann, Veronica Hernandez Garrido, Carol Huang, Mike Jin, Grant Johnson, Paul Jung, Maia Kamenova, Sarah Kang, Elijah King, Shanice Lam, Jasmine Lee, Eric Li, Sam Losi, Xindi Lyu, Taisei Manheim, Han Meng, Hagan Miller, Vishaka Nayak, Timothy Nelson-Pyne, Jules Przybylska, Mohammed Rahman, Robert Rice, Carly Sacco, Jai Sawkar, Shariq Shah, Shaelin Spahle, Vivian Teng, Melissa Thomas, Steve Wang, Olivia Werner, Andrew Xu, Ying Yan, Clara Zhao, Ellen Zhu

30

Phipps Installation


1/2” Metal conduit

4'-00"

Plastic wrap

0'-8"

4'-00" Metal stakes

Panel 2

P 2.1

98°

P 2.1 2.40”

2.27”

B2

4.03”

P 2.4

113°

P 2.5

3.02”

4.06”

P 2.5

P 2.6

2.15”

P 2.2 P 2.3

F1

P 2.2

.

°

67

P. 2.3

90°

P26

3.06”

.

°

97

P24

Panel 4 4.70”

P 4.2

128° P 4.4

3.35”

..

90°

P 4.3

°

P45 P46

232

P 4.1

P 4.1

2.59”

3.90”

°

120

P 4.2

B4

P 4.4 2.74”

P 4.6

2.33”

F1

59°

.

P43

P 4.5

2.20”

Jai Sawkar, Vishaka Nayak, Veronica Hernendez, Carol Huang, Ellen Zhu

31


Shariq Shah

32


Paul Greenway

Emma Father

Shariq Shah

Emma Father

33


34


Paul Greenway

Ellen Zhu

Shariq Shah

35


ELABORATION II MATERIAL MATTERS This studio explores the relationship between thinking and doing. The studio relies uponcuriosity, critical thinking and discourse to explore how a materially sensitive design process elevates one’s understanding of architecture and the environment. It leverages design techniques that address questions of perception, material presence and elemental conditionsof architecture. While materiality and novel fabrication techniques serve as centerpieces of much contemporary architecture, great architecture relies upon material presence to heighten one’s awareness of their surroundings and transform the everyday into the spectacular. As part of the core studio sequence, this studio builds upon the content of previous studios and seeks to impart students with a working methodology engaged in the material reality of architecture as lived in and felt space. As such, this studio relies on the lessons of previous studios related to conceptual, technical, urban and societal issues to promote a holistic understanding of the design process in which multiple interdependent factors are simultaneously in play. Through a rigorous process of modeling and prototyping, students interrogate and explore architecture’s form, material and structure in service to a material gestalt in which the sum is greater than its parts. STUDENTS Clover Chau, Amanda Cheng, Kimberlyn Cho, Joanne Chui, Aditi Dhabalia, Juhi Dhanesha, Emily Edlich, Victor Eraslan, Emma Father, Steven Fei,Veronica Hernandez Garrido, Isabella Giammatteo, Paul Greenway, Jenna Guo, Ammar Hassonjee, Adam He, Lukas Hermann, Carol Huang, Mike Jin, Grant Johnson, Paul Jung, Maia Kamenova, Sarah Kang, Elijah King, Shanice Lam, Jasmine Lee, Eric Li, Sam Losi, Xindi Lyu, Taisei Manheim, Han Meng, Hagan Miller, Vishaka Nayak, Timothy Nelson-Pyne, Jules Przybylska, Mohammed Rahman, Robert Rice, Carly Sacco, Jai Sawkar, Shariq Shah, Shaelin Spahle, Vivian Teng, Melissa Thomas, Steve Wang, Olivia Werner, Andrew Xu, Ying Yan, Clara Zhao, Ellen Zhu

36

INSTRUCTORS Coordinator Jeremy Ficca Instructors Jeff King Eddy Man Kim Jennifer Lucchino Brian Peters Manuel Rodriguez Shop Director Jon Holmes Terry Hritz Program B.A. B.Arch


Adam He

Adam He

Shariq Shah

37


Taisei Manheim

1’ = 3/16” Section C

Shariq Shah

38


Entrance Render

Paul Greenway

Cut

7.

7.

8.

7.

7.

8.

4. 4. 4. 4. 4. 4.

8.

6. 6. H.

G.

G.

F.

7. 8.

E.

5.

H.

8. 9.

5. I.

9. 9. 3.

J.

9.

C.

D.

Samuel Losi

9. 9. 2. 1. A. B.

Ground Floor Plan 1’ = 1/8”

1st Floor Plan 1’ = 1/8”

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Lobby Bike Shop Library / Work area Outdoor Courtyard Game Room Laundry Room Bathrooms Meeting Rooms Cafe kitchen / Mechanical Cafe

Communal Kitchen Indoor Eating area Outdoor Eating area Bathrooms / showers 4 Person Suite 2 Person Suite 2 Person Room 4 Person Room 6 Person Room

Shariq Shah

39


1’ = 3/16” Section Cut

Spring Valley

Youth Hostel

7.

8.

7.

7.

7.

8.

4. 4. 4. 4. 4. 4.

8.

6. 6. H.

G.

G.

F.

7. 8.

E.

5.

H.

8. 9.

5. I.

9. 9. 3.

J.

9.

C.

D.

9. 9. 2. 1. A. B.

Ground Floor Plan 1’ = 1/8”

1st Floor Plan 1’ = 1/8”

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Lobby Bike Shop Library / Work area Outdoor Courtyard Game Room Laundry Room Bathrooms Meeting Rooms Cafe kitchen / Mechanical Entrance Render Cafe

Paul Greenway

Communal Kitchen Indoor Eating area Outdoor Eating area Bathrooms / showers 4 Person Suite 2 Person Suite 2 Person Room 4 Person Room 6 Person Room

1’ = 3/16” Section Cut

7.

7.

8.

7.

7.

8.

4. 4. 4. 4. 4. 4.

8.

6. 6. H.

G.

G.

F.

7. 8.

E.

Paul Greenway

5.

H.

Public Courtyard Render

8.

9.

5.

I.

9. 9. 3.

J.

9.

C.

D.

9. 9. 2. 1. A. B.

Ground Floor Plan 1’ = 1/8”

1st Floor Plan 1’ = 1/8”

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Lobby Bike Shop Library / Work area Outdoor Courtyard Game Room Laundry Room Bathrooms Meeting Rooms Cafe kitchen / Mechanical Cafe

Communal Kitchen Indoor Eating area Outdoor Eating area Bathrooms / showers 4 Person Suite 2 Person Suite 2 Person Room 4 Person Room 6 Person Room

Public Courtyard Render

Julita Przybylska

Samuel Losi

40


Emma Father

Emma Father

Olivia Werner

41


1

1

2

3

Additional coursework by second-year B.A. and B.Arch students. Fundamentals of Computational Design, S19, Daniel Cardoso Llach (1); Modern Architecture, S19, Kai Gustchow (2); Materials and Assembly, F18, Gerard Damiani (3); Structures and Statics, S19, Irving Oppenheim (4) 42


1

4

3

1 43


INTEGRATION I ENVIRONMENT, FORM AND FEEDBACK This studio is founded on the premise that architecture is a part of a larger planetary ecology. Environment, Form and Feedback is a core design studio focused on architectures for extreme urban environments. Considering projections of rising waters and extreme weather events, the site of the Six Mile Island in Pittsburgh’s Allegheny Riverbecomes a testing ground for new forms and infrastructures within a landscape ecology of perpetualflooding. By engaging social and environmental patterns and identifying microclimatic behaviorsusing environmental simulation and drawing, students move towards the design of architectural interventions that translate across scales to give new shape to the contemporary city. Ecology posits that all entities in thermodynamic relationships with one another are bound together in complex systems of energy and information exchange: ecosystems. This studio focuses on design within a specific urban ecology while introducing performative considerations such as energy processing and climate responsiveness into the early stages of the design process. Initially, the studio focuses on understanding the larger ecology of the site, followed by a careful development of architectural organizations and their aggregation at the urban scale as they respond to issues of flooding. Students learn to negotiate spatial relationships between water infrastructure and proposed architectural tectonics. Through a semester-long design project, students are introduced to both analog and computationally based design techniques that integrate form making with environmental simulation, in search of individualized architectural languages for a dynamic urban landscape. STUDENTS B.Arch: Harrison Branch-Shaw, Shirley Chen, Andrew Chong, Fallon Creech,Takumi Davis, Vincent DeRienzo, Cathy Dong, Colleen Duong, Christoph Eckrich, Edward Fischer, Vanshika Gandotra, Owen Haft, Kirman Hanson, Tanvi Harkare, Martin He, Grace Hou, Cassandra Howard, Stephanie Huang, Gil Jang, Grace Ji, Romi Jin, Yeong Il Jo, Leah Kendrick, Yoo Jin Kim, Jihee Kim, Claire Koh, Ryu Kondrup, Jessica Kusten, Taylor Latimer, Jonathan Liang, Mike Longo, Rachel Lu, Longeny Luk, Alyssa Mayorga, Xiaoying Meng, Alejandra Meza, Jacob Moskowitz, Daniel Noh, Emmanuel Nwandu, Isabella Ouyang, Hsiao Tyng Peck, Anthony Ra, Brandon Smith, Kathy Song, Steve Sontag, Louis Suarez, Jacky Tian, Swetha Tulluri, Alex Wang, Emily Wein, Crystal Xue, Kwins Yang, Carmen Yu, Curran Zhang M.Arch: Joao Castro, Zuoming Chen, Deepthi Ganesh, Juliane O’Day, Tye Silverthorne, Lan Wei

44

INSTRUCTORS Coordinator Dana Cupkova B.Arch Heather Bizon Nina Chase Marantha Dawkins Mathew Huber Mathew Plecity M.Arch Eddy Man Kim Simulation Adviser Ömer Karagüzel Programs B.Arch M.Arch


Ryu Kondrup

Ryu Kondrup

Longney Luk

45


Gil Jang

46


Gil Jang

Brandon Smith

47


Louis Suarez

Ryu Kondrup

Louis Suarez

Louis Suarez

48


Louis Suarez

Curran Zhang

Claire Koh

49


INTEGRATION II ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION STUDIO As the final studio in the core sequence, the basis for the Advanced Construction Studio is the expectation that students retain and apply knowledge gained each semester to current assignments in the studio. The Advanced Construction Studio is concerned with the detailed development and refinement of architectural design as informed by the integration of structural, enclosure, environmental and material systems with the construction process. Students are expected to articulate concepts and develop designs with more precision and in greater detail than done in previous studios.

INSTRUCTORS

To enable students to achieve the ambitious learning objectives, the model of a studio coordinator, studio consultant, individual studio instructors and a concurrent lecture/ workshop series has been implemented. The studio coordinator and consultant assist students with the application and synthesis of knowledge from prerequisite studios and technology courses through pin-ups. They are available for design reviews on a weekly basis. The program for the semester-long project is the same for all students to encourage dialogue and to maximize learning opportunities from observing multiple approaches to design. The sites for the design proposals are different for each studio to increase the number of contexts to which the students are familiar and to learn the influence of context on design decisions.

Programs B.Arch M.Arch

STUDENTS B.Arch: Harrison Branch-Shaw, Eric Chen, Shirley Chen, Andrew Chong, Fallon Creech,Takumi Davis, Vincent DeRienzo, Cathy Dong, Colleen Duong, Christoph Eckrich, Edward Fischer, Vanshika Gandotra, Owen Haft, Kirman Hanson, Tanvi Harkare, Martin He, Grace Hou, Cassandra Howard, Stephanie Huang, Gil Jang, Grace Ji, Romi Jin, Yeong Il Jo, Leah Kendrick, Yoo Jin Kim, Jihee Kim, Claire Koh, Ryu Kondrup, Jessica Kusten, Taylor Latimer, Jonathan Liang, Mike Longo, Rachel Lu, Longeny Luk, Alyssa Mayorga, Xiaoying Meng, Alejandra Meza, Jacob Moskowitz, Daniel Noh, Emmanuel Nwandu, Isabella Ouyang, Hsiao Tyng Peck, Anthony Ra, Brandon Smith, Kathy Song, Steve Sontag, Louis Suarez, Jacky Tian, Swetha Tulluri, Shan Wang, Alex Wang, Emily Wein, Crystal Xue, Kwins Yang, Carmen Yu, Curran Zhang

Coordinator Stephen R. Lee B.Arch Akhil Badjatia Erica Cochran Stefani Danes Lori Fitzgerald Matt Huber M.Arch Jeff Davis Digital Workflow Consultant Ă–mer KaragĂźzel

       

 

     

       

     

 

     

     





M.Arch: Joao Castro, Zuoming Chen, Deepthi Ganesh, Juliane O’Day, Tye Silverthorne, Lan Wei

       

 



50

   







   

 

 


Christoph Eckrich

              

             

 







Cassandra Howard



Daniel Noh

51


SKYLIGHT OPERABLE LOUVERS

WOOD CLADDING

CROSS SECTION SCALE: 1’ 0” = 1/8”

SOUTH ELEVATION SCALE: 1’ = 1/8”

Water-proofing Membrane Rigid Insulation Gypsom Board Reinforced Concrete Decking Metal Cap

6

5

4

3

2

1

SKYLIGHT

WOOD CLADDING

KALWALL THERMAL BREAK

Acoustic Insulation MEP Service Space Wood Slats Finished Floor 1/4” Plywood

NORTH ELEVATION

Acoustic Underlayment 3 Layer CLT (4 1/2”)

SCALE: 1’ = 1/8”

5 Layer CLT (6 1/2”)

Metal Flasing

KALWALL E-Series Window

H

F

G

E

D

C

B

A

KALWALL E-Series Window Folding Shutter System with framed aluminum WOOD CLADDING

ACCOYA Radiated Pine Wood Boards (screwed to aluminum frame) Vapor Barrier 4” Rigid Insulation OSB Aluminum Composite Panel

OPERABLE WINDOW KALWALL THERMAL BREAK

Glulam Beam

Laminated Steel Structure

EAST ELEVATION SCALE: 1’ = 1/8” OPERABLE LOUVER SYSTEM TO OPTIMIZE SUNLIGHT AND SOLAR GAIN

A

SYSTEM DETAIL

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

14” x 14” Glulam Column

SCALE: 1’ 0” = 3/4”

KALWALL thernal brake system Rigid Insulation CEDAR WOOD CLADDING

Sand Gravel

OPERABLE LOUVERS

Steel Plate Rigid Insulation

Metal Flashing Stone Panel Concrete Footing Drainage

WEST ELEVATION SCALE: 1’ = 1/8”

WALL SECTION SCALE: 1’ 0” = 3/4”

Shan Wang

52


Ryu Kondrup

Brandon Smith

Gil Jang

Claire Koh

53


54

Danes Studio


TYNG PECK ENVIRONMENTAL SITE: CARRICK TYNG PECK SITE: CARRICK

CHARTER SCHOOL

ENVIRONMENTAL CHARTER SCHOOL

ACOUSTIC WOOD FIXTURE drop ceiling GLULAM BEAM CROSS-LAMINATED TIMBER FLOOR

TYNG PECK SITE: CARRICK

METAL DECKING CONCRETE ROOF SLAB 6" RIGID INSULATION COVER BOARD ROOF MEMBRANE FILTER FABRIC LIVE ROOF GREEN ROOF MODULE PLANTS GROWING MEDIUM CUSTOM CONCRETE BENCHES

GLULAM COLUMN with wood bracing WOOD PANEL interior finish STEEL STUD WALL with batt insulation DensGlass fiberglass sheathing AIR BARRIER CASCADIA CLIPS 6" RIGID INSULATION 2" AIR GAP CUSTOM CONCRETE PANEL

POURED CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB AIR BARRIER 6" RIGID INSULATION GRAVEL GEOTEXTILE FABRIC EARTH!

Ryu Kondrup

LONG SECTION scale: 1/8” = 1’0” RESIDENTIAL

S

SITE

Hsiao Tyng Peck

3 1

2

1 2 3 4

A1

A2

A3 D1 A4 D2

3 A5 D3

2

1

A6 D4 A7

D5

A8

D6

1

A9

D7

2 D8

3 4

D1

D9

D10

A1 D11

D12

GROUND FLOOR 1/8” = 1’-0”

A2

D13

3 1

2

A3

D14

D1 D15

A4

B8

D2

B7

1 B6

2

A5

3

D3

4

A6 D4 A1

A7

D5

A2 B5 B4

A3

A8

D1

A4

D6

B3

B2 D2 B1

A9

D7

A5

E7

D3 A6

D8

D4 A7

E6

E5

D5

D1 A8

D6

A9

E4

D9

D7

E3

D8 E2

D10 D1

E1 1

D11

D9

D10

D12

GROUND FLOOR 1/8” = 1’-0”

D11 2

D13

SECOND FLOOR 1/8” = 1’-0”

D12

GROUND FLOOR 1/8” = 1’-0”

D13

2

D14 D14

D15 B8

1

D15 1

B8

2

B7

C1

B7

B6

C2

B6 C3

C4

C5 B5 C6

B4 B3

C7 B2 B1

C8

B5

Christoph Eckrich

E7

B4 E6

B3

C9 E5

B2

C10 E4

B1

C11 E3

E7 C12 E2 C13

E6

E1 1 C14

E5

THIRD FLOOR 1/8” = 1’-0”

2

SECOND FLOOR 1/8” = 1’-0”

E4

E3

2

1

Harrison Branch-Shaw E2

1 2 C1

1 C2

C3

E1

55


CR E NU

VE TA AF

E

NU

E AV

PARCEL 0028-J-00266-0000-00

LE GA

ES

B OR

NA

F

E AC PL

HA ML ET

T IT

STR EET

AY W

EV CD M

E ALLIES

RD OF TH

BOULEVA

2 222 Craft Ave - Site Plan Scale: 1/128” = 1’-0” 0

32

64

128

2

Additional coursework by third-year B.Arch & first-year M.Arch students. Environment I: Climate & Energy, F18, Vivian Loftness (1); Ethics and Practice, S19, John Folan (2); Real Estate Design and Development, S19, Valentina Vavasis (3); History of Architectural Theory, S19, Kai Gutschow (4); Architecture Lighting Design, S19, Cindy Limauro (50 56


1

4

2

5

2 1 57


ADVANCED SYNTHESIS OPTION STUDIOS


HIGH_RISE “UNTITLED” This studio focuses on the role of the architectural promenade and how it can be adapted to the typology of the high-rise building. The “promenade architecturale” was first described by Le Corbusier as the sequence of spaces and direction of movement in the Acropolis in Athens as a way of constructing views, vistas and experiences. The high-rise, an American-born typology, maximizes building area but does not address the role of architectural sequence. This studio investigates the highrise typology through the hybridization with the architectural promenade. Located in SoHo, New York City this mixed-use high-rise project (containing a museum annex and residential units) is located directly across from the Judd Foundation. Often considered an artist of obdurate space, the works of minimalist artist Donald Judd (1928–94) are highly refined, conscious of their context—what he called “fundamental realities”—including space, material, color and detail. An inspiration to architects such as Steven Holl and Herzog & de Meuron, Judd’s work spanned both art and architecture through his search for autonomy and clarity in the objects and the spaces they occupy. This studio focuses on Judd’s writings and artistic output as the intellectual underpinnings of the studio. This informs the spatial and detailing agenda of the studio project along with the repropostioning of the architectural promenade.

INSTRUCTOR Gerard Damiani STUDENTS B.Arch Gunn Chaiyapatranun Keon Ho Lee Nicole Lee-Park Xin Hui Lim Emily Melillo Shariwa Sharada Somin Shim Lexi Yan Victoria Yong Selena Zhen M.Arch Bryan Trew William Ulmer

William Ulmer

60


Victoria Yong

Hugh Lee

61


Nicole Lee-Park

62

Gunn Chaiyapatranun


Somin Shim

Emily Melilo

63


SOLID THE RISE OF TIMBER? Wood is arguably architecture’s original additive material. Epitomized through Marc-Antoine Laugier’s myth of the primitive hut—in which trunk became column and branch became beam—the birth of architecture beyond the cave is inextricably tied to the tree. Despite the virtues of this abundant and replenishable material, modernism largely passed wood by in pursuit of the promise of steel and concrete to usher in a radical new global style of architecture. While the stylistic ambitions of modernism were undercut by an era of iconic building, modernism’s primary material palette of concrete and steel continue to serve as the basis for large-scale construction across the globe. In putting forth a material-centric agenda, this studio explores what it might mean to build with wood at larger scale in the city and how this method of construction might establish novel architectural scenarios. This studio challenges notions of permanence to consider architecture’s presence through time. The studio is interested in not only the spatialstructural affordances of timber, but also the psychological potential of wood environments and perceived notions of “natural” materials. In foregrounding structural–material conditions, the studio aims to extend contemporary material discourse from architecture’s skin to its bones.

64

INSTRUCTORS Jeremy Ficca Jeff King TA Stephanie Smid Hang Wang MARKET HALL

STUDENTS B.Arch Anirudh Anand Cotey Anderegg Xin Chen Zhi Tao Chen Mounica Guturu Jamie Ho Min Young Jeong Lingfan Jiang Christine Kim Sophie Lee Aaron Lee Yugyeong Lee Isadora Martins Jihoon Park Rachel Park Monica Toren M.Arch Yash Khemka Liale Nijem Mariana Rezza Yingyang Zhou MAAD Joonyoung Choi Shang Liu Zhiheng Jiao Jichen Wang

LOADING DOCK STORAGE

STORAGE

STORAGE

OFFICE


RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

KITCHEN

RESTAURANT

LIVING ROOM OFFICE

OFFICE BAR OFFICE RECEPTION

KIDS CENTER RESTROOM

RESTROOM

BICYCLE RENTAL CIRCULATION CORE

GROUND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/16’’ = 1’-0’’

Min Young Jeong + Zhi Tao Chen

Cotey Anderegg + Monica Toren

Min Young Jeong + Zhi Tao Chen

65


Cotey Anderegg + Monica Toren

66


Yugyeong Lee + Isadora Martins

Yugyeong Lee + Isadora Martins

Yash Khemka

Yash Khemka

Min Young Jeong + Zhi Tao Chen

67


DENSITY+COMPLEXITY SUSTAINABLE MEGASTRUCTURE Growing populations and economies increasingly stress natural resources and ecosystems. Changing socio-cultural and demographic trends, however, are accelerating urbanization around the world. Sites formerly considered too complex or burdensome for development, such as railyards and brownfields, have become some of the most desirable development sites in the most vibrant megacities. This advanced comprehensive studio gives students the opportunity to study density and mixed-use development through a sustainable megastructure on an underutilized pier on Midtown Manhattan’s Hudson River waterfront. Each narrative and concept was required to address several key issues and design components: 1) sustainability for extreme climate change, major sea-level rise and severe storm activity, 2) potential destabilization of environmental, social and infrastructure systems, 3) innovative opportunities for systems integration on a district scale and 4) resiliency to accommodate radically altered site conditions.

Building tip Level

INSTRUCTOR Hal Hayes

Roof deck Level

STUDENTS B.Arch Christina Brown Alessandra Fleck Kevin Jiang Ritchie Ju Alina Kramkova Zhuoying Lin Kelly Lu Nika Postnikov Ophelie Tousingnant D.K. Wang Kai Zhang

SKY PARK 3 plan�ng species 1 plan�ng species 2 plan�ng species 3 plan�ng species 4

Hotel 3 Level

Observation Deck Level

M.Arch Nikhita Bhagwat SKY PARK 3 plan�ng species 1 plan�ng species 2 plan�ng species 3 plan�ng species 4

Hotel 2 Level

Park 3 Level

Students work individually and in teams to develop hypothetical programmatic and narrative design scenarios. Building on baseline requirements of open space for the Hudson River Park, and exhibition space and hotel space for the Javits Convention Center expansion, students are required to reach a minimum of 20 floor-area ratio and 50% open space ratio. No height limit was imposed on the structure. This studio emphasizes the use of hand sketching and physical models to iterate design, expanding mastery of digital and parametric tools and video/animation for both analysis and conceptual/morphological design development.

Hotel Lobby Level

SKY PARK 3 plan�ng species 1 plan�ng species 2 plan�ng species 3 plan�ng species 4

Park 2 Level

SKY PARK 3 plan�ng species 1 plan�ng species 2 plan�ng species 3 plan�ng species 4

Oiffce Level

Sky park 1 Level

River Pavilion Level

Ternimal Departure Level

Ternimal Arrival Level

D.K. Wang

68

Kai Zhang, Ritchie Ju, Zhuoying Lin


Kai Zhang, Ritchie Ju, Zhuoying Lin

D.K. Wang

Nikhita Bhagwat

69


Allessandra Fleck + Kelly Lu

Allessandra Fleck + Kelly Lu

70

Christina Brown + Ophelie Tousingnant

Kevin Jiang, Alina Kramkova, Nika Postnikov


Kai Zhang, Ritchie Ju, Zhuoying Lin

Ritchie Ju, Zhuoying Lin, Kai Zhang

D.K. Wang

71


tems that are most suited for each office type.

RE-PURPOSING ARCHITECTURE STANDARD UNDERGROUND CABLE CO. Creating new architecture on greenfield sites is relatively easy compared to the challenges facing the architect who brings new life to aging buildings that have lost their original purpose. This studio experience aims to change the way students think about design, tackling puzzles, the mysteries of forensics and what it means to design “within the box� while practicing sustainable and regenerative architecture. Repurposing Architecture explores how the adaptive and creative reuse of buildings can become community resources, community assets and agents of market change. Students learn how context contributes to a sense of place and influences program, the difference between historic preservation and adaptive reuse, and how to alter an existing structural system to achieve a new architectural expression. The studio explores how architects have achieved technological breakthroughs within a confined framework and how building systems can lead to high-performance results without having to tear down and start over.

INSTRUCTOR Stephen Quick STUDENTS B.Arch Ryan Auld Rachel Baker Matthew Radican Sally Sohn Scarlet Tong M.Arch Chaz Barry Bridgette Mekkelsen Cassidy Rush David Suchoza

Visits to repurposed buildings throughout Pittsburgh, talks with architects who practice adaptive reuse on a daily basis, meetings with city officials responsible for the zoning and building codes that affect design and meetings with real estate professionals who market architecture augment the design explorations.

Process Sketches Scarlet Tong

72


Bridge.

Basic Massing

Ground Floor Mezzine

Planes

Egress

Open Space

Bike Path

N - E Section 1/16" = 1'-0"

1/16" = 1'-0"

Centripetal Centripetal Centripetal Rachel BakerBaker Rachel Rachel Baker Centripetal Rachel Baker

By studyingBy larger planslarger for the stripfor district anddistrict the riverfront, withalong bike plans by plans by studying plans the strip and the along riverfront, with bike BikePgh, the immediate context of 1600 Smallman street stands out as a potential BikePgh, immediate context of 1600 Smallman street out as a potential By studying larger the plans for the strip district and the riverfront, alongstands with bike plans by critical connection in the bike path network, with the potential topotential connect downtown to connection in theof bike path network, with the BikePgh,critical the immediate context 1600 Smallman street stands out astoaconnect potentialdowntown to thecritical Strip, connection along with easier access tonetwork, North making daily commutes and othertoand other the Strip, along easier accessShore, to North Shore, making dailydowntown commutes in the with bike path with the potential toalong connect By studying larger plans for the strip district and the riverfront, with bike plans by bike activities more accessible. Rather than simply bring bikers along smallman street, activities moreaccess accessible. Rather than simply bring bikers along the Strip,bike along with easier North Shore, making daily commutes andsmallman other street, BikePgh, the immediate context of to 1600 Smallman street stands out as athe potential which isactivities marked as “cautionary street biking”, thebiking”, pathbring isthe brought building. which is marked as “cautionary street path along isthrough brought through the building. bike more accessible. Rather than simply bikers smallman street, critical connection in the bike path network, with the potential to connect downtown to This also allows an easier connection to 16th Street Bridge. This alsoasallows an easier connection to 16th Street Bridge. which is marked street biking”, the path is brought through the building. the Strip, along with“cautionary easier access to North Shore, making daily commutes and other This activities also allows an easier connection tothan 16thsimply Streetbring Bridge. more accessible. bikers along smallman street, Thebike bike path an bold object in Rather theobject building that weaves through the building, Theisbike path is an bold in the building that weaves through the building, which is marked as “cautionary street biking”, the path is brought through the building. animates the space, offers aand new way experiencing the building. getBikers to get to animates the space, offers aofnew wayweaves of experiencing theBikers building. The bike path is anand bold object in the building that through the building, This allows easier connection to 16th Street Bridge. view thealso activities the building before onlanding a biker mezzanine. This allows the view theinanactivities in the on a biker mezzanine. This animates the space, and offers a building new landing waybefore of experiencing the building. Bikers get toallows the building to act as a hub foras cycling, with retail, renting, information, andallows parking. building toinact a hub for cycling, with retail, renting, repair, information, and parking. viewbike the activities the building before landing on a repair, biker mezzanine. This the The path is an bold object in the building that weaves through the building, Thebuilding rest of to theactbuilding stillfor focus on biker anbiker occupant, with a hostel, large The rest ofhub the building stillthe focus onasthe as an occupant, with a hostel, large as a cycling, with retail, renting, repair, information, and parking. animates the space, and offers a new way of store, experiencing building. Bikers massage get to sports outdoors health food store, restaurants, yogathe studios, sports &store, outdoors store, health food yoga studios, The &rest of the building still focus on thelanding biker asonanarestaurants, occupant, with amassage hostel, large the view the activities in the building before biker mezzanine. This allows therapists, and physical therapy clinic. therapists, and physical therapy clinic. sports & outdoors store, health food store, restaurants, yoga studios, massage building to act as a hub for cycling, with retail, renting, repair, information, and parking. therapists, physicalstill therapy clinic. The rest of and the building focus on thethe biker as anan occupant, with aishostel, large This indoor thecuts bikethrough path cuts indoor street developed. As the bike As path thethrough building, anbuilding, indoor street is developed. This indoor sports & street outdoors store, health foodpaths, store, restaurants, yoga studios, massage is cuts connected tothe two small-scale oneisconnecting indoor street is connected to two paths, a small-scale one connecting the indoorthe street to street to As the bike path through building,aan indoor street developed. This indoor therapists, and physical therapya clinic. Smallman large path thatto connects to thethe networks of bike as a Smallman and aStreet path that connects theconnecting networks of bike paths, astopaths, a street is Street connected tolarge two and paths, a small-scale one indoor street point the that Strip District,trails, riverfront trails, Ave and 16th critical pointcritical between thebetween riverfront Penn Ave Penn and 16th Street Smallman Street and a Strip largeDistrict, path connects to thestreet networks of bike paths, as a Street As the bike path cuts through the building, an indoor is developed. This indoor Bridge. Bridge. critical point between the Strip District, riverfront trails, Penn Ave and 16th Street street is connected to two paths, a small-scale one connecting the indoor street to Bridge. Smallman Street and a large path that connects to the networks of bike paths, as a

Rachel Baker

Coffee 260 SF

Juice and Smoothie Bar 1028 SF

Bike Rental 455 SF

Restaurant 1656 SF

Service Area 349 SF

M Bathroom 297 SF

Restaurant 7091 SF

critical point between the Strip District, riverfront trails, Penn Ave and 16th Street Bridge.

Health Food Store 2581 SF

Sports and Outdoor Store 3276 SF BOH 1170 SF

Ground Floor Mezzine 1/16" = 1'-0"

Site Plan Site Plan1" = 200'-0" Site Plan 1" = 200'-0" 1" = 200'-0"

Site Plan 1" = 200'-0"

Business Business Business Retail / Restaurant Retail // Restaurant Restaurant Retail Business Hostel Hostel Hostel Retail / Restaurant Parking Parking Parking Hostel

Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLINGArchitecture Architecture Parking

E-W Section Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLINGArchitecture Architecture

E-W Section 1/16" = 1'-0" Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture 1/16" = 1'-0"

Rachel Baker

73


18 Roof Plan Roof Plan k or -w

e ac Sp

Co

al r ork

e ac Sp ce

p rtu Sta

-

Offi

al ion e dit pac Tra ce S Offi

Exis

Program Diagram

Roof Plan

n w Ne uctio tr ns Co

tin g

Roof Plan

e ad Fac ing ist Ex

Roof Plan

Fac ade

Residential

Existing and New Conditions

Religion

Historic District

Industrial

Commerical

Site plan Scale: 1” = 200’=0”

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan Floor 4-8 Typical Plan Floor 4-8 Typical Plan Floor 4-8 Typical Plan Floor 4-8 Typical Plan

ce pa

n w Ne uctio tr ns Co

Exis

tin g

is Ex

Fac ade

g tin

e ad Fac

Floor 2-4 Typical Plan Floor 2-4 Typical Plan Scarlet Tong

Process Sketches

Existing and New Conditions

Residential

Religion

Industrial

Commerical

Site plan Scale: 1” = 200’=0”

Historic District

Floor 2-4 Typical Plan

Roof Plan Floor 2-4 Typical Plan Floor 2-4 Typical Plan

Roof Plan Roof Plan Smallman St.

Roof Plan

Smallman St.

Bridge llough Bridge llough Bridge llough llough Bridgellough Bridge McCou McCou McCou David St. David McCou St. David McCou 16th St. David 16th 16th St. David 16th St. 16th

Smallman St.

Roof Plan

Smallman St.

Smallman St. 17th St 17th St 17th St

Roof Plan

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan

17th St

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan

Mulberry Way

17th St

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan Roof Plan Mulberry Way

Mulberry Way

Roof Plan

Mulberry Way

Parking Ventilation Parking Sys. Ventilation Parking Sys. Ventilation Parking Ventilation Sys. ParkingSys. Ventilation Sys.

Roof Plan Mulberry Way Roof Plan

Ground Floor plan

Ground Floor plan

Floor 2-4 Typical Plan

Cisterns

Boiler

Cooling Tower

Boiler

Cooling Tower

Boiler

Cooling Tower

Boiler

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan

Cisterns

Floor 2-4 Typical Plan Floor plan Basement Cisterns

Scale: 1/16” - 1’-0”

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan

Floor 2-4 Typical Plan Basement Floor plan

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan

Basement Floor plan

Cisterns

Scale: 1/16” - 1’-0” Cisterns 1/16” - 1’-0” Scale:

Floor 2-4 Typical Plan

Boiler

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan Floor 4-8 Typical Plan

74

Ground Floor plan

Floor 4-8 TypicalGround Plan Floor plan

Ground Floor plan

Cooling Tower

Cooling Tower

Floor 4-8 Typical Plan

Basement Floor plan Scale: 1/16” - 1’-0”

Floor 2-4 Typical Plan Floor planScarlet Tong Basement Scale: 1/16” - 1’-0”


Bridgette Mekkelsen

Bridgette Mekkelsen Bridgette Mekkelsen

75


FREESPACE SERVING HUMANITY The 16th International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale, “Freespace,” inspired this studio to investigate issues raised by the curators, Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara. The biennale presented “work that exemplifies essential qualities of architecture … revealing [its] embodied power and beauty.” This studio considers the following questions: What responsibility do architects have as stewards of the built environment and towards our fellow humans? How do the architects’ skills create the conditions for enduring exchange between users and buildings? How can architects add value to projects in ways that allow them to exceed expectations? The studio investigates what it means to approach architecture with a generosity of spirit that serves humanity.

INSTRUCTORS Jennifer Lucchino Francesca Torello STUDENTS B.Arch Ghalya Alsanea Jonathan Cheng Fon Euchukanonchai Austin Garcia Jai Kanodia Bingxuan Liang Benita Nartey Michael Powell Ryan Smith Chitika Vasudeva Shan Wang M.Arch Maddi Johnson

Students explore the potential to enhance the essential qualities and experience of architecture in the context of Pittsburgh at various scales and contexts. The studio promotes critical design inquiry through three projects, focusing on design strategies that transform the quality and use of an existing, underutilized space, building and site while considering spatial, experiential and atmospheric qualities that create inviting places. The studio supports design alongside sustained research throughout the semester. Students conduct comprehensive, varied and in-depth research into the “Freespace” exhibition to familiarize themselves with its content, which leads to their creation of a personalized guide that identifies distinct paths through the exhibition and identifies a specific area of personal investigation and informs studio projects. Further, we explore the role of the Biennale as an institution through readings and discussion about the exhibition.

Maddi Johnson

76


Shan Wang

Ryan Smith

Michael Powell

Michael Powell

Bingxuan Liang

77


Shan Wang

Ryan Smith

BUILDING STRATEGY Collages were used as an exploratory tool to arrive at a material palette for the new Bloomfield Cultural Center. As seen, earlier ideas involved the construction of some kind of canopy to create an indoor-outdoor space between the pool and the building. In terms of building interior, both the use of wood to create a sense of warmth in an otherwise desolate building and the use of a bright color on the stair were determined with an aim to breathe some life into the exisitng spatial qualities of the building. Moreover, as seen in the documentation of the wider neighborhood of Bloomfield, color is an important part of the neighborhood fabric -- both visually and culturally, which inspired the decision to introduce a bright yellow circulating stair.

Building and site section

Fon Euchukanonchai

Chitika Vasudeva

Bingxuan Liang

78


Jonathan Cheng

Ryan Smith

Michael Powell Ghalya Alsanea

79


DE_CONSTRUCTING BLIGHT The 2018–19 Urban Design Build Studio (UDBS) explores the relationship between building disassembly, material harvesting and new housing construction oriented toward the elimination of concentrated poverty. Addressing dramatic shifts in regional housing needs that have precipitated over the past 70 years, this public interest design studio utilizes participatory processes to collaborate with residents, neighborhood partners and NGOs to develop viable urban housing strategies that can evolve with regional population dynamics. The central aspirations of DE_CONSTRUCTING BLIGHT are multidimensional; it probes the concept of deconstruction both literally and figuratively. In the literal sense, the studio harvests construction material in a manner consistent with National Building Material Reuse Association standards. In the figurative sense, the studio engages in design activism to deconstruct pre-existing notions of blight and concentrated disinvestment. Closely associated with urban environments, the word blight and associated concepts have historically been pretext for drastic forms of development that result in massive displacement. This studio seeks to change thinking and policy related to disinvestment through action that focuses on inclusion and population retention and sets the table for the construction of housing as part of the spring 2019 Constructing Authenticity studio.

Right, from top: DE_CON 01 deconstruction process, removing building components piece by piece sorting, stacking, and quantifying materials as they were removed from the building. Opposite, from top left: UDBS students remove interior finishes and clerestory window assembly from DE_CON 01; Axonometric technical drawings from the DE_CON 01 (De)construction Documents set depicting sequential deconstruction processes. These drawings were updated daily, and ultimately serve as a record of the deconstruction.

