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VAIL

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WAYS TO MOVE & BE MOVED

Cutting

Edge

AFTER HOURS

PUSHING THE ENVELOPE NOW

TAKE IT TO THE STREET

Stages of

Summer

FORWARD MOMENTUM Damian Woetzel’s global ideal

Passion. Drama. Beauty. We’ve got it.

VIRTUOSOS in Vail 2012 vail international dance festival

Buck Up

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31 39

contents

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OFFSTAGE Names. Notes. News. Views.

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DANCE CHRONICLES Photographer Erin Baiano’s visions

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JEROME ROBBINS’ MOVES A ballet in silence

Welcome to the Festival

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Venues, Parking & Box Office

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New York City Ballet MOVES PERFORMANCES

29

New York City Ballet MOVES — Opening Night

30

New York City Ballet MOVES — Program II

31

UpClose: Stravinsky by Balanchine

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International Evenings of Dance I

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International Evenings of Dance II

34

NOW — An Evening of Premieres

35

Dance for $20.12

GETTING VISCERAL Martha Graham Dance Company

36

Martha Graham Dance Company

56

DIGGING DEEP A night of premieres

37

Ballroom Spectacular

38

Dance TV

ARTISTIC GIANTS George Balanchine and Igor Stravinsky’s collaborative partnership

39

Free Community Events

40

Festival Artists

46

Underwriters & Donors

50

Thank you

64

VAIL DANCE

SCENE Support. Connect. Experience. Network. Enjoy.

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DANCING IN THE STREETS Putting the festive in festival

VAIL INTERNATIONAL DANCE FESTIVAL OFFICIAL PROGRAM

CURTAIN CALL Andrea Selby’s sketchbook

PHOTOS BY: ALEXANDER IZILIAEV, ERIN BAIANO AND MARTHA SWOPE.


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VAI L

PUBLISHER

Mark Bricklin mbricklin@vaildaily.com EDITOR

Wren Wertin wren@vaildaily.com ART DIRECTOR

Andrea Goodlin ASSISTANT EDITOR

Julie Kapala CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Erica Sheftman CONTENT & DIRECTION

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Martha Brassel Duncan Horner Shawn Kirschner Kate Peters CONTRIBUTORS

Erin Baiano Kimberly Nicoletti Dominique Taylor Mary Kelley Zeleskey CIRCULATION MANAGER

Jared Staber

All programs and artists are subject to change.

PRINTING & PREPRESS

American Web Denver, Colorado

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VAIL DANCE

The Vail Daily is a wholly owned subsidiary of Colorado Mountain News Media 200 Lindbergh Drive | P.O. Box 1500 Gypsum, Colorado 81637 p. 970.328.6333 f. 970.328.6409 Copyright ©2012 Colorado Mountain News Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited.


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OFFSTAGE

NOTES. NAMES.

OFFSTAGE OFFS STAGE NEWS. VIEWS.

FINDthe

beat

PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR.

FOR THE SIXTH CONSECUTIVE SUMMER AS PART OF THE VAIL

International Dance Festival, kids ages 8 to 13 are invited to participate in Celebrate the Beat's Pop Hop Camp. We believe the arts can transform lives — they’ve sure transformed ours. The dance and movement program encourages creative expression in a consistent, structured environment. The kids thrive, and you can see for yourself. The Pop Hop Camp kids take the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater stage right before the International Evenings of Dance performance on August 3. How can you resist?

VAIL DANCE

09


OFFSTAGE

news &

A LASTING LEGACY

NOTES

BY MARY KELLEY ZELESKEY RENOWNED ARTIST AND SOCIAL ACTIVIST

1

2

3

5

4

6

This time last year, Memphis jooker

4 LIL BUCK was leading crowds

through the streets of Vail as the Dance Festival’s Artist in Residence. Three months later, Madonna signed him as the newest member of her stage team. Vail’s 2007 Choreographer in Residence

1 CHRISTOPHER WHEELDON

Keith Haring died in 1990, yet he’s become a recognizable part of the Vail International Dance Festival in the 21st century. After being diagnosed with AIDS, he established the Keith Haring Foundation in 1989. That same year, he appointed Julia Gruen Director of the Foundation, a position that she still holds today. ¶ Haring invoked his imagery and craft to speak about his illness in order to generate activism and awareness. Haring’s work was chosen to accompany the New York City Ballet’s 1988 premiere of A Fool for You at the company’s American Music Festival. “Because of my love for (the New York City Ballet) and the dancers (Haring) had come to know and admire, I easily persuaded him to create an image for the evening — his joyful interpretation of the American flag,” said Gruen, a former ballet student herself and close friend of ballerina Heather Watts and other dancers at City Ballet. In 1990, Haring died at the age of 31. However, the Keith Haring Foundation continues to work with many organizations to keep his artistic legacy alive. ¶ In 2011, the Vail International Dance Festival presented a revival of A Fool for You, and Gruen offered Festival Artistic Director Woetzel (Watts’ husband) the use of Haring’s flag image to introduce it to the Vail audience. “This year, Damian and I discussed the possibility of adding an additional Haring image to promote the 2012 festival,” Gruen said. “We agreed on adding a quite different, but equally buoyant image to continue the VIDF/Keith Haring Foundation partnership.” For the 2012 Vail International Dance Festival artwork by Keith Haring, see page 25.

was asked to create a work for the closing ceremony of the Summer Olympics

5 RON “PRIME TYME” MYLES looks familiar, it’s because he recently appeared in the film Footloose. When NYCB dancers 2 ROBBIE FAIRCHILD, 3 DANIEL ULBRICHT and LAUREN LOVETTE come to Vail, in London. If

6 DANIEL AND ROBBIE rarely stop dancing. ®

10

VAIL DANCE

SELECT PHOTOS BY ERIN BAIANO AND CAITLIN KAKIGI.

© Keith Haring Foundation

they like to play. But


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OFFSTAGE

Q &A

CARLA KÖRBES

Q: What’s it like working with him? A: He really gets into the artist. He really knows what turns me on as an artist and he tries to make that possible for me. He must do that for other people, too, and that's incredible. Q: How is the new project going?

WENDY WHELAN New York City Ballet Principal Dancer Wendy Whelan is legendary. The muse of many, she seems fearless on stage. She’s debuting a project next year that has her premiering four dances with four choreographers — all of whom will share the stage with her.

A: It’s just beginning. I met with (choreographer) Kyle Abraham. He asked me, “What do you want out of what we’re going to make together?” I told him, “I want to be unrecognizable. I want to be something people won’t expect.” And when (choreographer) Brian Brooks and I talked, I told him, “I want you to find something new in me.” Q: Is it difficult to be open like that?

Q: You keep coming back to Vail. A: Damian (Woetzel) affords me incredible opportunities every summer. It's something I relish and am really, really grateful for. I look forward to the new work. Damian's really been incredible to me.

A: I like to dig, dig, dig. Help me find the bones of what I am. As people, we have so many aspects to ourselves. If we don't keep looking or playing, then we don’t find them.

Pacific Northwest Ballet Principal Dancer Carla Körbes was training in her native Brazil when Peter Boal encouraged her to travel to New York to study at the School of American Ballet. Very much in demand, Körbes travels all over the world to perform. Q: How long have you been coming to Vail for the Festival? A: Damian (Woetzel) asked me to come his first year as Artistic Director, and now I come every year. I love Vail itself, I love how it feels like it’s a vacation while I work. It’s a beautiful atmosphere and the people Damian brings are amazing — people I admire in the ballet world. And I like getting to see my old friends. So it’s a little reunion with my friends.

was one of Balanchine’s ballerinas. All that information is very precious to me. It’s good to layer the information to make it better, and I get to do that in Vail. Q: Do you help decide what you will perform in Vail? A: In the beginning I used to give Damian a list of things I thought I could do, or had done before. Now I just leave it up to him. He knows what he wants the program to be, and he knows my dancing. He knows how he can push me or work with me. And he loves pairing dancers with people from different companies.

Q: Do you often take working vacations? A: Down time doesn’t always feel like vacation to me, because it takes another 2 weeks to get back into shape. So it’s good to have fun and work. Plus I get to work with Damian and Heather (Watts) again. I love both of them. Many times I dance Balanchine works, and Heather

MUDSLIDES AND MILONGA DANCERS COME TO VAIL TO PERFORM, BUT THAT DOESN’T MEAN IT’S ALL WORK

and no play. Insiders tell us that an assortment of dancers from the New York City Ballet heads to the Bully Ranch, located at the Sonnenalp Resort of Vail, for the restaurant’s legendary mudslides. Made with Kahlua, Bailey’s, vodka and blended with ice, they’re grown-up milkshakes. And they jump-start the party. ¶ Dancers might go to Bully Ranch for mudslides, but other folks head there to dance. The resort hosts monthly dance night's themes include tango, salsa, swing and line dancing. ¶ The Sonnenalp is also the official après haus of the 2012 Vail International Dance Festival. As one of the performers’ Vail home bases, the Sonnenalp likely will be abuzz with dance energy. There will be post-performance food and drink specials (Tip-Toe Mojito, anyone?) and live music. Check out the Milonga on August 5 with Gabriel Missé, acclaimed Argentinean tango star (and Vail fan favorite). The ticketed event is open to the public.

12

VAIL DANCE

PHOTOS BY NISIAN HUGHES, KYLE FROMAN & DOMINIQUE TAYLOR.


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DANCE

chronicles

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VAIL DANCE


by wren wertin PHOTOGRAPHER ERIN BAIANO WATCHES VAIL THROUGH A LENS.

“HAIRSPRAY” WAS A TURNING POINT FOR ERIN BAIANO.

Her boss, photographer Paul Kolnik, double booked himself. And so he went to Seattle to shoot the musical and left his assistant, Baiano, in the city to shoot New York City Ballet dancers. A former dancer herself, it was a good fit. Baiano started out on the journalism path and imagined heading into war-torn countries, covering life from the front lines. “But I’m not really suited for that,” she said, laughing. “I really like what I do.” One of the things she’s done every year for the past five years is chronicle the Vail International Dance Festival. Sometimes she photographs performances, shooting “ninja-style” so as not to disturb the audience. But she also wanders through other parts of the festival — rehearsals as partners are just getting to know each other, studios filled with choreographers setting a new work on dancers, and the sometimes quiet, sometimes frantic rooms backstage. “It all started with Damian,” she said, referring to Artistic Director Damian Woetzel. “I call him ‘the hub.’ He’s the connector and brings all these incredible people together. He connects the dots in a way that’s really unique. He puts not-so-obvious partners together, and he makes dance accessible to everyone.” Baiano gets to witness many dance events every year, but she cites the Vail Festival as one of her favorites. Dancers return again and again, and the energy they bring with them is palpable. “Dancers are extremely visual people. They learn by connecting what they see to their bodies,” she says. “They also communicate in a non-verbal way. Ballet in particular is very precise, so to be able to shoot it you need to have some knowledge of it.” Because she understands the intricacies of the art, Baiano feels protective of the dancers. She doesn’t just think about lighting and focus — she wants to capture her subjects illustrating the very best of their abilities. And at the Vail International Dance Festival, rife with the kind of energy that keeps expanding as the days roll on, she’s able to do just that. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: HÉLÈNE BOUCHET AND THIAGO BORDIN. TILER PECK AND ROBBIE FAIRCHILD. MISA KURANAGA. STERLING HYLTIN. CARLA KÖRBES AND ERIC UNDERWOOD.

VAIL DANCE

15


Peace, Back by popular demand

BALLET STAR TILER PECK LEADS THE CROWD AT A DANCING IN THE STREETS EVENT AT ARRABELLE AT VAIL SQUARE.

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VAIL DANCE

PHOTO COURTESY OF CAITLIN KAKIGI.


DANCING in the

Streets ALL OF VAIL’S A STAGE… The Vail International Dance Festival is more than a series of on-stage performances Check out these fringe events: » Celebrate National Dance Day with the Dizzy Feet Foundation. » Jump into one of the Dancing in the Streets interactive community events — line dancing, hip hop, a public ballet barre class and square dancing. » Try tango lessons, or take a Master Class with some seriously well-known and respected teachers. » Check out the Hot Summer Nights of Dance 8150 Urban Dance Challenge. » Watch an impromptu dance dust-up, better known as a Village Vignette performance. For a complete list of the Vail International Dance Festival’s fringe scene, see page 39 or visit vaildance.org.

VAIL DANCE

17


SCENE support connect experience network enjoy

1

2

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: 1 Pam & Ernie Elsner, Mark Morris (Founder/Artistic Director, Mark Morris Dance Group), Artistic Director Damian Woetzel. 2 Senenne & Dr. Marc Philippon, Dr. Peter Millett. 3 Becky Hernreich & Susan Milhoan. 4 Jason Fowler, Arlene C. Cooper & Christopher Wheeldon (choreographer). 5 Artistic Director Damian Woetzel, Doe Browning & Carl B. Colby & Ballroom dancers Liana Churilova & Emmanuel Pierre-Antoine. 6 Yvonne Dawsey, Sarah Millett, Amy Gish & Henrietta Armbruster.

3

BE A PART OF THE 2012 SCENE

Opening Night Party July 29 @ Ludwigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Terrace, Sonnenalp Resort of Vail Champagne on Stage July 30 & August 4 @ Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater (Post-Performance) 2012 Dance Gala August 3 @ Betty Ford Alpine Gardens, Tent

4

6

Friends of Betty Ford Reception August 9 @ Betty Ford Alpine Gardens Closing Night Party August 11 @ Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater To learn how you can be a part of the 2012 VIDF Scene, contact Shawn Kirschner at 970.777.2015.

