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Dedication by Emily Perry

In Memory of Marshmallow Forever my baby girl Forever in my heart

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened. " - Anatole France


Volume 2, Issue 2


by Hannah Mollett


The Color Pink by Julianne Rae

When I made the big move from college to high school my aunt thought I needed a lanyard for my keys. Due to her once having breast cancer she bought me a breast cancer pink one. Now I’m not particularly fond of the color pink, especially one so pale, but because she gave it to me I kept it anyway. Five years later, I still have the same lanyard, and even though it’s rather dirty and worn by now, I still don’t have the heart to replace it until it’s no longer working. It may not be much, but everyday it reminds me of her and what she went through.

In 2011, only 15% of donations to Susan G. Komen for the Cure directly funded breast cancer research. - Reuters


Save the... What? by Sienna Monczunski

I’ve worked in my fair share of clothing stores. Retail had short hours, but it was fun to be able to dress up at work. It was my sophomore year of college; I remember aimlessly walking around the bright pink store. Dark floral dresses and jean jackets hung atop and sneered at the other


clothes. I looked for any shoe that could be out of place, any speckle of dust to feather away, anything to do, period. I finally reached the graphic t-shirt section. It was breast cancer awareness month so naturally I saw a lot of pink ribbons in the store. I folded a t-shirt that read, “save the tatas.” Nothing felt right about that. Breast cancer affects the person, I thought. I approached my co-worker and asked her how she felt about the statement on the shirt. She said it was phrased to appeal to a younger generation and that helps bring awareness. She was personally affected by breast cancer; her aunt is a survivor. I listened carefully to my co-worker. An article in Time stated that breast cancer affects about one in eight women in the United States. Those numbers increase with family members and loved ones are affected as well. I looked into my co-worker’s eyes. When she mentioned her aunt, she was also affected. I don’t ever want to see another t-shirt with the words “save the tatas” splattered on it. Can we instead talk about how important it is to give self-exams once a month? It’s also important to know the three types of lumps that can occur in breast tissue. I once had a cyst. I discovered it in the shower, and I visited the doctor about a week later. He said that cysts are the most common lumps found. They’re fluid filled and malleable, like a grape, and are nothing to worry about. I want to know how you feel about “save the tatas,” or the “Obsessed with Breasts” ad campaign by The Breast Cancer Fund. Email your thoughts at moncz1sm@cmich.edu, and some of your feedback may be posted in next month’s issue.


Feminism Without Borders is a monthly student-made zine What’s next?

November’s theme is Gender Roles. Send all art and writing submissions to cmusage@gmail. com by Tuesday, October 29th.

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Use your voice.

Contact us at cmusage@gmail.com


Feminism Without Borders: Volume 2, Issue 2