80

INSTRUCTOR John Folan STUDENTS B.Arch Miranda Ford Alison Katz Timothy Khalifa Gargi Lagvankar Alex Lin Christine Zhu M.Arch Kyle Bancroft Jacob Clare Ever Clinton Srinjoy Hazra Anthony Kosec Lana Kozlovskaya Fernanda Mazzilli Shailaja Patel Yashwitha Reddy Ryan Smerker Jay Tyan MSAECM Ishwar Balaji Bobuchi Ken-Opurum Weichen Zhan IDeATE Reality Computing Tamara Amin Erin Fuller Shenghui Lum Sean McGadden Paris Mielke Dan Morris Alejandro Murillo Chileshe Otieno Ben Scott Kevin Thies Kedi Zhang Audrey Zheng


SIMPSON STRONG-TIE 2"X4" 20-GAUGE FACE

53

53

53 54

54

54

3/4 - 10 X 2-1/4" HEX DRIVE PARTIALLY-THREADED STEEL BOLT (1-1/2" LG THREAD)

53 54 51

SIMPSON STRONG-TIE 2"X4" 20-GAUGE FACE

GENERAL NOTES: 1. THESE DOCUMENTS PROPERTY OF THE CAR STUDIO (UDBS). THE DO FOR ANY PURPOSE OTH ON THE COVER SHEET PURPOSE, SPECIFICALL AUTHORIZED WRITING STUDIO AND ITS DIREC 2. NONE OF THE DOCUM TO BE CONSIDERED IN UTILIZING THESE DOCU SURVEY, AND/OR CONS INFORMATION LOCATED INFORMATION AND DAT GOVERNING WORK DES BEFORE PROCEEDING INFORMATION AND DAT GUIDELINES GOVERNIN BIDDERS, ESTIMATING, BIDDING AND/OR CONS CONSTRUCTING. NEITH STUDIO (UDBS) ASSUME MISINTERPRETATIONS BIDDING AND/OR CONS 3. EXISTING SITE COND 4. MATERIAL YIELD WIL OTHERWISE

3/4" I.D. STEEL FLAT WASHER 51

2X4 AND 2X6 DIMENSIONAL LUMBER FORM THE JOISTS OF THE ROOF OF THE NORTH SIDE GROUND FLOOR SECTION AND OF THE FLOOR OF THE LOFT. THE ON EDGE MEMBERS ARE HELD BY ANNOTATED SIMPSON HANGERS AND THE ON FACE MEMBERS ARE END-NAILED.

53 53

UNDERSIDE OF LOFT SHOWN WITH JOISTS AND LVL MEMBERS.

54 54 54 54 54

53

TENSILE STEEL CABLE

54 53

5 16"

PLATES FIXED TO THE LVL MEMBERS OF THE LOFT WITH THE TENSILE STEEL CABLES ATTACHED.

53 53 54

3/8-16 PARTIALLY THREADED STEEL HEX BOLT (1" THREAD), MATCHING HEX HEAD NUTS AND 38" INNER DIA STEEL FLAT WASHERS, CONNECTING LVL MEMBERS AT THE BASE OF THE FRAMING STRUCTURE OF THE LOFT.

53 53 54 53

51 53 53 53 41

53

53

4 21"

THE 5/16" THK STEEL PLATE SHOULD BE UNFASTENED USING A POWER DRILL/SOCKET WRENCH WITH A 3/4" BIT AND A 3/4" CRESCENT WRENCH (1 PERSON)

37 TENSILE STEEL CABLE 53 53 54

51

54 53 53 54 53

51

61 51 51 51 54

66

51 FIRST FLOOR FRAME BELOW LOFT

81

62

79

HARD HAT

WORK GLOVES

61 53

NYLON STRAPS

CARLISLE CCW

53

POWER DRILL HIGH VISIBILITY VEST

53

REMOVAL OF THE LOFT

AFTER UNFASTENING ONE SIDE OF THE CONNECTION, ENSURE ANOTHER INDIVIDUAL HAS SECURED HOLD OF THE LVL MEMBER BEFORE REPEATING THE UNFASTENING PROCEDURE

3 4"

UNINSTALLING THE SIP ROOF OF THE LOFT

52

LAG BOLTS

CARLISLE CCW 51

3 4"

3/8 - 16 X 3-1/2" HEX DRIVE PARTIALLY-TURGADED STEEL BOLT (1" LG THREAD)

3 8" STEEL HEX DRIVE NUT

SOCKET WRENCH

POWER DRILL 3/8" SOCKET BIT WORK GLOVES

5 STACKED WALL SIPs

53

3/8" CRESCENT WRENCH

LOFT MODULE

DISCONNECTING THE PSL MEMBERS FROM THE LOFT PRIOR TO DISENGAGING THEM FROM THE STRUCTURE.

2 STACKED ROOF SIPs

4 GROUND FLOOR STRUCTURE REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE

ON SITE SIP STORAGE TO BE SAWED OFF INTO SMALLER PIECES.

THE 5/16" THK STEEL PLATE SHOULD BE UNFASTENED USING A POWER DRILL/SOCKET WRENCH WITH A 3/8" BIT AND A 3/8" CRESCENT WRENCH

2 LOFT REMOVAL PEREPECTIVE

NOT TO SCALE

NOT TO SCALE

81

NYLON STRAPS

51

61

3/8-16 3 21" HEX DRIVE PARTIALLY THREADED STEEL BOLT (1" LG THREAD), MATCHING HEX HEAD NUTS AND 38" INNER DIA STEEL WASHERS.

53

52

61

53

51 52 51 52 52 51 51 51 51

3 8"X3" LAG BOLT WITH 3 8" INNER DIA STEEL FLAT WASHER.

SIP PANELS DISLODGED BY CRANE USING GALVANIZED STEEL PICKPOINTS AND NYLON STRAPS AND PLACED ON THE GROUND.

5 16"

METAL PLATE CONNECTOR AT THE TOP OF THE FRAMING LVL MEMBERS OF THE LOFT

NYLON STRAPS

51 51

51 52 51

52 BOTH 28' ROOF SIPS WERE SECURED TO THE PSL STRUCTURE BY 12" LG PAN HEAD #3 SQUARE DRIVE PARTIALLY THREADED SELF-TAPPING WOOD SCREW (3" LG THREAD) AS A STRAIGHT EDGE

REMOVAL OF PSL MEMBERS BY CRANE AFTER TYING THE NYLON STRAP SECURELY

3/8-16 4 21" PARTIALLY THREADED STEEL HEX BOLT (1" THREAD), MATCHING HEX HEAD NUTS AND 38" INNER DIA STEEL WASHERS HOLDING PSL MEMBERS TOGETHER.

PSL 52

PHILIP HEAD SCREW 61

METAL PLATES

KEY NOTES: ¾” THK CEDAR EX 1. 2. RED MAPLE INTE 3. ¼” CYPRESS PLYW 4. ¾” THK x 3” WIDE O 5. ⅜” THK OAK INTER 6. 1" BIRCH HARDWO 7. 1/2" DOMESTIC BIR 8. BIRCH HARDWOO 9. ¼” ASH PLYWOOD 10. GYPSUM WALL BO 11. BACKER ROD WIT 12. HARDWOOD TRAC 13. BIFOLD DOOR TRA 14. MILLED HARDWOO 15. STANDING SEAM M 16. PERFORATED MET 17. SOLID GALVANIZE 18. PERFORATED GAL 19. FIXED WINDOW: R 20. AWNING WINDOW 21. MIXED TYPE WIND 22. SINGLE EXTERIOR 23. DOUBLE EXTERIO 24. INTERIOR DOOR W 25. INTERIOR DOOR W 26. EXTERIOR METAL 27. INTERIOR METAL D 28. LADDER TO LOFT 29. PV PANELS BP517 30. RACK FOR PV PAN 31. SOLAR THERMAL 32. RADIATOR FOR SO 33. 4” CELLULAR POL 34. ⅝” TRIPLE WALL C 35. POLYCARBONATE 36. ALUMINUM FRAMI 37. SHIM/BLOCKING 38. 3/4" RIGID INSULA 39. 1" RIGID INSULATI 40. APA RATED OSB P 41. OSB PLYWOOD SU 42. CLOSED CELL INS 43. BIRCH PLYWOOD 44. 1” x 3” WOOD FURR 45. WALL MEMBRANE 46. ICE AND WATER S 47. TCS GUTTER 48. TCS FLASHING 49. 10 GA GALVANIZE 50. 20 GA GALVANIZE 51. PREFAB BRACKET 52. 3-1/2” X 9-1/4” PSL 53. LVL MEMBER 54. 2”X4” DIMENSIONA 55. 2”X6” DIMENSIONA 56. 2”X10" DIMENSION 57. 2"X12" DIMENSION 58. COMPOSITE LUMB 59. COMPOSITE LUMB 60. COMPOSITE LUMB 61. 10 ¼” THK SIP 62. ¾” THK PLYWOOD 63. ⅜” THK PLYWOOD 64. WR GRACE WATE 65. 2’ 1-¾” LVL BLOCK 66. C 10X22 STEEL CH 67. WT 9X32.5 STEEL 68. 18” DIA. CAST CON 69. 3½” THK POURED 70. LIGHT FIXTURE 71. STAINLESS STEEL 72. WOODEN CUBBY 73. WOODEN KITCHEN 74. STAINLESS STEEL 75. STAINLESS STEEL 76. STAINLESS STEEL 77. OPEN CELL SPRAY 78. SEE MECHANICAL 79. PREFAB BRACKET 80. OSHA-COMPLIANT 81. SPREADER BAR 82. 8' 0" TALL CONSTR CONTRACTOR 83. PORTABLE TOILET 84. 30 YARD ROLL OF 85. 180 DEGREE ACCE 86. EXISTING TREE 87. EXISTING LAMP PO 88. EXISTING CURB A 89. EXISTING PLUMBIN 90. 12' LONG X 8' WIDE PROVIDED BY GEN 91. 35' ROLL OFF TRU CONTRACTOR 92. 50-TON CAPACITY CHASSIS WITH A 1 93. FLAT BED TRUCK GENERAL CONTRA 94. TEMPORARY ELEC ELECTRICAL CONT 95. SCAFFOLDING 96. PORCELAIN CARO 97. PORCELAIN HAND 98. BATHROOM FIXTU 99. OAK RAILING 3' 6-1 100. ¾” THICK X 3” WID 101. METAL SUPPORT 102. CONTINUOUS PIAN 103. 4”X3/4” PLYWOOD 104. 2”X2” LVL FLOOR S 105. STEEL FLOOR RIS

52

WOODEN LEDGE TWO 28' SIP ROOF PANELS WERE LIFTED FROM THE STRUCTURE USING THE 50-TON CRANE

51

PSL AND THE WOODEN LEDGE SCREWED TOGETHER WITH A METAL ANGLE 3/4-10 2 41" HEX DRIVE PARTIALLY THREADED STEEL BOLT (1 21" LG THREAD), MATCHING HEX HEAD NUTS AND 3/4" INNER DIA STEEL FLAT WASHERS CONNECTING PSL MEMBERS TO THE CONCRETE SLAB. PICTURE SHOWING UNINSTALLATION PROCESS.

HARD HAT W/ FACE SHIELD

51

3 PSL REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE

CHAINSAW

61

54

FULL LENGTH FILLET WELD FOR THE 165 " THICK STEEL PLATES.

1

NOT TO SCALE

5 16"

THICK STEEL PLATES SHOWING WELDS

ROOF SIP REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

NAIL THE 2"X4" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER IS NAILED INTO THE SIP PANEL, THEN CUT THE SIP PANEL INTO 4'X8' PANELS USING THE 2"X4" AS A STRAIGHT EDGE

81


PROJECT NARRATIVE: DE_CON01, THE URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO’ AND PROJECT RE_’S FIRST DECONSTRUCTION PROJECT, WILL INVOLVE THE DECONSTRUCTION OF THE FORMER BXA ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES LOCATED ON CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY’S CAMPUS. THE BXA WAS HOUSED IN CMU’S ENTRY TO THE DOE’S 2005 SOLAR DECATHLON COMPETITION. THE BUILDING HAS BEEN ON CAMPUS SERVING AS OFFICE SPACE SINCE THEN, AND IT HAS BEEN UTILIZED AS A LABORATORY FOR SUSTAINABLE PRACTICE AND EXPERIMENTATION THROUGHOUT ITS LIFESPAN.

SHEET DETAIL

PROJECT SCOPE: THE URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO IS WORKING ALONG WITH RYCON CONSTRUCTION ON THE FULL DECONSTRUCTION OF CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY’S ENTRY TO THE DOE’S 2005 SOLAR DECATHLON COMPETITION. THE URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL DECONSTRUCTION TO THE EXISTING CONCRETE SLAB.

RESTROOM 101 203 SF

ROOM NAME SQUARE FOOTAGE ROOM NUMBER ROOM DESIGNATION TAG DESIGNATOR AA WINDOW TYPE TAG

APPLICABLE CODES: SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (OSHA)

SITE LOCATION AND CONTEXT

333E DESIGNATOR DOOR TYPE TAG ENTRANCE

MAIN ENTRANCE

ENTRANCE

SECONDARY ENTRANCE

CONCRETE WALK TO REMAIN

Tue 7/10/18

Mon 5/21/18

Tue 5/22/18

University Issues R.F.P for Demolition of BxA Offices

Mon 6/4/18

RYCON Construction Approved as DE_CON Contraction

GENERAL NOTES: 1. THESE DOCUMENTS ARE THE COPYRIGHTED PROPERTY AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OF THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS). THE DOCUMENTS ARE NOT TO BE REPRODUCED OR UTILIZED FOR ANY PURPOSE OTHER THAN ORIGINALLY INTENDED AND AS STIPULATED ON THE COVER SHEET AND TITLE BLOCK. USE OF THE DOCUMENTS FOR ANY PURPOSE, SPECIFICALLY STIPULATED OR NOT, SHALL BE GRANTED ONLY VIA AUTHORIZED WRITING BY THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO AND ITS DIRECTOR, JOHN FOLAN AIA, LEED AP. 2. NONE OF THE DOCUMENTS INCLUDED IN THE DRAWING INDEX ARE INTENDED TO BE CONSIDERED IN ISOLATION OF ONE ANOTHER. ALL PARTIES/ENTITIES UTILIZING THESE DOCUMENTS FOR COST ESTIMATION, BIDDING, QUANTITY SURVEY, AND/OR CONSTRUCTION SHALL CONSULT THE GENERAL NOTES AND INFORMATION LOCATED ON THIS SHEET AND ALL "G" SERIES (GENERAL INFORMATION AND DATA) SHEETS FOR INFORMATION AND CONDITIONS GOVERNING WORK DESCRIBED IN DOCUMENTS LISTED IN THE DRAWING INDEX BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH PROCUREMENT AND/OR CONSTRUCTION. GENERAL INFORMATION AND DATA SHEET(S) ("G") PROVIDE CODE, PROCEDURAL AND USE GUIDELINES GOVERNING ALL BID AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. ALL BIDDERS, ESTIMATING, AND PRICING SHALL UTILIZE COMPLETE SETS OF THE BIDDING AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS IN QUANTIFYING AND CONSTRUCTING. NEITHER THE OWNER, ARCHITECT, NOT URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS) ASSUMES RESPONSIBILITY FOR ERRORS, OMISSIONS, OR MISINTERPRETATIONS RESULTING FROM THE USE OF INCOMPLETE SETS OF BIDDING AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. 3. EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS WILL REMAIN UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE 4. MATERIAL YIELD WILL BE TRANSPORTED TO PROJECT RE_ UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE

Fri 6/15/18

Mon 6/25/18

Mon 6/25/18

University Communicates Publicly That BxA Office are being Decommissioned

Tue 7/10/18

Tue 7/10/18

Deconstruction Day 1

Mon 10/1/18

Mon 10/1/18

Electricity Cut Off, Solar Panels Disconnected From Circuit Inside

Mon 10/1/18

Mon 10/1/18

Temporary Electricity Set Up For Site

Mon 10/1/18

Mon 10/1/18

Deconstruction Day 2

Tue 10/2/18

Tue 10/2/18

Carnegie Mellon FMCS And Rycon Construction Dumpster Mobilization Construction Fence On Site

Tue 10/2/18

Tue 10/2/18

UDBS Deliver Construction Tools And Equipment To Site Before End Of Workday 10/02

Tue 10/2/18

Tue 10/2/18

Portable Toilets Set Up On Site

Tue 10/2/18

Tue 10/2/18

Scaffolding Construction

Tue 10/2/18

Tue 10/2/18

Removal Of Bush At Southeastern Corner

Tue 10/2/18

Tue 10/2/18

Solar Thermal Collection System Drainage

Tue 10/2/18

Tue 10/2/18

Deconstruction Day 3

Wed 10/3/18

Wed 10/3/18

Safety Training

Wed 10/3/18

Wed 10/3/18

Trash And Debris Removal

Wed 10/3/18

Wed 10/3/18

Remove Sensors And Experimental Equipment

Wed 10/3/18

Wed 10/3/18

Removal Of Wiring

Wed 10/3/18

Wed 10/8/18

Remove Loose Furniture

Wed 10/3/18

Wed 10/3/18

Return Of Equipment To Intelligent Workplace

Wed 10/3/18

Wed 10/3/18

Transport Materials To Project RE_ On Flatbed

Wed 10/3/18

Deconstruction Day 4

Thu 10/4/18

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site KEY NOTES: 1. ¾” THK CEDAR EXTERIOR CLADDING 2. RED MAPLE INTERIOR CLADDING 3. ¼” CYPRESS PLYWOOD 4. ¾” THK x 3” WIDE OAK INTERIOR TONGUE-AND-GROOVE CLADDING 5. ⅜” THK OAK INTERIOR CEILING PANELS 6. 1" BIRCH HARDWOOD TRIM WITH P.U. COATING 7. 1/2" DOMESTIC BIRCH PLYWOOD SHEATHING WITH P.U. COATING 8. BIRCH HARDWOOD DADO BORDER WITH P.U. COATING 9. ¼” ASH PLYWOOD VENEER 10. GYPSUM WALL BOARD 11. BACKER ROD WITH DRY CAULK 12. HARDWOOD TRACK SHOE WITH GASKET SEAL 13. BIFOLD DOOR TRACK 111 SERIES BY JOHNSON HARDWARE 14. MILLED HARDWOOD DOOR WITH GASKET SEAL 15. STANDING SEAM METAL ROOFING 16. PERFORATED METALWORK 17. SOLID GALVANIZED STEEL AWNING 18. PERFORATED GALVANIZED STEEL AWNING 19. FIXED WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 20. AWNING WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 21. MIXED TYPE WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 22. SINGLE EXTERIOR DOOR METAL WITH INSET GLAZING AND STATIONARY PANEL 23. DOUBLE EXTERIOR DOOR METAL WITH INSET GLAZING 24. INTERIOR DOOR WOOD WITH INSET GLAZING 25. INTERIOR DOOR WOOD 26. EXTERIOR METAL DOOR FRAME 27. INTERIOR METAL DOOR FRAME 28. LADDER TO LOFT 29. PV PANELS BP5170 BP SOLAR MONO-CRYSTALLINE 30. RACK FOR PV PANELS 31. SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 32. RADIATOR FOR SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 33. 4” CELLULAR POLYCARBONATE INTERLOCKING PANEL 34. ⅝” TRIPLE WALL CELLULAR POLYCARBONATE 35. POLYCARBONATE EDGE DETAIL 36. ALUMINUM FRAMING FOR POLYCARBONATE 37. SHIM/BLOCKING 38. 3/4" RIGID INSULATION 39. 1" RIGID INSULATION 40. APA RATED OSB PLYWOOD SHEATHING FOR WALLS 41. OSB PLYWOOD SUBFLOOR 42. CLOSED CELL INSULATION 43. BIRCH PLYWOOD / RIGID INSULATION COMPOSITE CONSTRUCTION 44. 1” x 3” WOOD FURRING STRIPS 45. WALL MEMBRANE CCW 705 46. ICE AND WATER SHIELD 47. TCS GUTTER 48. TCS FLASHING 49. 10 GA GALVANIZED CARBON STEEL COLLAR 50. 20 GA GALVANIZED STEEL 51. PREFAB BRACKETS, 5/16” THK WELDED STEEL PLATE 52. 3-1/2” X 9-1/4” PSL MEMBER 53. LVL MEMBER 54. 2”X4” DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 55. 2”X6” DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 56. 2”X10" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 57. 2"X12" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 58. COMPOSITE LUMBER DECKING 59. COMPOSITE LUMBER RAILING 60. COMPOSITE LUMBER RISERS 61. 10 ¼” THK SIP 62. ¾” THK PLYWOOD 63. ⅜” THK PLYWOOD 64. WR GRACE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 65. 2’ 1-¾” LVL BLOCKING 66. C 10X22 STEEL CHANNEL 67. WT 9X32.5 STEEL SECTION 68. 18” DIA. CAST CONCRETE FOOTING W/ #4 BAR AND STL BEARING PLATE 69. 3½” THK POURED CONCRETE SLAB W/ EMBEDDED PEX TUBING 70. LIGHT FIXTURE 71. STAINLESS STEEL BAR HANDLE 72. WOODEN CUBBY 73. WOODEN KITCHEN CABINETRY SET 74. STAINLESS STEEL MICROWAVE 75. STAINLESS STEEL OVEN 76. STAINLESS STEEL STOVE 77. OPEN CELL SPRAY FOAM INSULATION 78. SEE MECHANICAL KEYNOTES 79. PREFAB BRACKETS, 1/2” THK STEEL PLATE 80. OSHA-COMPLIANT CRANE HOOK 81. SPREADER BAR 82. 8' 0" TALL CONSTRUCTION FENCE AT WORK AREA BOUNDARY BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 83. PORTABLE TOILET PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 84. 30 YARD ROLL OFF DUMPSTER PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 85. 180 DEGREE ACCESS GATE PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 86. EXISTING TREE 87. EXISTING LAMP POST 88. EXISTING CURB AND SIDEWALK 89. EXISTING PLUMBING EASEMENT/CONNECTIONS 90. 12' LONG X 8' WIDE X 3' HIGH 10-YARD ROLL OFF RECYCLING DUMPSTER PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 91. 35' ROLL OFF TRUCK FOR DELIVERY OF DUMPSTERS PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 92. 50-TON CAPACITY NATIONAL CRANE NBT50 MOUNTED ON A PETERBILT 359 4-AXLE CHASSIS WITH A 102’-0” BOOM LENGTH PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 93. FLAT BED TRUCK W/LIFT GATE FOR PORTABLE TOILET SERVICING PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 94. TEMPORARY ELECTRICAL SERVICE, 4 GFCI DUPLEX OUTLETS PROVIDED BY ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 95. SCAFFOLDING 96. PORCELAIN CAROMA DUAL FLUSH TOILET 97. PORCELAIN HAND SINK 98. BATHROOM FIXTURES 99. OAK RAILING 3' 6-1/8" LONG X 1' 0-9/16" WIDE, 44" ABOVE FLOOR 100. ¾” THICK X 3” WIDE BATHROOM DECKING 101. METAL SUPPORT FOR RAISED FLOOR PANEL 102. CONTINUOUS PIANO HINGE 103. 4”X3/4” PLYWOOD FLOOR PANEL 104. 2”X2” LVL FLOOR SPACER 105. STEEL FLOOR RISER

Wed 10/3/18 Thu 10/4/18

87

Safety Training For Deconstruction Trainees

Thu 10/4/18

Thu 10/4/18

Interior Cladding Removal

Thu 10/4/18

Wed 10/10/18

Exterior Cladding Removal

Thu 10/4/18

Wed 10/10/18

Store Materials Inside Structure To Be Transported Next Day

Thu 10/4/18

Thu 10/4/18

Deconstruction Day 5

Fri 10/5/18

Fri 10/5/18

Interior Door Removal

Fri 10/5/18

Fri 10/5/18

Interior Cabinet Removal

Fri 10/5/18

Fri 10/5/18

Interior Wall Finishes Removal

Thu 10/4/18

Interior Wood Floor Removal

Fri 10/5/18

Plumbing Fixture (Toilet, Shower, Sink) Removal

Fri 10/5/18

Fri 10/5/18

Interior ‘southern Exposure’ Removal

Fri 10/5/18

Mon 10/8/18

5000 FORBES AVENUE DE_CON 01 PITTSBURGH, PA 15213

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site 87

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site

140'-0" PLACEMENT OF LOFT FOR DISASSEMBLY REFER TO SCHEDULE FOR DETAILS

CONCRETE RAMP TO BE REMOVED 82

82

Fri 10/5/18

Fri 10/5/18

Fri 10/5/18

Mon 10/8/18

Exterior Wood Cladding Removal

Fri 10/5/18

Wed 10/10/18

12'-5 1/8" EMP56

Exterior Polycarbonate Removal PLACEMENT OF PSLS TO BE DISASSEMBLED INTO INDIVIDUAL PIECES REFER TO SCHEDULE FOR DETAILS

31

8'-1 3/4"

95

95

87

Mon 10/8/18 Mon 10/8/18 Mon 10/8/18

Mon 10/8/18

Mon 10/8/18

Mon 10/15/18

Fri 10/5/18

Mon 10/8/18

Remove Roof Membrane

Mon 10/8/18

Mon 10/8/18

Removal Of Solar Collectors

Mon 10/8/18

Transport Materials To Project RE_ On Flatbed

Mon 10/8/18

Deconstruction Day 7

Tue 10/9/18

Tue 10/9/18

Remove Exterior Cladding / Flashing

Thu 10/4/18

Wed 10/10/18

Remove ERV / Ducts

Tue 10/9/18

Window Removal

CONCRETE WALK TO REMAIN

0" 2'13

82

82 28'-0"

A AL CC L E EQ VE SS UIP HIC FO ME LE R NT S/

"

Tue 10/9/18 Tue 10/9/18 Wed 10/10/18

Removal Of ‘southern Exposure’ Framing

Wed 10/10/18

Wed 10/10/18

Galvanized Steel Cladding Removal

Wed 10/10/18

Wed 10/10/18

Thu 10/4/18

Wed 10/10/18

Thu 10/4/18

Wed 10/10/18

Disassemble Scaffolding

Wed 10/10/18

Wed 10/10/18

Transport Materials To Project RE_ On Flatbed

Wed 10/10/18

Wed 10/10/18

Deconstruction Day 9

Thu 10/11/18

Thu 10/11/18

Steel Fabricated Pick Points Delivered To Site And Installed

Thu 10/11/18

Thu 10/11/18

Deconstruction Day 10

Fri 10/12/18

Fri 10/12/18

50 Ton Crane Arrival On Site

Fri 10/12/18

Fri 10/12/18

Disassemble Solar Collectors On Site

Fri 10/12/18

Fri 10/12/18

Living Room Roof SIP Removal From Structure Via Crane

Fri 10/12/18

Fri 10/12/18

West Facade SIP Wall Removal From Structure Via Crane

Fri 10/12/18

Fri 10/12/18

East Facade SIP Wall Removal From Structure Via Crane

Fri 10/12/18

Fri 10/12/18

PSL Removal And Disassembly

Fri 10/12/18

Loft Disconnection And Placement On Staging Area Via Crane

Fri 10/12/18

Transport Materials To Project RE_ On Flatbed

Fri 10/12/18

Fri 10/12/18

Mon 10/15/18

Mon 10/15/18

Mon 10/15/18

Mon 10/15/18

Deconstruction Day 11

DR

IV

E

20'-0

Tue 10/9/18

Tue 10/9/18

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site

82

R SS FO N ACCETRUCTIO CONS TEAM

Mon 10/8/18

Rycon On Site

SIGN-IN STATION, BULLETIN BOARD, & FIRST AID KIT

87

Mon 10/8/18

Wed 10/10/18

Remove Exterior Cladding / Flashing

86

TOOLS & EQUIPMENT

Mon 10/8/18 Mon 10/8/18

Tue 10/9/18

Transport Materials To Project RE_ On Flatbed Deconstruction Day 8

Remove Interior Finishes / Fixtures DE-NAILING STATION

EXISTING TABLES TO REMAIN

Mon 10/8/18

Mon 10/8/18

Roof Gutter Removal

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site

85

ZONE FOR SIP ROOF TO BE PLACED & CUT DOWN TO 4'X8' SECTIONS (REFER TO SCHEDULE)

Mon 10/8/18

Removal Of Awnings Of ‘southern Exposure’

Remove Southern Exposure Windows 83 83

82

Fri 10/5/18

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site

DR IV E

UP

Fri 10/5/18 Mon 10/8/18

Exterior Door Removal Metal Roofing Removal

SE RV IC E

CONCRETE WALK TO REMAIN

TH LENG OM E BO

100'-0"

RE

AN

13'-9 1/8"

K

AL

W

TO

EXISTING SWINGSET TO REMAIN

CR

95

TE

RE

NC

CO

IN. "M 3/16

GRASS

AIN

M

EXISTING SWING-SET AREA TO REMAIN

86'-0

BLDG. TO BE DECONSTRUCTED

82

PLACEMENT OF EAST SIP WALLS TO BE CUT INTO 4X8 PANELS REFER TO SCHEDULE FOR DETAILS

95

Fri 10/5/18 Mon 10/8/18

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site Interior ‘southern Exposure’ Removal

94

Fri 10/5/18

Solar PV Panel Removal

Deconstruction Day 6 87

Fri 10/5/18

Metal Roofing Removal Transport Materials To Project RE_ On Flatbed

UP

Fri 10/12/18 Fri 10/12/18

RV

IC

E

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site

OV

ER

HA

NG

SE

Mechanical Equipment And Fixtures Removal

FENCE TO BE MOVED FOR CRANE ENTRY AND EXIT

2 9 O C T 2 0 1 8

F O R D E C O N

84

Window Removal

Mon 10/8/18

Mon 10/15/18

Loft Finishes Removal

Mon 10/15/19

Mon 10/15/19

SIP Resizing And Removal From Site

Mon 10/15/20

Mon 10/15/20

Transport Materials To Project RE_ On Flatbed

Mon 10/15/21

Mon 10/15/21

Deconstruction Day 12

Tue 10/16/18

Tue 10/16/18

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site

82

23

'-5

3/8

"

Loft LVL Removal

CONTACT NUMBERS ARCHITECT: URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS) C A R N EG IE ME L LON U N IV E R S IT Y 201 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS PITTSBURGH, PA 15213

Loft Floor And Joists Removal

Tue 10/16/18

Structure Removal

Tue 10/16/18

Tue 10/16/18 Tue 10/16/18 Tue 10/16/18

Transport Materials To Project RE_ On Flatbed

Tue 10/16/18

Tue 10/16/18

Deconstruction Day 13

Wed 10/17/18

Wed 10/17/18

Clean Site Of All Debris

Wed 10/17/18

Wed 10/17/18

Site Left With Concrete Deck And Foundation End Of Workday

Wed 10/17/18

Wed 10/17/18

End Of UDBS Scope

Wed 10/17/18

Wed 10/17/18

UDBS And De-construction Crew Work On Site

1 SITE PLAN SCALE: 3/32" = 1'-0"

G1.00

STEVE'S CAR PARKED WHEN CJ TRUCK ISN'T OPERATING DUMPSTER

Tue 10/16/18

JOHN FOLAN, AIA, LEED AP BD+C PENNSYLVANIA RA405452 DIRECTOR, UDBS W: 412.268.6260 C: 412.897.1619

01

1/2"

MOVEMENT OF WALL SIPs BY CRANE TO BE STACKED IN THE STAGING AREA

STACKING OF WALL SIPs IN THE STAGING AREA

92

CRANE OUTRIGGER PADS

61

CRANE OUTRIGGER PADS SET UP TO STABILIZE CRANE ON SITE

5"

50 TON CRANE IN OPERATION

GENERAL NOTES: 1. THESE DOCUMENTS ARE THE COPYRIGHTED PROPERTY AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OF THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS). THE DOCUMENTS ARE NOT TO BE REPRODUCED OR UTILIZED FOR ANY PURPOSE OTHER THAN ORIGINALLY INTENDED AND AS STIPULATED ON THE COVER SHEET AND TITLE BLOCK. USE OF THE DOCUMENTS FOR ANY PURPOSE, SPECIFICALLY STIPULATED OR NOT, SHALL BE GRANTED ONLY VIA AUTHORIZED WRITING BY THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO AND ITS DIRECTOR, JOHN FOLAN AIA, LEED AP. 2. NONE OF THE DOCUMENTS INCLUDED IN THE DRAWING INDEX ARE INTENDED TO BE CONSIDERED IN ISOLATION OF ONE ANOTHER. ALL PARTIES/ENTITIES UTILIZING THESE DOCUMENTS FOR COST ESTIMATION, BIDDING, QUANTITY SURVEY, AND/OR CONSTRUCTION SHALL CONSULT THE GENERAL NOTES AND INFORMATION LOCATED ON THIS SHEET AND ALL "G" SERIES (GENERAL INFORMATION AND DATA) SHEETS FOR INFORMATION AND CONDITIONS GOVERNING WORK DESCRIBED IN DOCUMENTS LISTED IN THE DRAWING INDEX BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH PROCUREMENT AND/OR CONSTRUCTION. GENERAL INFORMATION AND DATA SHEET(S) ("G") PROVIDE CODE, PROCEDURAL AND USE GUIDELINES GOVERNING ALL BID AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. ALL BIDDERS, ESTIMATING, AND PRICING SHALL UTILIZE COMPLETE SETS OF THE BIDDING AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS IN QUANTIFYING AND CONSTRUCTING. NEITHER THE OWNER, ARCHITECT, NOT URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS) ASSUMES RESPONSIBILITY FOR ERRORS, OMISSIONS, OR MISINTERPRETATIONS RESULTING FROM THE USE OF INCOMPLETE SETS OF BIDDING AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. 3. EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS WILL REMAIN UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE 4. MATERIAL YIELD WILL BE TRANSPORTED TO PROJECT RE_ UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE

2

2 9 O C T 2 0 1 8

A01

42

F O R D E C O N

10

104

A02 25

3.00

105 79

5 WALL SIPS STACKED

92

1 5/8"

2"

1 3/4"

/4"

Ø3

2"

4"

4"

1'-4"

4"

94

82

2 1/2"

"

Ø1

3/4

3

5"

6 SIP PICK POINT ELEVATION

WALL SIP CRANE OPERATION PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

NYLON STRAPS

SCALE: 1/4" = 1"

45

1/2"

61

CRANE LIFTING WALL SIP FROM FABRICATED PICK POINT

1'-4"

CARLISLE MEMBRANE LAYER ON EXTERIOR OF WALL SIP

51

45 DETAIL PHOTO OF FABRICATED 21" GALVANIZED STEEL PICK POINT FOR CLT WALL

61

Ø1 3/4"

5 SIP PICK POINT ELEVATION

2 CRANE HOOK PERSPECTIVE DETAIL

95

SCALE: 1/4" = 1"

NOT TO SCALE

51

52

51 51 PHOTO OF SITE AT THE BEGINNING OF CRANE DAY

61

61 92

45

KEY NOTES: 1. ¾” THK CEDAR EXTERIOR CLADDING 2. RED MAPLE INTERIOR CLADDING 3. ¼” CYPRESS PLYWOOD 4. ¾” THK x 3” WIDE OAK INTERIOR TONGUE-AND-GROOVE CLADDING 5. ⅜” THK OAK INTERIOR CEILING PANELS 6. 1" BIRCH HARDWOOD TRIM WITH P.U. COATING 7. 1/2" DOMESTIC BIRCH PLYWOOD SHEATHING WITH P.U. COATING 8. BIRCH HARDWOOD DADO BORDER WITH P.U. COATING 9. ¼” ASH PLYWOOD VENEER 10. GYPSUM WALL BOARD 11. BACKER ROD WITH DRY CAULK 12. HARDWOOD TRACK SHOE WITH GASKET SEAL 13. BIFOLD DOOR TRACK 111 SERIES BY JOHNSON HARDWARE 14. MILLED HARDWOOD DOOR WITH GASKET SEAL 15. STANDING SEAM METAL ROOFING 16. PERFORATED METALWORK 17. SOLID GALVANIZED STEEL AWNING 18. PERFORATED GALVANIZED STEEL AWNING 19. FIXED WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 20. AWNING WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 21. MIXED TYPE WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 22. SINGLE EXTERIOR DOOR METAL WITH INSET GLAZING AND STATIONARY PANEL 23. DOUBLE EXTERIOR DOOR METAL WITH INSET GLAZING 24. INTERIOR DOOR WOOD WITH INSET GLAZING 25. INTERIOR DOOR WOOD 26. EXTERIOR METAL DOOR FRAME 27. INTERIOR METAL DOOR FRAME 28. LADDER TO LOFT 29. PV PANELS BP5170 BP SOLAR MONO-CRYSTALLINE 30. RACK FOR PV PANELS 31. SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 32. RADIATOR FOR SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 33. 4” CELLULAR POLYCARBONATE INTERLOCKING PANEL 34. ⅝” TRIPLE WALL CELLULAR POLYCARBONATE 35. POLYCARBONATE EDGE DETAIL 36. ALUMINUM FRAMING FOR POLYCARBONATE 37. SHIM/BLOCKING 38. 3/4" RIGID INSULATION 39. 1" RIGID INSULATION 40. APA RATED OSB PLYWOOD SHEATHING FOR WALLS 41. OSB PLYWOOD SUBFLOOR 42. CLOSED CELL INSULATION 43. BIRCH PLYWOOD / RIGID INSULATION COMPOSITE CONSTRUCTION 44. 1” x 3” WOOD FURRING STRIPS 45. WALL MEMBRANE CCW 705 46. ICE AND WATER SHIELD 47. TCS GUTTER 48. TCS FLASHING 49. 10 GA GALVANIZED CARBON STEEL COLLAR 50. 20 GA GALVANIZED STEEL 51. PREFAB BRACKETS, 5/16” THK WELDED STEEL PLATE 52. 3-1/2” X 9-1/4” PSL MEMBER 53. LVL MEMBER 54. 2”X4” DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 55. 2”X6” DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 56. 2”X10" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 57. 2"X12" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 58. COMPOSITE LUMBER DECKING 59. COMPOSITE LUMBER RAILING 60. COMPOSITE LUMBER RISERS 61. 10 ¼” THK SIP 62. ¾” THK PLYWOOD 63. ⅜” THK PLYWOOD 64. WR GRACE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 65. 2’ 1-¾” LVL BLOCKING 66. C 10X22 STEEL CHANNEL 67. WT 9X32.5 STEEL SECTION 68. 18” DIA. CAST CONCRETE FOOTING W/ #4 BAR AND STL BEARING PLATE 69. 3½” THK POURED CONCRETE SLAB W/ EMBEDDED PEX TUBING 70. LIGHT FIXTURE 71. STAINLESS STEEL BAR HANDLE 72. WOODEN CUBBY 73. WOODEN KITCHEN CABINETRY SET 74. STAINLESS STEEL MICROWAVE 75. STAINLESS STEEL OVEN 76. STAINLESS STEEL STOVE 77. OPEN CELL SPRAY FOAM INSULATION 78. SEE MECHANICAL KEYNOTES 79. PREFAB BRACKETS, 1/2” THK STEEL PLATE 80. OSHA-COMPLIANT CRANE HOOK 81. SPREADER BAR 82. 8' 0" TALL CONSTRUCTION FENCE AT WORK AREA BOUNDARY BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 83. PORTABLE TOILET PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 84. 30 YARD ROLL OFF DUMPSTER PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 85. 180 DEGREE ACCESS GATE PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 86. EXISTING TREE 87. EXISTING LAMP POST 88. EXISTING CURB AND SIDEWALK 89. EXISTING PLUMBING EASEMENT/CONNECTIONS 90. 12' LONG X 8' WIDE X 3' HIGH 10-YARD ROLL OFF RECYCLING DUMPSTER PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 91. 35' ROLL OFF TRUCK FOR DELIVERY OF DUMPSTERS PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 92. 50-TON CAPACITY NATIONAL CRANE NBT50 MOUNTED ON A PETERBILT 359 4-AXLE CHASSIS WITH A 102’-0” BOOM LENGTH PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 93. FLAT BED TRUCK W/LIFT GATE FOR PORTABLE TOILET SERVICING PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 94. TEMPORARY ELECTRICAL SERVICE, 4 GFCI DUPLEX OUTLETS PROVIDED BY ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 95. SCAFFOLDING 96. PORCELAIN CAROMA DUAL FLUSH TOILET 97. PORCELAIN HAND SINK 98. BATHROOM FIXTURES 99. OAK RAILING 3' 6-1/8" LONG X 1' 0-9/16" WIDE, 44" ABOVE FLOOR 100. ¾” THICK X 3” WIDE BATHROOM DECKING 101. METAL SUPPORT FOR RAISED FLOOR PANEL 102. CONTINUOUS PIANO HINGE 103. 4”X3/4” PLYWOOD FLOOR PANEL 104. 2”X2” LVL FLOOR SPACER 105. STEEL FLOOR RISER

D01 DOOR REMOVAL

4

OAK FLOORING REMOVAL TOOLS NEEDED 1. CROW BAR 2. HAMMER 3. SCREW DRIVER

41 4

2.