5

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VAIL DANCE


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focus

jerome robbins'

MOVES, a ballet in silence

ABOVE: NEW YORK CITY BALLET IN MOVES. PHOTO BY PAUL KOLNIK.

by erica sheftman When Jerome Robbins’ ballet Moves had its premiere in 1959, it was programmed with the subtitle “A Ballet in Silence About Relationships.” Robbins said at the time that he wanted to create a ballet about connections between people – “man and woman, one and another, the individual and the group.” Perhaps the work’s most striking relationship is between the dancers and their audience. Robbins wanted each and every spectator to have a unique and self-aware viewing experience: unrestricted by music, scenery, costumes and narrative and inspired primarily by bodies in motion. Moves

was a courageous moment in modern ballet, born of Robbins’ wish to show the limitlessness of stand-alone movement. Vail International Dance Festival Artistic Director Damian Woetzel performed in Moves early in his career at New York City Ballet: "In all his ballets, Jerry demanded that the dancers be aware and responsive to each other as a community on stage, but never more so than in Moves because the ballet was entirely dependent on us reacting to one another and working together to counteract the absence of beat provided by the music. It actually was the perfect way to learn the Rob-

BALLETS: USA IN MOVES IN SPOLETO, ITALY IN 1959. PHOTO BY JEROME ROBBINS.

bins aesthetic of not playing to the front of the house, but instead being a separate world on the stage-- you really had to exist in that world in Moves or it would all fall apart." The ballet caused a sensation around the world, beginning in Spoleto, Italy where it premiered as part of the second season of Jerome Robbins’ Ballets: USA, the short-lived company Robbins created. Il Messagero pronounced Moves a “masterpiece by a great genius–a turning point in the dance,” and the New York Post wrote that the work was “pure movement made into stimulating theater, which like so much of Robbins catches the lives of youth.” The ballet features a group of 14 dancers dressed in simple practice leotards, moving in silence. An innate rhythm of spontaneous, mutual impulses seems to propel the army in a speedy mixture of both classical and modern movements. The dancers must keep time themselves, relying only on instinctual reactions

MOVES will be performed by New York City Ballet MOVES on Monday, July 30.

to the breaths taken and turns made by their peers. To watch fourteen dancers follow a collective, silent clock is to witness a breathtaking feat. Even without a musical base, the various theaters in which the ballet was performed echoed with what the New York Herald Tribune called “the sounds of dance, for breathing in various cadences of excitement can be heard and so also can the brush, stamp, tap of feet.” Performed outdoors against the landscape of the Rocky Mountains, and accompanied by the rustling of the Aspen trees and summer wind, Robbins’ silent ballet takes on a magical new life at the Vail International Dance Festival.

VAIL DANCE

21


Vail Mountain School is pleased to share our theatre and gymnasium with the Vail International Dance Festival as a practice space.

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VAILDANCE.ORG


welcome...

PRESENTERS’ CIRCLE

TO THE VAIL VALLEY FOUNDATION’S 2012 VAIL INTERNATIONAL DANCE FESTIVAL! This season New York City Ballet MOVES returns to open the Festival with three different programs over three nights. In addition to two separate evenings at the Ford Amphitheater, MOVES also presents a special UpClose performance at the Vilar Performing Arts Center celebrating the magnificent collaborations between composer Igor Stravinsky and New York City Ballet’s founder George Balanchine, who together formed one of the most important artistic partnerships in history. In a first at the Festival, this year we also feature Martha Graham Dance Company, the historic and heralded modern dance powerhouse. It is a cause for celebration to welcome this company to Vail, for the significance of the body of work it presents, but also because of the connection between Graham and the late Betty Ford, who once danced as an apprentice with the company, and maintained a connection with the troupe throughout her lifetime. In the second week of the Festival, we present another new performance entitled NOW, featuring world premieres and works previously unseen in Vail, by leading contemporary choreographers including Christopher Wheeldon, Doug Varone, Trisha Brown in collaboration with Jodi Melnick, and the Vail debut of BalletX with a new work by its co-director Matthew Neenan. And of course, in addition to the new programming, the signature International Evenings of Dance return with a selection of the world’s most compelling dancers in two unique performances, the popular mixedbill sampler Dance for $20.12 encourages new audiences, Ballroom swings under the stars, and this year’s episode of Dance TV features live performances by celebrity dancers from television’s hit dance programs. Beyond our performance lineup, we encourage you to join in one of the many interactive Dancing in the Streets off-stage events hosted throughout the town of Vail and encourage you to learn more about our Celebrate the Beat education program, teaching valuable learning skills year-round in Eagle County schools through music and dance. It is an honor to be able to make a difference through the arts onstage, offstage and in the classroom. We thank you for your support and hope you will enjoy the 2012 Festival, which once again reaffirms our commitment to sharing the many aspects of dance and to making Vail a place where the arts uniquely flourish.

Ceil Folz President Vail Valley Foundation

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VAIL DANCE

Damian Woetzel Artistic Director Vail International Dance Festival

The Vail Valley Foundation extends its sincere gratitude to our Presenters’ Circle donors, whose exemplary generosity has enabled the 2012 Vail International Dance Festival to achieve an extraordinary standard of excellence.

JUDY & HOWARD BERKOWITZ Judy and Howard have been supporters of the Vail Valley Foundation since its inception. Their love for the art of dance and continuous support has enabled the Vail International Dance Festival to reach the pinnacle it has achieved. Both Judy and Howard have been instrumental in the new direction of the Festival. They are members of the Cornerstone Friends program, and Judy serves as a member of the Foundation’s board of directors and chair of the Dance committee. In New York, Judy serves on the board of Rockefeller University, The New York Historical Society, and chairs The Center for Educational Innovation-Public Education Association. Howard is the President of The Washington Institute for Near East Policy and is former chairman of the Anti-Defamation League. He is on the Board of the Steadman-Hawkins Foundation and is a former board member of the New York City Ballet.

SUSAN & JEFFREY CAMPBELL Susan and Jeff Campbell are our newest Presenters to the Vail International Dance Festival. They live in San Francisco and Beaver Creek and are longtime supporters of the Vail International Dance Festival and Vilar Performing Arts Center.

OSCAR TANG FAMILY The Vail International Dance Festival is honored once again to be among the many beneficiaries of the Tang Family’s devotion to the arts. Oscar is an avid supporter of many charities in New York and the Vail Valley and maintains residences in both communities. The Tang Family has supported the Vail Valley Foundation at a leadership level since its inception and Oscar has long served as a member of its Board and executive committee. Oscar is currently a member of the Foundation’s Cornerstone Friends program and also generously supports the Foundation’s educational initiatives. He currently serves as chairman of the Education Committee.


VENUES, PARKING & BOX OFFICE

GERALD R. FORD AMPHITHEATER, VAIL

VENUES

Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater Owned and operated by the Vail Valley Foundation, the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater in Vail is an outdoor venue that seats 1,260 guests in covered seating and an additional 1,300 on its expansive grassy hillside with a breathtaking view of the Gore Range. Gates to the venue open one hour prior to showtime. Lawn seating is available on a first come-first served basis. Picnics with non-alcoholic, commercially-sealed beverages and legless chairs are permitted. Full concessions are available. Vilar Performing Arts Center Owned and operated by the Vail Valley Foundation, the Vilar Performing Arts Center is a 530-seat state-of-the art facility located in the heart of Beaver Creek. The theater’s intimate and inviting performance space was designed to exacting specifications to create perfect acoustics and unobstructed views from every seat. Please arrive early for performances. Lobby doors open at least one hour prior to showtime. Late

arrivals will be seated at the back of the house and only at the discretion of the House Manager. Full concessions are available. PARKING

Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater Limited paid parking is available at Ford Park, located northeast of the Amphitheater on the Frontage Road and at the Soccer Field, located southeast of the Amphitheater on Vail Valley Drive. Free parking is available at the Vail Village and Lionshead parking structures, both a short walk or shuttle ride to the venue. Courtesy cart service is provided on a regular basis for those needing transportation assistance. Vilar Performing Arts Center Limited free parking is available at the Villa Montane or Village Hall parking structures in Beaver Creek Resort. Additional free parking is located at the East and West lots at the entrance to Beaver Creek, with free shuttle service to the covered bridge bus stop.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JEFF SCROGGINS AND CONNOR WALBERG.

VILAR PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, BEAVER CREEK

BOX OFFICE

GERALD R. FORD AMPHITHEATER:

530 South Frontage Road, Vail VILAR PERFORMING ARTS CENTER:

68 Avondale Lane, Beaver Creek PHONE:

970.845.TIXS (8497) or 888.920.ARTS (2797) For online ticket purchases, visit vaildance.org HOURS OF OPERATION:

Daily; 11am to 7pm WE’RE SOCIAL:

f/VailDance o@VailDance

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JULY 29 ď&#x161;ť JULY 31 Launched at the 2011 Vail International Dance Festival, New York City Ballet MOVES opens the 2012 Festival with three completely different programs, featuring masterworks from NYCB founding choreographers George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins, as well as contemporary works from Ulysses Dove, William Forsythe and Peter Martins. MOVES also presents a special one-timeonly performance entitled UpClose: Stravinsky by Balanchine, focusing on the magnificent ballets created by Balanchine to the music of Igor Stravinsky.


PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY PAM & ERNIE ELSNER. TILER PECK & ROBERT FAIRCHILD’S APPEARANCES IN VAIL ARE UNDERWRITTEN BY THE MARY WOLF FAMILY.

JULY

29

SUNDAY, JULY 29 :: 7:30PM

new york city ballet moves OPENING NIGHT

Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail

IN CREASES

ZAKOUSKI

Music by Philip Glass Choreography by Justin Peck

SONATINE

Music by Sergei Rachmaninoff, Igor Stravinsky, Sergei Prokofiev, Peter Ilyitch Tschaikovsky Choreography by Peter Martins

Music by Maurice Ravel Choreography by George Balanchine*

IN THE NIGHT

RED ANGELS

Music by Frédéric Chopin Choreography by Jerome Robbins

Music by Richard Einhorn Choreography by Ulysses Dove

PICTURED ABOVE: RED ANGELS.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL KOLNIK.

*Choreography by George Balanchine © The George Balanchine Trust.

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PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY LUCY & STEVE COOKSON.

JULY

30

MONDAY, JULY 30 :: 7:30PM

new york city ballet moves PROGRAM II

Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail

SINFONIA Music by Igor Stravinsky Choreography by Peter Martins

MOVES A Ballet in Silence Choreography by Jerome Robbins

Jerome Robbins’ MOVES: “…a masterpiece by a great genius – a turning point in the dance.” – II Messagero (1959)

PICTURED ABOVE: NEW YORK CITY BALLET IN MOVES.

HERMAN SCHMERMAN PAS DE DEUX Music by Thom Willems Choreography by William Forsythe

THE WALTZ PROJECT Music by John Cage, Joan Tower, Philip Glass, Ivan Tcherepnin, Joseph Fennimore, Milton Babbitt, Robert Moran, Tom Constanten, Roger Sessions, Morton Gould Choreography by Peter Martins


PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY ANONYMOUS.

JULY

GEORGE BALANCHINE & IGOR STRAVINSKY REHEARSING AGON IN 1957.

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TUESDAY, JULY 31 :: 7:30PM

UpClose: Stravinsky by Balanchine NEW YORK CITY BALLET MOVES

Vilar Performing Arts Center, Beaver Creek Hosted by New York City Ballet’s Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins and Festival Artistic Director Damian Woetzel, UpClose: Stravinsky by Balanchine celebrates the 40th anniversary of the landmark Stravinsky Festival. This unique event will focus on the groundbreaking ballets created by George Balanchine to the music of Igor Stravinsky, ballets considered to be among the 20th century’s most important and enduring works of art. Among the ballets being showcased rehearsal-style by the brilliant dancers of NYCB MOVES, will be Agon, Apollo, Orpheus, Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Rubies (from Jewels), Symphony in Three Movements, and Firebird.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTHA SWOPE, PHOTO ON OPPOSITE PAGE COURTESY OF PAUL KOLNIK.

Balanchine is a trademark of The George Balanchine Trust. Choreography by George Balanchine © The George Balanchine Trust.

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AUGUST 3 PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY DOROTHY BROWNING & CARL B. COLBY. AUGUST 4 PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY BETSY & GEORGE WIEGERS.

AUG

3

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3 & SATURDAY, AUGUST 4 :: 7:30PM

international evenings of dance

WORLD STARS ON ONE STAGE

Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail

“Ballet adds human splendor to wonders of Vail.” – The New York Times

CARLA KÖRBES AND CORY STEARNS IN SWAN LAKE.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF ERIN BAIANO.


AUG

4

PERFORMING ARTISTS: TYLER ANGLE New York City Ballet

RON MYLES New Styles Krew

Underwritten by Jean & Tom McDonnell

Underwritten by Marcy & Gerry Spector

BRIAN BROOKS Brian Brooks Moving Company

MATTHEW RUSHING

Underwritten by Mary Sue & Mike Shannon

Underwritten by Elana Amsterdam & Rob Katz

BEATRIZ STIX-BRUNELL The Royal Ballet Underwritten by Friends of Beatriz

ANALIA CENTURIÓN & GABRIEL MISSÉ International Tango Stars

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

FANG-YI SHEU Fang-Yi Sheu & Artists Underwritten by Sheika & Pepi Gramshammer

LINDA CELESTE SIMS Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Underwritten by Pat & Pete Frechette

Underwritten by Marty Head & John A. Feagin, M.D.

CORY STEARNS

HERMAN CORNEJO

Underwritten by Susan & Harry Frampton

American Ballet Theatre

American Ballet Theatre Underwritten by Graciela & Carlos Hank

DANIEL ULBRICHT New York City Ballet

CRAIG HALL

Underwritten by Vikki & Michael Price

New York City Ballet Underwritten by Bobbi & Christopher Brody

ERIC UNDERWOOD The Royal Ballet

CARLA KÖRBES

Underwritten by LaDonna & Gary Wicklund

Pacific Northwest Ballet Underwritten by Nancy & Richard Lubin

WENDY WHELAN New York City Ballet

MISA KURANAGA

Underwritten by Susan & Jeffrey Stern

Boston Ballet Underwritten by Rella & Monty Rifkin

LAUREN LOVETTE New York City Ballet Underwritten by Leni & Peter May PICTURED ABOVE: WENDY WHELAN AND CRAIG HALL IN LITURGY.


PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY JILL & KEVIN PLANCHER. THE WORLD PREMIERE OF CHRISTOPHER WHEELDON’S BALLET IS UNDERWRITTEN BY MARGE & PHIL ODEEN. THE WORLD PREMIERE OF MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY’S LAMENTATION VARIATION IS UNDERWRITTEN BY PRISCILLA BREWSTER.

AUG

6

MONDAY, AUGUST 6 :: 7:30PM

NOW

AN EVENING OF PREMIERES HOSTED BY DAMIAN WOETZEL

Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail World premieres and acclaimed recent works bring together a selection of today’s most brilliant dancers and innovative choreographers on one stage, for one night. Performances by:

Choreography by:

Fang-Yi Sheu Wendy Whelan Tyler Angle Craig Hall Jodi Melnick Brian Brooks Sokvannara (Sy) Sar BalletX Martha Graham Dance Company

Brian Brooks Trisha Brown & Jodi Melnick Jill Johnson Matthew Neenan Doug Varone Christopher Wheeldon

Live Music by: Brooklyn Rider Cristina Pato

PICTURED ABOVE: FANG-YI SHEU & CRAIG HALL


PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY VAIL VALLEY FOUNDATION’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

AUG

7

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7 :: 7:30PM

dance for $20.12 Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail

Every seat in the house is $20.12 for this unique performance featuring a variety of Festival artists. APPEARANCES BY: •

New York City Ballet stars Teresa Reichlen & Robert Fairchild

Martha Graham Dance Company

BalletX

BALLETX FEATURING CHLOE FELESINA & JESSE SANI.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEXANDER IZILIAEV, PHOTO ON OPPOSITE PAGE COURTESY OF ERIN BAIANO.

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PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY FRIENDS OF BETTY FORD & PRISCILLA BREWSTER.

AUG

9

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9 :: 7:30PM

martha graham dance company Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail

“One of the seven wonders of the artistic universe.” – Washington Post The Martha Graham Dance Company has been a leader in the development of contemporary dance since its founding in 1926. Informed by the expansive vision of pioneering choreographer Martha Graham, the Company brings to life a timeless and uniquely American style of dance that has influenced generations of artists and continues to captivate audiences.

APPALACHIAN SPRING Music by Aaron Copland Choreography by Martha Graham

EMBATTLED GARDEN Music by Carlos Surinach Choreography by Martha Graham

CHRONICLE Music by Wallingford Riegger Choreography by Martha Graham

PICTURED ABOVE: CARRIE ELLMORE-TALLITSCH IN CIRCE.


PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY MARLENE & JOHN BOLL.

AUG

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10 :: 7:30PM

ballroom spectacular

10

Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail

A made-for-Vail showcase with ballroom champions from around the world. FEATURING: Liana Churilova & Emmanuel Pierre-Antoine Latin Dance Champions Iveta Lukosiute & Gherman Mustuc World Ten Dance Champions Mikhail Zharinov & Galina Detkina American Smooth Champions Delyan Terziev & Boriana Deltcheva World Cup Professional Latin Champions Anna Trebunskaya & Jonathan Roberts As seen on Dancing with the Stars

LIANA CHURILOVA & EMMANUEL PIERRE-ANTOINE.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIN BAIANO, PHOTO ON OPPOSITE PAGE COURTESY OF JOHN DEANE.

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PERFORMANCE UNDERWRITTEN BY THE MARY WOLF FAMILY.

AUG

11

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11 7:30PM

dance tv

Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail Back by popular demand, Dance TV is a commercial-free program featuring live performances by stars from the hit dance shows America’s Best Dance Crew, So You Think You Can Dance, Dancing With the Stars, and Live from Lincoln Center. Hosted by Vail TV personalities Tricia Swenson and Eric Williams!

FEATURING: Allison, tWitch and Alex as seen on So You Think You Can Dance Anna Trebunskaya and Jonathan Roberts as seen on Dancing With the Stars Poreotics (Season 5 winners) and Funkdation as seen on America’s Best Dance Crew Tiler Peck and Robert Fairchild, as seen on Live from Lincoln Center

MAIN PHOTO: tWitch FROM SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE, BELOW FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: ANNA TREBUNSKAYA & JONATHAN ROBERTS, FUNKDATION, ALLISON HOLKER, TILER PECK & ROBERT FAIRCHILD.

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SELECT PHOTOS COURTESY OF ERIN BAIANO.


EVENTS

7

FREE COMMUNITY EVENTS

8150 URBAN DANCE CHALLENCE

Bud Light Hot Summer Nights of Dance TUES. JULY 24 | 6:30PM GERALD R. FORD AMPHITHEATER, VAIL See Colorado’s top hip hop crews & b-boys battle live on stage for cash prizes & 8150 bragging rights.

NATIONAL DANCE DAY

Vail’s Family Saturday Afternoon Club SAT. JULY 28 | 3-6PM ARRABELLE AT VAIL SQUARE, LIONSHEAD Attention all dancers! No previous experience required. Learn and perform a group dance routine to be taped and submitted to FOX’s So You Think You Can Dance.

VILLAGE VIGNETTES SUN. JULY 29 | 11AM Line Dancing with Lindy Roy Vail Farmers’ Market SUN. AUGUST 5 | 11AM Celebrate the Beat w/ special guest Ron Myles Solaris Plaza, Vail Village

WED. AUGUST 8 Modern Dance Master Class with Martha Graham Dance Company Location TBD

MASTER CLASSES

SUN. AUGUST 12 Master Classes with So You Think You Can Dance stars tWitch, Allison Holker and Alex Wong Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater Stage

(All classes $20) DANCING IN THE STREETS

Free interactive dancing events WED. JULY 25 | 5:30PM Hip Hop with BreakEFX Arrabelle at Vail Square, Lionshead THURS. JULY 26 | 5:30PM Public Ballet Barre Class with Lindy Roy & Vail Valley Dance Intensive Solaris Plaza, Vail Village WED. AUGUST 1 | 5:30PM Line Dancing with Lindy Roy & Chad Schiro Arrabelle at Vail Square, Lionshead WED. AUGUST 8 | 5:30PM Martha Graham Dance Company Arrabelle at Vail Square, Lionshead

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 8150 URBAN DANCE CHALLENGE, 2011 DANCING IN THE STREETS, MASTER CLASSES.

WED. JULY 25 Urban Street Dancing with BreakEFX Vail Mountain School SAT. JULY 28 Ballet Master Class with New York City Ballet MOVES Vail Mountain School WED. AUGUST 1 Ballet Master Class with New York City Ballet Principal Dancer Daniel Ulbricht SUN. AUGUST 5 Tango Master Class with Gabriel Missé Sonnenalp Resort of Vail Master Classes supported by Friends of the Dance

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ERIN BAIANO AND ZACH MAHONE.

For complete details, visit vaildance.org

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FESTIVAL

artists

NEW YORK CITY BALLET MOVES MEGAN FAIRCHILD

Principal Trained at the Ballet West Conservatory in Salt Lake City, UT. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2000 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2001. Promoted to Soloist in 2004 and Principal in 2005. ROBERT FAIRCHILD

Principal Trained at the Ballet West Conservatory in Salt Lake City, UT. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2003 and joined New York City Ballet in 2005. Promoted to Soloist in 2007 and Principal in 2009. STERLING HYLTIN

Principal Trained at the Dallas Metropolitan Ballet in Dallas, TX. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2000 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2002. Promoted to Soloist in 2006 and Principal in 2007. TILER PECK

Principal Trained at the Westside School of Ballet in Santa Monica, CA. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2003 and joined New York City Ballet in 2005. Promoted to Soloist in 2006 and Principal in 2009.

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“Dancers are the athletes of God.” – Albert Einstein

AMAR RAMASAR

Principal Trained at the School of American Ballet from 1993 to 2000. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2000, and was promoted to Soloist in 2006 and Principal in 2009. TERESA REICHLEN

Principal Trained at the Russell School of Ballet in Chantilly, VA. Entered the School of American Ballet in 1999 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2000. Promoted to Soloist in 2005 and Principal in 2009.

CHASE FINLAY

Soloist Trained at Ballet Academy East in New York, NY. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2007 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2008. Promoted to Soloist in 2011. SAVANNAH LOWERY

Soloist Trained at the International Dance Academy in Seminole, FL and Judith Lee Johnson’s Studio of Dance in St. Petersburg, FL. Entered the School of American Ballet in 1999 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2002. Promoted to Soloist in 2007.

ANDREW VEYETTE

Principal Trained at Dance Arts in Visalia, CA and Westside School of Ballet in Santa Monica, CA. Entered the School of American Ballet in 1998 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2000. Promoted to Soloist in 2006 and Principal in 2007. ADRIAN DANCHIGWARING

Soloist Trained at Dance Theatre Seven in Fairfax, CA. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2001 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2002. Promoted to Soloist in 2009.

SEAN SUOZZI

Soloist Trained at the Nutmeg Ballet in Torrington, CT. Entered the School of American Ballet in 1997 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 1999. Promoted to Soloist in 2007. EMILIE GERRITY

Corps Trained at Betty Jean’s Dance Studio in Wappingers Falls, NY and the New Paltz School of Ballet in New Paltz, NY. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2006. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2009 and joined the company as a member of the corps in 2010.


FESTIVAL

JUSTIN PECK

Corps Trained at the California Ballet in San Diego, California. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2003. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2006, and joined the company as a member of the corps in 2007. BRITTANY POLLACK

Corps Entered the School of American Ballet in 2002. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2006, and joined the company as a member of the corps in 2007. GRETCHEN SMITH

Corps Trained at Evansville Dance Theatre in Evansville, IN. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2003. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2005, and joined the company as a member of the corps in 2006. TAYLOR STANLEY

Corps Trained at the Rock School in Philadelphia, PA. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2008. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2009, and joined the company as a member of the corps in 2010. CHRISTIAN TWORZYANSKI

Corps Trained at the Calvert-Brodie School of Dance in Columbia, SC. Entered the School of American Ballet in 2000. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2002, and joined the company as a member of the corps in 2003.

LYDIA WELLINGTON

Corps Trained at the School of American Ballet from 1997 to 2008. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2008 and joined the company as a member of the corps later that year. All New York City Ballet MOVES photos courtesy of Paul Kolnik. INTERNATIONAL EVENINGS TYLER ANGLE

New York City Ballet Trained with Allegheny Ballet Company in Altoona, PA and the School of American Ballet. Joined New York City Ballet as an apprentice in 2003. Promoted to Soloist in 2007 and Principal in 2009. ANALIA CENTURIÓN

Professional Argentine Tango dancer since 1995. Directed the Fusion Tango company, 2002-2006. Past cast member of Juan Carlos Copes and Company, Mora Godoy, La Ventana, Casa de Cena and Piazzolla Tango.

artists

IL, and the Chicago Academy of the Arts and Ruth Page Dance Foundation in Chicago, IL. Entered the School of American Ballet in 1997 and became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 1999. Promoted to Soloist in 2007. CARLA KÖRBES

Pacific Northwest Ballet Trained at Ballet Vera Bublitz in Porto Alegre, Brazil, and the School of American Ballet. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 1999. Promoted to Soloist in 2005 and joined Seattle’s Pacific Northwest Ballet as a Soloist later that year. Promoted to Principal in 2006. MISA KURANAGA

Boston Ballet Trained at the Jinushi Kaoru Ballet School in Osaka, Japan and the School of American Ballet. Former member of San Francisco Ballet. Joined Boston Ballet in 2003, promoted to Second Soloist in 2005, Soloist in 2007 and Principal in 2009. LAUREN LOVETTE

HERMAN CORNEJO

American Ballet Theatre Trained at Instituto Superior de Arte at Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the School of American Ballet. Promoted to Principal with Julio Bocca’s company Ballet Argentino in 1999. Joined American Ballet Theatre in 1999, and promoted to Soloist in 2000 and Principal in 2003. Cornejo is also a Principal Dancer with Corella Ballet Castilla y León in Segovia, Spain. CRAIG HALL

New York City Ballet Trained at Stairway of the Stars in Maywood,

New York City Ballet Trained at the Cary Ballet Conservatory in Cary, NC and the School of American Ballet. Became an apprentice with New York City Ballet in 2009 and joined the company as a member of the corps in 2010. GABRIEL MISSÉ

Trained with Antoino Todaro and Pepita Avellaneda in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Missé was featured in the Gianni Versace publicity campaign “Tango” and participated in the world-wide tours of Una Noche de Tango, with Miguel Angel Zotto’s company Tango x 2.