3.

9

9

1ST FLOOR - FLOORING REMOVAL

4 SIP PICK POINT PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

82

S

6

73

GROUND FLOOR - FLOORING REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

4

42

UNSCREW THE HINGES FROM THE FRAME. START FROM THE UPPER SCREWS. REMOVE THE DOOR AND PLACE IT IN A SAFE PLACE.

54

69

42

3.

SLIDE THE CROW BAR UNDERNEATH THE DOOR TRIM AND PRY IT ON SECTION UNTIL LOOSE.

4.

SLIDE THE CROW BAR BETWEEN THE DOOR FRAME AND THE STUDS BESIDE IT . PRY THE FRAME TO LOOSE THE FASTENERS.

5.

WITH A RECIPROCATING SAW, CUT THE REMAIN NAILS AND REMOVE THE DOOR FRAME.

34

3 GROUND FLOOR - DOORS REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

34 54

10

4 4

7

7 54

10 34

4

54

10 34

42

4

7

54

4 34

7

42

23

4

4

23

POLYCARBONATE REMOVAL 73

TOOLS NEEDED 1. RATCHET 2. 5/16" SOCKET 3. SCREW DRIVER

54

4

WORKFORCE NEEDED: 1 PERSON

4

INSTRUCTION 1. REMOVE THE PLUG SOCKETS BY UNSCREWING THE PHILLIPS SCREWS 2.

WITH A RATCHET , REMOVE FIRST THE SCREWS ON THE BOTTOM OF THE POLYCARBONATE AND THEN MOVE TO THE TOP PARTUNTIL IT IS COMPLETELY LOOSE

8 8 1ST FLOOR - WALL FINISHES REMOVAL

40

OAK CLADDING REMOVAL

69

TOOLS NEEDED 1. CROW BAR 2. HAMMER

7 4

WORKFORCE NEEDED: 2 PEOPLE

34

INSTRUCTION 1. SLIDE THE CROW BAR UNDERNEATH THE CLADDING WITH THE USE OF A HAMMER.

69

5 GROUND FLOOR - POLYCARBONATE REMOVAL

2.

PRY THE CLADDING GENTLY ON SECTIONS WITHOUT TRYING TO REMOVE IT ALL AT ONCE.

3.

USE THE CROW BAR TO LEVER THE CLADDING AND HOLD THE BOARD PIECE SO IT DOES FALL ON THE GROUND.

4.

TAKE THE REMOVED PIECES TO THE DENAIL STATION.

24 24

2

GROUND FLOOR - WALL FINISHES REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

4

73

2

2

10

25

73

54

44

7 4

4

OF

37

4

4

CABINETRY REMOVAL

4

TOOLS NEEDED 1. SCREW DRIVER 2. #2 PHILLIPS DRIVING BIT WORKFORCE NEEDED: 2 PEOPLE

40 69

2.

PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

3.

34

THEN REMOVE THE SCREWS HOLDING THE CABINET TO THE WALL, LEAVING THE SCREWS AT THE TOP OF THE CABINET FOR LAST ONCE THE CABINET IS FREE FROM THE WALL, YOU AND A PARTNER CAN LIFT IT DOWN FROM THE SUPPORT

MAPLE CLADDING REMOVAL

73

KEY NOTES: ¾” THK CEDAR EXTERIOR CLADDING 1. 2. RED MAPLE INTERIOR CLADDING 3. ¼” CYPRESS PLYWOOD 4. ¾” THK x 3” WIDE OAK INTERIOR TONGUE-AND-GROOVE CLADDING 5. ⅜” THK OAK INTERIOR CEILING PANELS 6. 1" BIRCH HARDWOOD TRIM WITH P.U. COATING 7. 1/2" DOMESTIC BIRCH PLYWOOD SHEATHING WITH P.U. COATING 8. BIRCH HARDWOOD DADO BORDER WITH P.U. COATING 9. ¼” ASH PLYWOOD VENEER 10. GYPSUM WALL BOARD 11. BACKER ROD WITH DRY CAULK 12. HARDWOOD TRACK SHOE WITH GASKET SEAL 13. BIFOLD DOOR TRACK 111 SERIES BY JOHNSON HARDWARE 14. MILLED HARDWOOD DOOR WITH GASKET SEAL 15. STANDING SEAM METAL ROOFING 16. PERFORATED METALWORK 17. SOLID GALVANIZED STEEL AWNING 18. PERFORATED GALVANIZED STEEL AWNING 19. FIXED WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 20. AWNING WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 21. MIXED TYPE WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 22. SINGLE EXTERIOR DOOR METAL WITH INSET GLAZING AND STATIONARY PANEL 23. DOUBLE EXTERIOR DOOR METAL WITH INSET GLAZING 24. INTERIOR DOOR WOOD WITH INSET GLAZING 25. INTERIOR DOOR WOOD 26. EXTERIOR METAL DOOR FRAME 27. INTERIOR METAL DOOR FRAME 28. LADDER TO LOFT 29. PV PANELS BP5170 BP SOLAR MONO-CRYSTALLINE 30. RACK FOR PV PANELS 31. SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 32. RADIATOR FOR SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 33. 4” CELLULAR POLYCARBONATE INTERLOCKING PANEL 34. ⅝” TRIPLE WALL CELLULAR POLYCARBONATE 35. POLYCARBONATE EDGE DETAIL 36. ALUMINUM FRAMING FOR POLYCARBONATE 37. SHIM/BLOCKING 38. 3/4" RIGID INSULATION 39. 1" RIGID INSULATION 40. APA RATED OSB PLYWOOD SHEATHING FOR WALLS 41. OSB PLYWOOD SUBFLOOR 42. CLOSED CELL INSULATION 43. BIRCH PLYWOOD / RIGID INSULATION COMPOSITE CONSTRUCTION 44. 1” x 3” WOOD FURRING STRIPS 45. WALL MEMBRANE CCW 705 46. ICE AND WATER SHIELD 47. TCS GUTTER 48. TCS FLASHING 49. 10 GA GALVANIZED CARBON STEEL COLLAR 50. 20 GA GALVANIZED STEEL 51. PREFAB BRACKETS, 5/16” THK WELDED STEEL PLATE 52. 3-1/2” X 9-1/4” PSL MEMBER 53. LVL MEMBER 54. 2”X4” DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 55. 2”X6” DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 56. 2”X10" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 57. 2"X12" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 58. COMPOSITE LUMBER DECKING 59. COMPOSITE LUMBER RAILING 60. COMPOSITE LUMBER RISERS 61. 10 ¼” THK SIP 62. ¾” THK PLYWOOD 63. ⅜” THK PLYWOOD 64. WR GRACE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 65. 2’ 1-¾” LVL BLOCKING 66. C 10X22 STEEL CHANNEL 67. WT 9X32.5 STEEL SECTION 68. 18” DIA. CAST CONCRETE FOOTING W/ #4 BAR AND STL BEARING PLATE 69. 3½” THK POURED CONCRETE SLAB W/ EMBEDDED PEX TUBING 70. LIGHT FIXTURE 71. STAINLESS STEEL BAR HANDLE 72. WOODEN CUBBY 73. WOODEN KITCHEN CABINETRY SET 74. STAINLESS STEEL MICROWAVE 75. STAINLESS STEEL OVEN 76. STAINLESS STEEL STOVE 77. OPEN CELL SPRAY FOAM INSULATION 78. SEE MECHANICAL KEYNOTES 79. PREFAB BRACKETS, 1/2” THK STEEL PLATE 80. OSHA-COMPLIANT CRANE HOOK 81. SPREADER BAR 82. 8' 0" TALL CONSTRUCTION FENCE AT WORK AREA BOUNDARY BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 83. PORTABLE TOILET PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 84. 30 YARD ROLL OFF DUMPSTER PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 85. 180 DEGREE ACCESS GATE PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 86. EXISTING TREE 87. EXISTING LAMP POST 88. EXISTING CURB AND SIDEWALK 89. EXISTING PLUMBING EASEMENT/CONNECTIONS 90. 12' LONG X 8' WIDE X 3' HIGH 10-YARD ROLL OFF RECYCLING DUMPSTER PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 91. 35' ROLL OFF TRUCK FOR DELIVERY OF DUMPSTERS PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 92. 50-TON CAPACITY NATIONAL CRANE NBT50 MOUNTED ON A PETERBILT 359 4-AXLE CHASSIS WITH A 102’-0” BOOM LENGTH PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 93. FLAT BED TRUCK W/LIFT GATE FOR PORTABLE TOILET SERVICING PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 94. TEMPORARY ELECTRICAL SERVICE, 4 GFCI DUPLEX OUTLETS PROVIDED BY ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 95. SCAFFOLDING 96. PORCELAIN CAROMA DUAL FLUSH TOILET 97. PORCELAIN HAND SINK 98. BATHROOM FIXTURES 99. OAK RAILING 3' 6-1/8" LONG X 1' 0-9/16" WIDE, 44" ABOVE FLOOR 100. ¾” THICK X 3” WIDE BATHROOM DECKING 101. METAL SUPPORT FOR RAISED FLOOR PANEL 102. CONTINUOUS PIANO HINGE 103. 4”X3/4” PLYWOOD FLOOR PANEL 104. 2”X2” LVL FLOOR SPACER 105. STEEL FLOOR RISER

4

TOOLS NEEDED 1. SCREW DRIVER 2. #2 SQUARE DRIVING BIT

40

WORKFORCE NEEDED: 2 PEOPLE

INSTRUCTION 1. REMOVE THE SCREWS THAT CONNECT THE CABINET UNITS TO EACH OTHER.

7 1ST FLOOR - STAIR AND METAL WORK REMOVAL

44

54

28

21

2

23

62

PICK POINT LOCATIONS + WALL SIP CRANE DISASSEMBLY

E

W

KEY PLAN

TAKE THE REMOVED PIECES TO THE DENAIL STATION.

UNSCREW THE FLOOR SPACERS AND THEN THE FLOOR RISERS.

4

16

AS4.00

.00

AS3

NOT TO SCALE

2.

69

USE THE CROW BAR TO LEVER THE CLADDING.

PULL THE PEX TUBING AND THE ALUMINUM HEAT SHIELD WITH A PROPER GLOVE

6.

PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

79

1 WALL SIP CRANE OPERATION PERSPECTIVE

PRY THE CLADDING GENTLY ON SECTIONS WITHOUT TRYING TO REMOVE IT ALL AT ONCE.

4. 5.

54

WORKFORCE NEEDED: 1 PERSON INSTRUCTION 1. FOLD A PIECE OF CARDBOARD AND PLACE IT UNDER THE FAR END OF THE DOOR. THIS WILL STOP THE DOOR FROM TIPPING ONCE ALL OF ITS HINGES HAVE BEEN UNSCREWED.

41

34

7

4

N

MEP 59

104 105

PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

7

94

TOOLS NEEDED 1. SCREW DRIVER & PHILLIPS DRIVING BIT 2. CROW BAR 3. RECIPROCATING SAW

MEP 57

105

WORKFORCE NEEDED: 2 PEOPLE INSTRUCTION 1. SLIDE THE CROW BAR UNDERNEATH THE CLADDING WITH THE USE OF A HAMMER.

5000 FORBES AVENUE DE_CON 01 PITTSBURGH, PA 15213

DETAIL PHOTO OF FABRICATED 21" GALVANIZED STEEL PICK POINT FOR LOFT MODULE

SCALE: 1/4" = 1"

1 5/8"

2 9 O C T 2 0 1 8

F O R D E C O N

C01

62

7 SIP PICK POINT PLAN

37

41

4

AS

GENERAL NOTES: 1. THESE DOCUMENTS ARE THE COPYRIGHTED PROPERTY AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OF THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS). THE DOCUMENTS ARE NOT TO BE REPRODUCED OR UTILIZED FOR ANY PURPOSE OTHER THAN ORIGINALLY INTENDED AND AS STIPULATED ON THE COVER SHEET AND TITLE BLOCK. USE OF THE DOCUMENTS FOR ANY PURPOSE, SPECIFICALLY STIPULATED OR NOT, SHALL BE GRANTED ONLY VIA AUTHORIZED WRITING BY THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO AND ITS DIRECTOR, JOHN FOLAN AIA, LEED AP. 2. NONE OF THE DOCUMENTS INCLUDED IN THE DRAWING INDEX ARE INTENDED TO BE CONSIDERED IN ISOLATION OF ONE ANOTHER. ALL PARTIES/ENTITIES UTILIZING THESE DOCUMENTS FOR COST ESTIMATION, BIDDING, QUANTITY SURVEY, AND/OR CONSTRUCTION SHALL CONSULT THE GENERAL NOTES AND INFORMATION LOCATED ON THIS SHEET AND ALL "G" SERIES (GENERAL INFORMATION AND DATA) SHEETS FOR INFORMATION AND CONDITIONS GOVERNING WORK DESCRIBED IN DOCUMENTS LISTED IN THE DRAWING INDEX BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH PROCUREMENT AND/OR CONSTRUCTION. GENERAL INFORMATION AND DATA SHEET(S) ("G") PROVIDE CODE, PROCEDURAL AND USE GUIDELINES GOVERNING ALL BID AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. ALL BIDDERS, ESTIMATING, AND PRICING SHALL UTILIZE COMPLETE SETS OF THE BIDDING AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS IN QUANTIFYING AND CONSTRUCTING. NEITHER THE OWNER, ARCHITECT, NOT URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS) ASSUMES RESPONSIBILITY FOR ERRORS, OMISSIONS, OR MISINTERPRETATIONS RESULTING FROM THE USE OF INCOMPLETE SETS OF BIDDING AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. 3. EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS WILL REMAIN UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE 4. MATERIAL YIELD WILL BE TRANSPORTED TO PROJECT RE_ UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE

URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERISTY 5 0 0 0 F O R B E S A V E N U E 201 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS P I T T S B U R G H , P A 1 5 2 1 3

61

OF

5000 FORBES AVENUE DE_CON 01 PITTSBURGH, PA 15213

1 A3.00 ELEVATION TAG

Finish Fri 10/12/18

Mon 5/21/18

BxA Office Vacated

INSTRUCTION 1. HOLD THE DRILL PERPENDICULAR TO THE SCREW PRESSING IT AGAINST THE WALL MAKING SURE IT IS SET TO GO BACKWARDS 2.

4 GROUND FLOOR - CABINETRY REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

69 34 24

START BY THE BOTTOM SCREWS ON THE BOARDS BY UNSCREWING THEM.

3.

HAVE SOMEONE TO HELP HOLDING THE BOARD WHILE REMOVING THE UPPER SCREWS.

4.

WORK BY CLADDING BOARD, DO NOT START UNSCREWING ANOTHER BOARD WITHOUT FINISHING TO REMOVE THE PREVIOUS ONE.

5.

CAREFULLY PLACE THE REMOVED BOARD IN A SAFE PLACE AND STORE THE SCREWS IN A PROPER BOWL.

24

1 GROUND FLOOR - MAPLE CLADDING REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

12

OF

ISOLATED INTERIOR EXPLODED PERSPECTIVES

NOTE DESIGNATION

Start Mon 5/21/18

Preparation Before Deconstruction

AS3.06

15 KEYNOTE TAG

Task Name DE_CON01

URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERISTY 5 0 0 0 F O R B E S A V E N U E 201 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS P I T T S B U R G H , P A 1 5 2 1 3

SYMBOLS LEGEND:

DRAWING INDEX: G0.00 COVER SHEET G1.00 GENERAL INFORMATION + SITE PLAN AS1.00 - OVERALL PERSPECTIVES AS2.00 - DISASSEMBLY AXON SERIES AS2.01 - DISASSEMBLY AXON SERIES AS2.02 - DISASSEMBLY AXON SERIES AS3.00 - MEP SYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE + MECHANICAL ROOM LAYOUT AS3.01 - PV PANEL EXPLODED PERSPECTIVE AS3.02 - ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE AS3.03 - MECHANICAL SYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE AS3.04 - PLUMBING SYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE AS3.05 - OVERALL INTERIOR EXPLODED PERSPECTIVE AS3.06 - ISOLATED INTERIOR EXPLODED PERSPECTIVES AS3.07 - INTERIOR PLANS AS3.08 - SOUTHERN EXPOSURE EXPLODED PERSPECTIVES AS3.09 - SOUTHERN EXPOSURE ELEVATIONS AS3.10 - POLYCARBONATE EXPLODED PERSPECTIVE AS3.11 - WINDOWS + DOORS EXPLODED PERSPECTIVE AS3.12 - ROOF EXPLODED PERSPECTIVES AS3.13 - STRUCTURE EXPLODED PERSPECTIVE AS3.14 - STRUCTURE DETAILS AS4.00 - PICK POINT LOCATIONS + WALL SIP CRANE DISASSEMBLY AS4.01 - ROOF SIP CRANE DISASSEMBLY AS4.02 - LVL BRACING AND DISASSEMBLY PERSPECTIVE AS4.03 - LOFT MODULE CRANE DISASSEMBLY A1.00 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 1 A1.01 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 2 A1.02 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 3 A1.03 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 4 A1.04 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 5 A1.05 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 6 A1.06 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 7 A1.07 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 8 A1.08 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 9 A1.09 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 10 A1.10 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 11 A1.11 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 12 A1.12 DISASSEMBLY PLANS DAY 13

PROJECT CONTEXT: DE_CON01 WILL INVOLVE THE DECONSTRUCTION OF CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY’S ENTRY TO THE DOE’S 2005 SOLAR DECATHLON COMPETITION. THE PROJECT IS LOCATED ON THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, OFF OF MARGARET MORRISON STREET.

GENERAL INFORMATION

THE FOLLOWING NARRATIVE AND ANALYSIS ARTICULATES THE DECONSTRUCTION OF THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY SOLAR DECATHLON HOUSE LOCATED IN DONNER DITCH.

URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERISTY 5 0 0 0 F O R B E S A V E N U E 201 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS P I T T S B U R G H , P A 1 5 2 1 3

ABBREVIATIONS: SF = SQUARE FEET UDBS = URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO " = INCHES ' = FEET

37


Images, opposite, from top: Site plan for the DE_CON 01 (De)construction Documents set utilized to coordinate with the general contractor, CMU Facilities Management and various subcontractors regarding issues such as crane operation paths, dumpster locations, truck access paths and loading zones, temporary electrical hookups and material staging locations; Documents in the DE_CON 01 (De)construction Documents set that communicate strategies for deconstruction and removal of materials from the building; The DE_CON 01 GAME developed in collaboration with the IDeATe Reality Computing cohort, which explores the potential of

virtual reality as a platform for low-barrier, off-site job skills training related to building deconstruction. Images, above, from top: Comprehensive deconstruction schedule developed by UDBS and Architecture– Engineering–Construction Management (AECM) students utilized to document and understand issues related to time, sequencing, task-overlap and labor requirements during DE_CON 01; Material metrics graphics depicting quantities of each material harvested from the deconstruction, labor required, tools utilized and estimated potential for reuse or recycling.

83


RE_CON 01 + 02

RE_CONSTRUCTING AUTHENTICITY The spring 2019 Urban Design Build Studio (UDBS) develops work and expands research on the relationship between infrastructure, policy and alternative construction practices initiated in fall 2018. In the spring, emphasis shifts from analytical to physical. This studio develops and demonstrates construction processes that exploit the potential of design for deconstruction (DFD) in single-family housing oriented toward the deconcentration of poverty. An emerging concept, DFD borrows strategies from upcycle design and fabrication processes, such as design for disassembly, reuse, manufacturing and recycling in consumer product industries. Considering the regional social, economic and environmental factors influencing Pittsburgh’s built landscape, UDBS leverages the merits of upcycle and downcycle DFD principles to create an authentic, placespecific housing prototype (RE_CON 01) for the East Liberty neighborhood; RECONSTRUCTING AUTHENTICITY from material that previously contributed to blight. The studio also expands the use of Reality Computing (capture, compute, create) technologies explored in collaboration with the IDeATe program. Capture, augmented reality and virtual reality technologies advance the studio’s design work, enhancing the efficacy of communication with residents and stakeholders and increasing transparency in the design process.

Images, above: Diagram illustrating 1) proposed strategies for material reuse, job skills training, passive and active environmental design strategies, design for deconstruction and quality of space to be implemented in two market-rate homes, RE_CON 01 and RE_CON 02, in Pittsburgh’s East Liberty neighborhood 2) the RE_CON economic model developed in partnership with East Liberty Development, Inc. (ELDI), which combats gentrification and supports the development of a healthy, mixed-income community by utilizing profits from the sale of market-rate homes to cover improvement costs for existing residents and 3) the network of partners involved with the RE_CON housing initiative. Right, from left: ELDI Community Planning Committee discusses RE_CON 01 and RE_CON 02 housing proposals with stakeholders and residents; UDBS student tests the RE_CON Virtual Reality experience developed in collaboration with IDeATE Reality Computing; Basswood sectional model of RE_CON 01.

84

INSTRUCTOR John Folan STUDENTS B.Arch Miranda Ford Alison Katz Timothy Khalifa Gargi Lagvankar Alex Lin Christine Zhu M.Arch Kyle Bancroft Jacob Clare Ever Clinton Srinjoy Hazra Anthony Kosec Lana Kozlovskaya Fernanda Mazzilli Shailaja Patel Yashwitha Reddy Ryan Smerker Jay Tyan IDeATE Reality Computing Anjali Balamurugan Bolaji Bankole John Butler Hannah Cai Emily deGrandpre Davis Dunaway Vivian He Meijie Hu Jen Kwang Dorcas Lin Miranda Luong Alejandro Murillo Joel Neely Jaclyn Saik Kevin Thies Elliot Toy Mira Zeitlin Sabrina Zhai Jiahao Zhou Vicky Zhou Jason Zhu

CONNECTION TO OUTDOORS

Kitchen located adjacent to back porch and backyard featuring a pass-through window to encourage social uses and interaction with nature.

RADIANT FLOOR HEATING Heating system zoned for energy efficiency that reduces energy bills and provides tactile comfort at the human scale. This is an add alternate that has the potential to compel market innovation in Pittsburgh.

RE_CON 01 + 02 HOUSING PROJECT

+$18,000

RE-INSULATION OF HOME FACILITATED BY OPEN HAND MINISTRIES AND ELDI

+$

WINDOW

FACILITATED BY

315 & 317 N ST CLAIR STREET, PITTSBURGH, PA


TITLE Subtitle

WALL TO ROOF CONNECTION

ROOF DECK Roof decks add market value and private outdoor space to new construction, thus maximising profits that can be redistributed to the neighborhood.

OPTIMAL DAYLIGHTING Large windows on southern and northern facades provide bedrooms with varying, but optimal lighting conditions paired with smaller perpendicular eastern and western windows to minimize glare.

PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAY Features a 7.2 Kw array and inverter to offset electricity usage by 8300 Kwh annually and lower occupant’s utility bill. This is an add alternate.

JOB SKILLS TRAINING Deconstruction, new construction and material processing can provide various transferable skills to individuals involved in the building trades, giving them a chance to earn a living wage

PANELIZED CONSTRUCTION

Framing components are panelized to increase quality, lessen construction waste, and reduce on-site risk through prefabrication while providing opportunities for job skill training through PROJECT RE_.

Photovoltaic Panels McElroy Metal Roof Panel 5/8” OSB Sheathing 4” XPS Rigid Insulation 5/8” OSB Sheathing with fluid applied air barrrier

HPCP rainscreen cladding Hat Channels Z-Girts Cascadia Clips

2x12 Roof joists with dense packed cellulose cavity insulation

HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE PANEL (HPCP) End-of-run, durable, high performance concrete panels produced by a regional manufacturer are diverted from landfill and utilized on the front and back facades creating a street presence and providing opportunities for job skill training through PROJECT RE_.

2” XPS Rigid Insulation Fluid applied air barrier 5/8” OSB sheathing

WINDOW SEAT FROM RECLAIMED LUMBER Use of reclaimed oak flooring from DE_CON on windows in home as interior window sill in third floor bedrooms, master bedroom and kitchen.

Prefabricated 2x6 offset stud wall panel system with dense packed cellulose cavity insulation

2x12 Floor joists with subfloor and add alternate radiant floor heating

STORMWATER PLANTER Reduces both the amount and flow rate of stormwater.Naturally treats the water stream by capturing and filtering pollutants

2” XPS Rigid Insulation with vapor barrier Ivany block foundation

+$10,000

ROOF REPAIR

FACILITATED BY OPEN HAND MINISTRIES

WALL TO FOUNDATION CONNECTION

EFFICIENT MECHANICAL SYSTEMS Concealed, ducted mini split heat pumps minimize invasive ductwork and are paired with ventilators which provide zoned comfort and user control in primary spaces.

MATERIAL REUSE RE_CON 01 and RE_CON 02 celebrate and promote local identity using materials from local deconstruction projects reconnecting new construction to its place and maintaining authencity across the neighborhood.

RESPONSIBLE PAVING Permeable surface minimizes water runoff. Enables use of driveway as social space with an immediate connection to the street.

$15,000

WS REPLACED

Y OPEN HAND MINISTRIES

+$20,000

HVAC RETROFIT

FROM ELDI ESCROW FUND

RE_CON is a broad housing strategy being developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Urban Design Build Studio and Project RE_ in partnership with East Liberty Development Incorporated (ELDI). The goal of RE_CON is to deconcentrate poverty and combat gentrification in Pittsburgh’s blighted neighborhoods by fostering the development of healthy, mixed income communities. Collaboration since 2017 has led to to the development of an economic model which leverages new market tax credits, where the profit from the sale of the market rate homes is then set aside by ELDI into an escrow fund that is dedicated to stabilizing long term neighborhood residents, and supporting renovation and repair efforts in the affordable housing sector, here shown as the orange homes. The project works in tandem with DE_CON, a program to harvest materials through deconstruction which will incorporate job skill training in order to provide individuals with access to a living wage. These two programs are inextricably linked and together aspire to support the creation of socially, economically and environmentally sustainable neighborhoods. funds allocated toward stabilization of existing residents in their home from RE_CON

85


EXTERIOR

FRONT PORCH

VIEW FROM PORCH ACROSS N. ST. CLAIR ST. TOWARDS RE_CON 01 & RE_CON 02

The below view depicts the view of RE_CON 01 and RE_CON 02 from a porch across the street. The view portrays how the streetscaping and landscaping begin to create a more lively and active neighborhood which reinforces Pittsburgh’s porch culture.

VIEW APPROACHING RE_CON 01

The below view depicts the front porch as a place of communal congregation. The design aspires to celebrate Pittsburgh’s porch culture which fosters a sense of community, social interaction and safety. The market-driven garage below the porch is a secondary space that the inhabitants can grow into.

Locally manufactured, end of run high performance concrete panel rain screen wall system fabricated at PROJECT RE_

Gutter to collect water run off from roof and channel into the rain water gardens underneath

Full length glazing extends living room outdoors onto an elevated porch

Vestibule provides a threshold between the outside and inside spaces as well as an air stop to reduce air infiltration

Steel angles to create a screen that continues the language of the metal panel siding while providing privacy and allowing light to flood in

Fox sedge planters

Wild hydrangea planters

Reclaimed lumber raingarden planters to collect water run off from the gutter

Entrance to garage which also functions as a secondary communal space with softscaped exterior that exhibit lush, inviting sensibilities

TOPOGRAPHY Site re-graded with soil from basement excavation in order to manage on site water within lot lines

FOX SEDGE Carex vulpinoidea - Robust perennial sedge, provides soft visual barrier - Grows well in wet soil -Native to region, 2-4ft tall

ENGLISH IVY Hedera helix - Vine, good for vertical surfaces. - Visual connectivity with neighbors - Evergreen, needs to be maintained to avoid overgrowth

RE_CON proposal replicated across the street opposite to 315 and 317 N St Clair St

Evergreen vegetation like English Ivy soften typically rough surfaces of driveways and foundations, thus encouraging social use of space

EXISTING TREES Trees to remain during construction as feasible, if not, same species will be re-planted to maintain local landscape

YELLOW MARSH MARIGOLD Caltha palustris - Perennial, flowering shrub - Suited to wet - Native to the region - Low maintenance, high flower yield

Site cast concrete rumble tracks lead to the basement garage, which allow for the driveway to have multifunctional purposes and promotes communal use of another space that interacts with the street. This bridges the social disconnection caused by the market driven garage.

DRIVEWAY

Grasscrete permeable pavers to reduce water run off and soften the landscape

Reclaimed cypress siding adds warmth and character along driveway wall and maintains authenticity of place by using materials sourced from regional building deconstruction

STORMWATER PLANTER - Reduces both the amount and flow rate of stormwater - Naturally treats the water stream by capturing and removing pollutants

GRASS PAVERS Precast + lawn - Permeable surface reduces stormwater runoff more than a lawn - Easy to maintain

LANDSCAPING

VIEW FROM INTERIOR OF GARAGE SPACE OF RE_CON 01

The above image looks out to N St Clair St from the basement entrance. It illustrates the use of the driveway as a secondary public space within the community, adjacent to the elevated porch on the left.

WHITE TURTLEHEAD Chelone glabra - Perennial, 1-4ft tall - Native to the region, suited to we. White blooms - Low maintenance

WILD HYDRANGEA Hydrangea arborescens - Perennial and native to the region - Attracts birds and bees - Does well in moist soils and adds color to landscape

VIEW FROM SIDEWALK ACROSS N. ST. CLAIR ST. TOWARDS RE_CON 01 AND RE_CON 02

The use of landscaping strategies in RE_CON 01 and RE_CON 02 incorporate a plethora of regional plants to populate rainwater collection systems and site while softening the streetscape.

UP. 12 12

DN

DN.

DN 4 12 12 6

UP.

UP

UP OPEN TO BELOW

12 12 12 6

PORCH ABOVE

PORCH BELOW

PORCH BELOW

PORCH BELOW

UP. UP.

Top: Exterior and site strategies for RE_CON 01 and RE_CON 02 presented to the ELDI Community Planning Committee in May 2019. Above: RE_CON 01 house plans illustrating market-rate scheme.

86


BEDROOM

KITCHEN

VIEW OF KID’S BEDROOM AT THE SOUTH EASTERN END OF RE_CON 01

The children’s bedroom of RE_CON 01 occupies the third floor of the home taking advantage of the interior surfaces of the intersecting gable roof to create a space of intrigue and wonder. The southeastern facing windows allow for morning sunlight to come in and frames views of the street.

Add alternate: Photovoltaic panels offset the energy consumption and reduce the homeowner’s reliance on the city’s energy grid, minimizing their environmental footprint

Clerestory windows provide ample natural, lateral daylighting without compromising the privacy of the first floor spaces

VIEW OF KITCHEN FROM DINING AREA IN RE_CON 01

The kitchen is designed as an integrated social space, where people preparing food have clear lines of sight extending through the entire first floor.

Direct access to outdoors through casement windows extend social activities out to the backyard

The pantry provides auxiliary storage space for food, cleaning supplies, and other household items

Visitable bathroom access located perpendicular to kitchen for increased privacy

Casework provides additional storage and seating and is made out of reclaimed lumber from DE_CON 01. Using materials from local deconstruction projects connects new construction to its place and maintains authencity across the neighborhood EnergyStar rated appliances reduce energy consumption and utility bills

Upcycled countertop made of reclaimed stone from Building Salvage adds local character while diverting material from landfill

16 linear feet of kitchen cabinetry for storage space

Adjacent windows allow cross ventilation to maximize comfort in an infill lot with a casement window on the front and back facades which catch side breezes

End of run high performance concrete panel rain screen enclosure produced at PROJECT RE_

Master bedroom overlooks backyard, framing views and maximizing daylighting in an infill lot

Walk in closet maximizes storage and increases the marketability of home

Master bathroom with a double vanity and shower

Opening to upper levels provides visual and auditory connection to rest of house, as well as a connection to the outside through the second floor windows

Double-height living room space introduces natural light and creates a grand social room

Bi-lateral lighting through clerestory windows serves to expand dimensions of space

Upcycled lighting fixture made from solar thermal collector tubes reclaimed from DE_CON 01, the pilot deconstruction project

Direct morning sunlight activates and energizes the space

Vertical circulation and auxilary spaces on the first floor are consolidated to one side of the house to allow for open floor plan

Open floor plan creates a flexible space to entertain, socialize, and organize

Casement windows open to fully catch breezes but also to offers higher security and energy efficiency than other window types when closed

MASTER BEDROOM

Reclaimed lumber surface paneling, sourced from local deconstruction adds warmth and regional character to space increase appeal for an environmentally conscious generation of homebuyer

Reclaimed vanity from building salvage fitted out with modern bathroom fixtures

VIEW OF MASTER SUITE OF RE_CON 01

The above view depicts the master bedroom with evening light from the north west facing window. The bedroom is connected to a walk in closet and a bathroom for private master suite.

Top: Renderings of interiors and proposed strategies for the RE_CON 01 and RE_CON 02 houses presented to the ELDI Community Planning Committee in May 2019. Photos, from left: Alongside the RE_CON housing, the HOME INCUBATOR was designed and built to serve as a public outreach and community engagement tool to collect interviews about housing with East End residents. The HOME INCUBATOR folds out to serve as a conversation platform; UDBS students presented the HOME INCUBATOR in May 2019; At the ELDI May 2019 Community

LIVING ROOM

VIEW OF LIVING ROOM IN RE_CON 01

Sunlight breathes life into the open first floor plan. A double-height living room connects to dining, kitchen, and eventually the backyard. The living room aspires to serve as the primary social gathering space, providing the homeowner with a grand room to entertain family, neighbors, and friends.

Planning Committee meeting, residents and stakeholders visualized the RE_CON housing proposals in virtual reality through a tool developed with IDeATe Reality Computing students; The RE_CON VR tool allows users to navigate the proposed housing designs to understand the buildings’ spatial and experiential qualities; the VR tool also allows users to understand how the proposed designs would fit into the existing neighborhood context.

87


BRAINHUB

Harnessing Technology that Helps the World Explore Brain & Behavior Brain science lies at the intersection of biology, neuroscience, psychology, computer science, statistics, art and engineering. CMU is a leader in the frontiers of brain and behavioral science research— neuroscience, cognition, learning, data overload, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and rejuvenation–and is planning a new 30,000 sq.ft. laboratory on its Pittsburgh campus.

INSTRUCTORS Vivian Loftness Charles Klee, Principal, Payette Associates, Boston STUDENTS

This studio, BrainHub: Harnessing Technology that Helps the World Explore Brain and Behavior, asks: will the architecture be form-fit to the traditions of scientific and technological research and education, or will the architecture be designed to transform the research process and product? The diverse expertise in health and cognition that CMU researchers bring to this innovative hub demands programmatic innovation— adjacencies, transparencies and flexibilities that conventional lab buildings undervalue.

B.Arch Gunn Chaiyapatranun Jonathan Cheng Alessandra Fleck Jamie Ho Lingfan Jiang Aaron Lee Sophie Lee Nicole Lee-Park Nayoung Sohn Ophelie Tousignant Kai Zhang M.Arch Davey Suchoza III

Research on the brain’s cognitive, neurological, skeletal, visual, audial and other integrated systems challenges the architect to focus on advanced building systems—enclosure, structure, conditioning and spatial systems as well as systems integration—as a generative, creative force in design. The future of cognition and neurological health stresses the importance of designing to the most visionary standards of regenerative design for a sustainable future.

Human Neuroscience (EEG/Auditory/Visual etc)

Lab Support/Computational

Write Up

Bench Lab

Medium-High Intensity Labs

Circulation & Collaboration

Labs visually open to public

Labs less open to public

Satellite Vivarium (non-accessible by public)

Robotics/Future Lab Teaching Lab #3 (large)

Lab Support

Microscopy/Computational Suites Teaching Lab #2 (small) Microscopy/Computational Suites

Lab Support

Teaching Lab #1 (small)

Children’s School Seminar Rooms & Colloquium Underground Parking & Loading fMRI Suite

sectional perspective scale | 1/8 in = 1 feet

Photovoltaic panels to harvest sun’s energy and use within building

Rooftop can collect rainwater and provide irrigation to the green wall Facade allows windows to be pulled back for more shade Horizontal shading for south facade Magic HVAC sill installation per office space (prevents ducts from traveling to other side of building)

Motorised operable windows for ventilation of the atrium Penthouse and mechanical are stacked vertically along the corner of the east facade and serves the floors individually Louvers to bring in outdoor air into the vertical penthouse

Double skin glass facade (Separation per floor to allow trapped heat to be reused in the winter)

Operable windows to naturally ventilate the circulation and shared spaces

Horizontal louvers for shade (Upper half reflects daylight deeper into space)

axonometric scale | 1/16 in = 1 feet

88

Jamie Ho


Jonathan Cheng

Aaron Lee

Gunn Chaiyapatranun

Nicole Lee-Park

89


Kai Zhang

Ophelie Tousignant

Ryan Jiang

Scale: 1’ = 1/64”

Alessandra Fleck

Davey Suchoza

90


Jonathan Cheng

Sophie Lee

Gunn Chaiyapatranun

Sally Sohn

Nicole Lee-Park

91


LOW RELIEF Despite Modern architecture’s insistence on truthfulness of material, architects before and since the modern movement have deployed an array of techniques to trick the senses, including the use of faux materials, forced perspective and applied media to walls and ceilings (e.g., frescoes). Low Relief: Virtual and Material Cultures of Architectural Deceit studies the material cultures of deceit in architectural design and construction. The studio explores architectural illusion not just as a visual technique, but as a precise shaping of physical material and the blending of hybrid media forms in three dimensions. Low Relief is motivated by the proliferation of virtual reality in contemporary media, and seeks to position the built environment as a proto-virtual interface. If a latent virtuality exists in architecture’s past, can historical precedent frame the use of emerging digital technologies—like robotics, projection mapping and reality capture—to explore new expressions of architectural duplicity? In order to address this question, Low Relief uses historical research, hands-on material play and full-scale prototyping of architectural elements to explore contemporary architectural culture.