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FESTIVAL

artists RON MYLES

New Styles Krew Ron “Prime Tyme” Myles was born in Memphis, TN. He is one of the country’s top street dancers, specializing in Jookin, a Memphis-based freestyle dance. Myles recently appeared in the film Footloose. MATTHEW RUSHING

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Trained at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts in Los Angeles, CA and The Ailey School in New York, NY. Joined Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1992. FANG-YI SHEU

Fang-Yi Sheu & Artists Trained at the Taipei National University of the Arts in Taiwan. Joined the Martha Graham Dance Company in 1995. Promoted to Principal in 1998. Founder, FangYi Sheu & Artists. LINDA CELESTE SIMS

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Trained at Ballet Hispanico in New York, NY. Joined Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1996. Recipient of an award by the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts, highlighted in the “Best of 2009” list in Dance Magazine and past guest star on FOX’s So You Think You Can Dance, ABC’s Dancing with the Stars, and NBC’s Today Show. CORY STEARNS

American Ballet Theatre Trained at Seiskaya Ballet in St. James, NY and the Royal Ballet School in London. Joined American

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Ballet Theatre’s Studio Company in 2004 and became an apprentice in 2005. Promoted to Soloist in 2009 and Principal in 2011. BEATRIZ STIX-BRUNELL

The Royal Ballet Trained at the School of American Ballet and the Paris Opera Ballet School. Performed with Morphoses/The Wheeldon Company before joining the Royal Ballet in 2010. DANIEL ULBRICHT

New York City Ballet Trained at the Judith Lee Johnson Studio of Dance and Les Jeunes Danseurs in St. Petersburg, FL. Entered the School of American Ballet in 1999 and became an apprentice with the New York City Ballet in 2001. Promoted to Soloist in 2005 and Principal in 2007. ERIC UNDERWOOD

The Royal Ballet Trained with Barbara Marks in Washington, D.C. and at the School of American Ballet. Joined Dance Theatre of Harlem in 2000, promoted to Soloist in 2001. Joined American Ballet Theatre in 2003, and three years later joined The Royal Ballet, where he is now a Soloist. WENDY WHELAN

New York City Ballet Trained with Virginia Wooton and at the Louisville Ballet Academy in Louisville, KY. Entered the School of American Ballet in 1982 and joined New York City Ballet in 1986. Promoted to Soloist 1989 and to Principal in 1991.

NOW BRIAN BROOKS

Mr. Brooks was a co-founder and managing director of the Williamsburg Art neXus from 1999-2004. He has been a Teaching Artist of Dance at the Lincoln Center Institute since 1999 and is currently the Chapter Leader of the TA Union represented by the United Federation of Teachers. TRISHA BROWN

Hailed as ”the most widely acclaimed choreographer to emerge from the post-modern era,” Ms. Brown was the first woman choreographer to receive the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, in 1991. Recipient of five fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and two John Simon Guggenheim Fellowships. Named Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et Lettres by the government of France and promoted to level of Commandeur in 2004. Recipient of numerous honorary doctorates and an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. JILL JOHNSON

Dancer, choreographer, educator and producer. Has appeared in more than fifty tours and taught master classes at dance companies and universities on five continents. Graduate of the National Ballet School in Toronto, ON and past Soloist with The National Ballet of Canada. Performed as a Principal Dancer with William Forsythe’s Frankfurt Ballet for ten years and staged Forsythe’s works for major companies worldwide. Appointed Dance Director at Harvard University in 2011.


FESTIVAL

JODI MELNICK

New York City-based choreographer, dancer and teacher. Recipient of the Jerome Robbins New Essential Works Grant, The Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grant, and the Guggenheim Fellowship. Recipient of two New York Dance and Performance “Bessie” Awards for sustained achievement in dance. MATTHEW NEENAN

Trained at the Boston Ballet School, LaGuardia High School of Performing Arts and the School of American Ballet. His works have been featured and performed by the Pennsylvania Ballet, The Washington Ballet, Colorado Ballet, Ballet Memphis, Milwaukee Ballet, Juilliard Dance, New York City Ballet’s Choreographic Institute, among many others. Mr. Neenan serves on the Dance USA / Philadelphia Advisory board the Board of Trustees for National Dance USA. DOUG VARONE

Mr. Varone works in dance, theater, opera, film, television and fashion. His New York City-based Doug Varone and Dancers has been commissioned and presented to critical acclaim by leading international venues for more than two decades. SOKVANNARA SAR

Trained at the Wat Bo School in his native Siem Reap, Cambodia, and entered the School of American Ballet in 2000. Joined Pacific Northwest Ballet in Seattle in 2007. Mr. Sar has performed with The Suzanne Farrell Ballet and joined Carolina Ballet as a soloist in 2011.

artists

ANITRA KEEGAN

BALLETX WILLIAM W. CANNON

Trained at BalletMet Dance Academy. Previously danced with BalletMet, Hubbard Street 2, and Complexions Contemporary Ballet. BalletX member since 2011. COLBY DAMON

Trained at Richmond Ballet, Virginia School of the Arts, Boston Ballet. Previously danced with Sacramento Ballet, Metropolitan Opera Ballet, Mark Morris Dance Group, Thang Dao Dance Company. BalletX member since 2008. CHLOE FELESINA

Trained at Deane Dance Center and The San Francisco Conservatory of Dance. Previously danced with The Foundry, Sacramento Ballet. BalletX member since 2010.

Trained at Academy of Dance Arts, Royal Academy of Dance, Pennsylvania Ballet School. Previously danced with Pennsylvania Ballet, Ohio Ballet, American Repertory Ballet, DancesPatrelle, Chamber Dance Project, BalletNY. BalletX member since 2009. WILLY LAURY

Former Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater soloist. Trained at Matthew Corzine Studio. Artist in residence: Francesca Harper Project. Film: Ever After and shorts on OWN. Theater: Still Rockin’, Give Me Up. BalletX member since 2012. JAIME LENNON

Trained at The Dance Center, The School of American Ballet. Former principal dancer with The Brandywine Ballet. BalletX member since 2010.

ADAM HUNDT

Trained at San Francisco Ballet, BalletMet, Indiana University. Previously danced with BalletMet, Ballet Pacifica, American Repertory Ballet, Hubbard Street 2. Royal Caribbean International director and choreographer. BalletX member since 2011. TARA KEATING

Trained at Pioneer Valley Ballet, Juilliard School. Previously danced with American Repertory Ballet, “THARP!,” Pennsylvania Ballet (soloist). Founding member/Artistic Coordinator/Dancer with BalletX since 2005.

JESSE SANI

Trained at Lehigh Valley Charter School for Performing Arts, New World School of the Arts, The Ailey School, Jacobs Pillow. Previously danced with Momentum Dance Company, PHILADANCO. BalletX member since 2011. ALLISON WALSH

Trained at Maryland Youth Ballet, School of American Ballet. Previously danced with Joffrey Ballet Chicago (seven years), Washington Ballet Studio Company. BalletX member since 2011.

VAIL DANCE

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FESTIVAL

artists

BALLROOM SPECTACULAR ANNA TREBUNSKAYA & JONATHAN

World Professional American Smooth Showdance Champions. Galina and Mikhail have also been featured on PBS’ America’s Ballroom Challenge.

ROBERTS

Anna and husband Jonathan competed in professional ballroom dancing competitions from 2001-2006, when they were ranked 6th in the U.S. and 24th in the world. As a pair, they are two-time undefeated USA Pro-Am 10 dance champions, three-time undefeated USA Pro-Am Latin champions and two-time USA Pro-Am American Ballroom champions. Anna has been featured on ABC’s Dancing with the Stars, finishing second in two separate seasons. LIANA CHURILOVA & EMMANUEL PIERRE-ANTOINE

Won first place at the prestigious La Classique de Quebec in Canada, the Florida Superstars DanceSport Championships, the Philadelphia Dance Festival and several Arthur Murray Dance-O-Rama competitions in Las Vegas, New Orleans and Miami. In 1999, Emmanuel was honored as Haiti’s dance representative to the International Dance Organization. His success has also garnered him appearances on PBS’ America’s Ballroom Challenge and ABC’s Dancing with The Stars. GALINA (DETKINA) ZHARINOV & MIKHAIL ZHARINOV

Began dancing together in 2007 and have emerged as a fast-rising couple in the American Smooth style. They are undefeated Fred Astaire National Professional American Smooth Champions, United States Professional American Smooth Finalists and

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VAIL DANCE

BORIANA DELTCHEVA & DELYAN TERZIEV

USA National Latin Show Dance Champions, winners of more than 40 Professional Latin competitions around the world (USA, Holland, Mexico, Japan, Singapore) and well-known as one of the most glamorous and charismatic couples on the competitive dance floor. Guest performers on ABC’s Dancing with the Stars, and PBS’ Americas Ballroom Challenge. IVETA LUKOSIUTE & GHERMAN MUSTUC

Iveta Lukosiute is one of the top professional 10-Dancers in the world. Together Ms. Lukosiute and Mr. Mustuc are the reigning United States Professional 10-Dance champions, in both Latin and Standard-style dancing, and are also the Professional 10-Dance champions of North America and the United Kingdom. In 2011, Ms. Lukosiute was a featured performer on FOX’s So You Think You Can Dance. DANCE TV STEPHEN “tWitch” BOSS

Finalist on CBS’s Star Search and MTV’s Wade Robson Project, and runner-up on Season 4 of FOX’s So You Think You Can Dance. Mr. Boss has choreographed worldwide, as well as for Se7en and the Cheetah girls. He also performs with Breed OCLA, Chill Factor, and Crew dancing troupes.

FUNKDATION

Funkdation Crew from Monterrey, Mexico competed in Season 7 of MTV’s America’s Best Dance Crew. Fusing elements of their Mexican heritage with hip hop technique, the crew consists of 8 members with a variety of styles. ALLISON HOLKER

Has made appearances on two seasons of FOX’s So You Think You Can Dance and is credited with a wide variety of work in film, television and concert tours. Currently she is a backup-dancer on FOX’s The X Factor USA. POREOTICS

Poreotics, crowned as MTVs America’s Best Dance Crew Season 5 winners, continue to captivate audiences across the globe with their unique fusion of robotics and choreography. With their unrivaled blend of dance styles, Poreotics has created fiercely entertaining and unparalleled performances. ALEX WONG

Danced with American Ballet Theatre in 2005 before joining Miami City Ballet, where he was promoted to Soloist in 2007. A favorite contestant on Season 7 of FOX’s So You Think You Can Dance, Mr. Wong has also appeared on NBC’s new TV series Smash, The Ellen Show, and The Voice, and was asked to re-join So You Think You Can Dance as an All-Star. MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY

PRINCIPALS TADEJ BRDNIK

Trained in Slovenia and moved to New York City in 1993. Principal with the Company since 1996.


FESTIVAL

KATHERINE CROCKETT

FANNY GOMBERT

Trained at Ballet Metropolitan in Columbus, OH. Joined the Company in 1993. Promoted to Soloist in 1994 and Principal in 1996.

NEFERTITI THOMAS

APPRENTICES ABDIEL JACOBSEN

MAURIZIO NARDI

Born in Florence, Italy. Trained with Beppe Menegatti and Carla Fracci. Joined the Company in 2002. MIKI ORIHARA

Joined the Company in 1987. Ms. Orihara was recently honored with a “Bessie” Award for her contributions to dance. BLAKELEY WHITE-MCGUIRE

Completed Martha Graham Center’s Professional Trainee program in 1996. Principal with the Company since 2002. SOLOISTS MARIYA DASHKINA MADDUX

Born in Kiev, Ukraine. Trained at Thomas Armour Youth Ballet in Miami, FL and attended New World School of the Arts. Joined the Company in 2007. LLOYD KNIGHT

Trained at the Miami Conservatory of Ballet in Miami, FL. Joined the Company in 2005. Promoted to Soloist in 2009. BEN SCHULTZ

(Soloist) Trained at Indiana University in Bloomington, IN. Joined the Company in 2009. DANCERS PEIJU CHIEN-POTT ANDREA MURILLO XIAOCHUAN XIE

NEW DANCERS NATASHA DIAMOND-WALKER IRIS FLORENTINY

YING XIN

MUSICIANS BROOKLYN RIDER

The adventurous, genre-defying string quartet Brooklyn Rider combines a wildly eclectic repertoire with a gripping performance style that is attracting legions of fans and drawing critical acclaim from classical, world and rock critics. The musicians play in venues as varied as Joe’s Pub and Alice Tully Hall in New York City, Todai-ji Temple in Japan, the Library of Congress, San Francisco Jazz and the South By Southwest Festival. ARTURO DELMONI

Violin For three months of the year, Mr. Delmoni holds the distinguished position of concertmaster of the New York City Ballet. Mr. Delmoni made his debut at Carnegie Hall at age 14 and has appeared as a soloist with major orchestras throughout the United States and Europe, the Middle East, Japan and Hong Kong. CAMERON GRANT

Piano Mr. Grant joined the New York City Ballet orchestra in 1984, became a Solo pianist two years later, and was appointed Principal pianist of the NYCB orchestra in 1998. Mr. Grant was also the pianist of the Leonardo Trio for fifteen years, as well as a member of the prize-winning Grant-Winn duo-piano team.

artists

NANCY MCDILL

Piano Ms. McDill began studying piano at an early age and later attended The Juilliard School, where she received a master’s degree. Soon after graduation, she joined the School of American Ballet, New York City Ballet’s official school, as an accompanist and in 1994 joined New York City Ballet as a Solo pianist. CRISTINA PATO

Galician bagpipe Internationally acclaimed as a gaita (Galician bagpipe) master and a classical pianist, Ms. Pato enjoys an active professional career devoted to both Galician popular and classical music. She has collaborated with world music, jazz, classical and experimental artists (including the Chicago Symphony, Yo-Yo Ma, The Chieftains and the Royal Pipe Band) and has given more than 500 concerts with her own band. Ms. Pato is a member of Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble. FESTIVAL DIRECTOR