INSTRUCTORS Joshua Bard Francesca Torello STUDENTS B.Arch Ryan Auld Keon Ho Lee Kelly Lu Michael Powell Monica Toren Dingkun Wang M.Arch Yingyang Zhou MAAD Joonyoung Choi Zhiheng Jiao Shang Liu Jichen Wang

DEVELOPING PROC

92

Initial Concept Images We imagined an observer capture the simi


oint generation

2. extract brightness values

Box Configuration

8

locate z-values

4. points density control

angulation

6. mesh surface created

CESS

er panel generation sequence

d to experiment with three-dimensional try and believed it would be different st projecting on a flat surface. Plaster e appropriate material to generate the ed form because of its clean whitend malleability that can easily follow ape. rface itself is generated by analyzing ghtness of each point on the photo of 10

ilarity between two

the space. On the scale of 0 to 1, when the brightest spot becomes 1 and the darkest one 0, the Z value of each point is decided.

Illusion

Augmented Reality

One of the spatial characteristics of CFA Great Hall is the symmetry influenced by Beaux Arts. Mirror reflection creates the continuity of space as the real space, and also generates optical illusion which reverses the sides. however, recognizing the change of the sides would be difficult because of the symmetry of the space. On the contrary, if mirrors are not installed, the observer will less feel about sense of space.

We experimented architectural AR with the juxtaposition of real space and reinterpreted space by projecting the real-time scene on the plaster surface. Although recognizing the similarity between real space and reinterpreted space depends on the resolution of the projection, the spatial symmetry also helps us envision the half covered space. In such way, the exploration between perception and reality begins. 11

Joonyoung Choi, Zhiheng Jiao, Shang Liu

93


Plaster Object

Mould

Projector Footing

Iterative Process While the exact site of our project has changed over the design process, the form and orientation consistently focused on the mirroring of perspectives to create the illusion of more space, in opposition to the space Hornbostle wished to hide between the two colleges. In reference to the Great Hall, our plaster block was carved into a barrel vault that is able to nestle itself into the Dean’s office doorway. We were drawn towards this specific doorway because of the plaster ornament around it which would typically be used as an entrance into a building, but within in the space feels like a point of exit. This peculiar element became the driving force within the design. Playing with the objects size, shape, and location we explored to create a forced perspective within the space. In response to the visually limiting space outside, we articulated an expansive corridor that appears to stretch along the campus axis.

Components different of final display. techniques

Building on these illusionary tactics, we located a specific point in he hall for spectators to be sucked into this false space. Throughout the process the magic box worked to build upon issues of illusion in order to seamlessly exist in this space. The object soon developed a relationship with the stairs as the stairs added to the complexity of the form. From the right position the stairs within in the object dissolve into the physical stairs of the hall.

Siting of object within the College of Fine Arts.

Keon Ho Lee, Michael Powell, Dingkun Wang

94


20

Fig. 2 - Compositional of Ornament on Classical and Modernist Columns

Keon Ho Lee, Michael Powell, Monica Toren, Dingkun Wang

Fig. 13- Exploded axon of full assembly

18

95


ACUPUNCTURE URBANISM URBAN COLLABORATORY STUDIO In spring 2019, the Urban Collaboratory Studio worked with Community Forge, a citizen-led initiative that is transforming Wilkinsburg’s former vacant school into a community and youth center. Community Forge is committed to youth empowerment, community collaboration, organizational incubation and neighborhood well-being. Together with community members young and old, the studio, redesigning the center’s outdoor spaces and transforming the former schoolyard into a shared resource for the wider neighborhood. In weekly participatory design workshops with Community Forge youth, the studio supported the development of ideas and helped to translate them into a coherent design strategy. The resulting urban design framework is an archipelago of islands programmed for diverse activities. The islands will be implemented incrementally over time, depending on funding and volunteer work available. Aimed at setting the transformation in motion, the studio completed the first island, “the field,” which integrates games and sports in an educational landscape. The “playground island” was implemented in the summer of 2019 with the support of a KaBOOM! grant. In a collaborative setting, within 15 weeks students went from exploring and analyzing the urban milieu of Wilkinsburg, to facilitating participatory design workshops with the community, to developing and implementing a strategic design intervention that promises to act as an urban catalyst for the neighborhood revitalization, or urban acupuncture.

96

INSTRUCTOR Stefan Gruber STUDENTS B.Arch Ghalya Alsanea Fon Euchkanonchai Mounica Guturu Min Young Jeong Ritchie Ju Rachel Park Shariwa Sharada Scarlet Tong Chitika Vasudeva M.Arch Mariana Alberola Rezza Gautam Jagdish Thakkar


Overall urban design framework

97


Quiet Bench

Music Bench

Play Bench

Design-build

Community workshop

Site exploration

Early concept sketch

Co-design charette Quiet Bench

98

Music Bench

Testing prototype

Play Bench

Garden Bench

Garden Bench


Quiet Bench

Music Bench

Play Bench

Mus

Garden Bench

The red porch

Design-build

Play Island

Volunteer day

99


IDENTITY & MAKING THE AMERICAN MASHUP What do we have in common and what connects us? How do we articulate our identity? Every day is composed of a multitude of elements; these elements are the combination of traditions, beliefs, values and belongings. Similar to a recipe, or folklore, the components can be reconstituted and remixed to produce different new results affecting people, places, things and events. We took up the tactic of the mashup to explore the identity and context of the American “melting pot.� What does combining cultural and spatial traditions and typologies do to affect and transform our built reality? How can we initiate a dialogue between people, places and things?

INSTRUCTOR Heather Bizon STUDENTS B.ARCH Zane Birenbaum Irfan Haider Isadora Martins Benita Nartey Ryan Smith M.ARCH Cassidy Rush Bryan Trew William Ulmer

This studio took up the notion of aesthetics and play relative to architecture and culture. Play makes room for much that is not possible in reality: to slip into roles outside oneself, to take risks without consequences and to challenge the codes and customs of society. Can activism through play and pageantry create public discourse? It is through the interaction, experience and discourse that we create our identities. As designers and makers, it is in the process of making proposals and making reactions where collaboration and dialogue, coupled with making as thinking, test and create new futures. Focusing on design at a multitude of scales, how do the people of the site become a place itself?

Design No. 2

100


Irfan Haider

Plate No. 7 William Ulmer

Cassidy Rush

Ryan Smith

101


Bryan Trew + Cassidy Rush

Cassidy Rush + Irfan Haider

Bryan Trew + Cassidy Rush

Cassidy Rush + Irfan Haider

STEPTREK

Will Ulmer + Benita Nartey

Cassidy Rush + Irfan Haider

Will Ulmer + Benita Nartey

102


Design No. 2

Plate No. 1

Design No. 3

Plate No. 1

Design No. 1

Plate No. 1

Cassidy Rush

SOUTHSIDE SLOPES

TROY HILL

POLISH HILL

William Ulmer

Will Ulmer + Irfan Haider

103


LINE, PLANE, VOLUME & TIME FOUR-DIMENSIONAL ARCHITECTURE While architectural space is largely threedimensional and static, human occupancy is inherently four-dimensional and dynamic. The volumes and masses defined in threedimensional space are dramatically altered by the occupant’s experience of them through time, the fourth dimension. This studio used the World Trade Center Performing Arts Center site as a vehicle to explore each of the four dimensions in sequence by extrapolating them into their architectural analogs in terms of occupancy: 1) line = path (narrative) 2) plane = program (rhythm) 3) volume = space (hierarchy) 4) time = sequence (procession)

INSTRUCTOR Hal Hayes STUDENTS B.Arch Anirudh Anand Xin Chen Zhi Tao Chen Denise Jiang Yugyeong Lee Zhuoying Lin Jihoon Park Somin Shim Selena Zhen M.Arch Chaz Barry Maddi Johnson Liale Nijem

A new experimental multi-venue performing arts center, currently proposed for New York City’s World Trade Center, is the vehicle for this semester-long study. The studio also considers the development of a conceptual narrative that is responsive to the program, the historical and social significance of the Ground Zero site, the role and function of this performing arts center within Manhattan’s rich performance ecosystem and the changing demographics of Lower Manhattan. A corequisite to this studio, Theater Architecture, provides the opportunity for a deeper, more focused exploration of the typology and predesign research than is typically possible in a semester-long studio. Interdisciplinary teams facilitate collaborative research between architecture students and students and faculty from CMU’s Drama and Master of Arts Management programs. A field trip to New York early in the semester included a site visit; meetings with the architecture firms’ teams that designed WTC Towers One & Seven (SOM)—and are designing the actual Perelman Performing Arts Center at the WTC site (REX); performances on Broadway and at Lincoln Center and tours of those theaters and other venues. A final presentation of the studio’s work to the REX design team is planned for summer 2019.

104

Blair Chen


Zhi Tao Chen

Anirudh Anand

105


Denise Jiang

106


Zhi Tao Chen

Denise Jiang

Somin Shim

107


BIRTH RIGHTS The maternal mortality rate in the United States is increasing; the U.S. is one of only 13 countries to have more maternal deaths today than 25 years ago. According to the Center for Disease Control, black women are three to four times more likely to die in childbirth or in the first year after than their white counterparts. Black infants are twice as likely to die as white infants. How can we envision a more holistic approach to mother and infant care that accounts for racial, socioeconomic, access and age disparities in communities around Pittsburgh? Working with members of the Pittsburgh birth community, Birth Rights: Connecting the Built Environment to Maternal and Infant Care in Vulnerable Populations in Pittsburgh seeks to understand the challenges and opportunities that arise from exploring systems in place at a variety of scales within the realm of women’s health, and how innovative built environments might rethink or restructure those systems to achieve better outcomes for vulnerable populations. How can architecture become part of the narrative that helps women and their babies survive into motherhood? How can architecture support vulnerable populations through prenatal, birth and postpartum stages of parenthood? How can architecture empower women to be advocates for themselves and their babies? For more student work, please visit www.birthrightsstudio.com.

INSTRUCTOR Annie Ranttila STUDENTS B.Arch Rachel Baker Serra Cizmeci Kevin Jiang Jai Kanodia Alina Kramkova Elizabeth Levy Bingxuan Liang Xin Hui Lim Nika Postnikov Lexi Yan Victoria Yong

Xin Hui Lim

M.Arch Bridgette Mikkelson Kevin Jiang

Jai Kanodia

Bingxuan Liang

Nika Postnikov

108


Birth Rights Studio

Elizabeth Levy

Elizabeth Levy

Alina Kramkova

Alina Kramkova

109


[ 05.4 F ] Implementing Color

[ 05.4 E ] Translucency / Transparency

[ 05.4 D ] Necessary Opaqueness

[ 05.4 C ] L6-L8 Resistance Glass

[ 05.4 B ] L4-L5 Resistance Glass

[ 05.4 A ] L1-L3 Resistance Glass

05.4 Enclosure Systems

[ 05.3 E ] Landmark

[ 05.3 D ] Regulatory

[ 05.3 C ] Identity

[ 05.3 B ] Informational

[ 05.3 A ] Directional

05.3 Wayfinding

[ 05.2 D ] Maximum Sightlines

[ 05.2 C ] Territoriality Planting

[ 05.2 B ] Active Security

[ 05.2 A ] Parking Layout

[ 05.1 H ] Maximum Sightlines

05.2 Parking

[ 05.1 G ] Planting for Privacy & Healing

[ 05.1 F ] Entrance Territoriality

[ 05.1 E ] Directional Planting

[ 05.1 D ] Planter Barriers

[ 05.1 C ] Vertical Planes

[ 05.1 B ] Escort & Visitor Placemaking

[ 05.1 A ] Behavioral Landscaping

05.1 Landscaping

Designing Safety & Security for Abortion Providers & Patients Evaluation Matrix high priority strategy recommended strategy not a directly correlated strategy

best practices dictionary [ 05.1 A ] Behavioral Landscaping The goal of the architect in preventing crime is to relocate the gathering of protesters to be near supervision or natural surveillance, and to promote a more orderly flow and break up the groups.

High

[ 05.1 B ] Escort & Visitor Placemaking There is an opportunity to advocate for the volunteer and to establish a friendly medical facility presence by implementing benches and other spaces that designate an area to be accessible and safe.

Medium

[ 05.1 C ] Vertical Planes In states of high political alert, histories of assault and other violence, sometimes a stronger barrier in the stand off zone is necessary to ensure safety. In this case, more ambitious designs of the “anti-fence” should be taken on, to remove such a stigma of enclosure and shame as much as possible.

Low Vandalism Broken Glass

[ 05.1 D ] Planter Barriers These function essentially like bollards, where the bottom is embedded in the ground and poured with concrete. These would be useful strategies to push to the perimeter, redistributing occupancy, and for lining sidewalks and walkways with decorative, comforting, greenery. The heavy duty concrete construction allows them to be used as security barriers and also enables them to support larger root systems.

Physical Assault

[ 05.1 E ] Directional Planting Planting can separate pedestrians from hazardous or sensitive areas such as traumatizing antichoice protesting, emphasizing the direction and circulation one must take to reach a provider. [ 05.1 F ] Entrance Territoriality Establishing territoriality should be approached carefully in areas where abortion is a particularly hostile political experience. However, in locations on the highway and or dense urban areas, softer means of establishing that territoriality could prove to be beneficial to provider and patient experiences.

Bombings Arsen

[ 05.1 G ] Planting for Privacy & Healing Opportunities for gardens that behave as therapeutic spaces are not always feasible on all sites though should be considered. Any space that provides an extra layer of comfort can benefit in the most hostile of spaces.

Shooting

[ 05.1 H ] Maximum Sightlines Shrubs and trees are often mistakenly considered to be good barriers for safety and privacy. With regards to the stand off zone they are often strategically used to prevent unprecedented car entry however, they should never obscure access, entry, or visuals of the street. Anybody standing behind them or under a shadow cannot be seen by anyone approaching the building.

Vehicle Ramming

[ 05.2 A ] Parking Layout For providers, there is a constant fear of being followed home. It is likely that they would feel more secure to conceal their cars and identities, eliminating risk of being followed home. For patients, a well planned lot accounts for the idea that late arrivals should not have to rely on the least desirable least safe spots. Barriers should be used to divert parking activity to create safe locations for late arrivals.

Network Stand Alone

[ 05.2 B ] Active Security Parking lots require extra security in addition to surveillance for the facility to maintain territoriality, sense of safety and control of the space.

Suburban Res.

[ 05.2 C ] Territoriality Planting Similar to entrance territoriality, although it should be kept to a minimum, some planting at the entrance of a parking lot reinforces ownership.

Highway

[ 05.2 D ] Maximum Sightlines Considering Parking Lots are areas in which there is no designated activity, landscaping should be avoided so that there is clear surveillance and visibility.

Semi Urban

[ 05.3 A ] Directional Positioning signs around the site that direct a patient to the proper entrance, especially when in proximity to a CPC or on long driveways, could alleviate some of the strategies anti choicers use to confuse patients.

Urban

[ 05.3 B ] Informational Similarly to directional signs, created moments where information is provided about the hours and specific services provided could only benefit a provider and its patients especially when many travel a hundred miles to reach it.

Public

[ 05.3 C ] Identity Signage that clearly identifies the organization or title of a provider eliminates any ambiguity or stigma that these are spaces that must remain hidden.

Street

[ 05.3 D ] Regulatory It is necessary to clearly explain buffer zones, restricted private property, and parking regulations CPC’s try to abuse.

Private

[ 05.3 E ] Landmark Although challenging to avoid a political image, sometimes Planned Parenthoods use this to their advantage. By using graphic elements, a provider can indicate their position along a route or destination.

Sidewalk Counsel.

[ 05.4 A ] L1-L3 Resistance Glass [ 05.4 B ] L4-L5 Resistance Glass [ 05.4 C ] L6-L8 Resistance Glass It necessary to implement shatter proof windows because even if the window is shot, it would take an attacker several minutes to force a hole through it. That moment of delay is exactly what architects should be advocating for because that dictates how much time people have to follow safety protocol while help arrives.

Car Counsel. Traumatizing Picket.

[ 05.4 D ] Necessary Opaqueness Sometimes the designs of clinics in areas that aren’t as politically hostile overuse clear sightlines or even semi transparent views of the street in spaces where women are experiencing very private trauma.

Organizational

[ 05.4 E ] Translucency / Transparency Though for many providers it appears to be an impossible expense or the hostility surrounding the clinic appears to be too intense to implement operable windows, there is an obvious benefit to both providers and patients to implement single hung windows with a translucent, solid, or patterned glass on the lower half of the window and clear glass above.

Provider Stalking

[ 05.4 F ] Implementing Color When it comes to healthcare environments, there is little evidence that color actually helps, though designers should aspire to curate appearances that are ultimately calming, therapeutic, and health promoting. Use of certain colors might only make healthcare settings appear less institutional.

Nearby CPC

Alina Kramkova

Abortion Provider Typologies

Best Practices Design Framework

High Alert

6

LOW

4 LOW

3 LOW

2 LOW

HIGH

ED BUILDING” urban / semi urban / parking / lot parking

110

5

OFFICE BUILDING” urban / no parking

What if Roe Fell ?

LOW

5 MEDIUM

4 LOW

3 LOW

2 LOW

7

7

7 HIGH

HIGH

HIGH

6

6

6 HIGH

MEDIUM

5 LOW

LOW

MEDIUM

4

4 MEDIUM

3 LOW

2 LOW

“normalizing” abortion

MEDIUM

5

5

embassy design

4 LOW

3 LOW

2 LOW

LOW

3 LOW

2 LOW

LOW

destigmatized

4 LOW

3 LOW

2 LOW

passive ambiguity

hospital design

CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design)

6

politically territorial

HOUSE?” suburban / street parking

HIGH

HIGH

AY CLINICS” suburban / parking

7 LOW

URBAN / SUB RES AREA” semi urban or suburban bus. / street parking / small lot

7

HIGH

HIGH

HIGH

L TOWN SHED” suburban / parking

HIGH

Elizabeth Levy


DIGNITY AND SUPPORT

by rachel baker

a community center for the birthing community, focusing on building continuous support systems and a healing environment.

corner market

event / gathering space

breastfeeding room

childcare

learning kitchen plan

large group rooms / classrooms

bathrooms

outdoor garden

small group rooms

yoga room

therapy / doula rooms

Rachel Baker

111


THESIS AND INDEPENDENT PROJECTS

112

The definition of “thesis� within the context of a professional architecture program depends on who you talk to. In a diverse and oftencontentious field of views that spans institutions, individuals, generations, schools of thought and practice, defining a thesis is tied to varying opinions on what constitutes research in architecture, how we do research to frame a project, its argument and methods or whether in conducting a design investigation we are in fact doing research at all.

COORDINATOR Mary-Lou Arscott

In either case, if we agree that there is research is being done, then we can also say that in crafting a thesis project, students enter a wider conversation and explore problems that have puzzled and inspired others. By proposing their own set of critical questions and methods of inquiry, students recognize their responsibility to engage seriously and rigorously with prior work, and to extend its intellectual scope through their own contribution. This studio adopts this view. The aim of this studio is to guide students through the process of defining and structuring a thesis project. The spring semester follows the successful completion of the thesis development in the fall semester. The studio is a venue for constructive discussion and mutual critique. In addition to the core thesis students, a limited number of independent project proposals for a semester-long studio project are considered.

M.Arch Nikhita Bhagwat

STUDENTS B.Arch Kerrian France Zain Islam-Hashmi Kelly Li Samson Liu Hannah Martinez Emily Melillo Matthew Radican Henry Yoon


es for

pacts can be ater and be seen a material enturies, sive and ants, only sphalt and aking, and collective uction. We

material for space n of o show also to n earthen n in dirt can we can ds-on ocess er the and in the

LEVEL 2

In the Caribbean, sites of significant historic trauma have been reduced to touristic symbols of a review 12.15pm 4/20 preserved colonial past. This project is a study of the role of colonial-era architecture in the development of Caribbean postcolonial identity and the social, political, and economic positioning of the current Caribbean. Since Jay D. Edward’s “First Comparative Studies of Caribbean Architecture” in the New West Indian Guide, there has been a gap in significant research regarding Caribbean architecture, particularly in relation to the anthropological and sociological aspects of the region. This project would be used to get a better understanding of the use of architecture to create and define a cultural and national identity in a post-colonial society. The goal is to create an understanding of architecture as a clear indicator of the historical narrative of the Caribbean’s development and its relationship with other cultures. Colonial-era architecture formally preserved through historic designation by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in the Caribbean serves as a basis for case study. The chosen sites are: historic Bridgetown and its garrison (Barbados), Trinidad and the Valley de los Ingenios (Cuba), the first coffee plantations (Cuba), historic Camaguey (Cuba), catedral de Santa Maria and colonial Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic), National History Park (Haiti), Brimstone Hill fortress (St.Kitts and Nevis), and historic Paramaribo (Suriname). The architectural preservation of these locations are seen as a form of “heritage preservation” from a significant time of European rule in the Caribbean’s cultural development history. Today, these sites that were built in the 17th-19th centuries, have become an integral part of the significant tourism industry in the Caribbean; a direct influence to the economy through the preservation of these cultural relics. For example, the neoclassical colonial town of Cienfuegos in Cuba and the National History Park Independence Monuments of Haiti represent different relationships between the architecture of the colonizing country and the Caribbean colony where they are situated. This project will analyze how the preservation of these case studies play a role in the distinct developments of cultural and national identity in Cuba, Haiti, and other significant sites of Caribbean colonial history.

project asks: How are these countries/architectural sites represented as sites of tourism? DIRT FORMSThis How should colonial architecture be reinterpreted for a post colonial identity? How has the cultural narrativeand been reclaimed, particularly with the role of UNESCO Understanding Implementing andesignation? Earthen Constructivism in Pittsburgh

LANDMARKS OF CULTURAL IDENTITY Postcardization of Caribbean Postcolonial Identity

Zain Islam-Hashmi

Kerrian France

As one of the oldest building methods, earthen construction33 serves and impacts billions of individuals worldwide. Abundant, reusable and cheap, anyone can transform the dirt below our feet into a multitude of forms and functions through the addition of water and manpower. It has stood the tests of time, nature and usage across continents. It can also be seen as a material to pave the way for a more sustainable and equitable future.

One of the aims of Landmarks of Cultural Identity is to acknowledge that sites of significant historical trauma have been reduced to touristic sites, symbols of a preserved colonial past.

holar

44

However, the values of societies have shifted, as well our relationship with materials, making and building. Earth has seen waves of (ab)use, shifting and trauma by humans, and become a discursive and material repository for pollution. We now associate it with dirtiness; we laden it with toxicants, only to then excavate and dump it, cover it and hide its imperfections beneath layers of asphalt and concrete. A consumerist mentality and system of specialization have decreased not only collective sharing of knowledge and skills, but also individual awareness and familiarity with construction techniques. We are also desensitized from the earth that surrounds us. Dirt Forms uses earth to reconnect people with their surroundings, their community and the material world around them. The project highlights earth as a means for space and place-making: a way to inform thought, action and collaboration through the creation of an introductory guide to adaptive earthen construction techniques. The aim is not only to show the public the advantages, versatility and simplicity of working with such a material, but also to showcase the power of individuals and groups by adapting earthen construction to their needs and comforts for collective use. By implementing this project in Pittsburgh, an opportunity arises to widen the impact, usage and audience for earthen construction. Through navigating the unique challenges of working in a postindustrial context, it also asks how we can start to influence spaces by reclaiming dirt, despite its imperfect nature. Through a hands-on process, Dirt Forms encourages individuals to share their process and experiences with the material in order to add to the evolving lexicon of earthen construction and further the potential of earth as a material for sustainable creation in architecture and design.

45

This project is a study of the role of colonial-era architecture in the development of Caribbean postcolonial identity and the social, political and economic positioning of the Caribbean today. Since Jay D. Edward’s 1983 article “First Comparative Studies of Caribbean Architecture” in the New West Indian Guide, there has been a significant gap in research regarding Caribbean architecture, particularly in relation to the anthropological and sociological aspects of the region. This project examines the use of architecture to create and define a cultural and national identity in a postcolonial society. The goal is to understand architecture as a clear indicator of the historical narrative of the Caribbean’s development and its relationship with other cultures. Colonial-era architecture formally preserved through historic designation by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in the Caribbean serves as a basis for 8 case studies. The chosen sites are: Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison (Barbados), Trinidad and the Valle de los Ingenios (Cuba), the First Coffee Plantations (Cuba), historic Camagüey (Cuba), Catedral de Santa María and Colonial Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic), National History Park (Haiti), Brimstone Hill Fortress (St.Kitts and Nevis) and Historic Paramaribo (Suriname). The preservation of these sites are seen as a form of “heritage preservation” from a significant time of European rule in the Caribbean’s cultural development history. Today, these sites that were built in the 17th–19th centuries have become an integral part of the Caribbean tourism industry; the preservation of these cultural relics directly influence the economy. For example, the neoclassical colonial town of Cienfuegos, Cuba and the National History Park Independence Monuments in Haiti represent different relationships between the architecture of the colonizing country and the Caribbean colony in which they are situated. This project analyzes the role these case studies play in the distinct developments of cultural and national identity in Cuba, Haiti and other significant sites of Caribbean colonial history. This project asks: How are these countries and architectural sites represented as sites of tourism? How should colonial architecture be reinterpreted to reflect a postcolonial identity? How has the cultural narrative been reclaimed, particularly with the role of UNESCO designation?

113


LEVEL 1

.

water. These complex systems can no longer be distinguished between artificial or natural because they are deeply interrelated. In human efforts to use water, discardreview waste, or10.00am sell water, we have radically altered water quality 4/20 and water access, putting the world on a dangerous trajectory. Historic infrastructural decisions and currently growing demands are revealing the widespread implications of water manipulation, from empty aquifers and dried lakes to lead poisoning and chemical contamination. Water is both a hyper-local issue and a global one, and as such requires a radical rethinking. METHODOLOGY Using a modified framework for complex systems analysis developed by environmental scientist Donella Meadows, Water Imperatives proposes a methodology for assessing water systems and identifying leverage points within them. Systems can generally be broken down into three areas: the material organization (how the physical pieces act together), informational flows (how information and feedback inform the acting of the pieces), and structural organization (how the entire system functions). Ultimately, paradigms inform how all three function together. Thinking of our concepts about water as a spectrum, our attitudes towards water can be mapped from complete disregard for water to the opposite, respecting water or even worshipping water. By plotting components onto the system structure along one axis and the corresponding paradigm on the other axis, a constellation of points reveal the tensions, overlaps, and contradictions of existing water systems.

ery

d

CASE STUDIES Through a contextual and systemic analysis of five case studies, this project highlights different points in water systems that are problematic: Management in the Flint Water Crisis, 2) Drought in Los Angeles, 3) Profit in Nestlé Waters, 4) Pollution in the Ganges River, and 5) Manipulation in Teotihuacán. For example, in Flint, Michigan, the failure of the sociopolitical management systems of regulation, testing, and accountability resulted in tens of thousands of people being exposed to lead over a period of multiple years. Meanwhile, the Ganges River is both ritually bathed in and filled with three billion liters of human and toxic waste each day. Similar stories can be found all around the world. PROPOSALS Beyond highlighting different points of the system that are problematic, this process also serves as a method for identifying opportunities for engendering change. This project makes five proposals that could flip the narrative of the previous five case studies to 1) Collective, 2) Decentralization, 3) Equity, 4) Longevity, and 5) Synthesis. Beyond proposals, this project is a demand to reframe our paradigms around water for the future of our water systems.

REBUILDING IN DESTRUCTION A Space for Victims of Abuse 24

Matthew 27 Radican With recent revelations about the gravity of abuse scandals within the Catholic Church, especially in the Pittsburgh region, the question of how to deal with the offenders has been discussed with renewed vigor. However, the course of action for the victims is often overlooked or overshadowed, when in fact it is the most important aspect of embarking on the healing process. This project proposes a site of healing for victims of abuse. Perhaps the most controversial component of this intervention is the decision to situate it within the ruins of a Catholic church. However, there is evidence of the cathartic power of recognition and rebuilding of the past to promote healing for the future. In the pamphlet “MOVE: Sites of Trauma,” Johanna Selah Dickson writes that, “...Reconstruction of the traumatic memory through architecture can free the present from the past...any act of transformation must recognize recovery as a process of construction, just as the trauma was a process of destruction….” In addition, this project also implements the basic tenets of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy through architectural intervention. These points include cognitive restructuring, skills training, psychological education, dealing with PTSD and exposure to trauma reminders. The chosen site is St. Peter and Paul Church in the Larimer neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Built in 1891, the church was a prominent establishment within the German-Catholic community of Pittsburgh, and also spawned two additional parishes from its Irish and Italian congregants. It has been vacant since it closed its doors in 1992, and has been falling into ruin ever since. Architecturally, the proposed intervention disrupts the axis of the church as a gestural move, thus contradicting the established spatial hierarchy of the existing architecture. This move also skews the perceived entry to the site, which could be a possible trigger for those hesitant to return to such a building. By playing with the notion of threshold between the old and new structures, the intervention seeks to provide a degree of personal exploration and decision; allowing the user to determine the depth of their re-entry at their own pace. Residual spaces within the hull of the former building are intended to be altered in a way that changes their perception while recognizing their existence through means such as the addition of nature or intentional deconstruction.

114

The Future of Viable Water Systems Requires Rethinking Water Paradigms to Address the Implications Between Scales of Material,25 Informational and Organizational Structures Kelly Li What do you think of when you think about water? Do you picture a water bottle, or tap water? Rain, or the ocean? Our cultural understandings of water have been crystallized into distinct categories, yet water that is bottled is the same water that flows through pipes, falls in rain and fills bodies of water. These complex systems can no longer be distinguished between artificial or natural because they are deeply interrelated. In human efforts to use water, discard waste or sell water, we have radically altered water quality and water access, putting the world on a dangerous trajectory. Historic infrastructural decisions and growing demands reveal the widespread implications of water manipulation, from empty aquifers and dried lakes to lead poisoning and chemical contamination. Water is both a hyper-local issue and a global one, and as such requires a radical rethinking. Using a modified framework for complex systems analysis developed by environmental scientist Donella Meadows, this project proposes a methodology for assessing water systems and identifying leverage points within them. Systems can generally be broken down into three areas: material organization (how the physical pieces act together), informational flows (how information and feedback inform the acting of the pieces) and structural organization (how the entire system functions). Ultimately, paradigms inform how all three function together. Thinking of our concepts about water as a spectrum, our attitudes towards water can be mapped from complete disregard to the opposite, respecting or even worshipping water. By plotting components onto the system structure along one axis and the corresponding paradigm on the other axis, a constellation of points reveal the tensions, overlaps and contradictions of existing water systems. Through a contextual and systemic analysis of five case studies, this project highlights different points in problematic water systems: 1) management in the Flint Water Crisis, 2) drought in Los Angeles, 3) profit in Nestlé Waters, 4) pollution in the Ganges River and 5) manipulation in Teotihuacán. For example, in Flint, Michigan, the failure of the sociopolitical management systems of regulation, testing and accountability resulted in tens of thousands of people being exposed to lead over a period of several years. Meanwhile, the Ganges River is both ritually bathed in and filled with three billion liters of human and toxic waste each day. Similar stories can be found all around the world. Beyond highlighting different points of the system that are problematic, this process also serves as a method for identifying opportunities for engendering change. This project makes five proposals that could flip the narrative of the five case studies to 1) collective, 2) decentralization, 3) equity, 4) longevity and 5) synthesis. Beyond proposals, this project is a demand to reframe our paradigms around water for the future of our water systems.


eem to

lot vely t that this variable usually VR as I urveys stem, e when was,

nd a de” its perations t could gical and

sis basic set. rently. vision

s, though user

LEVEL 2

review 1.45pm 4/19

IP project project IP

hannah hannahmartinez martinez

Memories, culture, culture, and and experiences experiences shape Memories, shape the the built built environment environmentas as thebuilt built environment environment is is shaping shaping them. the them.

narratives of memory, culture and people from pittsburgh pittsburghtotocuba cuba

from fromeast eastto toislands islands narratives of memory, culture and people from LEVEL3 LEVEL3

From East to Islands is a documentary style and moving image project that uses the advantages of From East to Islands is a documentary style and moving image project that uses the advantages of the medium of film to makes cuts across time and geography in order to explore similar problems the medium of film to makes cuts across time and geography in order to explore similar problems across history, politics, and countries. The narrative is driven by two main parts. The first part across history, politics, and countries. The narrative is driven by two main parts. The first part is to understand the ways architecture and the built environment both effect and represent the is to understand the ways architecture and the built environment both effect and represent the memories and cultural identities of the people who use and inhabit spaces, buildings, cities and memories and cultural identities of the people who use and inhabit spaces, buildings, cities and neighborhoods. The second part is to understand the history and political insights into the way neighborhoods. The second part is toover understand andthey political insights urban environments have developed time andthe thehistory patterns tend to take. into the way urban environments have developed over time and the patterns they tend to take. On one side, the focus is on the Kelly Strayhorn Theater and the historical and current On one side, the focusLiberty. is on the Strayhorn Theater development of East OnKelly the other side, the focus and is onthe thehistorical Plaza deand Sancurrent Juan de Dios in development of EastWith Liberty. side, the on theup Plaza de SanofJuan de events Dios in Camagüey, Cuba, a sideOnbythe sideother narrative, the focus projectisopens a dialogue similar Camagüey, a side by sidepeople, narrative, project Recognizing opens up a dialogue of similar events and stories Cuba, acrossWith different cultures, andthe identities. that historical themes and different themselves cultures, people, and identities. that as historical themes andstories eventsacross have repeated throughout history andRecognizing countries, such colonization, and events have repeated themselves throughout history and countries, such as colonization, relocation, and even political racism. The film compares the effects on the architectural and relocation, and even across politicaltwo racism. Thecountries film compares the effects on the architectural and their urban development different and cities. Comparing similarities between urban development across two1929 different countries and cities. Comparing ofsimilarities between their colonization, the effects of the Stock Market Crash, the destruction the built environment colonization, the effects the instability, 1929 Stock Crash, the destruction of thepopulations, built environment through political injusticeofand theMarket displacement of underrepresented and the through injustice attemptspolitical made to rebuildand andinstability, revitalize. the displacement of underrepresented populations, and the attempts made to rebuild and revitalize. As the narrative begins with a look back into history, we as an audience witness both the buildings As the narrative withSan a look into and history, an audience witness both the buildings belonging to thebegins Plaza de Juanback de Dios the we KellyasStrayhorn Theater (originally name the belonging to the Plaza Sanand Juanre-open de Diosasand Theaterto(originally name the Regent Theater) open,de close, the the pastKelly and Strayhorn present combine blur the differences Regent Theater) open, close, and re-open as the past and present combine to blur the differences with how the audience views historical and current events. with how the audience views historical and current events. Through a series of interviews with American and Cuban citizens that are intercut with historical

SPACY LANGUAGE Using Natural Language Interface to Visualize Spatial Experiences in Virtual Reality

Samson Liu

photographs andoffootage takenwith within the pastand fewCuban months, the filmthat makes connections with Through a series interviews American citizens are intercut with historical memories artists and citizens to their home. their personal experiences photographs and footage takenhave within the past fewListening months,tothe filmown, makes connections with and memoriesartists they have architecture and their own culture and urban environment, they speak and memories and with citizens have to their home. Listening to their own, personal experiences out what culture is towith them, how they were introduced to it inand the past while growingthey up, and the memories they have architecture and their own culture urbanorenvironment, speak waywhat theyculture have interacted environment on a personal andpast experiential level. Going into the out is to them,with howbuilt they were introduced to it in the or while growing up, and Though literature continues to create and inspire magnificent art, way they have seen other people come and go or stay as they’ve moved through spaces of culture, way they have interacted with built environment on a personal and experiential level. Going into the 17spaces of culture, time,they andhave history. language doesn’t seem to as important role in architectural way seenplay other people come and go orastay as they’ve moved through time, and history.of this project, I thought this was because design. At the beginning

unlike other scientific fields, few architecture terminologies & theories are universally/objectively defined, causing problems for people who seek to communicate and design with them. I also thought that this plethora of subjective terminology was because, unlike many technical disciplines, there is no easy way to do control variable experiments in architecture. Buildings are hard to build, 42 and built examples usually feature interlaced and complicated flows 42 of information. Therefore, I was interested in exploring language through virtual reality (VR), as I thought a virtual environment could adjust its different factors in real time, and thus be useful for surveys and experiments. Before I fully dove into making one complicated parametric system, however, I decided to start with case studies and interviews to investigate how people use language when talking about space. In the process, I realized how fluid and fickle language truly was, and I wouldn’t want to define a word with averaged-out parameters. Therefore, I chose to look at this problem from another angle, with a generative approach and a computational design perspective. Instead of “decoding” terminologies people use, I decided to “encode” a small set of words. For a single interior space, by defining a set of basic word inputs and its operations, all other language input could be mapped onto this personally defined set of operations by natural language processing techniques. That way, the basic set could be highly personalized and subjective, while the mapping of all language stays somewhat logical and consistent, thus creating a system for spatial design based on language input. As proof of concept, the program behaves based on my own definition of the basic set. Ideally, everyone would be able to define a basic set, and the system will behave very differently. Currently, the mapping from other words outside of the basic set is somewhat crude. I envision that the mapping process will be drastically improved with machine learning in the future. Since the prototype is set in VR, this project explores some interactive and unusual spatial conditions, though it’s not the main focus of the thesis. For example, the walls can cave in and point at the user while they are moving around in the space, or the space can flip inside out on itself.

review 4.45pm 4/20 review 4.45pm 4/20

FROM EAST TO ISLANDS Narratives of Memory, Culture and People from Pittsburgh to Cuba Hannah Martinez From East to Islands is a documentary-style and moving-image project that uses the advantages of film to cut across time and geography. This project explores similar problems across history, politics and countries. The narrative is driven by two main parts: the first part is to understand the ways architecture and the built environment both effect and represent the memories and cultural identities of people who use and inhabit spaces, buildings, cities and neighborhoods. The second part is to understand the history and political insights into the way urban environments have 43 developed over time and the patterns take. 43 On one side, the focus is on Pittsburgh’s Kelly Strayhorn Theater and the historical and current development of the East Liberty neighborhood. On the other side, the focus is on the Plaza de San Juan de Dios in Camagüey, Cuba. With a side-by-side narrative, the project opens up a dialogue around similar events and stories across different cultures, histories and identities. The project makes clear that historical themes and events have repeated themselves throughout history and across borders, such as colonization, displacement and racism. The film compares the effects of these themes on the architectural and urban development across two different countries and cities. It also compares similarities between their colonization, the effects of the 1929 stock market crash, the destruction of the built environment through political injustice and instability, the displacement of underrepresented populations and the attempts made to rebuild and revitalize. The narrative begins with a look back into history, asking the audience to witness both the buildings belonging to the Plaza de San Juan de Dios and the Kelly Strayhorn Theater (originally the Regent Theater) open, close and re-open as the past and present combine, blurring the differences between how the audience views historical and current events. A series of interviews with American and Cuban citizens that are intercut with historical photographs and footage taken within the past few months, the film makes connections with memories artists and citizens have to their home. Listening to their own, personal experiences and memories they have with architecture and their own culture and urban environment, they speak out what culture is to them, how they were introduced to it in the past or while growing up, and the way they have interacted with built environment on a personal and experiential level as they go into the way they have seen other people come and go or stay as they’ve moved through spaces of culture, time and history.