Damian Woetzel, former Principal Dancer with New York City Ballet, is the artistic director of the Vail International Dance Festival. Woetzel also serves as the founding Director of the Jerome Robbins Foundation’s New Essential Works (NEW) Program, the Director of the Aspen Institute’s Arts Policy Program, and he works with Yo-Yo Ma and his Silk Road Connect Program in the New York City Public Schools. In November of 2009, President Obama appointed Woetzel to the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

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U N D ERW RIT E RS & DO N O R S

UNDERWRITERS’ CIRCLE ANONYMOUS MARLENE & JOHN BOLL Sustaining donors to the Vail International Dance Festival since its inception, Marlene and John, VVF Cornerstone Friends, are generously underwriting International Evenings II on August 6th. They are founding members of the Vilar Performing Arts Center, where John served as its first chairman, and Marlene currently serves on the VVF Board of Directors and VVF Development Committee. PRISCILLA BREWSTER DOROTHY BROWNING & CARL B. COLBY Doe and Carl are members of the Friends of Vail Program and they support many other charities in the Vail Valley. Doe is co-chair of the VVF Social Committee and has been instrumental in the recent success of the VVF’s signature fundraising events Black Diamond Ball and Hold ‘Em For Hope. Doe and Carl are pleased to underwrite International Evenings of Dance for the 2012 Vail International Dance Festival. LUCY & STEVEN COOKSON PAM & ERNIE ELSNER MARJORIE & PHIL ODEEN Marge and Phil have had a home in Vail for nearly 40 years. When not in Vail they live in McLean, Virginia and North Palm Beach, Florida. They have supported the Dance Festival for several years and both have been active in numerous cultural and charitable activities in northern Virginia. JILL & KEVIN PLANCHER BETSY & GEORGE WIEGERS Long-time supporters of the arts in New York City and Denver, the Wiegers are also extraordinarily generous in

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the Vail Valley and contribute to many charities in our mountain community. The Vail International Dance Festival, as well as the Bravo! Vail Valley Music Festival, have both benefited greatly from George and Betsy’s philanthropy, and Betsy serves on the VVF Board of Directors, and VIDF Committee. MARY WOLF FAMILY In the summer of 1993, I was seated behind President and Mrs. Ford at a dance performance. During the intermission President Ford graciously inquired about my pregnancy and introduced himself to Melissa. The rest is history. We have joyously supported the festival ever since. (Reflects gifts received August 15, 2011 through June 1, 2012)

2012 VIDF DONORS VAIL VALLEY FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Andy Arnold Judy Berkowitz Marlene Boll Bjorn Erik Borgen Steve Coyer Jack Crosby Andrew Daly Ron Davis Frederick Eck Bill Esrey Tim Finchem Harry Frampton Pete Frechette Stephen Friedman John Garnsey Margie Gart Robert Gary George Gillett Donna Giordano Sheika Gramshammer Martha Head Michael Herman Robert Hernreich Al Hubbard William Hybl Yvonne Jacobs Chris Jarnot Rob Katz Kent Logan

Peter May Michael Noell Brian Nolan Michael Price Donald Remey Eric Resnick Douglas Rippeto Richard Rothkopf Ken Schanzer Michael Shannon Stanley Shuman Rodney Slifer Ann Smead Oscar Tang Stewart Turley Steve Virostek Betsy Wiegers DIRECTORS EMERITUS Adam Aron James Berry Craddock Pepi Gramshammer Steve Haber Elaine Kelton PRESENTERS’ CIRCLE Judy & Howard Berkowitz Susan & Jeffrey Campbell Oscar Tang Family UNDERWRITERS’ CIRCLE Anonymous Marlene & John Boll Priscilla Brewster Dorothy Browning & Carl B. Colby Lucy & Steven Cookson Pam & Ernie Elsner Friends of Betty Ford National Endowment for the Arts Marjorie & Phil Odeen Jill & Kevin Plancher Betsy & George Wiegers DIAMOND DRESS CIRCLE Kathy & Bjorn Erik Borgen* Bobbi & Christopher Brody Susan & Harry Frampton* Pat & Pete Frechette* Friends of Beatriz Graciela & Carlos Hank* Martha Head & John A. Feagin, M.D.* Elana Amsterdam & Rob Katz* Nancy & Richard Lubin Leni & Peter May* Jean & Tom McDonnell Vikki & Michael Price* The Jerome Robbins Foundation, Inc.

Mary Sue & Michael Shannon* Marcy & Gerald Spector* Oscar Tang* Mary Wolf Family *Denotes Cornerstone Diamond Dress Circle Members

PLATINUM CIRCLE Deborah & Charles Adelman Sheika & Pepi Gramshammer Wendy Williams & Noel Kullavanijaya Honey Kurtz Karen & Walter Loewenstern Rella & Monroe Rifkin Susan & Jeffrey Stern Linda & Stephen Waterhouse LaDonna & Gary Wicklund GOLD DRESS CIRCLE Peter Cooper & Norm Blachford Warren & Wendy Blumenthal Gleneen & Joseph Brienza Clara Willoughby Cargile Arlene Harris & Martin Cooper Arlene C. Cooper Linda & Berry Craddock Karen A. Nold & Robert J. Croteau Debra & Leonard Herz Ronne & Donald Hess Bonnie Lee & Lawrence Kivel Judy & Alan Kosloff Tracy Lenehan Ferrell & William McClean Helen McIntyre Jane & Skip Netzorg Deborah Nunez Sarah Petersen Andrea & Andrew Potash Nancy & Donald Remey Phoebe Smedley Marla Steele Brenton Ver Ploeg Joan Whittenberg Ellen & James Wiss Luanne & James Wright SILVER DRESS CIRCLE Anonymous Reid Balthaser & Martin Atkin Becky & Howard Braverman Renee & Jeffrey Epstein Micki & Larry Fletcher Miriam & Morris Futernick Vicky & John Garnsey Margery Goldman Linda & Richard Greene Susan & Murray Haber Kathy & William Hybl


UND E RWRITE RS & DO NO R S

Elaine & Arthur Kelton Gretchen & Charles Lobitz Marjorie Marks Roberta & Ernest Scheller Carol & Stanley Shapiro Marjorie Vickers Sandra & Herbert Wittow Barbara & Jack Woodhull VAIL VALLEY MEMBER Anonymous (2) Karin & Ron Artinian Jayne & Paul Becker Pamela & Brooks Bock Margaret & Clayton Chessman Maureen & David Cross Arlene & John Dayton Reggie DelPonte Holly & Buck Elliott Celeste & Peter Fenichel Friends of the Dance Kitty George Holly & Ben Gill Stephanie & John Hanson Sanford Hertz Margot & Stephen Holland Jill & Loyal Huddleston Susan & Steven Lipstein Lisa & William Maury Virginia & Timothy Millhiser Sandra & Fred Pack Ronnie & William Potter Barbara Rothenberg Carole Schragen Sydney & Stanley Shuman Catherine & Mark Slavonia Rae & David Smerling Nancy & C. John Snyder Mark Taylor Kathy & Tom Tyree Lois & John Van Deusen Joyce & Bernard West Margaret & Glen Wood COMMUNITY MEMBER Catherine & Truman Anderson Brenda & Gary Bailey Margo & Roger Behler Virginia & C. Sean Day Carol Ebert & Jim Ferrell Abbey & Alyne Kaplan Lynn & Andrew Kaufman Christina & Josh Lautenberg Sherry & Joe Mackinnon Victoria & Roger Marce Elizabeth & Luc Meyer Dominic Meylor Pat Peeples & Tony Vangalis Debra Rappaport Ann & Ronald Riley Joe Stearns Pat & Larry Stewart

Patricia & Edward Wahtera Tina & David Wilson Alyn Park & Jay Wissot Rosalie Wooten

Art & Stevie Strasburger Jeannie Suk Carol & Albert Tucker Hanna Warren Bryan Watabe

SUPPORTING MEMBER Anonymous Rochelle & Arthur Adler Paulette Ash Beth Barbre Wendy Boutin Diana Bradley Barbara & B.A. Bridgewater Joan & Donald Chambers Sherry & Doug Conner Louise & Heywood Davis Susan Dean Nancy & Craig Denton Jacqueline Deveric Kathleen & Brian Doyle Carolyn & Don Etter Phyllis & Joseph Fabrizio Donna & James Fisher Ingegerd Franberg Jim Francis Nancy & Gary Freedman Patricia Frese Eileen Friars & Scott Pyle Vicky Garza Carol & Ronald Goldman Ellie & Alvin Goldman Suzanne Greene Sue Harvison Betsy Hoke A. Jackson Holt Anna & Ron Huxley Myra Isenhart Shelly & Chris Jarnot Susan Jones Irit & Lawrence Karsh, M.D. Meredith & Jeff Kennedy Susan & Tony Krausen Ivy & Frederick Kushner Dorothy Lee Helena & Peter Leslie Dr. & Mrs. Warren Lieberman Ann & William Lieff Elspeth MacHattie Ellen & Stephen Manshel Maeva Marcus Debra Whitman McGrath Nancy & Michael McKeever Gedra Mereckis Leslie & Charles Mishner Suzette & Michael Newman Judy & Denny O’Brien Dana Peterson Jackie Pyka Suzie & Frank Robinson Pam Roehl Sue & Mike Rushmore Madeline & Leslie Stern Judith & Robert Stiber

CONTRIBUTING MEMBER Anonymous (3) Dorelle Ackermann Jane Allaman Grace Alessi Norma Almeida Anita Altman Michael Armstrong Carol Atha Nicole & Matt Balazs Diane & Richard Bardack Kathryn Benysh Jeff Booths Martha Brassel Mary Clare & George Broadbent Marcia Campbell Sally & Kevin Clair Elizabeth Coleman Patty Lou Daugherty Christin Crampton Day, Center Stage LLC Alejandra C. de Milmo Debra Devereaux Sherry & Kenneth Fardie Howard Finkelstein Don Freedman Michelle & Robin Gersten Susan & Ron Gruber Jan Harkins Kathleen Johnson Meggen Kirkham Maureen Lehman Carolyne & Barry Manley Linda McKinney Laurie Mooney Rosie Moreno Gloria & Arthur Rosener William Silvers MD Marco Slim Diane & Loren Smith Lucile Trueblood Martha Waterhouse Barbara & Stanley Weinstein Sheila Whitman Linda & Dean Wolz Gail Zucker VAIL INTERNATIONAL DANCE FESTIVAL COMMITTEE Judy Berkowitz - Chairman Kathryn Benysh Priscilla Brewster Allie Coppeak Jack Crosby

Donna Giordano Lisa Goldman Sheika Gramshammer Jonathan Haerter Thomas Jenkins Pat Peeples Senenne Philippon Stacey Sapp Oscar Tang Linda Waterhouse Joan Whittenberg Betsy Wiegers 2011-2012 VAIL VALLEY FOUNDATION DONORS

Millennium Club The Millennium Club recognizes the exclusive few listed below who, over their lifetimes, have made gifts to the Foundation of $1,000,000 or more. We sincerely thank these members for their lifetime of philanthropic commitments. Anonymous Beaver Creek Metro District Beaver Creek Resort Company Judy & Howard Berkowitz Marlene & John Boll Kathy & Bjorn Erik Borgen Ann Smead & Michael Byram Martha Head & John A. Feagin, M.D. Susan & Harry Frampton Pat & Peter Frechette The Gillett Family The Giordano Family Leni & Peter May Oscar Tang Town of Vail Vail Resorts, Inc Alberto Vilar The lists below reflect gifts received August 15, 2011 through June 1, 2012 LEADERSHIP GIVING CIRCLES

Cornerstone Friends Marlene & John Boll Susan & Harry Frampton Pat & Peter Frechette Graciela & Carlos Hank Martha Head & John A. Feagin, M.D. Elana Amsterdam & Rob Katz Leni & Peter May Vikki & Michael Price

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U NDERW RIT E RS & D O N O R S

Mary Sue & Michael Shannon Marcy & Gerald Spector Oscar Tang

Friends of Vail Anonymous Judy Hart & John M. Angelo Judy & Howard Berkowitz Kathy & Bjorn Erik Borgen Dorothy Browning & Carl B. Colby Patsy & Pedro Cerisola Lucy & Ron Davis Barbara & Thomas Dooley Julie & Bill Esrey LeeAnn & Jeffrey Ettinger Stephanie & Larry Flinn Donna Giordano Georgia & Donald Gogel Lyn Goldstein Nancy & Neal Groff Jeanne & Jim Gustafson George Handtmann Karen & Michael Herman Robert Hernreich Heather & Glenn Hilliard Kathy & Al Hubbard Mr. & Mrs. H. Anthony Ittleson Thomas Jenkins Cynnie & Peter Kellogg Patty & William Kleh Vicki & Kent Logan Patricia & Frank Lynch Shirley & Bill McIntyre Vicki & Trygve Myhren Terri & Michael Noell Jullie & Gary Peterson Molly & Jay Precourt Mary & Steven Read Sara & Eric Resnick Vicki & Douglas Rippeto Helen & Vincent Sheehy Sydney & Stanley Shuman Lisa & Rupinder Sidhu Ann Smead & Michael Byram Eleanor & L.W. Stolzer Susan & Steven Suggs Patrick Tierney Deborah & Fred Tresca Debra & Ken Tuchman Linda & Stewart Turley Sandra & Gregory Walton

Eagle Program Barbara Allen Devon & Peter Briger Lisa & Ronald Brill Kelly & Samuel Bronfman Margie & Tom Gart Lisa & Bruce Goldman Georgia & Robert Hatcher Vera & John Hathaway Susu & George Johnson Ruth & Sidney Lapidus

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Tara & Robert Levine Nicole & Steve Lucido Abbie & Wales Madden Michele & David Mittelman Amy & Jay Regan Helen & Charles Schwab Lynn & Chuck Steinmetz Joel Tucker Laura Tumperi

Future Founders’ Club: Medallion Level Molly & Rob Cohen Sarah & Peter Millett Dr. & Mrs. Marc J. Philippon Dr. William Sterett Marjorie Swig Joanne & Steve Virostek VALLEY VISIONARY CIRCLE The Valley Visionary Circle recognizes those listed below who have kindly informed the Vail Valley Foundation that they have included the organization in their estate plans. Anonymous P. Richard Bauer Margo & Roger Behler Ann Smead & Michael Byram Holly & Tim Finchem Ceil & Steve Folz Susan & Harry Frampton Kristen & Bob Gary Jean C. Graham Anne & Donald Graubart Neal Groff Family Jeanne & Jim Gustafson Robert Hernreich Lee & Bob Hirsch Marlene & Ben Krell Vicki & Kent Logan Dora Beatty & Peter Macdonald Dr. Barry J. Mankowitz Sherry & George Middlemas Ed O’Brien Martha & Terry Allen Perl Vicki & Doug Rippeto Lynn & Chuck Steinmetz Mary & Paul Webster ANNUAL GIVING CIRCLES

Champions’ Circle Marilyn Augur Carol & Harry Cebron Kay & Thomas Clanton Joanne & Jack Crosby Sharon Dennis Jane & Reed Eberly

Trish Fillo Peggy Fossett Joan Francis Laura & William Frick Sheika & Pepi Gramshammer Kiwi & Landon Hilliard Gloria & Steven Johns Alexia & Jerome Jurschak Marlene & Benjamin Krell Sue & James Liken Eugene Mercy Sissel & Richard Pomboy Dr. Bill Rodkey Carlos Rojas June & Paul Rossetti Lisa & Ken Schanzer Suzanne & Bernard Scharf Janis & Ronald Simon Beth & Rodney Slifer Nancy & C. John Snyder Sue & Marty Solomon Gay & Richard Steadman Brooke & Martin Stein Aja & Patrick Stokes Nancy & Thomas Traylor Sally & Gregg Tryhus James Vincent Carol & Patrick Welsh Joan Whittenberg Carla & Leonard Wood

Megan Frigon Vicky & John Garnsey Tracy McCoy Gillette Fund of The Columbus Foundation Amy Gish Andrea & Michael Glass Joy & Todd Guth Dr. Thomas Hackett Bethany & Jonathan Haerter Margo & Paul Hields Yvonne & Chris Jacobs Shelly & Chris Jarnot Tanya & Paul Kessenich Brenda Buglione & Jeff Kirwood Ingrid & Sean McGinley Kaia & Misha Moritz Amanda Precourt Sara & Aldo Radamus Kelli & Kreston Rohrig Stacey Sapp Annalisa & Adam Savin Melanie & Timothy Schmieding Susan & Robert Tartre Andrew Tennenbaum Jean & Alexander Urquhart Allison Krausen & Kyle Webb Teresa & Paul Wible

Legends’ Circle

Vail Valley Foundation Sports Club

Anonymous Gleneen & Joseph Brienza Lois & Stephen Eisen Margaret Elliott Jane & Charles Klein Laura & Stephen Wehrle

Directors’ Circle Marcella & Robert Barry Susan & Graham Burton Kathleen & Frederick Eck Cheryl & William Jensen Jan & John Meck Pamela & Frank Saxton

Future Founders’ Club: First Tracks Level Anonymous Ann Newman & Andy Arnold Sandy Gregorak & Tom Bassett Beck Building Company Alix & Hans Berglund Melissa & Doug Bonnette Anne & Jeffrey Brown Inspirato LLC Rebecca Soffieti & Joseph Crosbie Katie & Dillion DeMore Erika & Matt Fitzgerald Nicole Folino Ceil & Steve Folz

Alpine Bank Ascent Sotheby’s International Realty Brill Insurance Agency Peter Dann Kevin Deighan Dogma Athletica Betsy & Jesse Fink Emily & Michael Kloser Mountain Clear Water Terri & Mike Noell OutThere Sara & Rick Pylman Brad Quayle Skea Sportube Triumph Development Steve Virosiek

President’s Circle Shannon & Todger Anderson Mary & Paul Asplundh Jayne & Paul Becker Diane & Jeffrey Brundage Robin & Tom Burch Susan Catalano Mary Ellen & Stanley Cope John Dakin Arlene & John Dayton Doris Dewton & Richard Gretz Irene & Jared Drescher


UND E RWRITE RS & DO NO R S

Holly & Tim Finchem FirstBank Avon Terry & John Forester Jon Franklin Miriam & Morris Futernick Christopher Galvin Rebecca & Stuart Green Pamela & David Gross Susan & Murray Haber Nicole & Philip Hadley Roslyn & Ralph Halbert Stephanie & John Hanson Thistle & Rose Foundation Verna & Thomas Howard Kathy & William Hybl Mary Sue & Stephen Katz Elaine & Arthur Kelton Mitchell Kleinstein Jennifer Lansing Candice Wilhelmsen & Ted Leach Doug Lovell Dora Beatty & Peter Macdonald John W. Madden III Jenifer & Lawrence Marx Brenda & Joseph McHugh Nancy & Robert McLeod Virginia Kraft Payson & David Cole Jan & R.H. Pickens Jackie & James Power Arlene & Robert Rakich Ann & Ronald Riley David W. Schlendorf & Nancy S. Wolk Carole & Peter Segal Jamie & John Stone Suzanne & Michael Tennenbaum Marco Tonazzi John Tyler Paula & William Verity Diane & Marshall Wallach Susan & Thomas Washing

Vail Valley Member Anonymous Sandra & Larry Agneberg Arnold Family Wendy & Andrew Bernstein Scott Blackmun Janelle & Buck Blessing Sara & Raymond Duncan Susan & Stewart Eves Mark Fenstermacher Widge Ferguson Catherine & Barry Gassman Herbert Glaser Adrienne & Burton Glazov Mr. Matthew Gobec & Mrs. Doris Clinton-Gobec Ziggy Gosiewski Sue Harvison

Kristel & B.J. Hybl Helen & Henry Justi Gary C. Klein & Family Vanessa Kong-Kerzner Marisa & Merrill Lahman Dorothy Lay Janet & Robert Lipnick Ann & John Martin Patricia & Charles McMunn Hazel & Matthew Murray Andrea & Joel Press Robert Schilling Pat & Larry Stewart Mary & Paul Webster The John & Marilyn Wells Family Foundation Melinda & Robert Welter Geri & Stuart Yount

Community Member Peter Abuisi Judd Babcock Donna & William Barrows Janie & Bill Burns Carolyn & Gary Cage I. & F.W. Distelhorst Nancy Hassett Cathey Herren Carrick Inabnett Brian Kolzow Bettan Laughlin Deb & Dan Luginbuhl Mile High United Way Wendy & Donald Milliman Jane & Harry Misakian Nancy & W. Peterson Nelson Gerry & Ed Palmer Jr. MD Debra Rappaport Marcia & William Reed Arthur Rhein Robyn & Mark Shegda Howard Sherwood Kelley & James Smith Gloria Spencer Swenson Family Foundation Martha & James Turner Susan & Albert Weihl Edward Yingling

Supporting Member Scott Alexander Terry Kay & Richard Bargar Helga & Henry Beck Peggy & C. Houston Bell Kay & Charlie Bertrand William Bethke Jane & Terry Brady Jerry Brant Sally & Dave Brew Polly & James Brunkhardt Barbara & Charles Clark Heidi & Stephen Elzinga Dr. Raymond Finn & Linda Hryckowian Finn

Laura Fisher Sally & Crosby Foster Marshall Gordon Margaret & Thomas Gorrie Sharon & Donald Green Nancy & Neal Groff Roberta & Gene Hagerman Rochelle Hanley & Shirish Shenolikar Maryan & Caleb Hurtt Stacy & Jim Jacob Sharon & Charles Kimbell Sandra & Fred Kinsley Ann & Collier Kirkham Robert Knous Jessica & Tom Korzenecki Evelyn & Edward Lang Natalie & George Lee Jane Lowery Kelly & David Lyle Anne & Kelly McCann Laurie & Mark McKinley Kristine & James Mestdagh Carol Monson Helen & Foxhall Parker Joyce & Robert Pegg Shelley & John Pinkham Steve Prawdzik Martha & Scott Raecker C. Lee Rimel Patricia & T. Ritchie Christine Sena Deborah & Scott Smith Katherine & R. A. K. Smith John Stewart Swenson Family Foundation W.I. & Trudy F. Thomas Tina & Steve Vardaman Volckmann Family Foundation Traci & Michael Wodlinger Kathy & Stuart Zimmerman

Contributing Member Betty Allen Alexis Asher Kelsey Ashton Nicole & Matthew Balazs Cheryl Baumruck Charles Best Martha Brassel Margaret Blazek Alan Brocker Michael Brooks Werner Bruggeman Peggy & Jack Buchannan Judith Buechel Wyatt Burton Lyndon Chamberlain Gordon Chisholm Millie & Don Combs Kathleen & David Cope Carol & C. Jack Corgan Evelyn Cox

Kelsey Cullen Courtney Dahlberg Barbara & Phil DeChant Cynthia & Richard Demore Elizabeth Duke Patricia Duty Heidi Eckhoff Melissa Eggert Audrey & Thomas Eggert Sylvan Ellefson Cara Feldkamp Natalie Findell Fox Hot Tubs Sarah Franke Sue & Orv Froeschle Mac Garnsey Tom Gingrich Jon Harrach Henderson Edwards Wilson, LLP Deanna Henry Scott Hermon Kelly Hillencamp Shana & Duncan Horner Susan Johnson Colleen & Rick Kasch Abigail Kasch Max Key Rebecca Lynch Donna Miller Kari Miller Alexandra Mowrey Jean Naumann Sara Newsam Matt Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Beverly Oneto Rob Osborn Diana & Ronald Palmer Brittany Parker Kate Peters Carol & Peter Powell Janet Reed Bethany Roberts Joanne Rock Cynthia & Philip Rudolph Collin Schmidt Jasa Schumacher Constantine Scontras Camilla Shapleigh Barbara & Clark Shivley Jena Skinner Doreen Somers John Steiert Blythe Tai Julie Tomlinson-Kapala Lee Tourgee Margaux Viola Bob Walsh Robert Wolfe Bill Zeller

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TH A NK

you!

SPONSORS GOLD Anheuser-Busch Volvo Town of Vail Vail Resorts SILVER Alpine Party Rentals Big Delicious Catering Comcast Gallegos Maximum Comfort Pool & Spa Slifer Smith & Frampton Real Estate The Ritz-Carlton Residences-Vail Triumph Development The Vitality Center at Vail Mountain Lodge Wells Fargo HOST HOTELS Antlers at Vail Christie Lodge Manor Vail Lodge Sonnenalp Resort of Vail Tivoli Lodge Vail Cascade Resort & Spa Vail Marriott Mountain Resort & Spa Vail Resort Rentals Vail Spa Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa COMMUNITY PARTNERS Julie & Bob McCormick Dean Johnson Management, Inc. East West Resorts EPS Design and Print FirstBank Hoffman West Real Estate Lionshead Merchant Association Resort Events Riverwalk Wine & Spirits Ruggs Benedict Sonnenalp Foundation Viele Construction THANK YOU Melinda Roy, Vail Valley Dance Intensive Cheryl Giattinni Craig Cohn, Solaris Ellie Gauthier, Bravo! The Vail Valley Music Festival

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Tango Colorado cmDance Patrick Zimmerman, High Country Backline Molly Eppard, Art In Public Places The Arrabelle Lionshead Merchants Association Brian Hall, Blue Creek Productions Vail Valley Academy of Dance Colorado Mountain College Vanesa Thomasi Krissi Barnes TV8, Tricia Swenson & Erik Williams B-Line Express Vail Mountain School Solaris VS Design Pink Monkey Solutions John Brandza Vail Integrative Medical Group Julia Gruen Keith Haring Foundation SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS Allegria Spa Christy Sports BCRC Beaver Creek Rodeo Bobble Zone Perfect Bars LaTour Blue Moose Holly Cole, Vail Valley Magazine Stone Creek Charter School TV8 The Metropolitan Keith Haring Foundation

VIDF PERSONNEL

TILER PECK PHOTO BY ERIN BAIANO

INTERNS Paige Hupy Montana Nash Meredith Steinke Kathryn Barnes Caitlin Yarger

PRODUCTION Neal Kerr Director of Production Jim Leitner Production Lighting Designer Lisa Leonhardt Stage Manager

Martha Brassel Festival Manager

Mark Valenzuela Sound Engineer

Shawn Kirchner Development Officer

ML Geiger Lighting Designer

Erin Fogarty Assistant to Artistic Director

Ariel Pierce Assistant Stage Manager

Harper Addison Intern Coordinator

Brianna Johnson Assistant Stage Manager

Erica Sheftman Media Project Manager

Justin Kirkland Master Electrician

Kathryn Benysh House Coordinator

Jan Hiland Wardrobe Mistress

Bill Douglas Transportation Coordinator

Peter Vavra Rehearsal Pianist

Erin Baiano Photographer Nel Shelby Videographer

GRFA STAFF Jennifer Mason Director Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater Dan Wallace Front of House Manager Graham Olson Production Manager

VVF BOX OFFICE STAFF Larry Matthews Box Office Manager Charlotte Mintz Project Manager Susan Gruber Cindy Petrehn Lea Renay Teri Madigan Sophie Ozaneaux Elizabeth DiJulio Berneil Bannon Rebecca McDonnell Lauren Gary Leslie Cothran


TAKE IN A PERFORMANCE IN VAIL’S GREAT OUTDOORS JAZZ @ THE FARMERS’ MARKET (Free) Sundays, June 24 – August 26

BRAVO! VAIL VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL June 25 – August 4

JAZZ @ VAIL SQUARE (Free)

Thursdays, July 5 – August 30

VAIL INTERNATIONAL DANCE FESTIVAL July 29 – August 11

VAIL SOUL MUSIC FESTIVAL August 17-19

LABOR DAY WEEKEND JAZZ PARTY

August 30 – September 3

Tiler Peck and Aaron Carr in Rock Steady at the Vail International Dance Festival. Photo by Erin Baiano.