115


deprived of most facilities

the creation of dead space from sociopolitical disparities

allows for

LEVEL 2

eva introduces the that causes abjection tions, rules. The inace that lies between self-rejection and thus well as related objects onsider how we as e rarely consider it or it to be an object, elements, creating

nd Louise hese artists had of temporality and f boundaries, creating they do not actually ng not only physical esthetic elitist spaces lementing or denying l architecture.

within the proximal al status and many of These condemned for a new concept: p a condemned home is perceived as an imultaneously it still oncept of Dead Space hed neighborhoods to the adjacent ces that should not be ntly exists in modern

review 2.30pm 4/20

review 11.15am 4/19

One of the main aims of the ‘teaching hospital’ is also to make sure that it provides good education to the students- an education that will encourage them to stay back in Haiti and improve medicine, rather than move to another country to be able to practice better, with better pay and job security. This means not only better infrastructure within the hospital, but also higher quality of education with the right resources to be able to have practical knowledge rather than textbook-learning, which is often the case in Haitian medical schools. But how do you integrate these students with the normal goings-on of a hospital, without them hindering the various tasks of the hospital staff? Learning by practice is an integral part of medical school, but can a healing environment for the ill also act as a learning environment for the young? The reason behind the integration of these seemingly independent fields is also to set a precedent for more such institutions. Over time, this institution aims to become a mutually-educative process, where the students learn the need for better medicine in a country like Haiti, and in return can propose to educate the patients, or at least those visiting these patients on a regular basis, how to practice a healthier lifestyle. The first step in improving the medical education system is to integrate practical learning with theory, and a hospital provides the best platform for said practice. Mere observation in a hospital can help one know that the cause for illnesses amongst Haitians is also due to their lifestyle choices. Haiti has the highest rates of infant, under-five and maternal mortality in the Western Hemisphere. 2% of the people are living with HIV, which in turn also leads to children being born HIV +ve. High numbers of children die before the age of 5 due to malnutrition, a lot of them because of their ignorance about the certain NGOs that specifically cater to child nutrition and health. It is a known fact that the right kind of nutrition is also vital in the recovery of a patient, yet many patients are known to have family members take care of them in hospitals instead of nurses to avoid extra costs. These visitors most often tend to secure food from nearby street vendors to avoid the extra travel- food that is fried, food that is prepared in unhygienic facilities- which can easily harm the recovery process of the patient. They do not realize that in doing, they are also inadvertently prolonging the hospital stay, which will also add to their expenditure.

ABJECT SPACE can one carrySpace out a process that can help the students simultaneously teach and learn? The CreationHow ofthen,Dead Can a mere hospital building reach its arm far out towards community medicine? Integrating a learning environment with a healing environment might also give the medical students a greater from Sociopolitical Disparities incentive to stay back and help their nation grow. Simple steps within the household can greatly add to the community’s growth. Is it possible that a hospital can accommodate spaces that can 37 help carry out these tasks of educating its visitors about the importance of safe practices before, during and after healing?

Emily Melillo

Part of the designer’s role includes creating a cohesive built environment that efficiently transitions between a healing and educational space in a way that makes it seem more welcoming than imposing.

12 of Horror: An Essay on Abjection,” In her writing “Powers philosopher Julia Kristeva introduces the concept of the abject. She describes that it is “not lack of cleanliness or health that causes abjection but what disturbs identity, system, order. What does not respect borders, positions, rules. The inbetween, the ambiguous, the composite.” The abject exists within a liminal space between the subject and the object. The boundaries that define it exist within our own self-rejection and thus create a sense of displacement as we disown pieces of ourselves and objects around us. In relating “the abject” to architecture, one must consider how we interact with space. To make a space abject, it first must be considered an object, and for it to be an object, our relationship with it must change. The architecture must diffuse into taboos, creating discursive objects and unoccupiable corporeal space.

The works and theories of three artists—Robert Smithson, Gordon Matta-Clark and Louise Bourgeois—can help understand abject space further. Each of these artists had their own theories and concepts relating to space, more specifically, its temporality and affectual qualities. Smithson’s “Non-Site” sculpture calls on the concept of boundaries, or rather lack of boundaries, creating metaphorical representations of different sites or locations in places or forms where they do not actually exist. Matta-Clark’s “Anarchitecture” concept acts as a mirror for architecture, disrupting not only physical forms but also dismantling architectural authority of the modern era and the aesthetic elitist spaces it creates. Bourgeois’s Unsafe Narrative infuses form with memory, either implementing or denying a narrative that acts as a medium of temporality and the counterpart of spatial architecture. When it comes to the question of where abject space exists, one answer can be found in Pittsburgh neighborhoods. The more than 90 neighborhoods vary in socioeconomic status and many of them suffer from severe poverty and an oversaturation of condemned homes. These condemned homes are abandoned, deemed unfit for occupancy and serve as an emblem for a new concept: dead space, a structure that is killed by its own emptiness. If one were to strip a condemned home of its structure, the only thing left would be an unoccupiable, dead space. It is perceived as an object because we understand that we can and should not occupy it, but simultaneously it still exists as a space. This creates ambiguity within our relationship to it. The concept of dead space goes beyond a dilapidated condemned home when considering the impoverished neighborhoods they exist in. These neighborhoods themselves become abject dead spaces to the adjacent affluent neighborhoods surrounding them. They are perceived as unsafe, resulting in a significant sociopolitical disparity issue.

116

LEVEL 1

HEALING AND LEARNING Providing Health Services to Haiti

Nikhita Bhagwhat 13that One of the main aims of the teaching hospital is to make sure it provides good education to students. In the case of this hospital, the goal is to provide an education that will encourage students to stay in Haiti and improve medical access there, rather than move to another country with better pay and job security. This requires not only providing better infrastructure within the hospital, but also a higher quality of education with the resources to be able to offer practical knowledge rather than textbook-learning, which is often the case in Haitian medical schools.

But how do you integrate these students with the normal hospital operations without them hindering the hospital staff? Learning by practice is an integral part of medical school, but can a healing environment for the ill also act as a learning environment for the young? Over time, this institution aims to become a mutually educational facility, where medical students learn the need for better medicine in a country like Haiti, and in return they educate patients about healthy lifestyle choices. The first step in improving the medical education system is to integrate practical learning with theory, and a hospital provides the best platform for that. Haiti has the highest rates of infant, under-five and maternal mortality in the western hemisphere. Two percent of Hatians live with HIV. High numbers of children die before the age of five due to malnutrition. The right kind of nutrition is vital in the recovery of a patient, yet many patients are known to have family members take care of them in hospitals instead of nurses to avoid extra costs. These visitors most often tend to secure food from nearby street vendors to avoid the extra travel—food that is fried and prepared in unhygienic facilities—which can impede the patient’s recovery. How can one building help students teach and learn? Can a hospital building reach out towards community medicine? Integrating a learning environment with a healing environment might also give the medical students a greater incentive to stay back and help their nation grow. Simple steps within the household can greatly add to the community’s growth. Is it possible that a hospital can accommodate spaces that can help carry out these tasks of educating its visitors about the importance of safe practices before, during and after healing? Part of the designer’s role includes creating a cohesive built environment that efficiently transitions between a healing and educational space in a way that makes it seem more welcoming than imposing.


LEVEL 2

review 11.30am 4/20

HANNARA Experimental Connections for a United Korea

Henry Yoon 31 Hannara speculates on experimental connections in the context of a unified Korea. The demilitarized zone (DMZ) serves as both a physical and emotional barrier between North and South Korea, further dividing and widening the gap between the neighboring countries. Through a research exercise, multiple visits to South Korea and a compilation of North Korean testimonies, this speculative design exercise projects interventions that enable both physical and emotional connections between the Koreas.

This project is divided into three phases: 1) contextual history research, 2) potential future speculation and 3) experimental scenario possibilities. When approaching speculative design, understanding the history of the situation is very important. As someone of Korean heritage but U.S.-born, this proposal was also a journey towards immersing myself in the cultures of North and South Korea. The complex history starts with the Joseon Dynasty and continues through the Japanese occupation, through the Cold War. It involves understanding the circumstances under which families were divided through the Korean War and contrasting how North and South Korea developed under different political institutions. Finally we look at the unification efforts of the past few years, which have developed at an unprecedented rate, revolving around South Korean president Moon Jae-in and the Supreme Leader of North Korea, Kim Jong-un. This project then goes into the “Potential Future Speculation”; I lay out a spectrum of futures is laid out based on Anthony Dunne & Fiona Raby’s notion of a “Spectrum of Possible Futures.” Expanding from the present, the potential futures are organized by their likelihood of occuring. The present moment is marked by the handshake between Moon Jae-in and Kim Jong-un. These possible futures range from one that envisions a cryptocurrency as a inter-Korean currency to another that foresees World War III. It is important to consider all possible futures, even the ones that are borderline impossible, because they help visualize the outcomes of current discourses. With the spectrum of futures laid out, this presents the opportunity for “Agency to Design.” The “Experimental Connection Possibilities” are laid out based on the environmental conservation at the DMZ, building inter-Korean infrastructure, speculating on pro-unification propaganda and promoting an educational system between the two Koreas. This led to the development of five different proposed interventions that promote both a physical and mental connection that can be established between North and South Korea. A family narrative addresses these five interventions as part of their timeline, interweaving how different infrastructures contribute to a gradual implementation, normalizing both border crossings and interactions between North and South Koreans.

117


1

5

2

4

Additional coursework by upper-year B.A., B.Arch and M.Arch students. Urban Design Methods and Theory, F18, Jonathan Kline (1); Detailing Architecture, S19, Gerard Damiani (2); Pre Thesis, S19, Kai Gutschow (3); Architectural Theory, S19, Kai Gutschow (4); Advanced CAD, BIM, and 3D Visualization, S19, Kristen Kurland (5); GIS/CAFM, S19, Kristen Kurland (6); Paradigms of Research in Architecture, S19, Joshua Lee (7) 118


2

5

3

1 7 119


GRADUATE PROGRAMS


MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE The SoA has reintroduced its Master of Architecture (M.Arch) degree program after 25 years to provide a studio-based, first professional degree program to educate tomorrow’s leaders in architecture-related careers. The M.Arch program is built on CMU’s 100-year tradition of training architects in the practice of design and technical fundamentals, with the opportunity to engage with SoA’s long-standing expertise in sustainable (MSSD), computational (MSCD), urban (MUD), public interest design (UDBS) or construction management (MSAECM). Our M.Arch program’s INTERIOR VIEW small : CLASSROOM SPACE strategically size allows students to shape their individual educational agendas and career paths as they interact directly with leading-edge research projects in the school, community and around the world.

Track Chair Kai Gutschow Instructors Nina Baird Dana Cupkova Gerard Damiani Jeffrey Davis Jeremy Ficca Eddy Man Kim Stephen Lee Vivian Loftness Irving Oppenheim Valentina Vavasis

1. CLA

BELOW

First-year M.Arch students are enrolled in one of two tracks. Track A students take Environmental, Form and Feedback studio (fall) and Advanced Construction Studio (spring). Track B students take Urban Design Build Studio all year. In their second year, students may take any Advanced Synthesis Option Studio. STUDENTS Mariana Alberola Rezza, Chaz Barry, Nikhita Bhagwat, Jacob Clare, Maddi Johnson, Yash Khemka, Anthony Kosec, Bridgette Mekkelsen, Liale Nijem, Cassidy Rush , David Suchoza III, Gautam Jagdish Thakkar, Bryan Thew, Jay Tyan, William Ulmer, Yingyang Zhou, Kyle Bancroft, Zuoming Chen, Ever Clinton, Deepthi Ganesh, Srinjoy Hazra, Lana Kozlovskaya, Yashwitha Haram Reddy, Fernanda Mazzilli Toscano De Oliveira, Joao Guilherme Nobrega De Castro, Juliane O’Day, Shailaja Patel, Tye Silverthorne, Ryan Smerker, LanDETAIL Wei ELEVATION

122EAST

ELEVATION

3

4

1. OFF

3. KIT

Zuoming Chen (Advanced Construction Studio)

Deepthi Ganesh (Advanced Construction Studio)

NO


Lan Wei (Environment, Form and Feedback)

Lan Wei (Environment, Form and Feedback)

Deepthi Ganesh (Environment, Form and Feedback)

Joao Castro (Advanced Construction Studio)

123


Gautum Jagdish Thakkar (Commoning the City)

William Ulmer (High Rise)

124


Mariana Alberola + Liale Nijem (Solid: Rise of Timber?)

Mariana Alberola + Liale Nijem (Solid: Rise of Timber?)

Nikhita Bhagwhat (Density + Complexity)

125


CONSOLIDATED COURT AUTOMATION PROGRAM (CCAP) AN ONLINE WEBSITE CATALOGING ALL SPEEDING TICKETS, CHILD SUPPORT DISPUTES, DIVORCES, EVICTIONS, FELONIES, AND OTHER LEGAL BUSINESS IN THE WISCONSIN COURT SYSTEM. ARRESTS WITHOUT CONVICTIONS ARE ALSO DISPLAYED WITH A DISCLAIMER, FROM WHICH LANDLORDS AND EMPLOYERS CAN MAKE THEIR OWN ASSUMPTIONS. PRIVATE INFORMATION LIKELY COULD NOT BE REMOVED.

PREVIOUS EVICTIONS AVAILABLE TO LANDLORDS

NATASHA DAUGHTER MALIK GRANDSON

MIKEY GRANDSON

RUBY DAUGHTE

DORLEEN HINKSTON TENANT

JADA GRANDDAUGHTER PATRICE DAUGHTER

RENTER OF SHERRENA’S UNIT AT 18TH AND WRIG RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY BROKEN HOME SINGLE PARENT(FEMALE) MINOR CHILDREN DEALT WITH DNS DEALT WITH CCAP

KAYLA MAE GRANDDAUGHTER

Davey Suchoza (Brain Hub)

CHRIS SON

TRISHA TENANT RENTER OF SHERRENA’S UNIT ON 13TH STREET BENEFACTOR OF SSI

BOOSIE SON LARRY EX-BOYFRIEND JORI SON

Nikhita Bhagwat (Thesis) THE DREAMSCAPE FOUNDATION

JAFARIS SON

ARLEEN TENANT

RENTER OF SHERRENA’S HOME ON FEAR OF LOSS OF CHILDR BROKEN HOME NUISANCE ORDINANCE SINGLE PARENT(FEMALE MINOR CHILDREN BENEFACTOR OF W2 T DEALT WITH WDCF(CPS REACHED OUT TO RED CRO BENEFACTOR OF WRAPARO

GER-GER SON MERVA AUNT

WISCONSIN WORKS (W2 / W2 T) A WORK BASED FINANCIAL AND EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM THAT HELPS LOW-INCOME PARENTS WITH MINOR CHILDREN. W2 T IS RESERVED FOR THOSE WITH DISABILITIES.

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

Yingyang Zhou (Low Relief)

Maddi Johnson (FreeSpace)

126

J.P. COUSIN


RICKY BURGESS

DEPARTMENT OF NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES

Y ER

3 DAUGHTERS

CJ SON

MILWAUKEE LANDLORD TRAINING PROGRAM

ALDERMAN WITOWSKI ELECTED COUNCIL MEMBER

MUNICIPAL LEVEL ORGANIZATION THAT ENFORCES BUILDING CODES AND OVERSEES THE CONDITION OF BUILDINGS IN THE CITY EMPLOYS BUILDING INSPECTORS CAN LOOK OUT FOR INTERESTS OF RENTERS WHO ARE NOT BEHIND ON RENT OR HAVE NOT BROKEN TERMS OF LEASE.

FUNDED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, THE LANDLORD TRAINING PROGRAM BEGAN IN THE 1990S WITH THE GOAL OF “KEEPING ILLEGAL AND DESTRUCTIVE ACTIVITY OUT OF RENTAL PROPERTY.” IT HEAVILY FOCUSED ON SCREENING METHODS THAT WERE INTENDED TO ELIMINATE DRUG DEALERS, CRIMINALITY, AND POVERTY BUT ALSO OFTEN DISADVANTAGED POOR FAMILIES AS WELL.

FAIR HOUSING PARTNERSHIP

PITTSBURGH COMMISSION TO HUMAN RELATIONS PROPOSED LEGISLATION

TRAVIS FRIEND BILLY BOYFRIEND

KAMALA TENANT

GHT

RENTER OF SHERRENA’S UNIT AT 18TH AND WRIGHT

FATHER

DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING/ PERMITS, LICENSES, & INSPECTIONS

MILWAUKEE CITY COUNCIL

BELINDA HALL REPRESENTATIVE PAYEE

BLISS DAUGHTER

NED BOYFRIEND

HEROIN SUSIE TENANT

PAM TENANT

RENTER OF TOBIN’S TRAILER PARK DRUGS LEGAL TROUBLE

RENTER OF TOBIN’S TRAILER PARK PARTICIPATED IN AA BENEFACTOR OF SNAP PAID RENT TO BIECK MANAGEMENT BENEFACTOR OF MCBSDAC PARTICIPATED IN NA

LENNY MANAGER

SANDRA DAUGHTER KRISTIN DAUGHTER

RESPONSIBLE FOR SCREENING PROSPECTIVE PARK TENANTS THROUGH THE CONSOLIDATED COURT AUTOMATION PROGRAM. RESPONSIBLE FOR COLLECTING RENT.

RESPONSIBLE FOR MANAGING FINANCES OF SSI BENEFICIARIES

QUENTIN TARVER HUSBAND

THE CITY OF MILWAUKEE

THE ILLUSTRATED ANALYSIS MAPS ITS GREATER RELEVANCE AND SPECIFIC RELEVANCE TO PITTSBURGH

SHERRENA TARVER LANDLORD EDDY SON

LAURA DAUGHTER

OWNER OF THE COLLEGE MOBILE HOME PARK, SITUATED ON THE FAR SOUTH SIDE OF THE CITY WHERE “POOR WHITE FOLKS” LIVED MILWAUKEE’S LICENSE COMMITTEE REFUSED TO RENEW TOBIN’S LICENSE TO OPERATE THE TRAILER PARK, POINTING TO 70 CODE VIOLATIONS AND 260 POLICE CALLS TOBIN’S LAWYER SUBMITTED AN ADDENDUM INCLUDING TEN STEPS TO TAKE TO RENEW HIS LICENSE, INCLUDING EVICT NUISANCE TENANTS, HIRE AN INDEPENDENT MANAGEMENT COMPANY, AND ADDRESS PROPERTY CODE VIOLATIONS THE NEW MANAGEMENT COMPANY, BIECK MANAGEMENT, FIRED LENNY AND SUSIE, TOBIN’S EXISTING EMPLOYEES

LUKE SON

RENTER OF SHERRENA’S DUPLEX BENEFACTOR OF W2 T REACHED OUT TO RED CROSS

A THIRD-PARTY MANAGEMENT COMPANY THAT COULD WORK AS A MIDDLEMAN BETWEEN TENANTS AND LANDLORDS. IT REPLACED LENNY AND OFFICE SUSIE AT COLLEGE MOBILE HOME PARK. AS AN IMPERSONAL ENTITY, IT ACTED UNDER STRICT RULES WITHOUT HUMAN MERCY.

TOBIN CHARNEY LANDLORD

DEMARCUS NEIGHBOR

LAMAR TENANT

THREE RIVERS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

JAYME DAUGHTER

PITTSBURGH PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SERVICES

MEGAN DAUGHTER JERRY LEE EX-HUSBAND

LARRAINE TENANT

RENTER OF TOBIN’S TRAILER PARK SUSAN SINGLE PARENT(FEMALE) SISTER MINOR CHILDREN PAID RENT TO AND DEALT WITH BIECK MANAGELANE MENT. BROTHER- IN-LAW WENT TO MARCISA. P. HOGGS HUMAN SERVICES CENTER FOR AID CONFLICT WITH WE ENERGIES BENEFACTOR OF SNAP GLEN EVICTED BY SHERIFF BENEFACTOR OF SSI FORMER BOYFRIEND

OFFICE SUSIE SECRETARY

BUCK NEIGHBOR

REAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT PITTSBURGH

BIECK MANAGEMENT

EVICTED TAKES PLACE IN

MANAGED MAINTENANCE OF RENTAL PROPERTIES

RENTED HER PROPERTIES TO POOR AND DISADVANTAGED TENANTS. MOST OF THE CITY’S POOR ARE EXCLUDED FROM HOMEOWNERSHIP AND PUBLIC HOUSING SO THEY RENT IN THE PRIVATE HOUSING MARKET SERVED PATRICE HINKSTON AN EVICTION NOTICE AGREED TO RENT TO ARLEEN BELL AFTER A CASEWORKER AGREED TO PAY THE SECURITY DEPOSIT AND FIRST MONTH’S RENT WAIVED LAMAR’S SECURITY DEPOSIT, BELIEVING HE WOULD BE APPROVED FOR SSI. AS A BLACK WOMAN, SHERRENA REPRESENTS A DOUBLE MINORITY IN THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY. SHE NETWORKED AT THE MILWAUKEE REAL ESTATE INVESTOR’S NETWORKING GROUP (RING) AND OFFERED TO BE A “BROKER TO BLACK MILWAUKEE”

LAURA DAUGHTER

EMPLOYEE OF THE COLLEGE MOBILE HOME PARK

RUBEN BROTHER

ODESSA SISTER

TEDDY FRIEND DAVID ALDEA FRIEND

13TH STREET REN

E E)

PITTSBURGH POLICE DEPARTMENT

CRYSTAL MAYBERRY TENANT

T S) OSS OUND

RENTER OF SHERRENA’S UNIT ON 13TH STREET BROKEN HOME NUISANCE ORDINANCE DEALT WITH MILWAUKEE PD RECIPIENT OF SSI CONFLICT WITH WE ENERGIES

MARTIN BROTHER

WRAPAROUND MILWAUKEE A LOCAL SOCIAL SERVICES AGENCY INTENDED TO PROVIDE HIGHLY INDIVIDUALIZED CARE FOR CHILDREN WITH SERIOUS EMOTIONAL, BEHAVIORAL, AND MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS AND THEIR FAMILIES. CAN PROVIDE EMERGENCY FINANCIAL SUPPORT.

YOUTH AND FAMILY TRAINING (UPMC)

ANNA ALDEA FRIEND OSCAR ALDEA FRIEND

SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

SCOTT TENANT RENTER OF TOBIN’S TRAILER PARK PARTICIPATED IN ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS BENEFACTOR OF SNAP PAID RENT TO BIECK MANAGEMENT BENEFACTOR OF MCBSDAC PARTICIPATED IN NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS

DIVISION OF MILWAUKEE CHILD PROTECTIVE SERVICES (DMCPS) A DIVISION WITHIN THE WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES (WDCF). HAS THE POWER TO REMOVE CHILDREN FROM SITUATIONS OF PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL, OR SEXUAL ABUSE, INCLUDING POOR LIVING CONDITIONS AND NEGLECT.

PITTSBURGH CHILD PROTECTIVE SERVICES

THE OFFICIAL GOVERNMENT PROGRAM FOR FOOD STAMPS QUALIFIES HOUSEHOLDS TO A SET AMOUNT OF MONEY FOR GROCERIES PER MONTH. IT IS A FEDERAL PROGRAM THROUGH THE USDA’S FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE (FNS) PROGRAM.

BEAKER TENANT RENTER OF TOBIN’S TRAILER PARK PAID RENT TO BIECK MANAGEMENT

PITO ALDEA FRIEND

VANETTA FRIEND

3 DAUGHTERS

SHERIFF’S OFFICE OF MILWAUKEE THE LOCAL POLICE DEPARTMENT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ENFORCING EVICTION NOTICES, BREAKING UP DOMESTIC DISPUTES, AND SERVING NUISANCE ORDINANCES, AMONG MANY OTHER DUTIES.

WE ENERGIES MILWAUKEE REAL ESTATE INVESTORS NETWORKING GROUP (RING)

A NETWORKING GROUP FOR INVESTORS, MOLD ASSESSORS, LAWYERS, AND OTHER PLAYERS IN REAL ESTATE, BUT MOST MEMBERS ARE LANDLORDS. THE EXISTENCE OF SUCH A NETWORK IS A TESTAMENT TO THE RAPID GROWTH OF THE INDUSTRY AS A LEGITIMATE PRIMARY CAREER PATH.

PITTSBURGH REAL ESTATE INVESTORS NETWORK THROUGH MEETUP

SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME (SSI) A MONTHLY STIPEND FOR LOW-INCOME PEOPLE WHO ARE EITHER ELDERLY OR HAVE MENTAL OR PHYSICAL DISABILITIES. BENEFICIARIES ARE ONLY ALLOWED TO HAVE $2,000 IN THE BANK OR PAYMENTS ARE CUT UNTIL SAVINGS DROP BELOW THE LIMIT AGAIN. SSI RECIPIENTS SEE THIS AS A DISINCENTIVE TO SAVE.

DUQUESNE LIGHT COMPANY

THE ENERGY SUPPLIER FOR MILWAUKEE. DISCONNECTS HOUSEHOLDS FOR NONPAYMENT. THE CITY PLACES A MORATORIUM ON DISCONNECTION DURING THE COLD WINTER MONTHS. EVERY YEAR, EVICTIONS SPIKE IN THE SUMMER AND EARLY FALL, WHEN FAMILIES PAY THE UTILITY COMPANY, AND GO DOWN IN NOVEMBER WHEN THE MORATORIUM BEGINS AND FAMILIES PAY THEIR LANDLORDS.

MILWAUKEE COUNTY BEHAVIORAL SERVICES DIVISION ACCESS CLINIC (MCBSDAC)

BIRMINGHAM FREE CLINIC

A CLINIC INCLUDING THERAPISTS, PSYCHIATRISTS, AND DOCTORS SPECIALIZING IN BEHAVIORAL ISSUES. THE CLINIC SERVES RESIDENTS WITH NO INSURANCE OR ONLY MILWAUKEE’S PUBLIC INSURANCE (GAMP).

Urban Design Build Studio

Urban Design Build Studio

Bridgette Mekkelsen (Birth Rights)

127


MASTER OF URBAN DESIGN The Master of Urban Design (MUD) is a studiobased program distinguished by its emphasis on integrating socially engaged practice with new tools and techniques for representing, understanding, and designing cities; by the opportunity to work in transdisciplinary teams at the intersection of the arts, humanities and technology across Carnegie Mellon’s departments and colleges; and by its location in Pittsburgh—a thriving post-industrial laboratory. The Master of Urban Design (MUD) degree is a post-professional, two-­year program that prepares graduates for careers using urban design to critically address environmental, economic, social, political, and cultural issues affecting contemporary urbanization. The studio-­based curriculum allows students to explore design strategies in a variety of scales and settings, from the post-­industrial city to the dense metropolis, from sprawling suburbia to informal settlements. In the first year, the MUD studios provide a foundation in place making and integrated urban systems design, using Pittsburgh as an urban laboratory and collaborating with local communities. In the second year, the fall and spring studios engage in a researchbased design project exploring the negotiation of topdown design and bottom-up transformations of cities. One recent example for the research produced within the MUD program is the exhibition and publication project, “An Atlas of Commoning.” The collective research provides a stepping stone for defining individual thesis proposals that are pursued in the last semester. Previous international studios have worked in Doha, Kigali, Berlin Barcelona, London, Toronto and New York City. A fieldtrip to an international city is part of the program experience.

128

TRACK CHAIR Stefan Gruber INSTRUCTORS Nicolas Azel Daragh Byrne Donald K. Carter Stefani Danes Marantha Dawkins Ray Gastil Hal Hayes Jonathan Kline Kristen Kurland Paul Ostergaard Stephen Quick Nida Rehman Diane Shaw Valentina Vavasis


Urban Places Studio BLOOMFIELD’S GATEWAY: A NEW MIXED USE CENTER INSTRUCTOR Stefani Danes Bruce Chan STUDENTS Yilun Hong Suprima Joshi Jinhan Liang Ryann McMahon Abhinavv Singh Xianfu Sun Yiya Wang Wenzheng Wu

The first studio in the Master of Urban Design program focuses on shaping urban form and space by intervening in an existing Pittsburgh community. The studio includes extensive interaction with a community organization client and participatory meetings with residents and stakeholders. The 2019 fall studio worked with the Bloomfield Development Corporation (BDC) to design a new mixed-use center for the area at the foot of the Bloomfield Bridge. The intersection of the bridge, Liberty Avenue, and Main Street creates a major place of arrival in the city, since the bridge is linked by major arteries from Downtown, Oakland, and the regional highway system. It not only serves the Bloomfield Neighborhood, but West Penn and Children’s Hospitals, and destinations throughout the East End. The area also anchors the western end of the Bloomfield Business District.

All around Bloomfield, the fabric of dense working-class neighborhoods is largely intact, which locates the site within a highly walkable and potentially sustainable urban community. From an urban design perspective, it serves three key functions simultaneously: gateway, crossroads, and primary destination. Its significance and potential are extraordinary. Teams of students analyzed the site, examined a series of comparative urban case studies, and generated four alternative urban design schemes.

Client Workshop

Xianfu Sun + Suprima Joshi

Group Analysis

Xianfu Sun + Suprima Joshi

129


Abhinavv Singh + Wenzheng Wu

Yilun Hong + Yiya Wang

Ryann McMahon + Jinhan Liang

Urban Systems Studio PITTSBURGH’S RIVERFRONT TRAILS: THE NEXT GENERATION INSTRUCTOR Stephen Quick STUDENTS Yilun Hong Suprima Joshi Jinhan Liang Ryann McMahon Abhinavv Singh Xianfu Sun Wenzheng Wu

The second MUD studio introduces design methods and processes for working with larger and holistic urban systems. The studio works with interdisciplinary agencies and organizations to explore how large urban systems can be shaped through both design frameworks, guidelines and policy interventions. The studio ends with an overall system vision and series of place studies. The studio uses design tools that are analytic- and modeling-based, including geo-locational and building modeling softwares, systems methodologies and processes, sustainability through triple bottomline and other indicators and design evaluation using performance measurements. The spring 2019 studio worked with Friends of the Riverfront (FOR), a non-profit organization responsible for the development and stewardship of Pittsburgh’s 24-mile Three Rivers

130

Heritage Trail. Pittsburgh’s riverfronts are a regional asset and FOR embraces the idea that the Heritage Trail should be an environmental, economic and social generator for its long-term sustainability. FOR asked the studio to help them build the design case to attract the investment needed to make this a reality. Missing are basic features, such as comfort stations, good access, restaurants and other placebased amenities that would draw citizens and visitors alike to the trail system. The studio developed design ideas, guidelines and performance measures for Friends of the Riverfront to take forward as the Heritage Trail’s steward and advocate. 


Yilun Hong + Yiya Wang

24-Mile System Trail System

RIV-MU

RIV-GI

RIV-IMU

RIV-MU Sharpsburg

Sharpsburg

RIV-MU

RIV-GI

Morningside

RIV-MU

RIV-GI

RIV-MU

Morningside RIV-IMU

RIV-MU

RIV-IMU

RIV-MU

RIV-MU

RIV-GI

RIV-IMU

RIV-MU

Upper Lawrenceville

Millvale

RIV-MU

Highland Park

RIV-MU

RIV-MU

Highland Park Central Lawrenceville Lincoln-Lemington-Belmar Marshall-Shadeland

Lincoln-Lemington-Belmar

RIV-MU

RIV-GI

Destination io

eny

egh

All

Riv

er

RIV-IMU

Riv

South Shore

a River

Monogahel

RIV-IMU

RIV-MU RIV-NS GT-C

RIV-NS GT-C

RIV-IMU

GT-C

RIV-IMU

RIV-IMU

GT-C

South Oakland

South Side Flats

RIV-IMU

RIV-RM

RIV-RM

RIV-IMU

RIV-NS

North Shore

Bluff

Hill

RIV-MU

Strip District

RIV-MU

RIV-IMU

RIV-RM

RIV-RM

RIV-MU

Central Business District

Squirrel

RIV-RM

RIV-RM

RIV-MU

er

Chateau

Oh

RIV-MU

RIV-GI RIV-IMU

RIV-GI

RIV-RM

RIV-RM

Troy Hill

Elliott

RIV-MU

RIV-GI RIV-IMU

Lower Lawrenceville

Esplen

RIV-GI

RIV-MU RIV-IMU

Squirrel

RIV-IMU

GT-C

RIV-RM

RIV-MU

GT-C RIV-GI

RIV-MU RIV-IMU

RIV-IMU

RIV-MU

RIV-MU

RIV-RM

RIV-GI

RIV-MU RIV-IMU

RIV-IMU

RIV-NS

RIV-MU

RIV-RM

RIV-MU

RIV-IMU

RIV-MU

Hill

South

South

Swisshelm

GT-C

Swisshelm

RIV-IMU

Hazelwood

Glen Hazel

RIV-IMU

RIV-IMU

t

RIV-GI

RIV-MU RIV-RM

RIV-IMU RIV-GI

RIV-MU

RIV-IMU

RIV-GI

RIV-GI

RIV-MU

24-Mile Trail System

Testing elines Center- Designs RiverCenter Guidelines - RiverCenter Designs Designs

s

RIV-IMU

GT-C

Glen Hazel Hays

RIV-IMU

RIV-GI

Sharpsburg

Morningside

Upper Lawrenceville

Millvale

Highland Park Central Lawrenceville

Development

Lincoln-Lemington-Belmar

Marshall-Shadeland

Lower Lawrenceville Esplen

Troy Hill iver

Chateau Ohi

iver

yR

en

gh

Alle

oR

Elliott

Strip District

North Shore

Central Business District

Entertainment Adaptive Reuse

Adaptive Reuse

AdaptiveDestination Reuse

Maintainence Destination

Sense of Performance Metrics Metrics Environment Connections Connections Connections Development ownership

Bluff South Shore

Monogahela

Destination

River

South Oakland

South Side Flats

Squirrel Hill South

Swisshelm

Hazelwood

Adaptive Reuse

24-Mile Trail System

Development

Maintainence

Development Maintainence

Sense of ownership

Sense of Adaptiveownership Reuse

erCenter Designs Investment

Visitors

Land Value

Investment Use diversity

Jobs

Visitors

Glen Hazel

Hays

Maintainence Sense of Adaptive Reuse ownership

Adaptive Reuse

Testing Guidelines - R Investment Use diversity

Jobs

Land Value

Use diversity

Visitors

Jobs

Land Value

Performance Metrics

Investment

Use diversity

131


COMMONING THE CITY This year-long, research-based design studio focuses on the bottom-up transformation of cities and explores how designers and planners can tap into the self-organizing behavior of cities in order to empower citizens to claim their right to the city. The first semester, taught by Stefan Gruber, focuses on collective case study research leading to the development of an individual design thesis proposal. The second semester, taught by Jonathan Kline, supports students in developing their design proposal culminating in an exhibition at the Miller Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA). While required for all second year Master of Urban Design students, the studio offers M.Arch and ASOS students an opportunity to pursue a year-long thesis within a structured research environment. In fall 2018, the studio travelled to Zurich, Switzerland for fieldwork and research on citizen-led urban developments and cooperative housing. The commons are emerging as a key concept beyond the binaries of public and private space for tackling the challenges of the contemporary metropolis: How to build urban resilience in the face of dwindling resources? How to tackle growing inequity in the face of polarizing politics? How to articulate common interests despite increasing social individualization? How to find agency as architects given the scope of these challenges? Here “commons” are understood as a set of practices dealing with the production and self-management of collective resources and spaces beyond conventional forms of domination (such as class, gender or race). Throughout the 2018–19 academic year, the studio continued a collaboration with ARCH+ magazine and ifa, contributing to the travelling exhibition, “An Atlas of Commoning,” and its accompanying publication. The studio’s research was featured in the international premiere of the exhibition in Pittsburgh at the Miller ICA in the summer of 2019.

INSTRUCTORS Stefan Gruber (fall) Jonathan Kline (spring) STUDENTS B.Arch Yang Gao Aditi Thota Veronica Wang Alvin Wong MUD Jianxiou Ge Chase Kea Rebecca Lefkowitz Sai Prateek Narayan Deepanshi Sheth Sujan Shrestha Chi Zhang

Fall: Research-Based Design The fall studio developed the core Atlas, by researching and assembling both international and Pittsburgh region cases that critically explore practices of urban commoning and embed them in a broader context of societal transitions. Learning from the collective research, students then develop a hypothesis and begin testing the acquired know-how in an urban milieu of their choice. The site, program and general parameters of the project are determined during the fall, allowing students to gather data and base materials over the winter break. Spring: Design-Based Research The spring 2019 studio focused on developing individual thesis and design proposals exploring practices of commoning as driving force. Students are expected to take a personal position and formulate a thesis, expressed and refined through design. The thesis project serves as a stepping stone towards defining modes of practice and possible career paths.

132

Right, top: Case Study posters of General Sisters and the Breath Project; Middle: An Atlas of Commoning exhibited at the Miller ICA; Bottom left: student review in the thesis exhibition; Bottom right: studio research trip to Zurich.


GENERAL SISTERS

THE BREATHE PROJECT

Braddock, Pennsylvania

“Hell with the lid taken off”

General Sisters

“Top 10 most polluted cities in the nation with year-round particle pollution”

“Top 2% of US counties for cancer risk from air pollution”

“Heavy Industry - Clairton Coke Works is one of the biggest contributors”

58% of air pollution still comes from industries

22% of air pollution comes from homes

“Particulate matter 2.5 comes from diesel trucks, trains, cars, and coal”

Edgar Thomson Steel Works Monongahela River

22% of air pollution comes from mobility

ZE

N TO OL

TAKING ACTION

K

address and express concerns through written media

educated protest to influence public officials

GRAS PI

ICS OP

S

AB H D AT

EXPOSIN G

POLLUTIO N AIR

TH DATA WI

G

CO

M

public officials work towards creating new ordinances and regulations

factual and emperical data on various topics surrounding air pollution

collect data from devices through crowdsourcing to distribute to public officials and organizations

C H TO OLS

raised concern for air quality in neighborhoods

drafting of new regulations and ordinances

PL PEO E TO

MU

THER GE

BRINGI N

AS

E

RE

RC

TE

meeting like-minded communities and developing social bonds

N IT Y P O

RT

Connection to Local & State officials

We knew that building a neighborhood grocery store as a community meant pausing construction and focusing on the wellbeing of the whole neighborhood, so we joined the fight against fracking to save Braddock’s water, air, and health.

ENGAGING CITIZENS

RELEVANT T NG

EA

North Braddock Residents for Our Future is a grassroots group of residents organized to promote community health and clean air, and fight unconventional gas drilling in our community.

data about local laws, public meetings and hearings, policy updates, and taking action at home

IT

TI

CI

Between the mill and the proposed fracking at Grand View Golf Club, residents like me suffer respiratory problems and cancer. The Healing Garden is a great place for making new friends and rejuvenating.

INCREASING AWARENESS

R VOIC E YOU

G

ARD HE

MAK IN

COLLECTING DATA The untapped potential of the land as a community resource creates a new, internal economy that builds financial & intellectual capital starting from only sunlight, water, soil, and seeds.

AL

Grand View Golf Club

“29% of days in 2017 had good air quality”

PITTSBURGH, UNITED STATES

The fracking proposed at the Grand View Golf Club would bore 2500-3000 meters into the earth, then turn ninety degrees and drill horizontally 1.5 km. Fluids would be pumped into the ground, pressurizing the pipeline and forcing oil and gases out of the earth.

develop phased plans to work towards common goal

SmellPGH App

“Pittsburgh’s recent lead crisis is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to our aging infrastructure, particularly in working-class communities. Working alongside The Breathe Project is helping me be a tireless advocate and organizer for protecting our environment and all of us who must live in it.” - Summer Lee

Enlightened Protest

“As active citizens who are concerned with the air quality in Pittsburgh, we are protesting at County Executive Rich Fitzgerald’s office every Friday with insurmountable data provided by the crowdsourced SmellPGH App.”