Visit us this summer with lodging from $99* For lodging and a full list of events go to vail.com *based on availability, some restrictions apply.


MOSCHINO CHEAP & CHIC

Solaris 970.479.0050

In the Sonnenalp Resort 970.476.1667


KATHERINE CROCKETT AND DAVID MARTINEZ IN MARTHA GRAHAM’S DIVERSION OF ANGELS.

MARTHA GRAHAM’S BOUNDARY-PUSHING DANCE IS ELEGANTLY RAW, REAL AND VITAL.

Visceral THERE IS A BREATH, A rhythm —both harmonious and discordant— everpresent in life. Martha Graham yearned to express the full range of her inner landscape, and in doing so she forever changed the world of dance. In an era where classical ballet kept dancers in line through beautiful, decorative flow, Graham began experimenting with percussive, disjunctive, sharp, angular movements and falls. Her choreography

PHOTO COURTESY OF SARA D. DAVIS.

evoked raw emotion, as well as political, psychological and sexual themes. “Her physical vocabulary was shocking at the time,” said Janet Eilber, artistic director of the Martha Graham Dance Company. “It was a whole new way of moving on the stage. It emerged out of real human emotion.” Graham’s movement originated from her torso, eliciting visceral responses. She followed “stirrings” in the

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GRAHAM’S LEGACY IS ONE OF

forward momentum,

OF SEIZING GRAHAM’S APPETITE FOR EXPERIMENTATION AND EXPLORATION AND DIVING INTO UNCHARTED DIMENSIONS OF PERSONAL AND ARTISTIC EXPRESSION. center of her body, extended them through her back and then radiated them through her arms and legs, as opposed to simply moving her limbs in a less embodied fashion. “Martha Graham said, ‘We feel life in our center, the center of our being where all the viscera are,’” said principal dancer Katherine Crockett. “The closer that you move to that center, the more honesty lives in that movement. “Because it is wrapped around this concept of vitality and emotion, about what it means to be human, it does not grow old. It is a universal expression in the way that it touches you so kinetically. There

is something that pulls you in because we all understand and empathize (with emotion).” AN EVENING WITH THE COMPANY The Martha Graham Dance Company, originated in 1926 as Graham’s studio, is one of the oldest dance companies in North America. And though the company proudly bears her name and history, Eilber reminds people they are “not coming to see a museum by any means.” Graham’s legacy is one of forward momentum, of seizing Graham’s appetite for experimentation and exploration and diving into uncharted

KATHERINE CROCKETT IN MARTHA GRAHAM’S “STEPS” FROM CHRONICLE.

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dimensions of personal and artistic expression. Though the company will showcase three of Graham’s pieces during their festival debut evening Aug. 9, “Vail is not going to see dance like it was danced 50 years ago,” Eilber said. “These are 21st century artists; they’re powerful athletes — some of the most extraordinary dancers in the world. We’ve incorporated a new facility (encompassing) the vibrancy of today and tomorrow.” Each piece highlights one of Graham’s best works from the decades of the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s. “They represent the essence of her revolution,” Eilber said. “The grouping shows the starkness of her work in the 1930s compared to the more lyrical work of the ’40s and the complicated interaction of the ’50s. You can see how diverse her thinking and inspiration were, from the Bible to political (statements) to her evolution as an abstract artist.” Chronicle is one of Graham’s early political pieces, choreographed in 1936 in response to fascism in Europe. Earlier that year, she refused to dance at the 1936 Olympics in Germany because of Jewish persecution. The original work contained three sections, but the company has reconstructed it and now performs the center section, portraying the tragedy of war, the prelude to action, and the power of people to effect change. Aaron Copland wrote the score for Appalachian Spring,

a narrative about newlyweds moving into their new home on the frontier. The dance portrayed the American spirit of optimism, determination and hope for the future at a critical time in America, 1944, and was considered to be a significant support in the war effort, Eilber said. It also exemplifies two of Graham’s revolutionary contributions to dance, in the realms of both time and space. Graham was the first to “change the shape of space” through three-dimensional stage sets, when other dancers simply performed against painted backdrops. For Appalachian Spring, she worked with sculptor and set designer Isamu Noguchi to create an angular, three-dimensional feeling of expansiveness reminiscent of the new frontier. She also portrayed changes in time on stage through flashbacks and techniques such as freezing motion and allowing one dancer to step forward and convey a character’s inner thoughts. Graham’s erotic side emerges in Embattled Garden, choreographed in 1958. Its contemporary look on temptation and forgiveness includes Adam, Eve, Lilith (Adam’s first wife) and the serpentlike Stranger. The piece began more innocently, but Carlos Surinach’s steamy Spanish music and Noguchi’s stylized forest set inspired Graham to infuse the movement with lusty sexuality. On Aug. 6th, the dance company will perform Graham’s original Lamentation, followed by a new work choreographed by Doug Varone, based on Graham’s piece. The project, called Lamentation Variation, began

PHOTO COURTESY OF COSTAS. OPPOSITE PAGE PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS.


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“Vail became what I never had before - a home. It's my home, the only home I ever had. — Sheika Gramshammer “I don't feel that I gave up anything moving to Vail. There was nothing difficult at all about it; it was an adventure. I thought it was wonderful, and I never thought of leaving.” — Christie (Blanche Hauserman) Hill

MARTHA GRAHAM, ERICK HAWKINS AND THE MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY IN MARTHA GRAHAM’S APPALACHIAN SPRING.

when the company’s 2007 season opening night landed on 9/11. To honor the date, they commissioned three different choreographers to create three separate 4-minute pieces based on Graham’s original work. The project was so successful, they’ve commissioned five more pieces since. “She was stripping away decorations, getting down to the thing itself,” Eilber said, explaining how she embodied the feeling of grief, rather than simply depicting it. “It’s what makes her art timeless and allows it to inspire (people) in so many directions.” EMPOWERING EXPLORATION Graham’s fiery spirit and dedication to self-discovery resulted in a sense of empowerment not commonly found in women in the early 1900s. She passed that sense of power onto her students — one being Betty Ford. Ford studied with Graham in the late 1930s and performed in a couple of Graham’s dances as part of the larger cast. “Ford revered her,” Eilber said. “She had such a formative

time with Martha. She had a new understanding of how women could be powerful.” Graham rejected the label of feminist, saying, “I’ve just done whatever I’ve wanted to do,” Eilber said. “She led by example. You could feel that she had a clear idea of what she wanted, and she went after it.” Historians have compared Graham’s influence on modern dance to that of Picasso’s on art, Stravinsky’s on music and Frank Lloyd Wright’s on architecture. “She brought us (ways of) looking inside of ourselves — our sensual and sexual selves,” Crockett said. “She fearlessly took on frontiers and opened up realms for other artists to explore.” Today, the company continues to foster Graham’s genius by showcasing not only her masterpieces, but also those of her successors. “(Graham named her school) the Martha Graham School of Contemporary Dance — not modern dance — because it continues to evolve with the breath and movement with each dancer that comes in contact with it,” Crockett said. “It is very, very passionate work.”

“If Vail was a family, then the Copper Bar was its living room.” — Diana Donovan

This is a delightful book of stories told by the women who left the lives they knew and moved to Vail before it was on the map.

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Available now: The Bookworm in Edwards bookwormofedwards.com and at the Vail and Minturn Farmers’ Markets in the Vail Daily booth.

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A NIGHT OF PREMIERES STEPS UP TO OPEN AUDIENCES’ PERCEPTIONS AND FEED THE ART OF DANCE.

by kimberly nicoletti

DIGGING

deep

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OPPOSITE PAGE: FANG-YI SHEU AND CRAIG HALL. BELOW: BALLETX REHEARSING WITH MATTHEW NEENAN.

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OST PEOPLE listen to music. Choreographers visualize it. And when they translate what they see into dance, audiences often experience familiar compositions in completely different ways. For Christopher Wheeldon, it’s innate. Within 30 seconds of listening to a piece, he knows if it fits. “I hear music, and I see how that music could be translated into movement,” Wheeldon said. “I paint and sculpt music in a way… and hopefully it transports people.” He trusts his process so completely that he doesn’t begin choreographing until he is in the room with the dancers; it all happens in the moment. “I used to beat myself up about that,” Wheeldon said. “I know a lot of choreographers who plan (their

PHOTO BY ALEXANDER IZILIAEV. OPPOSITE PAGE PHOTO BY ERIN BAIANO.

pieces). There’s a certain safety to that, but it’s not interesting being in a studio by myself. It’s much more interesting to be in a studio working with dancers.” Last summer, Wheeldon spent 10 days, from dawn to dusk, working spontaneously with the dancers in Vail. This year’s piece for NOW on August 6th will extend Wheeldon’s 2011 3 Movements and 4 Repeats premiere. (He’s also choreographing a piece for the summer Olympics’ closing ceremony for retired ballerina Darcey Bussell.) For the Vail performance, it doesn’t hurt that he’s working with some of today’s finest dancers in a fusion of bare feet and pointe shoes. “He’s combining one of the greatest modern dancers — Fang-Yi Sheu — with one of the greatest ballerinas — Wendy

Whelan. It’s a fascinating mix,” said Damian Woetzel, Artistic Director of the Vail International Dance Festival. A Renowned Creative Space When Woetzel first invited him to Vail, Wheeldon saw an opportunity to “create new work out of the public eye in a beautiful place, in an environment focused on dance.” He was right — except for the anonymity factor. Now, he realizes it was a fantasy to think Vail remained “out of the public eye” —the festival’s reputation draws critics nationwide. Today choreographers strive for invitations to present at the festival. “This has been a strategic goal of ours since we started BalletX,” said co-founder Matthew Neenan. Neenan is one of those choreographers who not only pushes the body to the next level, but also opens up audiences’ perception of music. He researches songs and their composers, whether classical or pop, looking for clues about their lives and experiences because he believes it all bleeds into the music. Most people, for instance, heard Rufus Wainwright’s “My Phone’s on Vibrate for You” as a sweet love ballad. Neenan, on the other hand, approached his choreography to

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the song by translating Wainwright’s drug addiction and pain into movement, resulting in a “sad and maybe a little disturbing” interpretation that made audiences hear the pop song differently. Just like Neenan digs into composers’ lives, he also delves into his own heart and soul to emerge with some-

up-and-coming creations that push the boundaries of dance. Woetzel expects one of the premieres by Brian Brooks to leave audiences stunned with its feats. Brooks’ dances often use movements so virtuosic they seem almost impossible — in fact, he worked extensively with Elizabeth Streb, who is known for her extreme,

“I think it’s important to feel an array of emotions when you’re watching something live.” – Matthew Neenan thing honest. Only through this sincere communication does he feel he can connect dancers with the audience. “I think you have to surprise the audience, where they say, ‘Wow, I didn’t see that coming,’ whether you like it or not. I think it’s important to feel an array of emotions when you’re watching something live,” Neenan said. At press time, Neenan hadn’t chosen music for his Vail debut, but he said: “It’s going to be a very personal piece for the privilege of being there.” Neenan believes in always exploring even if it means failing, because that, in turn, results in learning and breaking through to the next level. “He has a particularly unique take on how classical ballet fits in the new world,” Woetzel said. An extraordinary balance AS THE FESTIVAL’S ARTISTIC DIRECTOR, Woetzel attempts to balance timeless classic works, which audiences can view in Vail’s fresh environment, with

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daredevil choreography. “Elizabeth Streb does things you don’t think can be done, and Brian brings some of that experience with him,” Woetzel said, “but Brian also adds a sense of humanity to his work, of how a person relates to the world, or another dancer, or just to the stage—it’s a very personal vision that I find extremely affecting.” Jodi Melnick will follow Brooks’ new work with a piece choreographed together with Trisha Brown, the revered postmodern dance pioneer. The nine-minute solo performed by Melnick herself is an abstract dance, which slips between casual and formal movement. Titled One of Sixty Five Thousand Gestures, the piece represents Melnick’s first choreographic collaboration with Brown. “She’s incredibly intuitive, smart and rambunctious,” Melnick said of Brown. “She’s a wild card. Profound beauty just happens because you’re in her presence. Both our spirits are very much present (in this dance.)”

Sokvannara (Sy) Sar will perform Solo for Sy by Jill Johnson, a piece scheduled for last year but canceled when Sar became injured. As the title implies, the piece is very much a personal ode to Sar, a Cambodian dancer who was the subject of the documentary Dancing Across Borders. Then, the Martha Graham Dance Company presents a New Lamentation Variation. The Lamentation Variation Project began in 2007, when the company opened its season on 9/11. In order to honor the day, they asked three choreographers to produce pieces based on the original Lamentation, Martha Graham’s legendary 1930 work. What they came up with was so compelling that the company continued to commission choreographers to expand the body of work. In Vail, the versatile modern dance maker Doug Varone will premiere his version.