133


Jianxiao Ge SOCIOPOLIS Reimagining Public Housing in Taipei

Today, China’s large cities have some of the highest housing costs in the world, with some of the highest global price-to-income and rent-to-income ratio. Housing pressure is particularly intense for China’s young people, as costs have been driven up by an increase in speculative real estate investment. Housing is a basic human right, but in China, people increasingly have to struggle for it, despite the centralized communist economy. In part this problem stems from China’s partial economic liberalization of real estate, while maintaining its top-down government provision of public housing. This project explores how China’s public housing system could be reformed to more effectively address housing justice issues in Taipei, the Taiwanese city with the most serious housing problem. By looking into existing policy mechanisms of agencies and the actors involved, I identified 5 major problems in the current top-down, government-dominated public housing system: 1) Not enough public engagement in the early and middle stage of projects, 2) Citizens don’t have the chance to communicate with designers directly, 3) Insufficient and inefficient communication between new residents, private sector property managers and the municipal urban development department once the property is occupied, 4) The lack of a dedicated special agency responsible for public housing and 5) A missed opportunity to utilize existing social groups to build and maintain consensus in designing and managing projects. In response to the problems listed above, I propose creating two new organizations, The Housing Cooperative founded by the city government, and a self-governing residents’

134

committee. Together these new organizations could provide a realistic and more democratic system for the design and management of public housing. As the core of the new system, the Housing Cooperative will operate as a non-profit organization funded by the city government at the beginning, but will ultimately operate independently of the state and will become responsible for its finances. The cooperative will develop new housing, utilizing with a participatory design process inviting different stakeholders, including the government, future tenants and local neighborhoods, designers and potential partners to communicate and negotiate projects together. The project demonstrates how a cooperative might operate through the redesign of current highly controversial large-scale public housing project in Taipei. Maintaining the proposed density, I tested a series of urban design scenarios, and ultimately proposed a new master plan and a series of urban design rules emulating how the housing cooperative staff might balance community concerns and support more diverse social programs. This aspect of the project adopts lessons learned from utopian models like Bolo’bolo and case studies of commoning from the Atlas of Commoning, particularly examples of Swiss cooperative housing in Zurich. Building on these examples, this project proposes a new massing strategy with shared common courtyards populated with social programs. A series of in-between public spaces serve the entire project and the surrounding neighborhoods. Several architectural rules are also proposed to guide the design, with the intent that the housing cooperative commissions multiple architects to implement its projects.


Veronica Wang SYNANTHROPOLIS Rethinking Cohabitation with Urban Wildlife on Pittsburgh’s Public Staircases

As a result of urbanization, habitat fragmentation and edge effects are causing a 27% drop in biodiversity around the world. Interior forest species have decreased significantly and cities are expecting an increasing number of edge species, including synanthropic species who benefit and rely on man-built structures. In response to this change, this project explores how tactical urban interventions might allow city dwellers to interact with and relate to other species in new ways, building consciousness about humans’ impact and responsibility for environmental stewardship. To help foster a mutually beneficial relationship for humans and synanthropic species and to design for urban cohabitation in Pittsburgh, this project incorporates underutilized urban woodlands to provide new habitats and unique experiences/interactions with urban wildlife on Pittsburgh’s deteriorating public staircases, while raising awareness of the environmental impact of daily human activities.

Existing Generic Staircase

Expanded Landing - Tree Seats

Expanded Landing - Bird Blind

Expanded Landing - Stepped Seating

Operable Railing Seats

Expanded Landing Trellis, Rain Barrel, Compost bin

Expanded Landing - Slide and Net Seating

Expanded Landing - Bike Rail, Stepped Seating, Side Table

Recycled Wood Crates Seating

Expanded Landing - Zipline

Expanded Landing - Hammocks

Expanded Landing - Ramped Stepped Seating

Sculpted Landscape Seating

Expanded Landing - Picnic Table and Swings

Expanded Landing - Playground

Expanded Landing - Chimney Swift Tower

Pittsburgh, with it steep and rapidly shifting topography, offers spatial proximity between human communities and ecologically valuable remnant woodlands. Across the city, these woodlands are crossed by actively used public staircases, the site of this project. Inspired by the works of Laura Zuroski, Joyce Hwang, Saran Gunawan, Issac Monte and many others, I propose a taxonomy of plug-in public spaces on the staircases to incentivize usage, maintenance and environmental stewardship, while designing for four of Pittsburgh’s most prevalent synanthropes—raccoons, squirrels, chimney swifts and little brown bats—as they experience conflicts and threats in shared urban spaces with humans.

135


Rebecca Lefkowitz EX LIBRIS A Library for a Common Future

The public library occupies a unique niche in the American cultural imagination and has an unrivaled opportunity to mitigate the unequal distribution of resources to the masses. As an organizational model, the library’s purpose is simple: to collect, store and provide access to knowledge. As a political institution, the library represents the pinnacle of cultural knowledge and power—the primary point of access to truth for a curious citizenry. As urban space, the library today serves as a public recreational space while simultaneously providing simple human needs like shelter, employment assistance and interpersonal connection. As an architectural symbol, the library references historical democratic ideals of free assembly and free speech. The library accomplishes all this without conforming to the pressures of the market. In a time of political turbulence, reduced funding for social services, increasing privatization and unregulated surveillance of spaces masquerading as public fora, the role of the library has expanded. No longer simply needed to collect knowledge, the library is now responsible for providing free educational after-school programs for kids, access to ever-evolving technology, assistance with research and resource questions and more. More than a sacred space for solitary research pursuits, the library is a physical space unencumbered by the burdens of censorship and paywalls that restricts many virtual spaces; it is a tool for empowerment in historically disenfranchised communities, arming citizens with evidence and solutions to overcome problems created by unsympathetic market forces or government inaction. Bottom-up community organizations that provide social services, monitor community development and advocate for the rights of

136

disenfranchised residents are best equipped to tackle issues of gentrification, housing and access to resources, but are often unable to scale their efforts. The historical model of the public library can be adapted to fit this purpose, acting as a centralized, symbolic anchor point through which these community resources might find common ground in order to scale up their operational scope. Known today as “the birthplace of America,” and a major node within the Northeast megalopolis, the City of Philadelphia has a long history concerning issues like contested land ownership, utopian planning ideologies and radical political undercurrents. These narrative threads are tied not only to the city, but can be extrapolated to the history of the library and the U.S. as a whole. It is therefore appropriate to consider Philadelphia as a foundational archetype in the ideological premise of democracy: a city built on concepts of freedom, symbolism and unity. Philadelphia also suffers the urban ailments common to American cities today: vacancy, gentrification and the uneven distribution of resources are particularly prevalent in South Philadelphia. This project explores how the traditional function of the library could be combined with an additional set of spaces intended to house and support existing and unforeseen community organizations, expanding the library’s program to support bottom-up social innovation. A library that assembles disparate resources and local initiatives in a disinvested South Philadelphia neighborhood offers space for the commons, acting as a symbol for civicminded, bottom-up institution-building for a more equitable future.


A myriad of problems have caused water to become one of the most rarefied and contested resources. We cannot take it for granted any longer. Despite the market vying for the privatization of water and sea-level rise impacting real estate values, to waterfronts threatened by climate change and a growing concern for access to clean water, we have become desensitized to nature and oblivious to its rarity. Charles Fishman, author of “The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water,” calls the human race “water illiterate,” and rightfully so. We don’t question the process of treatment of water, the resource-based commons that is most intimately tied with our homes, our neighborhoods and life on this planet. This project explores how changes to urban water infrastructure could increase both water access and water literacy. Since the implementation of underground water and sewer systems, water is hidden, making it easy to forget that water was the focal point for social gatherings from the bath houses of ancient Rome to the wash houses of France. Even today, several European neighborhoods incorporate drinking fountains in their public spaces, where people spend hours of leisure; many cultures around the world hold water in high regard as an asset that brings groups of people together. Today, we are starting to develop dissolute behavior regarding water, in a world where children die of water-borne diseases and communities struggle to get clean water more than once a week.

Our increased distance water and the creeping destruction of the hydrosocial cycle has caused a distorted perception of water and lack of public knowledge, a huge missed opportunity for urban designers to intervene and produce collaborative spaces for the state and public to share knowledge on our critical resources, and perhaps even spark ideas for alternative methods of resource negotiation.

Sai Prateek Narayan WATER MARKS Restoring Water’s Status in the Urban Realm

This project proposes a linked set of interventions designed to raise awareness of water issues and create new accessible interactions with drinking water in Pittsburgh’s public realm. It proposes a new system of on-street public fountains integrated into small water parklets that utilize existing fire hydrants. The kit of parts could be reconfigured in different situations to enable a fountain to be created in each of Pittsburgh’s 90 neighborhoods. In addition, it proposes a new water quality rating app to create an expanded voice for water advocacy and real-time feedback for the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority.

Type: The Playspace

D

E B C

C

A

B A

HYDRANT source of water in the streetscape

PIPES reminiscent of the hidden infrastructure

C

D

E

SIGNAGE informing people of water in their region

FOUNTAIN providing access to drinking water

SPRAY PARK invoking water as a playspace for children

Example: Larimer

D

C

C

B

E

A

137


Sujan Shrestha [NEIGHBORHOOD] GUTHI Reframing Traditional Practice to Develop Agency Through Social Transformation

In 2015, an earthquake in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley wrought significant destruction to the city’s historic communities. Since then, low-income residents in the city’s aging but culturally significant neighborhoods have received little governmental assistance and are often unable to access private capital in order to rebuild their communities. This project builds on the traditional Nepali collective organizations, guthi, to propose a new mechanism for community planning, microlending and cooperative development grounded in local cultural practices. The neighborhood guthi exercises radical planning techniques to propose a new form of neighborhood cooperative designed to increase agency and foster economic self-sufficiency. It aims to produce a solidarity economy that reinstates access to resources. The neighborhood guthi will reinstate the citizens as a polity, engendering a transition to an autonomous system that is resilient to future shocks and stresses. Through interventions that aim to create a system-level change in the mindset of the residential community, the guthi aims to invoke a sense of what it is to exercise citizenship as it evolves. This project explores how the new guthi could be structured as an organization, offers spatial examples of potential community intervention, and explores mechanisms for disseminating the idea of the guthi through newspapers and comics.

138


The Beijing hutong courtyard is a typical Chinese residential morphology, which usually manifests as a courtyard surrounded by 4 houses. Siheyuan (courtyard housing) was originally a single-family housing type built in Beijing during the Yuan Dynasty. During World War II, many house owners sold their houses and moved out. Some were divided among families, leading to their evolution into courtyards shared between multiple households. China’s socialist transformation in the 1950s required homeowners to declare their property in order to allow the government to claim some of it. In the 1960s and ‘70s courtyards owned as larger landholdings were ‘’socialized,’’ claimed by the government and provided as social housing. In this period the conversion of the traditional singlefamily siheyuan into crowded and overbuilt multifamily dazayuan courtyards transformed Beijing’s hutongs. In the 1980s the government began to return the “socialized housing property” back to the previous owners, but the government still kept the lease contracts to make sure the tenants who moved in during the postwar period wouldn’t become homeless. Up to now, the property of courtyard houses has changed from private to public, then semiprivate, and finally to a shared space occupied by demographically diverse and often lowerincome residents.

was tolerated and negotiated between longterm residents. However, migrant “floating” residents in recent decades have destabilized this balance. This project proposes both a new community organization and a system of architectural plug-ins to replace the poorly built courtyard additions. Bringing together long-term residents and short-term renters with government officials, the community committee and urban designers the community-based organization will negotiate the demolition of the attached buildings and their replacement with new shared facilities. The organization will be founded by Beijing’s Municipal Commission of Housing and UrbanRural Development and Historical Preservation Department.

Chi Zhang HUTONG PLUGIN Renegotiation of Common Space in Traditional Chinese Courtyards

The architectural plug-in system includes bathroom, kitchen and laundry modules which can be configured in a variety ways, adapting to different courtyard geometries. The system allows the original historic hutong buildings to be restored, improving daylight access, expanding open space and organizing new modern utilities into an efficient shared central building. Ideally the plug-in system could be piloted in one community and then deployed in other hutongs throughout Beijing.

As the limited living area of the courtyard buildings are shared by a greater number of people, many households have built their own additional buildings encroaching into the shared courtyards with kitchens, bathrooms or storerooms. While illegal, this encroachment

139


ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN The Master of Advanced Architectural Design (MAAD) is a post-graduate, studio-based program that engages emerging methods of design and fabrication through architectural design to speculate upon future modes of architectural practice, enhanced construction methods and material culture within the built environment. With a particular emphasis upon design, the four-semester program leverages the SoA’s and CMU’s core strengths in design fabrication, architectural robotics, computational design and ecological thinking as vehicles for knowledge acquisition and speculation. The program focuses on the creation of new insights and new knowledge—or “research”—through the design process, or “research by design.”

TRACK CHAIR Jeremy Ficca THESIS STUDENTS Stephanie Smid Hang Wang

The program seeks to probe the technical and cultural opportunities and implications of a data-rich future in which design methodologies, construction processes and sustainable building life cycles are intrinsically interlaced. The goal is consciously speculative and experimental work that is deeply enmeshed with social and environmental concerns, with explicit ties to humanistic and cultural discourses, industry and contemporary practice. CMU’s emphasis on interdisciplinary learning, its computational culture, world-class robotic fabrication facilities and a dedicated group of faculty offer unique hands-on opportunities for experimentation and speculation in the context of a small-scale, yet globally focused, school and university.

Hang Wang

140


Hang Wang

Stephanie Smid

141


COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN The Master of Science in Computational Design (MSCD) is a post-professional research-based program investigating new design opportunities and critical perspectives at the intersection of design and computation. The program mobilizes CMU’s computational strengths to enable students to explore technical and cultural aspects of computation as it relates to architecture, design and the built environment. In spheres ranging from the applied to the speculative, and from the poetic to the critical, students in the program conduct research on subjects such as artificial intelligence, architectural robotics, digital fabrication, simulation, computational geometry, responsive environments and shape grammars—as well as on embodied and tangible forms of design interaction, fabrication and expression. As a research program, the MSCD adopts a broad view of design technologies as vehicles of design inquiry, as speculative artifacts and as worthy subjects of critical analysis and debate. The program is well suited to highly inquisitive applicants who are interested in challenging disciplinary boundaries, developing a unique research agenda and acquiring the conceptual and technical skills to conduct computational design research at the highest levels of scholarly rigor and creativity. TRACK CHAIR Daniel Cardoso Llach STUDENTS MSCD: Ozguc Bertug Capunaman, Yufei Cheng, Wei Wei Chi, Zhihao Fang, Yixiao Fu, Ian Friedman, Siyu Guo, Yun Hao, Anna Henson, Yaxin Hu, Runchang Kang, Yi-Chin Lee, Zheng Luo, Hongtao Ma, Jiawei Mai, Weixin Qiu, Jinmo Rhee, Erik Ulberg, Humphrey Yang, Zhuoni Yang PhD–CD: Ardavan Bidgoli, Emek Erdolu, Jingyang Liu Manuel Rodriguez Ladron De Guevara, N. Miya Sylvester Noreen Saeed, Pedro Veloso

142

CAM AS A TOOL FOR CREATIVE EXPRESSION Informing Fabrication Systems through Real-Time Human Interaction Ozguc Bertug Capunaman The role of the designer has been long defined to be highly conceptual and immaterial. This distinct separation between mind and body coined in the Renaissance era undeniably constitutes the basis for contemporary design practice, in which designers are mainly concerned with the representation of the design and not so much with the materialization. Following the successful attempts at automating the fabrication process starting from the 1940s, Computer-Aided Mawnufacturing (CAM) and Design (CAD) tools further focused on attempting to liberate designers from arduous tasks of design. Even though such efforts enabled faster and more accurate fabrication, CAM tool implementations are deterministic, minimizing ambiguity and discoveries that inform design decisions, and highly generalized, failing to capture vast possibilities of computation in design. This thesis proposes an interactive design-fabrication pipeline where users can actively manipulate the object at any given moment during the fabrication process, which then can be captured using a computer vision-based feedback loop to inform digital representation, capturing geometrical intentions introduced through physical interaction. By doing so, this thesis argues that active engagement with materials is a learning opportunity that can enhance creative freedom and inform design decisions, and that creative human agency can coexist along deterministic machines to facilitate creative and cognitive exploration through making.


MODELING COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN An Interactive Visual Analysis of the Field Based on Topic Modeling and Bibliometrics

Zhuoni Yang Computational design is a field combining multiple concepts and a variety of fields linking design and computation around the innovative re-definition of computer-aided design methods through digital, physical and interactive computing. Through computational visual analysis based on several conferences in computational design fields, including ACADIA, CAADRIA, CAAD, CHI, DIS and ICCAD etc., this thesis aims to increase our understanding of this rich field of research and practice. Through data visualization and analytics it tries to find new insights from the field’s production, including what are the important theories; how authors and institutions have cooperated and impacted each other over time; and the distribution of researchers based on gender, location and institutions. This thesis tries to introduce the field’s historic evolution in a clear interactive visualization, for people to quickly understand what topics are covered, the areas of focus and the blind spots of research during the past 50 years. The thesis uses the unsupervised classification method, LDA topic modeling, to discover the topics covered by papers and to illustrate how to gain insight into the structure of the field from those topics. Through topic modeling with a network structure, the thesis tries to extend the model to include authorship information. Taking a visual analytics approach like D3js and Threejs, I integrated those text analysis algorithms with interactive visualizations to provide a dynamic system that allows users to explore collections of documents.

Analysis and Generation of Urban Fabric Using Deep Learning, Based on the Patterns of Buildings, Streets, and Lots in Pittsburgh

Jinmo Rhee This thesis reports on the analytic and generative potential of machine learning methods on context-rich urban datasets. Working with a dataset of Pittsburgh’s urban data, the paper proposes a novel method to extract information about each building in the city in ways that reflect its immediate urban context, analyzing its morphology. The method can identify urban characteristics or gradients that yield surprising correlations with Pittsburgh’s distinctive neighborhoods by clustering feature vectors of a novel dataset. In contrast to analyzing the morphological homogeneity of urban space in a top-down fashion (such as existing GIS data focusing on individual buildings) this thesis illustrates a bottom-up method to reveal morphological patterns in new ways. The potential of this framework to integrate morphological and nonmorphological aspects of cities — such as economic and socio-cultural data — is discussed.

143


ENDOWING THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT WITH INTELLIGENCE A Design Framework for Interactive Sensing Environments Runchang Kang As the line between the physical and the digital is gradually blurred because of the rapid developments in computation, cybernetics, artificial intelligence and engineering, architectural environments increasingly become receptive, perceptive, reactive, interactive and even proactive. However, although people are fascinated with the idea of reactive spaces and ubiquitous computing, there is still missing an integrated sensing system which not only leverages the occupants’ status, activities, interactions and contextual information but also maintain extensibility and expandability. Moreover, it still requires great effort, especially for non-experts, to design appliances and applications compatible with the system. In this thesis, I present a lightweight sensing system which can gather, analyze and fuse the occupants’ movement, gestures and voice data, and provide easy-to-use templates and rules for designers and developers to create appliances and configure the behavior of the application. I provide the audiences with a design space which articulates the potency of the system being applied in two major domains—smart home context and creativity installation context. The system, including software and hardware components, is packaged and documented in detail, serving as an off-the-shelf opensource project for developing sensor environments.

144

geoMATries Designer-Oriented Material Programming and Simulation Tools for a 4-D Printing CAD Platform Humphrey Yang Materials in nature are mostly active, responsive and transformative. Yet in conventional design practices, these features are often neglected and removed from the actual design. 4-D printing is an additive manufacturing technique that leverages these properties to create stimuli-responsive, shape-changing artifacts. However, due to the lack of a fast and physically accurate simulation method to inform design decisions, prior studies in 4-D printing rely almost exclusively on physical prototyping. A proper simulation method to inform decisions in this domain is needed. This thesis addresses this challenge by proposing a data-driven simulation method that leverages finite element analysis for accuracy and machine learning for computational speed. Compared to other simulation methods, this approach can produce physically accurate transformation predictions in real-time, allowing for an interactive forward-design process of 4-D printing. A prototype CAD tool is also implemented to expose the design and development guidelines of a “forwarddesign tool” adopting this simulation engine, and is deployed in several design tasks to demonstrate its applicability.


SMART FILTER A Machine Learning Approach for “Content-aware” Image Processing

3D MICROSCOPIC TEXTURE INTERFACE IN CAD Cultivating Material Knowledge for the Practiced Digital Hand Zheng Luo

Designers translate their ideas into images via visualization tools. Most of these tools provide some level of editing capabilities. Although these tools have very powerful and comprehensive capability in editing, they require users to have a strategy before using and decide the combination of commands they need to apply. For some simple task, for instance, moving the position of the light source in an image, these tools will have very limited power (image processing) or require great amount of computational resources (render). Even though the user may have a clear image of the expected result, current tools will have a hard time with the task, mostly because they are “content-blind.” To test the idea of a “content-aware” image processing tool, in this research I use machine learning methods to develop a proof of concept tool that is able to rapidly re-light an image based on content traits in the image (depth, shape, reflectiveness, etc.) that relate to the re-lighting task. By doing this, we can have the light weight convenience of an image processing tool as well as the content-awareness of a rendering tool.

Wei Wei Chi The adoption of Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems changed the workflow of design disciplines and shifted design practice towards visual representation. The abstraction of design into digital representation biased designers towards idealized visual form, undermining the physical relevance of design artifacts. This thesis attempts to bridge the physicality of design artifacts and abstract visual representation by redefining our interaction with CAD systems, using 3-D texture capturing and haptic simulation techniques. The thesis documents the development of an integrated hardware and software toolkit that would allow sampling of real-world texture at a microscopic scale and enable designers to map the sampled texture into the 3-D model, where texture can be simulated through a haptic interface. A novel representation of texture at microscale along with the haptic toolkit could provide more active engagement with materiality during the CAD process that could inform design decisions through a simulated perceptual experience of the material.

145


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN The Master of Science in Sustainable Design (MSSD) is a post-professional graduate program focused on critical engagement of design with technical expertise to enable innovative approaches to sustainable strategies for the built environment. Our MSSD program has long led the world in integrated building technologies that sustainably reshape the built environment. Challenges posed by climate change urgently require design professionals to act across scales of urban ecosystems to address environmental issues ranging from urban landscapes, to resource depletion, embodied energy, net zero architecture, and human health. The MSSD program engages environmental issues related to architecture and urban systems at the intersection of building science, design, and technology. it is a designresearch based program that explores technical and multicultural aspects of ecological thinking, while building actionable expertise in sustainable design methodologies that impact early stage design decision making. Based in the legacy of sustainability teaching at Carnegie Mellon University, the MSSD program investigates research-based design innovation strategies, prepares students to excel in research methods, and to become experts in integrative design thinking for the future of the built environment. TRACK CHAIR Dana Cupkova STUDENTS Miranda Ford, Komal Keshav Ganoo, Siddharth Ghoghari, Pragya Gupta, Yi-Jia Liao, Nihar Nitin Pathak, Ruiji Sun, Jianxiong Wu

ARCHITECTURE OF RECYCLING The New Material Possibilities of Waste Plastic Miranda Ford One of the most mainstream, universally accepted, and physically manifested examples of overall environmental degradation is the overwhelming problem of plastic pollution. The fabrication of recycled plastic for large-scale, long-term architectural use can theoretically aid these problems. Through a life-cycle comparison of traditional materials with recycled PET or HDPE materials, my research determines that shingle roofing, sheet roofing, masonry cladding, siding cladding, and window frames provide the best opportunities for recycling plastic waste and reducing the environmental impact of the building industry.

146


Non-isothermal HVAC Zoning Design for Energy Conservation and Thermal Satisfaction

Improvement of Water Systems for Commercial Buildings in Dalian

Ruiji Sun Current HVAC systems are pursuing both spatially and temporally isothermal environments, which ignore desire for different thermal zoning, and consume signifi cant energy. Using case study data and simulation I propose to develop scenarios for a non-equivalent temperature environment across zones. The goal is to maximize individual thermal comfort and minimize energy consumption for heating and cooling.

Jianxiong Wu Integrated water system design is a powerful response to the current and future water crises. With increasing population in dry urab area of Dalian this study is focused on the design of water conservation systems that contribute to quality of the environment from an architect’s perspective. The main focus of this thesis is on the potential of water systems metrics and design guidelines for sustainable water systems while refl ecting on the quality of the urban environment.

147


Passive Design Framework for Rammed Earth Thermal Mass

Pragya Gupta Rammed earth construction is an environmentally benign alternative to current construction methods and can reduce the energy associated with heating/cooling a building. The study explores additive mixes and geometrical figuration as a technique to improve the thermal performance of rammed earth while reconnecting with vernacular practices of architecture.

148

Architecture of Bioplastics: Design Potential of Biodegradable Materiality

Nihar Pathak + Yijia Lao Biodegradability and reuse of food waste are two ways that can close the unsustainable open loop of the production/waste cycle. This research examines the potential of using biomass-based bioplastics (renewable and bio-degradable) and food waste (wasteto-resource) to tackle the issue of dependency on fossil fuel-based material and the overburden of landfills.


A Geometric Approach to Passive Strategies for High Density Urban Districts

Siddharth Ghoghari Tall buildings, as a result of their height, are exposed to extreme weather conditions making them rely heavily on their mechanical systems which in turn consumes a lot of energy. By integrating climate based site-specific passive design strategies linked to the physical attributes of the building like orientation and overall form using simulations, I propose to explore the limits on mitigating the energy load on tall buildings in high density urban districts.

ECO-INNOVATION Designing Green Infrastructure for Urban Stormwater Capture and Neighborhood Equity Komal Ganoo Green infrastructure design with a placemaking approach can enhance the spatial quality and strengthen the socioeconomic equity in a vulnerable urban neighborhood. Using urban mapping, water flow simulation coupled with calculation of water capture, and urban design strategies; this study aims to investigate the potential of GI and stormwater capture in the environmentally and socioeconomically vulnerable neighborhoods of Pittsburgh.

149


BUILDING PERFORMANCE & DIAGNOSTICS The SoA’s graduate programs in Building Performance & Diagnostics (BPD) have long led the world in advanced building technologies that sustainably reshape the built environment. The Master of Science in Building Performance & Diagnostics (MSBPD) degree program is intended for practitioners, researchers and educators in architecture and the building industry who wish to be leaders in advanced building technologies and building performance outcomes. The program is based on the premise that the integrated design of building and community systems is critical for environmental sustainability and human health and productivity. The MSBPD is a building science and research-oriented program, with technical depth for careers in sustainability-focused professional practice, environmental research and consulting, the building industry, or pursuing a PhD in Building Science. TRACK CHAIR Vivian Loftness STUDENTS MS BPD: Rashmi Baliga, Wenrui Guo, Sen Hong, Zhizhang Hu, Phillip Kuehne, Qingyang Liu, Leila Srinivasan, Jin Yang, Xidai Yang, Lili Yu, Zhou Yu, Shihao Zhang PhD–BPD: Bokyung (Bo) Jun, Eleni Katrini, James Katungyi, Christopher Leininger, Zekun ‘Suzy’ Li, Siliang Lu, Flore Marion, Hetal Parekh, Annie Ranttila, Youngjoo Son, Surekha Tetali, Jiarong Xie, Yujie Xu, Chenlu Zhang, Zhiang Zhang ADVISORS Vivian Loftness, Erica Cochran Hameen, Azizan Aziz, Volker Hartkopf, Omer Tugrul Karaguzel, Nina BaIrd

150

Creating the Everyday Commons

Eleni Katrini People in neighborhoods around the world have developed creative ways to satisfy their daily needs through sharing and collaboration, creating alternative solutions that are resourceful and more socially engaging. These creative sharing communities provide local solutions to a more sustainable use of human, environmental and economic resources. This thesis has developed a taxonomy of sharing culture practices based on everyday life, and explored the value it brings to meeting communities and individual needs’ based on a Max-Neef model. The taxonomy introduces and then studies ten categories of sharing culture—food, shelter, work, care-giving, knowledge, well-being, resources, mobility, leisure and services. The interdisciplinary research synthesizes methods from social sciences and theories of practice, architecture, urban design and planning to reveal spatial patterns of sharing culture at three critical scales: building, threshold and urban. In-depth ethnographic case studies of sharing culture in London and Athens combine qualitative analysis of participants interviews and documents, with observation, architectural drawing and cartography. The actionable spatial patterns of sharing are a first step towards helping designers and communities to understand sharing culture practices through an architectural lens, and to leverage space to create transitional pathways towards the diffusion of sharing culture.


Food Producing Façade Key to Sustainable Future

Christopher Leininger The built environment uses significant and increasing amounts of energy, 1,000 times the energy density per unit area of the natural environment, and contributing to the Urban Heat Island. Simultaneously, population growth and urban development have outpaced food production globally. In response, there has been a growing trend to redefine the ancient tradition of incorporating plants into the built environment via green roofs, green facades, urban agriculture and other green infrastructures. Growing food producing plants on modern, living façades offers multiple benefits for food production, shading, natural cooling and air purification. This research uses semi-controlled field experimentation to test the building performance gains of integrating food producing plants into a living, bioclimatic façade in the Pittsburgh climate. Multiple years of testing indicate that a maximum production of 0.46 pounds of vegetables per square foot of façade can be produced annually, while reducing the façade surface temperature 20 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit. These outcomes can be achieved utilizing rainwater capture for primary irrigation, deploying 10-12 gallons per day, illustrating the potential for future buildings to be regenerative contributors to a sustainable built environment.

The impact of daytime circadian thermal variability on nighttime sleep of occupants and performance at simple tasks James Katyungi The steady state approach to indoor thermal conditioning cuts occupants off from the thermal variability of their natural environment by maintaining near-constant indoor temperatures. The adaptive approach, the other approach to thermal conditioning, connects occupants to the thermal variability of their natural environment. Indoor thermal conditions in the adaptive approach therefore tend to vary in a circadian pattern. The commonly used thermal comfort surveys cannot capture the impact of circadian thermal variability on building occupants’ health and performance at tasks. Thermal comfort surveys are also subjective. This research aims to establish the impact of circadian thermal variability on occupants’ sleep quality and performance at simple tasks. The research thereby also explores if sleep quality and performance at simple tasks, which are objective metrics, can be used as criteria for evaluating daytime thermal environments. Circadian thermal variability could result in greater satisfaction with indoor thermal environments and reduced energy consumption.

151


Developing HVAC Supervisory Control Strategies via Reinforcement Learning with Whole Building Energy Models

152

Visual Environmental Quality Promoting Occupant Satisfaction and Productivity in Office Environments with a Holistic Approach

Zhiang Zhang

Youngjoo Son

Recent research demonstrates that building energy models (BEM) has the potential for developing optimal control strategies for HVAC supervisory control to significantly improve HVAC energy efficiency, as compared to the widelyused rule-based control strategies. Yet BEM is a high-order model so that classical optimal control methods cannot be directly applied, and BEM has slow computational speed, which limits its application for large-scale optimization problems. This thesis develops a reinforcement learningbased method (RL) to develop HVAC supervisory optimal control strategies using whole building energy models. Through computer simulations, the RL-based method is evaluated for different scenarios covering four HVAC systems, four climates and two building thermal mass levels. The RL-based method achieves satisfactory control performance for a variable-air-volume (VAV) system for both cooling and heating, with obvious energy saving and less time when setpoint is not met, however RL does not effectively address changes in indoor air temperature setpoints. The RL-based method also achieves reduced heating demand and improved-or-similar thermal comfort for a slow-response radiant heating system, however the reward function must include heuristics to deal with the slow thermal response and imperfect energy metric of this system. The RL-based method fails in controlling a multichiller chilled water system due to system complexities. The thesis concludes that “deep� reinforcement learning is not necessary for effective HVAC control, and recommends using a narrow and shallow non-linear neural network model as the functional approximation of reinforcement learning.

Visual environmental quality such as view and daylight availability is getting attention because it promotes occupant satisfaction, health and productivity. A common approach to evaluate environmental quality is pairing subjective responses collected via survey questionnaires asking occupants’ satisfaction with objective measures such as illuminance and luminance. However, unfortunately, another objective component, building system attributes such as lighting fixture specifications, window and view, shading devices and space subdivision are rarely considered together. In an attempt to mitigate this gap, this thesis investigates how subjective responses, measures and building system attributes in visual environment are affecting each other when they are considered as a whole. To do this, the thesis consists of three parts identifying 1) how specific subjective responses are correlated to broader subjective responses, 2) which measures and building system attributes that best predict subjective responses and 3) how building system attributes impact measures. The results are expected to contribute to determining how visual environmental satisfaction could be raised by providing different combination of building system attributes and how the building systems result in measurable difference.


Interplay Between Built Environment Factors and Urban Heat Island Phenomenon in India and the U.S.

Bio-Sensing and Personalized Reinforcement Learning Control Agents for Personalized Thermal Comfort and Energy Efficiency in Offices

Surekha Tetali

Chenlu Zhang

While the impact of Urban Heat Island (UHI) on building energy consumption has been well studied, a comprehensive understanding of the role of buildings and urban built environment in formation of the UHI has not reached the same level of maturity. Research on if and how the built environment interacts with UHI at different spatial and temporal scales is scant. This research proposes to analyze the interplay between the natural and built environmental factors influencing the UHI across some of the highly populated Indian urban regions and compare it with urban regions of the United States. UHI magnitude can be quantified as the difference between urban and rural land surface temperatures (LST), referred to as SUHI or canopy air temperatures—CUHI. Using a multi-method approach this study proposes to analyze both SUHI and CUHI across different locations in India and the US to identify any existing correlation between them, and the factors influencing their formation. UHI related policy makers, and code and standard development organizations are expected to benefit from the outcome of this research. Further, this research is expected to be the first of its kind in the Indian context, especially through application of an urban canopy model for Indian urban regions, and for its multi-method approach of UHI analysis. As such, it will serve as a stepping stone for more such research for a country that is expected to be the biggest contributor of urban growth in next 30 years.

While comfortable indoor thermal environment plays a crucial role in occupant health and productivity, prevalent air temperature and schedule-based “one-size-fits-all” thermal comfort control system has resulted in low thermal satisfaction and high energy use in offices. The development of personalized thermal comfort models with occupant feedback to establish individual-specific thermal comfort requirements for individual controls are compromised when averaged into controls in shared multi-occupant spaces. This thesis proposes a new paradigm for personalized thermal comfort control placing the human-in-the-loop by continuously integrating bio-signals, preferences and environmental conditions into individual “agents” for the operation of the heating and cooling systems for maximum comfort and minimum energy use. The bio-sensing and reinforcement learning agents for personalized thermal comfort control establishes individual preferences related to thermal comfort to initiate the best control actions on behalf of an occupant, given the constraints of the building systems. Field testing of the human-in-the-loop reinforcement learning agent was completed in both heating and cooling systems with variations in ambient and task settings to demonstrate computational and bio-signal innovation in building system controls to deliver occupant comfort and wellbeing and energy effectiveness, with benefits for health and productivity.

153


An Integrative HVAC System Featuring Adaptive Personalized Cooling with NonIntrusive Sensing Techniques

Siliang Lu

Truly effective and efficient HVAC systems can create comfortable indoor environments for all occupants, at the lowest energy demand, even in the large zones of open plan office environments. The development of an adaptive personalized cooling system that controls desk fans with non-intrusive sensing and machine learning algorithms will improve the thermal environment for all occupants. A new control paradigm where personalized set points are connected to optimize the ambient cooling set-point to maximize satisfaction and save energy. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulator was used to analyze the 14% energy savings for a typical open office plan while maintaining over 80% acceptable thermal comfort values to meet ASHRAE design standards. The proposed hybrid cooling system with adaptive personalized cooling will optimize energy performance and ensure occupant thermal comfort in open-plan office buildings.

Benchmarking Ordinances to Reduce Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings for a Low Carbon Future Flore Marion

Buildings use 40% of the US energy and are responsible for the vast majority of carbon emissions, reaching 70% in New York City and 80% in Pittsburgh. To accelerate energy efficiency improvements in new and existing buildings, 29 U.S. cities have now passed benchmarking and transparency ordinances. This research evaluates the effectiveness of such ordinances, hypothesizes that benchmarking ordinances facilitate more energy efficiency initiatives which lead to reduced energy consumption in commercial buildings. The statistical analysis of the EnergyStar national dataset supports the quantification of building EnergyStar improvements that occurred after the establishment of benchmarking and transparency ordinances. The preliminary results show +0.53 point EnergyStar score improvement (p=0.013), with significant carbon and dollar savings, that can be extrapolated to national benefits.

Smart Surfaces for Sustainable Urban Futures

Suzy Li

Dark and impervious urban surfaces have had destructive impacts on the climate of cities, contributing to urban heat island issue and combined sewer overflows. In U.S. cities, hard surfaces for roofs, roads, sidewalks, and parking have reached 50–60% of the urban surface area. The low reflectivity of the surface material increases surface and air temperatures, and the impervious qualities of these surfaces contribute to flooding and the combined sewer overflows. An illustrated smart surface taxonomy has been developed for roofs, streets and sidewalks and parking lots, with metrics to quantify the benefits for mitigating heat and storm water runoff. The taxonomy introduces dark and light surfaces, impervious and pervious pavement types, bioswales and trees with and without structured water storage, green/blue roofs and more. The design community and city leaders must make strategic choices to shift to smart surface materials to control urban heat and water. 154


Policy Interventions to Catalyze Uptake of Energy Efficiency Upgrades in the U.S. Hetal Parekh The US commercial building energy retrofit market is estimated at $72 billion and is projected to reduce energy use by 30% with $280 billion in energy savings over 10 years and an influx of 850,000 cumulative job years. Despite the potential for tremendous savings, the overall uptake of energy efficiency projects still remains low in the U.S. due to multiple unaddressed market and non-market barriers. Through a meta-analysis of the literature and existing policy, the key unaddressed barriers faced by building owners involve understanding, identifying and obtaining external financing for energy retrofit, with a critical need for financing decision support tools. This research provides building owners’ easily accessible, aggregated, streamlined, simplified information about available pathways and resources to finance an energy retrofit project. External financing programs were mined and aggregated into a repository with overlaying information about organizations that offer tax benefits, loans, leases, rebates or grants. The proof of concept of a tool has been built for the city of Pittsburgh and is tested for usability and functionality by industry professionals in the Pittsburgh’s 2030 District. The thesis contends that active engagement with energy efficiency financing materials is a learning opportunity that can enhance creative freedom and inform design decisions.

Schools for the Whole Child: Designing for Health, Well-being and Educational Outcomes as well as Safety

Annie Rantilla

School environments play a crucial role in the education of children. While safety is a growing emphasis in school building investments, it is critical to understand the importance of high quality school facilities for student health, well-being, performance and behavior. This thesis contends that Schools for the Whole Child must be designed to support students to: behave well, breathe well, be fit, be happy, stay focused, be safe and be present. Extensive literature and case studies have been assembled to draw linkages between design decisions and these seven outcomes, and to establish relative risks for our nation’s students. An interactive toolkit has been created to reveal synergies and conflicts, and enable teachers, administrators, and designers to set priorities. The interactive toolkit has been piloted in a workshop setting with Pittsburgh-based educators, administrators, designers and parents, with results to be synthesized into a final version of the toolkit for K-12 decision-makers nationwide. Providing high quality, healthy and safe school environments is essential for individuals, cities and society.

155


ARCHITECTURE—ENGINEERING— CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT The Master of Science and PhD of Architecture— Engineering—Construction Management (AECM) programs are jointly offered by the SoA and the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at CMU. The AECM programs prepare building-delivery professionals for careers in capital project delivery dealing with the entire life-cycle of capital projects, from pre-design to design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance stages. It focuses on the integration of design and technology, particularly advanced information systems, as a means of both improving building performance and eliminating negative environmental impact. Graduates of the SoA’s AECM programs are educated to become effective decision makers who can positively impact economic, environmental and ethical aspects of the built environment through professional management strategies. Graduates have successful careers in government, industry, business and NGO (non-governmental organization) sectors, prospering in positions where design professionals continuously make large-scale capital project design, construction, and maintenance decisions. STUDENTS MSAECM: Ishwar Balaji, Sandhya Balasubramanian, Patrick Byrne, Sarthak Chakraborty, Arnav Choudhry, David Cleaves, Victor Edet, Elif Oguz Erkal, Safiya Hodari, Abhishek Maniktala, Damini Mathur, Julie Miller, Shubhashree Mukherjee, Elif Oguz Erkal, Asli Darga Ozutemiz, Ankita Patel, Ananth Sadhana Pisipati, Anuroy Vyas, Xueyan Wang PhD–AECM: Rachel “Lola” Ben-Alon, Nizar Eldaher, Bobuchi Ken-Opurum, Alejandra Munoz, Shalini Priyadarshini, Lipika Swarup

156

School of Architecture Track Chairs Erica Cochran Hameen Joshua Lee Civil and Environmental Engineering Track Chair Susan Finger


Integrating Earthen Building Materials and Methods into the Mainstream Construction Industry

Rachel “Lola� Ben-Alon The vast majority of modern buildings are constructed from highly processed materials such as synthetic insulation, concrete and steel. Making and processing these building materials consumes 15% of global warming impacts, 20% of global energy demand and up to 40% of global solid waste. Essentially, it has been shown that relying on these conventional building materials is draining global natural resources. One prominent solution to this problem is using natural, minimally processed building materials. Specifically, earthen building materials such as rammed earth, adobe and cob offer a waste-free, also known as cradle-to-cradle lifecycle. They require less energy to be produced and they provide much healthier, non-toxic living environments. However, despite their advantages, earthen building materials have not been implemented comprehensively, because they are missing technical data, perceived negatively as low-tech and are not represented in building codes. To address these hurdles, the presented research aims to integrate earthen building materials within mainstream construction using three critical steps: (1) developing an environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of earthen materials compared to conventional materials, (2) identifying how negative perception on earthen buildings can be replaced and (3) conducting a policy repair analysis for earthen building codes and standards. Additionally, literature on performance data of earthen materials is synthesized, considering thermal, structural, durability, indoor air quality and economic parameters. This research contributes to the development of environmental and policy measures, used by policy makers and earthen construction advocates in their endeavors to catalyze the use of earthen building materials in mainstream construction projects. The long-term implications this research hopes to achieve are the catalysis of earthen construction in mainstream projects through the development of a complete, safe and user-friendly earthen building representations in building codes worldwide.

Green Storm Water Infrastructure Strategy Generation and Assessment Tool

Nizar Eldaher Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI), which includes elements like green roofs, bioretentions, pervious pavement and cisterns, has proven to be a cost effective alternative that can achieve a wider range of benefits in stormwater management compared to the single-purpose grey/traditional infrastructure (Combined Sewer System or Municipal Separate Storm and Sewer System). However, the implementation of GSI as a replacement or support system for grey infrastructure faces some barriers preventing its adoption by planners/designers and decision makers, in the private as well as in the public sector. While understanding and quantifying the full costs and the benefits of GSI plans are critical for sound decision making and to facilitate its adoption, planners/designers face challenges pertaining to hydrologic calculations (including sizing of Green Stormwater Infrastructure Elements (GSIEs), cost estimation (life cycle costs) and benefit assessment). This thesis presents a proof of concept tool (prototype) developed to help planners/designers and different stakeholders involved in conducting a comprehensive GSI planning process. The tool generates GSI alternative solutions (combination and size of GSIEs) that meet the user’s financial and hydrologic objectives. These alternatives are generated to maximize benefits, reduce costs and account for design specifications and multi-functionality of GSI. The prototype has three modules: 1) an Interface Module (including input and output interfaces), 2) a process module for hydrology, cost and benefit calculation and an optimization model for strategy generation and 3) a database module for storing collected data that are used for different process module calculations. The prototype, which is developed in Excel, was successfully tested for functionality and usability on a residential development site in Pittsburgh. The prototype required minimal input from the user (site specific data) and generated strategies that double the net annual benefits compared to the plan proposed by the developer. The tool also allowed generation of strategy scenarios that responded to multiple user objectives.

157


Meta-Analysis of Current Environmental and Health Quality Metrics for Construction Contractors During Pre-occupancy Stages of Construction Bobuhci Ken-Opurum The existing sustainable building standards and codes are aimed towards improving Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ), health of occupants and reducing the negative impacts of buildings on the environment. While they address the post-occupancy stage of buildings, there are fewer standards and research studies on the pre-occupancy stage, during construction of the building. This research identifies gaps in sustainability standards during the preoccupancy stage of building construction from ground-breaking to substantial completion, and the consequent impacts to health and productivity of construction workers and the effects on the environment. The research conducted will include a quantitative review of available standards and codes, and a comparative analysis of findings from Post-Occupancy and Pre-Occupancy field surveys. It aims to open a discussion about thermal, lighting, ergonomic, acoustic and air quality and identify tremendous opportunities to improve the conditions of the construction labor force that are underrepresented in the current standards. Preliminary results from the review of nine green building standards and two building codes revealed that most of the sustainability context within the standards and codes (texts) are related to the building sector (post-occupancy). This is illustrated in the “Normalized percent hits of key terms” bar chart above. Furthermore, the common key terms—color coded in the bar charts—within the texts relates to the pre-occupancy aspect of the building supply chain. This contrasts the results of the contractors’ survey performed which identified most of the key terms as areas affecting both their productivity and health while on site. For example, the impacts of equipment for lighting, heating and cooling, and other productivity-based tasks is just as significant pre-occupancy as it’s for post-occupancy, however, the common metrics do not identify these issues within their text. Construction management, workers productivity and the triple bottom line are neglected and underrepresented in sustainable construction preoccupancy stage. To fully understand the impacts of limited environmental and health quality metrics for contractors during pre-occupancy stage of construction, this research aims to further determine the connection between inefficient lighting and health implications on construction workers, additionally, and perform a larger survey to determine trends and investigate the correlation between different methods of site coping strategies for thermal comfort and contractor comfort and productivity.

158

A Tool for Sustainable Residential Water Management for the Architectural Design Delivery Process Alejandra Muñoz Water problems due to climate change urge changes regarding how professionals design buildings to sustainably manage water. In the near future, it is expected that general environmental awareness will increase the demand of sustainable water management (SWM) practices in the U.S. residential sector. However, research on SWM design practice has been oriented to specific design professionals, problems and technologies. These approaches lack holistic approaches to SWM. Even though tools have been developed for SWM, there is a dearth of tools oriented to architectural design delivery in the residential sector. In order to address these deficiencies, my dissertation work proposes to develop a prototype tool, test it and make recommendations for further development. By means of a national survey, two ethnographic studies and literature review, a model of the design process and five requirements of the tool have been identified which will be further studied through the development and testing of a software prototype. The envisioned prototype should be focused on early design phases and support the selection of SWM components based on economic and environmental factors. Results of this research will provide a better understanding of the early phases of the architectural design process for SWM and will allow the development of future tools rooted in the reality of architectural and SWM design practice.


Health, Safety and Comfort of On-Site Workers in Construction

Shalini Priyadarshini Studies are indicative of an uneven spread of occupational hazards across different economic sectors with some work types, e.g. mining and construction being inherently more dangerous than others. Researchers also suggest that industries with highest incident rates possess certain common characteristics including use of heavy equipment and materials, and exposure to risky settings such as uncertain subterranean conditions and adverse weather. The construction sector is responsible for the production and upkeep of a nation’s physical infrastructure, including buildings for housing and work, transportation networks and structures for energy generation. Construction worksites are dynamic, organizationally complex, multi-employer systems that simultaneously pose numerous health and safety challenges and typical construction activities are known to frequently expose workers to physical, biological and chemical hazards. The sector reports a disproportionate share of fatalities, injuries and illnesses, despite the widespread use of technological, organizational and regulatory interventions promoting worker safety. Research into cause of accidents relates them to the uniqueness of work in construction, difficult site conditions, human behavior and poor safety management, together resulting in unsafe work methods, equipment and procedures. Based on primary and secondary data, this research investigates several aspects of specific construction worksite hazards; including an evaluation of the effectiveness of Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) guidelines in addressing on-site worker safety.

Exploring the Role of Project Priority on the Application of Project Delivery Practices in a Group of Multiple Projects Lipika Swarup The primary aim of this study is to “examine the role of project delivery characteristics in triggering inter-project dependencies in Architectural Engineering Construction Group of Multiple Projects (GMP).” Construction management literature is dominated by studies that view and analyze construction projects as standalone. However, recent years demonstrate that many projects are implemented in a “portfolio or multiple project” setting, leading to interest in inter-project interaction and its effect on project outcomes. “Portfolio or group of multiple projects” (GrMP) projects have been defined as a group of unrelated projects brought together for optimization and implemented concurrently. To optimize and increase efficiency, GrMP’s use common resources, which in turn trigger interdependencies among projects. The result is that projects come to influence the performance of other projects. There is little research on delivery of individual projects and inter project interdependencies. The result is limited understanding of 1) the basis of lessons learned through single project delivery research or 2) the role of delivery of single projects within the larger strategic and business model of Architectural, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) organizations. To fill this gap, the present research poses the question, “What are the critical project delivery characteristics that trigger inter-project interdependencies within AEC GMP’s?” It hypothesizes that 1) the influence of interdependencies can be categorized as risk and/or opportunity 2) interdependencies between projects of a GMP can affect the extent of achievement of project level goals and 3) achievement of GMP goals supersede achievement of individual project level goals. This study uses mixed methods (QUAN-QUAL). First quantitative data will be collected via surveys and further analyzed by multiple regression. Next qualitative sample will be nested within the quantitative sample for further analysis. Data will be collected by structured interviews and analyzed by pattern matching, cross-case synthesis and analytic induction. The expected deliverables and contributions of this study are 1) standardization of nomenclature within project portfolio management; 2) a framework to identify the effects of project level changes on the overall GMP and 3) list of critical project delivery characteristics at the GMP level.

159


2

4

Additional coursework by undergraduate and graduate students. Environmental Performance Simulation, F18, Ă–mer Tugrul KaragĂźzel (1), Reactive Spaces and Media Architecture, F18, Jakob Marsico (2), Architecture Lighting Design, S19, Cindy Limauro (3), Shaping the Built Environment: Experiments in Geometry and Matter, S19, Dana Cupkova (4) 160


3

1

4

2

161


AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS The American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) is an independent, nonprofit, student-run, national organization dedicated to advancing leadership, design and service among architecture students. AIAS CMU is one of the organization’s oldest chapters, and this past year has only seen it grow in leadership and positive impact. At the chapter scale, AIAS CMU successfully planned and hosted a wide variety of events, ranging from professional development events such as monthly Firm Tours to social events such as our biannual Membership Dinner. The organization also continues to have a strong presence within the larger communities of the University, as well as the city of Pittsburgh. This year also marked the second School of Architecture Pavilion, which was designed and built by SoA students in collaboration with AIAS CMU leadership, and exhibited as the entryway to Spring Carnival 2019.

2018-19 EXECUTIVE BOARD Selena Zhen Vincent DeRienzo Alejandra Meza Nika Postnikov Cassie Howard Timothy Khalifa Ghalya Alsanea Vivian Teng Bryan Trew Chitika Vasudeva Advisor Alexis McCune Secosky Fall Membership Dinner

Within the wider professional network, the chapter has a thriving relationship with the Young Architects’ Forum (YAF) of Pittsburgh, who have offered unwavering support in the form of several mentorship and leadership initiatives. In particular, the PALM program (Promoting Advocacy and Licensure through Mentorship) and the Crit Night with YAF event saw increased attendance during the 2018-19 academic year. Finally, as a chapter with a history of notable national involvement and recognition, AIAS CMU left its mark on the wider organization this year as well, hosting the AIAS Research Symposium: Crit Live in April, becoming the only chapter to win both the Chapter Honor Award and the Chapter President Honor Award (to past President Zain Islam-Hashmi), and supporting alumnus Amy Rosen (B.Arch ‘17) through a historically impactful term as 2018-19 AIAS National President.

Crit Night with YAF Pgh

162


studio d’ARC Firm Tour

Strada Firm Tour

SoA x AIAS Spring Carnival Pavilion

Grassroots 2018 in D.C.

Honor Awards at FORUM, 2018

163


FREEDOM BY DESIGN Freedom by Design™, the AIAS community service program in partnership with the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), uses the talents of architecture students to radically impact the lives of people in their community through modest design and construction solutions. The program embraces efforts to provide both design-build and engagement solutions to address five barriers: physical, educational, environmental, socioeconomic and cultural. In Pittsburgh, 66% of working families make the choice between paying for rent or paying for utilities. When the house you are renting is poorly maintained and you can’t afford to make the repairs, much of the heat you are paying for will go out the window. Simple initiatives such as caulking and weatherstripping your home can reduce infiltration rates by 20%, which can amount to significant savings on utilities and minimize the need to make tough choices about which bills to pay. We assembled weatherization kits for people in need from the Larimer neighborhood in Pittsburgh. These kits address a need for information on how to perform these energy and cost-saving initiatives, while providing the materials necessary to do so. The Weatherization Kit project is an AIAS Freedom By Design project in partnership with NCARB, Frost King, PROJECT RE_, Construction Junction, the Kingsley Association, CMU SoA and many others. Thank you to everyone who contributed with their time and/or donations.

164

BOARD Alison Katz Alina Kramkova Christoph Eckrich Michael Powell

Kit Assembly

STUDENTS Cotey Anderegg Christina Brown Angela Castellano Takumi Davis Edward Fischer Giulia Giampapa Shanice Lam Zoe Li Alex Lin Nika Postnikov Ken Preister Lydia Randall Chitika Vasudeva Ellen Zhu DESIGN MENTOR John Folan

Demonstration Event


Demonstration Event

Demonstration Event

Weatherization Book

Demonstration Event

Demonstration Event

Kit Iterations

Final Kit Assembled

165


NATIONAL ORGANIZATION OF MINORITY ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS The mission of National Organization of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS) is to champion diversity within the design professions by promoting the excellence, community engagement and professional development of its members. Our purpose is to foster communication, cooperation, solidarity and fellowship among minority students at the SoA.

BOARD Alyssa Mayorga Taylor Latimer Takumi Davis Gisselt Gomez Angela Castellano Lydia Randall Chase Kea

The 2018-19 executive board sought to achieve the goals of our organization by hosting a variety of activities. In October 2018, we sent six members to the NOMA National Conference to participate in the Barbara G. Laurie Student Design Competition, held in Chicago. In November, we held a Thanksgiving Dinner with AIAS to embody community and togetherness within the SoA. Beginning in the spring semester in time for internship hunting, we hosted a portfolio and resume review with members of NOMA Pittsburgh, an opportunity for professional development. At the 2019 SoA Design Awards, NOMAS was awarded the Alwin Cassens Jr. Memorial Fund in Architecture Prize to support our participation in a design competition addressing mixed-income housing. We ended out the year by presenting CMU NOMAS stoles to five graduating seniors that served the organization over their time at CMU.

B.Arch Ghalya Alsanea Anirudh Anand Yael Canaan Kerrian France Vanshika Gandotra Jason Garwood Giulia Giampapa Tanvi Harkare Lake Lewis Hannah Martinez Benita Nartey Emmanuel Nwandu Victoria Yong

As a new initiative, we launched MAP, the Minority Architect Project, to introduce the School of Architecture to design professionals from diverse backgrounds and experiences. We were also recognized with a webpage on the NOMA National website. Monthly, we hosted general body meetings with professional advancement opportunities, stress relievers, and peer bonding. And most importantly, our members grew professional relationships and personal friendships through the 2018-19 year.

166

STUDENTS

M.Arch Chaz Barry Ever Clinton


NOMAS Design Competition

NOMAPGH North Side site tour

NOMAS trip to Mt. Washington

Portfolio-Resume Review with NOMAPGH

NOMA National Conference in Chicago

167


INTER·PUNCT inter·punct is a platform for ideas, theory, and discourse—sometimes about architecture and sometimes at its periphery. The group was founded by students at CMU in 2011, and has released two full length issues: para·meter (2013) and inter·view (2016). This year has been categorized by both a return to traditions and a penchant for experimentation. We have been working through a backlog of interviews, gearing up for our next full issue, pre·fix. This year, we were also lucky enough to branch out of strictly print media for the first time. A mysterious post-digital confessional, the black box made several appearances—one at the 107th Annual Meeting of the ACSA. We also hosted our first guest lecturer, Desmond DeLanty of the Hangzhou Art & Design Collaborative. The launch of a new website, merchandise collection and a retrospective exhibit marked a shift in the ethos of the organization. And of course throughout all this we maintained our (almost) monthly broadsheet publication, inter·mission. View the group’s work at www.interpunct.pub inter·punct is a journal about architecture. inter·punct is a dot jostling for space; it disrupts, agitates, demystifies. inter·punct champions free print. Ideas should not be exclusive. inter·punct is run by students who don’t hide from their naïveté. inter·punct is not a journal about architecture.

168

VOL. 04 NUM. 01

WWW.INTERPUNCT.PUB

27 AUGUST 2018

inter·mission EDITORS IN CHIEF Christoph Eckrich Chitika Vasudeva EDITORIAL BOARD Joanne Chui Nick Cuppola Gil Jang Harsh Kedia Kelly Li Rachel Lu Daniel Noh Michael Powell Mohammed Rahman Robert Rice Jai Sawkar Alex Wang Olivia Werner

27 AUGUST 2018 | PITTSBURGH, PA

FEBRUARY 2018 — inter·punct joins Mark Stanley for a breakfast interview discussing culture and politics in the late-postmodern.

i•p: You presented a broad array of work, far more modes of expression than most lecturers. This made us wonder if you see yourself as wearing many hats - for instance, if you act as a curator for exhibition work and as a critical designer with the futurology institute - or if you see yourself as an architect in all of your projects?

MS: It’s a little of both. There are moments along the way where you have to basically risk a claim and say, “Okay. I know I’m going to make 21 agents in this project”. That happened in the Manhattan Project 2.0 really early on. I just said, “I really want to spread the deck on this project. I want to make 21 agents. Some of them are going to be built things, some are going to be people, some will be nonhuman actors, and some are going to be

Mark Stanley: I like to think of myself as a cultural producer more than anything. I think architecture and architects are good at that anyway; they know more than they let on about cultures, about things that happen inside of architecture, about things that architectures cultivate or throttle or modulate inside of them. That’s probably my favorite way to think about it. So when I’m taking on different modes, I’m usually not thinking about it differently; I like to not make distinctions between the types of work I do. I get that other people do like to do that, so any kind of steerage or categorical framework around my work – and this is the only reason I would do it – would government be to try to be understandable to entities, but I know 21 different audiences. In this lecture, is the right number.” Just because I just wanted everyone to know it’s larger than 20 and less than 22, that I wasn’t completely crazy, so it’s an odd number, it’s a multiple I showed some work up front to of 7 and it just seems like the right demonstrate that I’m a designer number. So there are moments like too, before getting into something that, but there are also moments I was way more interested in, which along the way where things start was to try to open up some cultural to emerge: structures, ways of organizing things. For example, juice, some politicalbuild frameworks, inter•mission limericks, not walls harsh kedia some programmatic thinking there were three governmental the Agency of Airborne a small selection of a series of limericks around what happensBelow in isthe world fromentities: generated algorithmically the tweets of President Donald Trump - done to display the Information, the Bureau of and in architecture and they generalhow reductivism and simplicity displayed by the supposed leader of the free world. Techno-Nature, and the Institute Theeach idea is to other. subvert - by can be allied withdecontextualizing and changing meaning - and Simulation and Actualization. hopefully make poetry out of of hatred and ignorance. i•p: Is the idea of medium So those three became main something you have resolved organizers in the project to gather going into a project, oronceisa manitwho wasn’t the other seven agents around There was exactly lucid, “Oil will be everyone’s our a process that influences theproblem,them, which was not a concept I leaders are stupid!”, He’d often doozer, articulation of the end product? had at the beginning but one which “Decimated by the court, he’s a loser!”,

emerged through the development. i·p: You talk about this idea of Network Culture, where urbanity is synonymous with connectivity — but what does that mean for the new rural? How do these ideas apply to the 2016 election, one of the clearest urbanrural divides in recent history? MS: The 2016 election was this recalibration moment between the urban and the rural. People who h a d

always been rural and had never engaged in what we think of as the city suddenly had all this agency in everything because they were connected to the network. They had been snapped – at least behaviorally and socially – into an urban condition. The election map is a sea of red with blue points on it where all the cities are. Every impeach inter•punct time there’s a city in a county, that county turns blue. We know that cities align with democratic left-leaning politics. Why is that? Because there are simply more people in a space together. They have to get along together, even if they don’t like each other, and become citizens next to each other. But in a rural place, that’s not the

All of his claims were later disputed.

INTER•PUNCT

|

INTERPUNCT.ARCH@GMAIL.COM

case. I grew up in a rural place, which is just an entirely different life experience. After a while, a lot of political ideas that don’t involve other people appeal to you a lot more. The 2016 election cycle was interesting because the people in rural places which presumably had no agency to change the politics of the nation in any serious sense tapped into this really highpowered agency across social media. And now we’re learning a lot more about other non-human agents that had a hand in that too, like Russian bots. “Where’s the rural now?”, I think you said. Well, I’m not sure it exists anymore. I mean, what are the statistics about cell phones — there are 9 billion cellphones on the planet and 7 billion people? Is anyone really disconnected anymore? And if they are, do they really register on the global culture? That’s one fairly irresponsible way of looking at it, but if we just allow ourselves irresponsibility, sometimes it gives us new ways of thinking about everything. i•p: There’s an idea in policy debate of inherency versus solvency; inherency being the statement of the status quo and solvency a much more pragmatic call to action. A lot of us struggle with this space between just raising awareness about an issue and dictating a solution, and we wonder how you reconcile the two within your own work as you bridge the gap from very human-related practical solutions to extremely speculative projects. MS: It’s a good question; a difficult one. I think that it’s easy and common, not only in architecture, editors note but ce+cv in creative and policy disciplines all over, forto people to We find it difficult in this time live with ourselves under the constant distraction and disillusion of ourthe political climate. Focusing on studies and identify problem and then want blocking out the imminent issues surrounding us provides temporary solace, but fosters long term to solve that problem. And people ignorance and eventual helplessness. Taking a stab talking about these themes in our work and now seem inattowriting, be dissatisfied thatat times in the best thing that with can be done like these is to educate and ruminate. In this issue we document some reactions toeverything today’s discourse the 21st century, because and would like to think of “impeach” as more than political protocol - and attempt to examine our is so complicated. Everyone knows relationship with the process along with its larger implications. that there’s not a simple solution The title impeach instantly brings to mind certain individuals and certain intentions. Perhaps we to what you’re talking about, but can push slightly further and use the term to encapsulatealso our distaste system andup use one doesn’t needwithtothethrow it as a vessel to apply those feelings elsewhere. Dissatisfaction with authority has long been a motivator for great societal change, and is how

many revolutions, artistic LECTURE movements, theories, BROUGHT TO YOU IN PART BY THE ALAN H. RIDER SERIESand philosophies were conceived. Regardless of origin, such powerful feelings should be respected and used as engenders of change. And in the end, all any of us want to see is a little change.

There was once a man who was known to accuse, “Just another phony story by the fake news!”, He was often mad, “Trump campaign is not bad!”, It just seemed like he was confused.

Cover Illustration by Daniel Noh

inter•mission We read the news on our phone (if we read it at all), draw on our tablets, and write love letters on our computers. What happened to paper? Surely, we can’t all care about trees that much. This isn’t about the quantity of content; it’s a question of the streamlining of information into 140 characters that illuminate our faces, the information stuck somewhere in our optical nerves.

There was once a man who would often bawl, “We must build a great wall!”, Often, he’d overuse, “Sadly, it is not being reported that way by the fake news!”, But to be fair, he wasn’t very tall.

We provide you with a new format: a piece of paper, usually tabloid, duplex printed. Each issue explores a new topic, through words and images. In a sense, we hope this new format will help you turn on, tune in, and drop out. Today, it is more important than ever to slow down, pause, process, and think. And what better way to do this than receiving more content? Take a break, and sit down with us. This is inter•mission.

There was once an old schmoozer, “Me, I’m proud of myself, you’re a loser!”, He was often mad, “They are very expensive and bad!”, He came to be known as quite the abuser.

inter·punct is a platform for ideas, theory and discourse sometimes about architecture.

editors note

christoph eckrich + chitika vasudeva

the trump index

christoph eckrich

impeach architecture

nicholas cuppola

build limericks, not walls

harsh kedia

Brought to you in part by CMU SoA’s lecture series, curated by Spike Wolff. Shout out to Mary-Lou and Kai.

www.interpunct.pub interpunct.arch@gmail.com


No matter how its boundaries are re-defined, architecture still provides shelter, erects structures, organizes movement as well as ideas, stimulates perception and engages culture. Yet, how do we proceed? As architects, what are we supposed to do and how do we learn to speculate creatively? Desmond DeLanty and Hangzhou Art & Design Collaborative confront these issues directly, tackling ideation, iteration, modeling, construction, testing, and remaking. The design-build studio is a typology of pedagogy, a typology of practice, and a typology of production. Come listen to Desmond speak about his teaching and his practice, and how the one-to-one connects us to material, to ourselves, and to one another. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED | WED 3.27, MM 303, 4:30PM

169


170


Ruhr Tour, summer 2018. SoA faculty Stefan Gruber and Kai Gutschow led a trip through the post-industrial heart of Germany—known as the Ruhrgebiet—ending in the port of Hamburg.

171


Lunar Gala 2019. SoA student collections: Alluminaire (Stephanie Smid, Mariana Alberola, Zain Islam-Hashmi), Eden (Vincent DeRienzo, Tyng Peck, Leah Kendrick), Lucid (Sophie Cy Lee, Somin Shim, Nicole Somi Park), Phantasus (Jieli Clara Zhao), Re::born (Xiaoying Meng), Shibui (Ellen Zhu), Synergy:Coexist (Christine Haewann Kim, Min Young Jeong), Urban Nomads (Dingkun Wang, Yang Gao, Veronica Wang)

172


173


Foundation II studio in Philadelphia.

174


Elaboration II studio in Boston.

175


Density + Complexity studio in New York City.

176


4-D Architecture studio in New York City.

177


Low Relief studio in Paris and London.

178


Urban Design students in Zurich.

179


180


SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 2018–19 LECTURE SERIES As the world, its technologies and our cultures are rapidly and progressively evolving, so is the practice of architecture. The interests, influences and investigations in current architectural practice are broad and unrestrained; there coexists both a rich tradition of the discipline and a provocation towards a future yet to be invented. These series of lectures are strategically unstrategic and intentionally eclectic, reflecting the expansive diversity of the field. The lecture series provides both a measure of what is out there and a challenge to the divergent potentials of where architecture can go. Spike Wolff Special Faculty & Curator, School of Architecture

Fall 2018: Marlon Blackwell, Marlon Blackwell Architects; Dwayne Oyler, Oyler Wu Collaborative; Dang Qun, MAD Architects; Eyal Weizman, Forensic Architecture; Brian Evans, Mackintosh School of Architecture; Beatriz Colomina, Princeton University; Next-Up, SoA alumni panel and networking reception; Heather Bizon, Ann Kalla Visiting Professor Spring 2019: Kipp Bradford, kippkitts; Brad Samuels, SITU; Jeremy Smith, Irving Smith Architects; Louis Becker, Henning Larsen; Toshiko Mori, Toshiko Mori Architects; Wang Shu & Lu Wenyu, Amateur Architecture Studio

181


2018–19 NEWS

09/13/2018

UDBS and PROJECT RE_ Recognized at AIA Awards & in Public Interest Design Education Guidebook 2018 marks the 10th anniversary of the SoA’s Urban Design Build Studio (UDBS). After receiving multiple state and local AIA awards this year. Another round of recent awards mark the 20th honor the 20th honor the interdisciplinary studio has won.

09/05/2018

Code Lab Uses Computation to Understand How Pedestrians Use Market Square The SoA’s Computational Design Laboratory (Code Lab) collaborated with the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership (PDP) and Metro21: Smart Cities Institute to better understand how Pittsburghers use Market Square in order to inform future planning decisions. The project, led by Code Lab researcher Javier Argota Sánchez-Vaquerizo (MSCD ‘18), is based on an urban analysis toolkit that uses computer vision and machine learning techniques to collect and analyze anonymous data about the movement of people and vehicles in public spaces, with unprecedented accuracy. Argota, an architect from Spain, completed his MS in Computational Design with the support of the Fulbright Foundation. Argota developed key aspects of the toolkit as part of his master’s thesis, advised by Code Lab codirector Professor Daniel Cardoso Llach. The toolkit was co-developed by Urban Data Eye, a company that Argota formed to develop the technology further. The PDP expects that the insights produced by this project will help maintain Market Square as a vibrant hub of downtown activity, and perhaps reveal new planning opportunities. With this research, the Code Lab seeks to expand the current repertoire of tools to understand how cities function, and enable new kinds of urban and architectural analysis.

09/07/2018

DesignIntelligence Names Stephen Lee One of the Most Admired Educators in Architecture

The 2019 DesignIntelligence survey names Stephen Lee, Professor & Head of the SoA, one of the Top 25 Most Admired Educators in Architecture, Interiors and Landscape Architecture. Lee most recently received the honor in 2015, along with the SoA’s John Folan. The rankings, conducted annually by DesignIntelligence on behalf of the Design Futures Council, survey the design industry to compile rankings for architecture schools across the United States. 182

At the 2018 AIA Pittsburgh awards in November, UDBS won an Honor Award in the Design + Innovation category for REACH, a mass-produced, mobile classroom for a local nonprofit specializing in humanitarian computer outreach. The REACH cart is deployed to Carnegie Library locations throughout the greater Pittsburgh area to facilitate computer literacy courses targeting low-income and elderly residents. UDBS also earned a Certificate of Merit for OV COURSE, an initiative seeking to address issues of food access, entrepreneurship/ economic opportunity and community interaction in Pittsburgh through the design, production and implementation of pre-fabricated, mass-produced community ovens used for baking bread and pizza. At AIA Pennsylvania’s 2018 Architectural Excellence Design Awards ceremony, UDBS received the 2018 State of Pennsylvania Impact Design Practice award and the Bronze Award in Impact Design for the REACH Mobile Computer Literacy Training Lab. UDBS was also featured in print. The second book in Routledge’s Public Interest Design Guidebook series, Public Interest Design Education Guidebook: Curricula, Strategies and SEED Academic Case Studies showcases UDBS among over 60 thought-leaders that together are shaping public interest design education. Written in a guidebook format that includes projects from across design disciplines, this book describes the learning critical to pursuing an inclusive, informed design practice. Professor John Folan contributed to the book, and the work of the Urban Design Build Studio (UDBS) and PROJECT RE_ appears within and on the book’s cover.


10/03/2018

09/20/2018

Art Lubetz Receives Andy Award for 30 Years of Service at CMU

SoA Research Showcased at 2018 Robotics in Architecture Conference in Zurich Associate Professor Joshua Bard presented two papers at the ETH in Zurich for the 2018 Association for Robotics in Architecture Conference (Rob|Arch). The papers reflect the ongoing contributions of the SoA in the fields of robotic construction and additive manufacturing. One paper discussed the collaborative research he and Associate Professor Dana Cupkova are conducting on profile 3-D-printing of complex concrete building components, which was published in the Construction Robotics Journal. Bard also presented a paper on behalf of co-authors Ardavan Bidgoli (PhD-CD candidate ‘20), Wei-Wei Chi (MSCD ‘19) and Richard Tursky of Ball State Architecture, which discussed the use of convolutional neural networks for the inspection of robotically plastered surfaces. A video showing research by Manuel Rodríguez Ladrón de Guevara (PhD-CD candidate ‘21) with L. Borunda Monsivais from the Polytechnic University of Madrid was also shown at the conference. “Free-Oriented Additive Manufacturing” shows a fabrication technique for architectural speculation of previously unexploited spaces, providing the means for reconfiguring and bonding new qualities to existing infrastructures. It has the potential to produce complex form, bespoke performance, and mass instantiations. 09/20/2018

Francesca Torello and Joshua Bard Publish Journal Article in “Dialectic VI: Craft” for Plaster ReCast App Adjunct Professor Dr. Francesca Torello and Associate Professor Joshua Bard published an article in the journal Dialectic, issue VI: Craft - The Art of Making Architecture. Their article “Plaster ReCast: Augmented Reality as Medium for Craft-Focused Pedagogy” describes the development of Plaster ReCast, a mixedreality app designed to enhance the visitor experience at museum plaster cast collections. Torello and Bard researched the plaster casts collection of the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMoA) in Pittsburgh and created the framework and content for the app, then worked with a team of students from CMU’s Entertainment Technology Center to develop it. Together, they combined an understanding of history, architectural design and applied technology. The app was piloted this past year at the CMoA during the museum’s Copy + Paste exhibition in 2017-18. Visitors to the museum had the opportunity to test the tablet-based app, which shows users 3-D scans of the plaster casts, 3-D models of the original buildings from which the casts derive and historical information about the original buildings overlaid on the tablet’s camera view. Augmented reality allows the user to access these layers of information without detracting from the museum experience.

The SoA congratulates distinguished critic Art Lubetz, AIA, NCARB for receiving a 30 Years of Service Award during CMU’s 2018 Andy Awards Ceremony. Lubetz is a principal of Front Studio Architects, formerly Arthur Lubetz Associates, which practices in a wide geographical area. He has taught architectural studio courses at the SoA since 1988. Lubetz is a graduate of Carnegie Institute of Technology (now CMU) and has practiced architecture in Pittsburgh since 1967. His work is held in the CMU Architectural Archives.

10/10/2018

SoA PhD Students & Faculty Receive Outstanding Paper Award at IBPC 2018 PhD-BPD candidates Zhiang Zhang and Chenlu Zhang, and Professor Emeritus Khee Poh Lam, received an Outstanding Paper Award at the 7th International Building Physics Conference (IBPC) for their paper, “A Deep Reinforcement Learning Method for Model-based Optimal Control of HVAC Systems.” Their research paper was one of only six papers awarded out of the roughly 200 peer-reviewed accepted papers at the conference. The event, which took place September 23-26, 2018 in Syracuse, New York, also featured a keynote presentation by Professor Vivian Loftness entitled “Intelligent Buildings for Resiliency, Health and Productivity.” 10/11/2018

Pedro Veloso Co-Authors Paper in Automation in Construction Journal and Presents at ACADIA Conference Graduate Instructor Pedro Veloso co-authored a paper with Brazilian researchers Gabriela Celani and Rodrigo Scheeren, published in Volume 96 of the journal Automation in Construction. The paper, entitled “From the generation of layouts to the production of construction documents: An application in the customization of apartment plans,” describes an application of shape grammars in the customization of apartment plans by using a workflow 183


that goes from the interactive generation of plans to their full representation as a complete (3-D) BIM model. The work shows the feasibility of a system that allows the customization of home plans in an automated manner. In October 2018, Veloso and Ardavan Bidgoli (PhD-CD candidate ‘20) presented their paper, “DeepCloud: The Application of a Data-driven, Generative Model in Design,” at the ACADIA Conference at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City. Additionally, Veloso was recognized as one of 16 scholarship recipients of the 2018 ACADIA Conference.

10/18/2018

Jonathan Kline and Christine Brill Respect Pittsburgh’s History and Create New Lives for Old Spaces

Urban designer and SoA Associate Studio Professor Jonathan Kline (B.Arch ’98) and architect Christine Brill (B.Arch ’99) are partners in marriage and in revitalizing and beautifying Pittsburgh one space at a time. “As a small architecture practice, we do a very broad range of really diverse projects,” said Kline. Their decade-old design firm, Studio for Spatial Practice, is increasingly gaining local and national attention and awards. One of the firm’s nationally lauded projects is the award-winning restaurant Superior Motors in Braddock, PA. Housed in a long-vacant car dealership across from the U.S. Steel’s Mon Valley Works – Edgar Thomson Plant, the restaurant was conceived in collaboration with Executive Chef Kevin Sousa and Braddock Mayor John Fetterman. Superior Motors was named one of Food & Wine magazine’s 10 “Restaurants of the Year 2018,” the “Best New Restaurant of 2018” by Pittsburgh Magazine and is on Time magazine’s list of “100 Greatest Places 2018.”

10/18/2018

B.Arch Program Receives Maximum 8-Year NAAB Re-Accreditation, M.Arch Program Granted Initial Candidacy In fall 2018, the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) granted the SoA’s Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch) degree program the maximum allowable 8-year re-accreditation. The next NAAB accreditation for the B.Arch program will occur in 2026. The SoA’s Master of Architecture (M.Arch) degree program, re-introduced in 2017 after a 25-year hiatus, was granted initial candidacy in 2018. The next visit for either initial accreditation or continuation of candidacy is scheduled for fall 2019.

184

10/24/2018

Mary-Lou Arscott Speaks at Inauguration Day Symposium

Following the Inauguration Day investiture ceremony on Friday 26 October, in which President Farnam Jahanian was formally installed as CMU’s 10th president, a two-part symposium featured 10 distinguished professors from across CMU. The speakers discussed their innovative work, its power to enhance lives and celebrate CMU’s impact in Pittsburgh, the region and the world. SoA Studio Professor & Associate Head Mary-Lou Arscott spoke during the first session, entitled “Pittsburgh as a Living Lab.” Arscott works with communities to collaboratively address and solve social problems. Through insight and observation, she engages with communities to become part of their ecosystem, enabling the development of a holistic approach for improvement. An example of her work is the Latham Street Commons project, which works to enhance the health and wellbeing of people living in Pittsburgh’s Garfield and Friendship neighborhoods. The project created a rooftop garden and a gathering place for community camaraderie.

10/24/2018

Seven SoA Graduate Students Receive 2018 GuSH Research Grants from CMU Seven SoA students have received 2018 Graduate Small Project Help (GuSH) Research Grants. Combined, the students received over $5,000 in support of their research efforts from CMU. The large number of SoA graduate students receiving GuSH funding is a testament to the strength of the research activities currently underway across the school’s broad range of Master’s and PhD programs. The SoA congratulates the following students on achieving this award: Lola Ben Alon (PhD-AECM candidate), “Integrating Earthen Building Materials and Methods into Mainstream Construction”; Özgüç Bertuğ Çapunaman (MSCD ’19), “CAM as a Tool for Creative Expression: Fabrication Through Human Interaction”; Wei-Wei Chi (MSCD ’19), “3-D Texture Interface in CAD: Cultivating Material Knowledge for the Practiced Digital Hand”; Manuel Rodríguez Ladrón de Guevara (PhD- CD candidate ‘21), “Multi-Resolution in Architectural Design: Human-Machine Collaboration Practices for Manufacturing Digitally Designed Complex Surfaces”; Jinmo Rhee (MSCD ’19), “Computational Design Study Material Development: Introduction to Digital Media”; Gautam Thakkar (M.Arch ’19), “Commoning the City - Urban Collaborative Studio”; Chenlu Zhang (PhD-BPD candidate), “Individual differences in thermal environment preferences.”