ABOVE: BRIAN BROOKS

Janet Eilber, artistic director of the Martha Graham Dance Company, believes Graham would “be delighted to have all this creative energy springing from her.” Just as she might be thrilled to watch choreographers further the field of dance and musical interpretation at the Vail International Dance Festival. “Vail can be like a lab to try new things,” Woetzel said. “The Festival lends itself to creativity, and it’s an opportunity for the audience to see what’s happening across the spectrum of dance, and how dancers can come together in unique ways.” Audiences also bear witness to choreographers pushing the boundaries of movement and music, in order to continuously breathe new life into the art of dance.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID BAZEMORE.


“For if I could write music it seems to me this is how I would want it to sound.”

DIANA ADAMS AND ARTHUR MITCHELL IN GEORGE BALANCHINE’S AGON (1957).

- George Balanchine on Igor Stravinsky’s music, 1949

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PHOTOS BY MARTHA SWOPE.


Artistic by erica sheftman

GIANTS

GEORGE BALANCHINE AND IGOR STRAVINSKY EACH DISCOVERED SOMETHING ESSENTIAL IN THE OTHER’S WORK. THEIR COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIP HELPED CHANGE THE ART FORMS OF BOTH DANCE AND MUSIC.

WHEN GEORGE BALANCHINE met Igor Stravinsky in 1925 at the introduction of the Russian impresario Serge Diaghilev, it was the beginning of what would become, over the next 40 years, one of the most important artistic partnerships of the 20th century, and indeed, of all time. In 1971, following Stravinsky’s passing at the age of eighty-nine, Balanchine proposed the idea of a festival – or rather, a “party” – in Stravinsky’s name, to take place in June of 1972 and mark what would have been the composer’s ninetieth birthday. This was the “Stravinsky Festival,” and on Tuesday, July 31, the Vail International Dance Festival celebrates the 40th anniversary of this landmark event, with an UpClose performance featuring excerpts from the Stravinsky-Balanchine canon performed rehearsal style by the dancers of New York City Ballet MOVES, with accompanying insight and commentary from NYCB ballet master-in-chief Peter Martins, and Vail Festival Director Damian Woetzel.

PICTURED ABOVE: BALANCHINE AND STRAVINSKY AT A STUDIO REHEARSAL FOR THEIR BALLET AGON.

‘Musique Dansante’ In 1934, as George Balanchine was working on what would become the first ballet he would choreograph in America, Serenade, Igor Stravinsky was asked by the press about whether he personally saw a future for ballet. Stravinsky replied, with characteristic frankness, “There is not a great deal of good ballet music. Either it is sunk in the dance or it is irrelevant to it as a rule. Music and dance should be a true marriage of separate arts, a partnership, not a dictatorship of the one over the other.” Stravinsky couldn’t know then how just how much he – in partnership with George Balanchine – would help transform the scope of ballet music forever. By 1963, after over three decades collaboration, the great masters’ work was completely intertwined, with Stravinsky now writing of Balanchine’s choreography for his ballet Movements for Piano and Orchestra, “Balanchine has joined the score to the body of my music far faster than it could ever get there by way of the concert hall…To see Bal-

anchine’s choreography of the Movements is to hear the music with one’s eyes...The choreography emphasizes relationships of which I had hardly been aware.” Balanchine similarly expressed his belief in the essential relationship of Stravinsky’s music to his choreography and to contemporary dance itself, remarking at a 1972 Stravinsky Festival press conference, “Stravinsky is who is responsible for anything we are using in music… He made musique dansante…There are men who say there is no time, no space. But Stravinsky made time — not big, grand time – but time that works with the small parts of how our bodies are made. Probably dance would stop if we didn’t have Stravinsky.” The beginnings of their partnership took place under the aegis of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes troupe, and yielded Apollo, one of the most important ballets of all time, created in 1928 to an existing Stravinsky opus. Scores commissioned especially for Balanchine would

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GEORGE BALANCHINE REHEARSES CIRCUS POLKA: FOR A YOUNG ELEPHANT.

happen in America, where the young Harvard graduate and nascent arts impresario Lincoln Kirstein had brought Balanchine in 1933, with the aim of establishing an American classical ballet tradition. Ironically, Kirstein’s personal vision of a national American dance style “bred from basketball courts, track and swimming meets and junior proms…” was to come to fruition most brilliantly by two Russian émigrés. The work that Balanchine and Stravinsky produced together was an expression of the idiom of their adopted country: form and content could be separate entities, the movement could be released from any specific emotional narrative, and the dance could be at once independent from the music, and subservient to it. Most importantly, in Balanchine Stravinsky found someone who shared his understanding that a choreographer must first and foremost be an organizer of rhythms. Both understood dance as a simple expression of time and space, and both had a common view of the primacy of music. “When I choreograph to Stravinsky’s music, I am very careful not to hide the music,” Balanchine wrote. “I sort of subdue my

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dances. They’re always less than the music. As in modern architecture, you rather should do less than more.” Balanchine’s deference to music as the superior art was also reflected in his professional and personal relationships with Stravinsky. A friend observed, “The only time Balanchine loses that air of calm, complete authority he has is when he’s with Stravinsky. Then he’s like a boy with his father. The two can respect each other’s opinions, be gay and playful together, work together — but they never forget who is the father and who the son.” While choreographing Orpheus, Balanchine told Stravinsky that the duet between Orpheus and Eurydice should take “about” two and a half minutes, to which Stravinsky retorted, “Don’t tell me ‘about.’ It’s either two minutes and twenty, thirty, or forty seconds; no more, no less.” Trust, spontaneity and even fun grounded the partnership. In 1941, the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus made Balanchine the unusual proposal of choreographing a ballet for its famous troupe of elephants. Balanchine turned immediately to Stravinsky

and told him he needed a polka. “For whom?” Stravinsky asked. “For some elephants,” Balanchine replied. “How old?” “Very young.” “All right. If they are very young elephants, I will do it.” Circus Polka: For A Young Elephant was written by Stravinsky in 1942, and performed by fifty ballerinas and fifty elephants in pink ballet tutus, led by the great Indian elephant Modoc and Balanchine’s wife, principal ballerina Vera Zorina. The score has stayed in the New York City Ballet’s repertory to this day, first re-choreographed by Balanchine for a 1945 performance by students from the School of American Ballet, and again by Jerome Robbins for the 1972 Stravinsky Festival, as a showpiece for very young ballet students and an adult ringmaster, played by Robbins himself at the premiere.

The Trilogy The Kirstein-StravinskyBalanchine triumvirate was one of the most extraordinary collaborative triumphs of the twentieth century. For Kirstein, Apollo was the jumping-off point: it was the ballet which confirmed the significance of the revolutionary symbiosis of music and dance generated through the Balanchine-Stravinsky partnership. “Apollo was actually my start in musical education,” he wrote in a letter to Stravinsky. “It was a door through which I passed into the music of the past, and out of which I heard the music of the present and the future. Apollo gave me confidence in the line of the academic classic dance, and on it our school has been founded.” Balanchine, too, looked upon

Apollo as the “turning point” of his life: “In Apollo, and in all the music that follows, it is impossible to imagine substituting for any single fragment the fragment of any other Stravinsky score…Each piece is unique in itself, nothing is replaceable…I examined my own work in the light of this lesson. I began to see how I could clarify, by limiting, by reducing…to the one that is inevitable.” Apollo was the first in what is known as the Greek Trilogy of masterpieces created by Balanchine to Stravinsky’s music. The second was Orpheus, based on the myth of Orpheus and Euridice. It premiered in 1947 to a Stravinsky score commissioned by Ballet Society, the precursor to the New York City Ballet, which was officially founded in 1948, in no small part due to the success of Orpheus. As Kirstein described it, it was a performance of this work that led Morton Baum, chairman of the executive committee of the City Center of Music and Drama, to invite Ballet Society to become its permanent ballet company: thus New York City Ballet was born. And the work continued. On the very night Orpheus premiered, Kirstein set pen to paper writing Stravinsky to request a third ballet to be added to Apollo and Orpheus. It took almost a decade, but that ballet was Agon, premiering in 1957, and completing the trilogy with what is considered one of the finest works of art created in the 20th century. Before Agon, one other Stravinsky-Balanchine ballet was to make the New York City Ballet into the powerhouse of American dance: Balanchine’s version

PHOTO ON OPPOSITE PAGE BY MARTHA SWOPE.


of Firebird, with scenery and costumes by Marc Chagall and the legendary Native-American ballerina Maria Tallchief in the lead role. The score, originally written in 1910 for the Ballets Russes, made Stravinsky famous and delivered on Diaghilev’s wish to create the “first Russian ballet.” Balanchine’s 1949 version on the other hand, using only a suite drawn from the full-length score, made American dance history. Tallchief’s electrifying appearances as the Firebird were landmark occasions for the New York City Ballet and brought it global renown. Agon, which means “competition” in Greek, took the insistent, frenetic pulse so associated with Stravinsky’s earlier works inspired by Slavic folklore and pagan traditions, like The Rite of Spring (1913), and evolved it into a reflection of a whole spectrum of Western inspirations, particularly ragtime and jazz. Agon is perhaps the most characteristic and celebrated example of the fifty-year partnership. At its premiere on December 1, 1957, the curtain opened on a bare stage with a horizontal

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN

line of four men across the back of the stage, facing away from the audience and clad in practice clothes in a simple black and white palette. The dancers moved with an almost mechanical speed and precision, yet the choreography was also characterized by a devoutly American, jazzy syncopation, which evoked New York City’s Beat Generation. Balanchine’s choreography was ingeniously intertwined with Stravinsky’s punchy twelve-tone music in a radically modern and athletic manner. In the work’s central, abstractly sexual pas de deux, the man manipulated the woman’s limbs, twisting them and forcing them into extensions which pushed all conventional boundaries. Three months after the crisis over desegregation in Little Rock, Arkansas, Balanchine had chosen for his leads the Caucasian ballerina Diana Adams, and a black dancer, Arthur Mitchell. New York’s City Center was filled with an audience of artists and intellectuals that included Marcel Duchamp and Edwin Denby, who said that audience members came out into the lobby after the performance giddy, “their eyes bright as if the piece had been champagne.”

AND GEORGE BALAN CHINE BOTH HOLD ORPHEUS’ LYRE, COMMISSION ED BY ISAMU NOGU CHI FOR ORPHEUS ADOPTED AS THE OFF AND ICIAL SYMBOL OF THE NEW YORK CITY BAL LET.

The Festival The 1972 festival was unparalleled in its sheer all-or-nothing ambition. The event was a seven-day powerhouse retrospective of over thirty ballets created to Stravinsky scores. It allowed the New York City Ballet to look back across a broad span of Stravinsky’s career before 1970, from the lost Sonata movement of 1904 through the Ballets Russes-era Firebird (1910) and Pulcinella (1920) to Danses Concertantes (1944), with premieres by choreographers including Jerome Robbins in addition to Balanchine himself. On opening night, the orchestra played “Happy Birthday,” and the curtain opened on the 1908 Stravinsky ballet Fireworks. Kirstein and Balanchine toasted Stravinsky with, as customary in Russia, a shot of vodka. The centerpiece of the occasion, however, were the eight new works created by Balanchine. Three of these are considered to be among his greatest masterpieces: Duo Concertant, Stravinsky Violin Concerto, and Symphony in Three Movements. The Balanchine ballets premiered at the Stravinsky Festival broke new ground in a collaborative partnership which had already made history. The opening of Symphony in Three Movements is perhaps one of the most iconic in all of neoclassical ballet: a long diagonal of women covers the entirety of the stage, lined up in perfect symmetry in identical arabesques. As Stravinsky’s first chords sound, the women swing their arms violently in large circles, plunge forward, and thrust their arms in front of them. The first section is a kaleidoscopic explosion of

ELEGIE FOR SOLO VIOLA Igor Stravinsky’s Elegie for Solo Viola (1944) was choreographed twice by George Balanchine— first in 1945 as a piece for two women, and then for the 1982 Stravinsky Festival he re-choreographed the ballet as a solo for the ballerina Suzanne Farrell. The ballet vanished after several performances in 1982, but now returns as a revival for the 2012 Vail International Dance Festival. Staged by Festival Artistic Director Damian Woetzel, Elegie will be performed by Pacific Northwest Ballet star Carla Körbes as part of the International Evenings of Dance.

bodies in motion, as the army of women — wearing only tights and leotards —wind themselves into little balls and then unfurl themselves into explosive jumps and lunges. At the last moment of the ballet, the entire stage freezes, and Stravinsky has the last word. The Stravinsky Festival tradition was reprised by Balanchine once more ten years later, in 1982, to celebrate the centennial of Stravinsky’s birth. In total, Balanchine set twenty-nine pieces of Stravinsky’s music, five of which were commissions (like Agon) and nine of which were substantial re-workings of earlier settings. Soon after the 1972 Festival, Balanchine was interviewed about Stravinsky. “I did not come to understand all of his music immediately,” he said. “Now when I think about Stravinsky, I see that he did everything right, while I often went astray…Now it’s easy to say, ‘Stravinsky? A genius!’ Well, I knew that sixty years ago, when it wasn’t so easy to figure out!”

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CURTAIN call

“BREAK” BY ANDREA SELBY Artist Andrea Selby sketches from a seat in the audience. Working in the dark, she keeps her sketchbook under her coat or bag, rarely looking away from the stage. “I never erase. It is a small artistic challenge that I have with myself. Just as a dancer cannot redo a step on stage during a performance.”

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Vail Dance  

The official program of the 2012 Vail International Dance Festival.

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