10/31/2018

12/26/2018

Gerard Damiani Serves as Juror, Panelist for AIA New Jersey State Design Awards & Design Conference Associate Professor Gerard Damiani, AIA served as a juror for AIA New Jersey’s 2018 design awards. On the award jury, Damiani worked alongside the Science Channel’s Danny Forster, architect and host of Build It Bigger. Damiani also served as a panelist for AIA New Jersey’s discussion on the state of residential architecture during the chapter’s Design Conference in November 2018.

Alumnus Phil Kaplan of Kaplan Thompson Architects Makes Architect Magazine’s Top 50 Firms in Sustainability List Kaplan Thompson Architects, led by Principal Phil Kaplan (B.Arch ’91), was named as the only Maine-based company on ARCHITECT magazine’s 2018 Top 50 Firms in Sustainability List. The ARCHITECT 50 program is an annual ranking released by the publication, the official journal of the American Institute of Architects. Kaplan said, “We have been committed to sustainable design since we started the firm 12 years ago. It’s gratifying to be recognized for this commitment and we’re honored to have our work reviewed by such an esteemed panel of judges.” The sustainability rankings are calculated based on participation in the AIA’s 2030 Commitment Program, the percent of projects that met or exceeded the 2030 target, employee certifications, building certifications and a green project that exemplifies the firm’s commitment to sustainability.

11/14/2018

Gindroz Travel Prize Inspires New Work from Rebecca Lefkowitz Rebecca Lefkowitz (MUD ‘19) received a competitive study abroad scholarship in 2018 from the Marilyn and Ray Gindroz Foundation. Upon returning to Pittsburgh, her international studies were displayed in the Gindroz Travel Prize Exhibition from November 16-17, 2018 in the College of Fine Arts’ Kerr Conference Room. Lefkowitz exhibited her drawings and books in “Between Times.” “For my study, I proposed using architectural drawing to study the historical styles in a city and how different styles become revealed or concealed, such as a change in leadership causes huge areas to be rebuilt. I am interested in how the city’s historic roots appear through stylistic juxtapositions,” Lefkowitz said. Lefkowitz practiced self-discipline on her travels, completing more than 80 drawings during six weeks on the road. “Rebecca’s work is driven by a genuine intellectual curiosity for understanding how people’s behavior shape our cities and how their spaces in turn transform a society’s values and relations,” said Associate Professor Stefan Gruber. “There is no better way to study these questions than through hands-on experience and immersing oneself in different urban milieus.” The Gindroz Prize for Travel was established by CMU alumni Ray and Marilyn Gindroz to enrich lives and enhance education through travel and the study of architecture, urbanism and music. It recognizes the life-changing potential of becoming immersed in a different culture, language and environment. Ray, who earned degrees in architecture in 1963 and 1965, and Marilyn, who graduated with a degree in music in 1973, first met in Rome while studying abroad. “Both of our lives were changed in dramatic and positive ways through travel,” Ray said.

02/14/2019

Stefani Danes and Doug Cooper Collaborate on Mural in New Tepper Building In spring 2019, SoA faculty members Doug Cooper and Stefani Danes unveiled their collaborative mural installation outside of the Simmons Auditorium in the new Tepper Building entitled “The Collaborative Campus.” The pair pooled their talent in drawn imagery and fabric piecework to create a cohesive depiction of cross-campus collaboration and innovation at CMU. Composed of alternating panels of fabric and charcoal drawings, the mural depicts both abstract and realistic scenes of the hallmarks of cooperative innovation and collaboration at CMU. Various scenes depict familiar campus buildings and show students, faculty and staff working collaboratively. The SoA’s Urban Design Build Studio (UDBS) and PROJECT RE_ are both featured in the mural; architecture students are shown building with salvaged materials in the great hall of the Field Robotics Center. Cooper is recognized for his panoramic murals of cities, including Pittsburgh, Rome and Frankfurt. A principal with Perkins Eastman Architects, Danes has devoted much of her life’s work to designing urban environments for special populations within the nonprofit sector. 185


The two first began collaborating in 2013 when they worked together on a 44-foot by 24-foot mural for the East End Cooperative Ministry in Pittsburgh. They began the Tepper mural early in 2018 and worked throughout the year to complete the project in time for installation during the university’s winter break. “We worked in two separate studios throughout the process, meeting in one space or the other from time to time to ensure continuity in value, scale and line between fabric and drawing,” said Cooper. Working in his South Side studio, Cooper was assisted by School of Drama student Adryan Miller-Gorder throughout this past summer; she contributed on the many figures that populate the drawn scenes. Bruce Chan, an adjunct professor and former student of Danes, assisted in the process of acrylic sealant application to the drawings to fix the charcoal to the paper substrate. 02/16/2019

Rana Sen Receives 2019 Alumni Service Award from CMU

CMU has awarded alumnus Rana Sen (MSCD ‘99) a 2019 Alumni Service Award. The annual CMU Alumni Awards program honors professional achievements and generous service to the university. Sen serves as a managing director at Deloitte US, where he leads their smart city initiative, U.S. state/local transportation practice and smart city work globally. His work includes design and implementation of smart transportation solutions, automation of long-term care case management, disease surveillance and outbreak prevention systems and “smart city” strategy.

02/16/2019

Emily deGrandpre Presents App at Global Grad Show in Dubai

02/16/2019

Zain Islam-Hashmi Has Designs for Fashion Zain Islam-Hashmi (B.Arch ’19) has created his niche as an architect of fashion, who creates clothing and wardrobe ensembles with materials like resin, cement and plexiglass. Islam-Hashmi, 2019 head designer for CMU’s annual Lunar Gala fashion show, graduates with a bachelor’s degree in architecture and minors in intelligent environments and digital fabrication. He has taken advantage of opportunities at CMU and around the world and has shaped them into something unique. For the third year, Islam-Hashmi presented a fashion line at the Lunar Gala that relies heavily on materials more commonly found in architecture and the construction industry. His teammates on the line, known as Alluminare, are Mariana Alberola Rezza (M.Arch ‘19) and Stephanie Smid (MAAD ‘19). Islam-Hashmi said that architecture and fashion are not mutually exclusive. “We have an understanding of people in architecture. Fashion is a way to deepen that interaction,” said IslamHashmi, a past chapter president of the CMU chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students. “There’s a lot of techniques and material in architecture that could have a lot of relation and applicability in fashion. Merging the two helps bridge the two worlds, where each learns from the other.” In spring 2018, some of his fashion designs used dirt, concrete, sand and paper and he won Pittsburgh’s Ecolution: Forces of Nature fashion show, which challenged designers to incorporate recycled and reused materials. 02/27/2019

Emily deGrandpre (BA ‘19) traveled to the Global Grad Show in Dubai in November 2018 to present the app Amica that she co-developed with School of Design class of 2018 alumni Joseph (Ji Tae) Kim and Tina Park. The app acts as a social media platform to allow the “trailing spouses” of internationally relocated workers to connect with people and experiences in their new communities. Amica was part of a select group of projects invited to the event, which exhibits graduate work from the world’s leading design and technology schools. Since launching in 2015, the show has grown to become the world’s largest such student gathering. 186

Stephen Quick Studies Light Pollution in Pittsburgh with Drones SoA adjunct professor Stephen Quick was featured in Mobility Lab for his research on the light pollution impacts of LED streetlights in urban areas. Quick, along with Diane Turnshek of the CMU physics department, led a team of researchers to create a high-resolution light pollution map of Pittsburgh and raise awareness for serious consequences of light pollution within the city.


Their research responds to an issue that affects cities across the world – controlling the optimal light temperature and intensity for pedestrian and vehicular safety. As a trial, the researchers used drones to monitor 3,000 LED lights throughout the city of Pittsburgh. The project is supported by the Pittsburgh Chapter of the International Dark Sky Association (IDA), the City of Pittsburgh and the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. The researchers looked at the potential of creating an integrated, “smart” system for controlling the lights, and ultimately recommended that Pittsburgh invest in LEDs with lower, warmer temperatures and limited controls. “We know that everybody sees better with lower light levels,” says Quick. “Your eyes don’t take as long to adjust.” Ultimately, the light pollution research will improve resident safety for Pittsburgh and other cities.

03/06/2019

Christine Mondor Named to AIA College of Fellows

In 2019, SoA adjunct faculty member Christine Mondor was elevated to the AIA College of Fellows. AIA Fellows are recognized with the organization’s highest membership honor for their exceptional work and contributions to architecture and society. Named to the fellowship for her “Service to Society,” Mondor joins just three other AIA Pennsylvania members in achieving this important career milestone in 2019. Mondor is the strategic principal of Pittsburgh-based evolveEA, and has diverse experience as an architect, educator and activist in sustainability. She served as project architect for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, one of the first LEED-rated buildings in the country, and has provided green building consulting for clients including the Carnegie Libraries of Pittsburgh, ALCOA Corporation and CMU. In addition to her LEED accreditation, Christine has been a board member of a number of organizations including the Green Building Alliance, Three Rivers Association for Sustainable Energy (TRASE) and the citizen board to the Southwestern Pennsylvania Regional Planning Commission. Christine currently teaches architecture and landscape design at CMU and Chatham College. For her role as a thoughtful leader in promoting and implementing sustainable and equitable development in Pittsburgh, Mondor was also named one of the 25 Essential Pittsburghers by NEXTPittsburgh.

03/15/2019

Alumnus Matthew Ciccone’s Firm Beauty Shoppe Recognized for Cutting-Edge Redevelopment Projects Pittsburgh-based Beauty Shoppe, a firm that transforms historic buildings into elegant and inviting co-working spaces, has seen tremendous growth in recent years. SoA alumnus Matthew Ciccone (MUD ‘06), Beauty Shoppe co-founder and CEO, was highlighted in a recent TRIBLive article for the firm’s innovative redevelopment projects. Beauty Shoppe now has 500 members in the city of Pittsburgh, and in 2018 expanded into Cleveland. Ciccone plans to open a similar concept in Detroit. “As people move toward freelancing and more flexible styles of work, co-working is a significant shift in the way people purchase office space,” Ciccone said. “There’s more demand, so we are opening more spaces. I don’t think that trend is going to stop.” Ciccone worked with adjunct faculty member Andrew Moss, owner and principal of mossArchitects, to transform three floors of the former police bureau in East Liberty into beautiful co-working spaces. Staying true to the history of the buildings they work with, Ciccone and his partners consider each project’s original architectural features when making their aesthetic decisions. The result is tastefully decorated conference rooms and office spaces that boast unique features like fluted ceilings and ornate crown molding. Beauty Shoppe is working with McKnight Realty Partners to revitalize the Pittsburgh Terminal Building in the South Side Flats to create a number of unique makerspaces for artisans and craftspeople. Their project, now known as “The Highline,” will include a number of enticing amenities to revive the century-old structure.

187


03/28/2019

ACSA National Meeting in Pittsburgh Features SoA Faculty, Alumni and Students The 107th Annual Meeting of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) was organized by Associate Professor Jeremy Ficca along with Amy Kulper of Rhode Island School of Designand Grace La of Harvard University. The event drew architectural educators and practitioners to Pittsburgh and included participation by SoA faculty, students and alumni in several arenas. The events culminated in keynote lectures by Toshiko Mori and Amateur Office’s Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu in partnership with the SoA’s 2019 Spring Lecture Series. Exhibitions (left): Jeremy Ficca designed and curated Drawing the Design Imaginary, which included drawings by SoA faculty, students and alumni. Building upon the conference’s theme on the current state of architecture’s core, this exhibition explores the role of drawing as a pedagogical instrument. Broad in scope, technique and medium, it opens inquiry on the role of drawing for the design imaginary and as a scaffold for design thinking and pedagogy. Workshops: The 4th annual ACSA/AIA Housing and Community Development Workshop under the theme of “Building the Equitable City.” The workshop brought together practitioners and educators from across the country. A neighborhood tour guided by SoA faculty Jonathan Kline, Valentina Vavasis and others, provided insight to affordable housing approaches in Pittsburgh’s East Liberty and Larimer neighborhoods. The workshop featured a panel with faculty Stefan Gruber and John Folan in which they shared and discussed their respective experiences of teaching community engagement. The event was featured in Metropolis magazine in an article by adjunct Sarah Rafson, “Good Neighbors: How Architecture Schools Are Rethinking Their Relationship to Rust Belt Cities.” Students organized their own research symposium alongside the meeting. The CMU American Institute of Architecture Students chapter (AIAS) hosted the 2019 CRIT Live: AIAS Research Symposia. This research-based program provides a platform for students to present research projects to their peers, and trains AIAS members in best practices related to funding, conducting and presenting research. The day consisted of a professional research tutorial workshop, panels exhibiting student research projects, and a showcase of the 2017-2018 CRIT Scholar work. Awards: The Urban Design Build Studio (UDBS) was honored by the ACSA as a winner of the 2018-2019 Collaborative Practice Award for the project HOME RE_CONSIDERED : HOME RE_DEFINED. Each year the ACSA honors architectural educators for exemplary work in areas such as building design, community collaborations, scholarship, service and best practices in school-based community outreach programs through its Architectural Education Awards program. Award winners inspire and challenge students, contribute to the profession’s knowledge base and extend their work beyond the borders of academy into practice and the public sector. The ACSA selected Professor Emeritus Ömer Akin to present his paper at its Teacher’s Conference this June in Antwerp, Belgium. His talk is entitled “Precedent-Based Learning: An approach for studio pedagogy in the early years.”

188


03/29/2019

Lola Ben-Alon Wins First Place in 2019 CMU Energy Week Student Poster Competition

The SoA congratulates Lola Ben Alon (PhD-AECM candidate) for winning first place and a $1,000 prize in the annual CMU Energy Week Student Poster Competition. Ben-Alon’s poster, “Integrating Earthen Building Materials and Methods Into Mainstream Construction,” presented the doctoral research she is developing with the guidance of of SoA professors Vivian Loftness (chair) and Erica Cochran Hameen, as well as professor Kent Harries from the University of Pittsburgh Civil & Environmental Engineering program. Ben-Alon’s research deals with the challenges of using earthen building materials, which offer sustainable alternatives to conventional materials used in construction. The environmental and policy measures she is working on are intended to help policymakers include earthen materials in mainstream construction projects, resulting in broader adoption development of a healthy, low impact built environment.

04/09/2019

SoA Faculty & Students Explore Role of Architecture in the History of Computing at CMU An interactive installation by SoA faculty and students in April explored the role of the SoA in the history of computing at CMU. The installation in Posner Hall reconstructed “CISP,” an early system for generative urban design developed by Christos Yessios in 1972, as part of a larger exhibition celebrating the 50th anniversary of the first computer at CMU. Drawing from the CMU archives, the team reconstructed Yessios’ “CISP,” a software based on a “linguistic model” of design that allows users to define basic urban conditions, a repertoire of architectural units, and spatial constraints — such as access, views, and distance. Using a backtracking algorithm, the system iterates through alternative placements of the units until it finds an optimal solution. Professor Daniel Cardoso Llach explains that CISP “offers a glimpse into the role architectural researchers at Carnegie Mellon played in pioneering computational approaches to architectural and urban design. Its author, Yessios, was the first doctoral student in architecture at CMU — a degree then granted by SUPA, the predecessor to Heinz College. His doctoral committee included Charles Eastman and AI pioneer Allen Newell.” CISP thus illustrates CMU’s distinctively interdisciplinary spirit, with researchers across fields combining methods from computer science, urban planning, and architecture to better understand and shape the built environment. The installation is part of Llach’s ongoing research project, “Experimental Archaeology of CAD,” which combines historical research and technology prototyping in order to reconstruct early computational design systems and explore their gestural and material dimensions. The CISP reconstruction project team includes students Harshavardan Kedia (B.Arch ’19) and Erik Ulberg (MSCD ’20).

189


04/10/2019

Daniel Cardoso Llach Speaks at Harvard GSD, Bauhaus Universität & Clemson University Between October 18-19, 2018, Associate Teaching Track Professor Daniel Cardoso Llach delivered an evening lecture and conducted a one-day “masterclass” at the Bauhaus Universität (University) in Weimar, Germany as part of the Bauhaus Digital Masterclass series. The lecture, entitled “The Calculative Imagination: Computation and the Boundaries of Design,” examined how computing technologies have kindled new visual and material languages, as well as new understandings of the design process and its actors. Introducing recent research developed at the SoA’s Code Lab at CMU, the one-day class delved into specific aspects of computing in design, from material production and organizational change, to data-enriched models for architectural design and analysis. In the spring, Cardoso delivered a lecture entitled “Infrastructures of the Imagination” at Clemson University’s Department of Architecture on March 27, 2019. Drawing from his research on the history of CAD systems, and from recent work developed at the Code Lab, Cardoso discussed how architects and designers across fields may engage critically and creatively with computation in design. The lecture was part of a backto-back event with CMU School of Design’s Associate Professor Molly Wright Steenson, whose lecture focused on the related histories of architecture and artificial intelligence in the 20th century. The two lectures were followed by a conversation between the two CMU faculty, moderated by Clemson University Professor Winifred Elysse Newman. Soon afterwards, on April 2, 2019, Cardoso participated in the symposium “Other Histories of the Digital” at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. At the symposium, Cardoso discussed aspects of digital labor in architecture based on his ongoing research on the history and contemporary practices of computer-aided design and building information modeling. The event concluded with a roundtable discussion moderated by Harvard’s Antoine Picon where Llach joined other architecture scholars, including Sean Keller, Andrew Witt, Olga Touloumi, Theodora Vardouli and Eve Blau, among others.

190

04/12/2019

SoA Students Construct Official Entryway for CMU Spring Carnival At the 2019 Spring Carnival, a group of 50 SoA students started a new tradition by designing and building the official entryway to the Midway festivities. The effort was led by SoA Pavilion Committee chairs Ghalya Alsanea (B.Arch ’20), Edward Fischer (B.Arch ’21) and Ryu Kondrup (B.Arch ’21). The 16-foot-tall archway established a new presence for the SoA at the annual event. The team of students envisioned the archway as a sustainable structure, aligning with this year’s “Planet Earth” theme. They planned to repurpose the materials following the event. “To have this project go from an idea to an actualization is priceless,” said Ghalya. “The archway was created to be sustainable. It can be disassembled and reassembled to be reused later on. The pieces can be used to create tables or chairs.” Made up of three-axis wooden modules, the rectangular arch welcomed alumni and friends back to campus while showcasing the department’s construction skills and innovative design work.


04/13/2019

SoA Honors the Achievements of Ömer Akin and Volker Hartkopf in Retirement Ceremony Professors Ömer Akin and Volker Hartkopf have both achieved the status of Professor Emeritus with the SoA. A Retirement Celebration honoring their careers and achievements took place Saturday April 13, 2019 during Spring Carnival. The event was a joyous occasion, featuring remarks from esteemed colleagues including Urban Design Associates’ David Lewis and SoA professor Vivian Loftness. Dr. Hartkopf has taught and conducted research at CMU since 1972. In 1975 he co-initiated and subsequently directed, until 1981, the first multidisciplinary program in Architecture, Engineering and Planning in the United States with grants from the National Science Foundation and the building industry. In 1981 he founded the Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics (CBPD) at CMU. Under Professor Hartkopf’s leadership, the CBPD team has received numerous prestigious national and international awards for research. In 1988, Professor Hartkopf created the Advanced Building Systems Integration Consortium (ABSIC) focused on creating high-performance work environments. ABSIC, in cooperation with CMU, designed and constructed the Robert L. Preger Intelligent Workplace, officially opened in the winter of 1997, which it still maintains. SoA Head Steve Lee reflects with admiration on Dr. Hartkopf’s legacy at the school. “I was Volker’s first student upon his arrival at Carnegie Mellon in 1972,” Steve recalls. “We developed an immediate bond through our mutual interests in technological innovation, future environments and social equity. What followed was a whirlwind of eye-opening, careerdefining activities—building Ice City in Fargo, ND (1973); building refugee housing in Peten, Guatemala (1974); winning the UIA World Student Competition on refugee housing solutions for India/East Pakistan (1975); receiving the UIA Prize of three weeks of travel in the USSR as guests of the USSR Architects Association (1976); demonstrating a refugee housing prototype at the UN World Conference in Vancouver, CA and receiving full tuition scholarship to the inaugural class of the Master of Architecture in Advanced Building studies (1976). After five wonderful years at Urban Design Associates, I joined the faculty at the SoA and reconnected with Volker. My partner Yoko Tai and I led the ABSIC Japan Studies while we on sabbatical in Japan and I became the project manager for realizing the Intelligent Workplace. To say that Volker was my mentor and collaborator would be a gross understatement. His impact on me, the profession, the university and the planet is of the highest level.”

Akin developed the Architecture–Engineering– Construction Management (AECM) Master’s and PhD degree programs, as well as the Doctor of Professional Practice (DPP) degree program. He also served in many administrative positions including as head of the SoA from 1981–87. Akin conducted extensive research in design cognition, and is best known in this area for his book Psychology of Architectural Design (Pion Ltd., 1986). More recently, he also published Generative CAD Systems (CMU, 2004) and Embedded Commissioning of Building Systems (Artech House, Inc., 2012). He authored numerous publications on topics including creativity, early stages of design, architectural programming, computer aided design and human computer interaction. SoA Head Steve Lee reflects with admiration on Akin’s legacy at the school. “The first assignment of my academic career was teaching 1st year studio with Ömer Akin; we taught placemaking on the basis of Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities,” Steve recalls. “This interaction had a lasting and profound impact on my attitude towards the studio and classroom. Over the years we went on to become good friends and through him I learned the importance of teaching how we design, not just what we design. Upon becoming head of the school in 2008, I relied upon Ömer for leadership in the AECM program and for the creation of the DPP program. Ömer’s retirement is a time for us all to reflect on the positive and lasting impact he has had on the SoA community – by my count there are over 1,500 undergraduate and graduate students that have had him as a teacher, mentor and/or agent provocateur.” Sincerest thanks to Dr. Akin and Dr. Hartkopf for their many decades of service and dedication to the SoA.

Ömer Akin served as a faculty member at CMU since 1977. He earned his PhD in 1979 at the SoA, and focused his research in building commissioning, architectural programming and generative design. During his time with SoA, he taught design studios and graduate courses, advised graduate students and lectured both nationally and internationally.

191


04/15/2019

CMU Women Featured in List of Emerging Leaders and Advocates in Pittsburgh Architecture

04/14/2019

BA Student Hamza Qureshi Speaks at 2019 Commencement The SoA congratulates Hamza Qureshi (BA ‘19) on being named the student speaker at CMU’s 122nd Commencement Ceremony on May 19, 2019 in Gesling Stadium. Qureshi earned his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degree with an additional major in human-computer interaction. He has been an active member of the student body, serving on the Undergraduate Student Senate, on the SoA’s Student Advisory Council, as an Orientation leader and as an academic coach with CMU’s Academic Development Department.

04/15/2019

Martin Aurand Awarded Distinguished Service Award from the Association of Architecture School Librarians In 2019, Principal Architecture Librarian & Archivist Martin Aurand was awarded the Distinguished Service Award for distinction in the profession from the Association of Architecture School Librarians (AASL). The award was made for outstanding and sustained service to the profession through active participation, advocacy and leadership in AASL; outstanding and sustained service to a library serving an academic architectural program in a manner consistent with the highest standards of the field; and significant research or publication that demonstrates the value of architecture librarians and their profession.

192

In the AIA Pittsburgh’s list of 10 Emerging Leaders and Advocates in Pittsburgh Architecture, 7 are affiliated with the SoA. Victoria Acevedo, Assoc. AIA is an alumna of the UDream program and currently serves as the Vice President of NOMA Pittsburgh. Cat Adams, AIA is an SoA alumna (B.Arch ‘11). Lakeisha Byrd is an alumna of the UDream program. Safiya J. A. Hodari, AIA is an alumna from the first cohort of the UDream program and a graduate of the MSAECM program. Alison Katz is a fourth-year B.Arch student in the SoA and currently heads the school’s Freedom by Design chapter. Alyssa Mayorga is a current SoA student and NOMAS President. Alicia Volcy, Assoc. AIA is an alumna of the UDream program and currently serves as the President of NOMA Pittsburgh. The list was part of a series edited by Point Line Projects, founded by adjunct faculty Sarah Rafson. 04/17/2019

SoA Alumni at Payette Teach Advanced Studio and Receive Top Honors

Payette is a highly collaborative Boston-based practice in which 10 partners share equal roles in marketing, management and design. The office includes SoA alumni at many levels. This spring, the SoA welcomed Charles S. Klee, AIA, LEED AP (M.Arch ‘89) as an adjunct faculty professor teaching the Brainhub Advanced Synthesis Option Studio with professor Vivian Loftness (see p. 90). Klee is a principal at Payette, where he leads the firm’s Research Initiative within the Building Science Group. He brings new ideas and technology to the practice through his independent research projects in which he assesses both the programmatic and technical performance of buildings. In 2019, SoA alumnus Michael Hinchcliffe (B.Arch ’94) was promoted as one of five new principals at Payette. Hinchcliffe’s nearly 25-year career includes a breadth of award-winning projects for academic science,


research and healthcare. His leadership advances teams from programming and planning through design, documentation and execution on projects that achieve balance between elegant design, technical program complexity and high-performance sustainability. Hinchcliffe’s promotion is a top honor in a firm that was awarded the 2019 AIA Architecture Firm Award with four projects receiving AIA Committee on the Environment (COTE) Top Ten recognition in the last four years, including two in 2019. Numerous SoA alumni at Payette have contributed to the great work recognized by this award, a top ten selection of projects exemplifying sustainable architecture and ecological design.

04/26/2019

04/19/2019

Carolina Tamayo Wins 2019 John Stewardson Memorial Fellowship in Architecture Alumna Carolina Tamayo (B.Arch ’17) won the 2019 John Stewardson Memorial Fellowship in Architecture, and Elizabeth Levy (B.Arch ’19) was named a top ten finalist in the oldest and most prestigious award for architecture students and graduates in Pennsylvania. Tamayo is the first winner from the SoA since Brent Buck (B.Arch ’03) won in 2003. This year’s design competition, Ex/Libris. A New Prototype Library for Renovo, Pennsylvania, tasked participants with developing and interpreting the role of the library within 21st-century society. Tamayo’s winning entry, RPL (Renovo Public Library), demonstrates the ability of architecture to uplift and sustain the community around it. The jury said Tamayo’s RPL “sought to establish a civic gathering space at the water’s edge by employing an L-shaped parti coupled with a book tower. Its beacon-like qualities assembled a place in the community that, through its difference in scale and relativity of vernacular form, championed the coming-together of people in a new civic space… the mixture of spaces was successful in capturing the diverse demands that face the modern library.”

Burdett Assistantship Award Winners Exhibit Their Work at EDGE Gallery, Install 3-D Map of Pittsburgh in CFA Building On May 3, 2019, the exhibition “Topographic Textures” curated by Zain Islam-Hashmi (B.Arch ‘19) and Gargi Lagvankar (B.Arch ‘19) opened at EDGE Gallery in the offices of GBBN Architects as part of the First Fridays/ Unblurred Gallery Crawl in the Garfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Funded through the SoA’s Burdett Assistantship, the exhibition reflects on the power of water to sculpt landscapes and the effect of the three rivers on the development of Pittsburgh over time. The exhibit documents the evolution of the river systems in relation to urban development as Pittsburgh evolves from a manufacturing hub into a knowledge city, and exposes the latent connections of hydrology, geology and human geography through historical and architectural analysis. Their project culminated in the development of a 3-dimensional topographic map of Pittsburgh, made of milled foam board, that was installed on a permanent basis in the College of Fine Arts building stairwell.

Now in its 118th year, the fellowship awards winners a $10,000 prize to pursue the study of architecture in a foreign country(s) to promote their design discovery and growth. The award is open to students or recent alumni (within three years) pursuing a B.Arch or M.Arch degree from an accredited school of architecture in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The top ten finalists’ project boards tour Pennsylvania schools of architecture as the Stewardson Exhibition in the months following the competition. 193


05/07/2019

Professor Dana Cupkova Receives 2019 ACADIA Teaching Award of Excellence

Associate Professor Dana Cupkova received the 2019 ACADIA Teaching Award of Excellence. The ACADIA awards are internationally recognized as one of the highest honors in the field. From the jury’s citation: “This award recognizes Dana Cupkova’s impact as an educator leading the integration of digital technologies, experimental methodologies and ecological approaches in architectural education.” Cupkova will present her work at this year’s conference at The University of Texas at Austin, October 24–26, 2019. Other awardees include Thom Mayne, Roland Snooks, Catie Newell, Jose Sanchez and Chris Yessios. In the 2018-19 school year, Cupkova also delivered talks at the ACADIA 2018 Conference, SimAUD 2019 Symposium, Living Architecture Systems Group (LASG) and Penn State’s Stuckeman School, where she was a keynote speaker.

05/07/2019

Kristen Kurland Featured in Book on Women and GIS

Teaching Professor Kristen Kurland was featured in the book Women and GIS: Mapping Their Stories (Esri Press, 2019). Her chapter “The Heart of a Giving Teacher” includes her work in GIS and Urban Design at CMU. Women and GIS: Mapping Their Stories shows how 23 women globally applied themselves and overcame obstacles, using maps, analysis and geographic information systems (GIS) to contribute to their professions and the world. Sharing the experiences of their childhoods, the misstarts and challenges they faced and the lessons they learned, each story is a celebration of a woman’s unique path and perseverance.

194

05/13/2019

Nikhita Bhagwat Designs Teaching Hospital for Haitian Village Poverty cripples every section of Haiti. Graduate student Nikhita Bhagwat saw it in Google images and web searches in the weeks before she flew to the island nation for the first time. Reality, she said, was much worse. “Once you step foot there, it’s quite unbelievable to see people facing that much poverty and lack of infrastructure,” said Bhagwat, a native of New Delhi, India. “It’s very sad and heart-breaking, but it makes you feel like returning more often to make a difference.” That’s why Bhagwat dedicated her architecture master’s thesis to documenting and designing a teaching hospital in Neply, a small village about three hours away from the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince. She created a facility that combines health operations, such as urgent care and pediatric care, with a medical school for the youth of the village. Her schematic designs will eventually be sent to Haitian architects for approval. With luck, the first phase could be constructed in Neply by 2023 or 2024. “This project has been extremely fulfilling,” Bhagwat said. “In a few years, hopefully this will be a tiny step for the redevelopment in Haiti.” Bhagwat is one of 17 M.Arch graduates graduating in 2019. “I always wanted to pursue a master’s degree in architecture and had an interest in the field of public interest design,” she said. “Carnegie Mellon broadened my horizons and helped me discover that healthcare is something I specifically want to pursue in the next phase of my life.”


05/16/2019

Francesca Torello Selected to National Endowment for the Humanities Program

Adjunct Professor Francesca Torello, PhD was selected to participate in a four-week program with the National Endowment for the Humanities Institute during July 2019. Hosted at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, “Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere” approaches museums as sites for interdisciplinary inquiry that offer windows on today’s educational, ethical and cultural debates. Home to dozens of public and private museums, Washington, DC will serve as a laboratory for a collective exploration of these debates. During the Summer Institute, Dr. Torello will continue work on two projects: a history of Pittsburgh collections in the frame of the debate about museums in the Gilded Age, and an examination of the long-term, paradigm-shifting consequences of the adoption of digital technologies in museums today. 05/31/2019

CMU Receives Gold Rating for Sustainability Efforts In 2019, CMU received gold status from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), surpassing its silver rating in 2015. CMU’s self-reported sustainability performance was evaluated using AASHE’s Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS). The assessment cites several SoA courses and degree programs that contributed to the rating. SoA assistant teaching professor Nina Baird, cochair of CMU’s Green Practices Committee, said the assessment measured practices in relation to the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals for 2030. “Those goals cover a broad range of aspirations about doing the best we can to live in this world: to seek social justice, environmental health, economic equity and ongoing personal wellbeing, including quality education and lifelong learning,” said Baird, faculty lead on the assessment project. “So much of what we do on this campus reflects those goals, from the courses we offer and research we do, to the way we support staff, faculty and students, and continually work to improve campus operations.” Baird thanked the many individuals who were involved in compiling the report. “Dozens of staff and faculty worked on the assessment itself and it reflects the work of thousands — what we’re already doing to make this place and the world more sustainable. It’s truly a group effort and reflects the strength and quality of CMU,” she said. The next AASHE evaluation is slated for 2022. “I hope we keep striving so we reach Platinum status on our next review,” Baird said.

06/01/2019

SoA and School of Design Collaborate on Interdisciplinary Course “Postal Places” In spring 2019, the SoA and School of Design launched an interdisciplinary course to provide students from multiple disciplines the opportunity to explore linkages between community scale place-making and the postal system. “The historian Winifred Gallagher describes the postal network as America’s central nervous system that binds the nation together and in which all communities are still treated equally,” explained Associate Professor Stefan Gruber, who co-taught the course with School of Design faculty Kristin Hughes and Andrew Butcher. “We were inspired by the vision of the future post as civic commons and eager to rethink what the post’s universal service obligation might mean in the 21st century. Bridging the postal and place-making divide opens up a space of opportunity for meaningful social innovation.” During the 16-week elective course, students focused on developing radical imaginations of possible futures for postal places in order to inspire new types of conversations and possibilities between communities and the postal service. The course utilized strategies of community engagement and creative placemaking to provide meaningful input and insights as to what is possible relative to the adaptation of postal facilities and distribution infrastructure. The course also featured guest lecturers with expertise from local community development, city planning, placemaking and national postal policy and history. The course culminated on April 26, 2019 with the presentation of “Postal Places: A Pittsburgh Forum.” Student teams presented concepts at a first-of-its-kind dialogue between place-based stakeholders and postal system experts at a dedicated Pittsburgh Postal Places Forum hosted at CMU. Through presentations and a series of interactive sessions, students and faculty sought feedback in an effort to help prompt information sharing between the postal and place-making domains.

195


CURATORIAL NOTE REFRAMING EXCHANGE STEFAN GRUBER ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR & EX-CHANGE CURATORIAL CONCEPT/ EXHIBITION DESIGNER

The 2019 year-end exhibition, EX-CHANGE, presents a cross section through the SoA. In architecture, sections provide a unique form of knowledge as they visualize what will never be experienced, thus shifting our attention from image to performance, and from singular elements to the articulation of part-to-whole relations. Just as in a building section, the EXCHANGE exhibition draws a section plane that exposed select details and reveals how different parts of the school come together to form a coherent whole. Thus, the exhibition reflects on the relations and assemblage of the work and ideas produced across the school. Challenging the common frame of reference as constituted by the studio brief, the exhibition re-organizes the students’ work according to three types: two-, three- and four-dimensional media are each displayed in a unique setting—a point, a line and a field. Drawings and renderings are presented in a linear archive, physical models are arranged into a sprawling miniature metropolis and timebased presentations are screened in an intimate theater setting. Freed from the studio agendas from which the projects emerged, here the visual artefacts speak for themselves. Meanwhile, the unifying displays open up opportunities for new, unexpected associations: Against the backdrop of intricate skyscraper designs for Manhattan’s Hudson Yards, the abstract compositions of Bauhaus-inspired lamps, built at full-scale by first-year students, appear as constructivist megastructures. The formal explorations from a digital fabrication class resonate with the pulsation of endless design iterations for affordable housing typologies. And the pattern of a falling drape in a charcoal drawing of a nude comes to life in contrast to the systematic rhythm of the curtain wall in the adjacent elevation of a charter school project. Thus the exhibition fosters immediate, synoptic insights, and renders variations and 196

recurrence immanent, prompting the viewer to look beyond presumed categories. As visitors explore the exhibition, one can hear students speculate with each other: “In which studio was this sketch produced?” “No, this is not a thesis project, but a first-year shelter design for a bat!” After all, what might appear to be inadvertent relations mirrors the student’s experience in traversing the architecture curriculum: encountering diverse, sometimes contrary positions, and yet learning to constitute a thread that holds these views and approaches together, and form a more unique and deeply personal answer to the question what architecture is. It goes without saying that there are likely as many answers to this question as there are students and faculty members in the school. Rather than a singular answer, the exhibition aims to foreground the common quest in pursuit of an answer as the shared interest that brings us together. On a more literal level, the exhibition was designed as an exercise in adaptive reuse. Existing shelves, tables and generic office supplies were hacked to perform as exhibition displays. This is more than a pragmatic answer to limited resources, but also an indication of a change in the discipline of architecture. Architecture as a whole is increasingly revolving around responsible sourcing of materials, reuse and upcycling, critical care and creative maintenance. Here the inconspicuous furniture turned into whimsical exhibition display, thanks to students’ efforts, resonates with the unlikely nature inherent to any end-of-year show. The moment in which pristine models and intricate drawings emerge from the overwhelming chaos of final reviews often feels like alchemy. EXCHANGE celebrates that moment when the ordinary transforms into the extraordinary and becomes something palpable.


198


EX-CHANGE year-end show. May 4–5, 2019, College of Fine Arts, Pittsburgh.

199


Credits Photography: P. 23: CT scan monarch butterfly chrysalis © Richard Stringer, Micro Photonics Inc. P. 181: Christina Jin - Christina Jin Photo Studio, @tinajinphotos. P. 182: Liam van Oort. News articles have been adapted from those written by Meredith Marsh, Marketing and Communications Manager, except for the following articles by other authors. By Kathryn Reilly: “Christine Mondor Named to AIA College of Fellows,” “SoA Faculty Stefani Danes and Doug Cooper Collaborate on Mural in New Tepper Building,” “Professor Stephen Quick Studies Light Pollution in Pittsburgh with Drones,” “Alumnus Ben Saks Debuts Documentary FLOAT at Cleveland International Film Festival,” “Alumnus Matthew Ciccone’s Firm Beauty Shoppe Recognized for CuttingEdge Redevelopment Projects,” “BA Student Emily deGrandpre Presents App at Global Grad Show in Dubai.” By Heidi Opdyke: “Architecture Student Has Designs for Fashion.” By Jason Maderer: “Master’s Student Designs Teaching Hospital for Haitian Village.”


School of Architecture Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Avenue College of Fine Arts 201 Pittsburgh, PA 15213

2019

EX-CHANGE is a year-end show and publication celebrating the work of the SoA from first year to PhD. Inaugurated in fall 2017, EX-CHANGE is an ongoing opportunity to shine new light on the SoA programs and position the work within larger questions of research and practice.

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

EX-CHANGE 2019

Profile for Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture

CMU School of Architecture EX-CHANGE 2019  

In 2019, Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture's EX-CHANGE became a year-end exhibition, and for the first time celebrated the e...

CMU School of Architecture EX-CHANGE 2019  

In 2019, Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture's EX-CHANGE became a year-end exhibition, and for the first time celebrated the e...

Profile for cmusoa
Advertisement