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The Tutorialite

Celebrating the Past. Challenging the Present. Creating the Future.

Mr. Joseph Waterton Castello

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Founder Mr. Austin Cosmo Castello

IVERSAR N N 193 14 Y A 9 - 20 Tutorial High School 75th Anniversary Souvenir Magazine


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12th Triennial International Reunion

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12th Triennial International Reunion Sunday, July 27 - Sunday, August 2, 2014 Georgetown, Guyana

Contents

2 Message from the Minister of Tourism, Industry & Commerce (Ag.) 3 Message from The Guyana Chapter

4 Message from The New York Tutorial Support Group, Inc.

23 Frederick Debidin - One Outstanding Alumnus 24 Tutorial High School is 75 Years Old 28 The Castello Commemorative Fund

5 Message from The Toronto Chapter

31 Legacy of the School Vendor

6 Message from The UK Chapter

32 First Guyanese Female Olympian

7 Executives of the THSAA Guyana Chapter 8 A Vibrant School Board

34 Celebrating the Past. Challenging the Present. Creating the Future

10 Snapshot of Our Founders

36 Tertiary Education Bursaries for 2013 & 2014 Graduates

11 The First Seven Pupils

38 Photo Flashback - Reunion 2002

11 Guyana Scholarship Winners

39 First Board of Governors

12 Dr. Jacob Bynoe, A Consummate Scholar 12 Locations of our Alma Mater 13 Of Mini Skirts and Rules 14 The Good Ol’ School Days

39 Chronicle of Student Enrollment 40 A Tribute to Claudette Masdammer 41 A Tribute to Dr. Charles Colin Garrett

17 Some Early Achievers

42 A Tribute to Austin Cosmo Castello

18 Tutorial Lives On

43 Origin of Names of Tutorial Houses

20 The Girl Guides Unit

44 Poem - “Tutorial High School”

The Executive and Members of the Tutorial High School Alumni Association Guyana Chapter wish to thank all those who have contributed towards the success of this magazine. CONTRIBUTORS: • Marjorie Chester • Fritz Mclean • Malcolm Parris • Joyce Richardson • Stephen Phillip Garrett • Dr. Lear Matthews • Archibald A. Moore • Anna Kokaram • Sherlock Sampson

Design, Layout & Printing

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July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Irfaan Ali, M.P. Minister of Tourism, Industry & Commerce (Ag.)

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e welcome you and invite you to rediscover the beauty, warmth and hospitality of destination Guyana.

Congratulations! For you, this is indeed a momentous occasion as you commemorate Tutorial High School’s 75th Anniversary and the Alumni Association’s 12th Triennial International Reunion. We believe that this is an opportune time to reconnect with family and friends. Over the years we have seen an influx of re-migrant Guyanese returning home for reunions and familiarisations trips, many of whom are equipped with various skills and abilities that can be harnessed to aid in the transformative development of Guyana. Guyana’s improving economy is the main deciding factor which has influenced persons to return home, as more re-migrants are investing and capitalising on the country’s resources. In addition, the Government of Guyana has implemented various programmes and incentives to ease the repatriation process, including the Ministry of Housing’s re-migrant Housing Programme. While you are here, we encourage you to take advantage of the numerous opportunities to experience and explore Guyana, visit the resorts, enjoy bird watching in the Botanical Gardens or go fishing up the Abary River. Whatever your choice of activity, Guyana remains the perfect place to return to, invest and retire.

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12th Triennial International Reunion

Desmond Sears, President Guyana Chapter THSAA

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t was by no accident or the hand of fate that this 12th Triennial Reunion of the THS Alumni Association is being held here in Guyana to coincide with the auspicious 75th (Diamond) Anniversary of Tutorial High School. This decision was calculated by the alumnae in the early epoch of THS Reunions. From 2002 the Reunions did the rounds (so to speak) in London, Toronto and New York and on this auspicious milestone, it has come full circle back to its origins. This opportunity I will grasp with both hands to express our deepest appreciation to every member of the Tutorial High School Alumni Association, those residing in Guyana and overseas, who have given of themselves in materials, time and money to ensure that the current students of Tutorial want for nothing. But that is our raison d’etre. Over the past three years, during the course of planning for this Diamond Anniversary, I have had cause to reminisce about my own school days. My mind has been calling up long forgotten incidents and “Hallelujah moments”, and the people who had the greatest and the smallest impact on my youth, the operative word being IMPACT. I’ve been reminded over and over again of how fortunate we all were to have people of the caliber of Austin and Joseph Castello and the well chosen cadre of teachers to guide our educational paths at that crucial stage of our lives. Where we are now is ample testimony of the successes that Tutorial presented to the world. The Guyana Chapter has the good fortune of actual presence on the school’s premises where we get to interact personally with teachers, parents and students, with the added benefit of identifying and satisfying their needs more quickly through the many avenues available to the school - the Toronto and London Chapters, the New York Support Group, the Ministry of Education and Guyana’s community of Private Sector entrepreneurs. While it is not possible to bring back the ‘Glory days’

(1960/70’s) of Tutorial since Guyana’s socio-political milieu has undergone dramatic changes, it is certainly in our (alumnae’s) power to use our advantages of hindsight and our own personal achievements to galvanise the current and future crops of students into high competitive gear in an effort to return Tutorial to the echelons of educational prowess in Guyana. It’s been done by the Castellos, and now it’s our turn to do it again. We’re past that period of sociopolitical stagnation (some 30 years from the 1980’s). The Education Ministry is much more amenable. The THS Alumni Association is arguably one of the most vibrant among all secondary schools in Guyana, and relentless in our efforts to ensure that the profile of the school is raised to lead its peers through competitive achievements. In Guyanese parlance, we are called ‘Old Students’ but that adjective belies the vigour and vitality (to borrow an advertising mantra) that we apply to keeping our alma mater properly sustained. “Congratulations” are in order for the people, every single individual who has contributed to the welfare of the school to keep it functional since the departure of our Founder, Austin Castello and his brother, Joseph, who are sadly not among us to celebrate this milestone. However, we are committed to Celebrating the Past and Challenging the Present so that we may Create the Future. HAPPY 75th ANNIVERSARY! Desmond Sears President, Guyana Chapter July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Keith Cadogan, President New York Tutorial Support Group, Inc.

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eunions in general and High School Reunions in particular are occasions for engaging in nostalgia and reminiscences: catching up with friends, renewing acquaintances and reflecting on the good and not so good times in and out of school. And I am sure that the atmosphere throughout this week will rightfully engender a fair amount of those reflections. In retrospect, it was twelve years ago in July 2002 that many of us convened here in Georgetown after a number of years away from Guyana and Tutorial High School for the inaugural International Tutorial High School Reunion. Since then, the concept of the 1-week Tutorial International Triennial Reunion has evolved and THS overseas alumni associations in London, England; New York, USA and Toronto, Canada have hosted successful events, to the benefit of current and future Tutorial students. So as the geographical cycle has made a complete circle, we meet again in Guyana in July 2014, this time for a special commemoration and reflections, as well as to reaffirm our commitment to the sustenance of our alma mater through mechanisms such as the Castello Commemorative Fund. In its seventy five (75) years history, Tutorial High School has produced outstanding students, many of whom have gone on to not only significantly improve themselves academically, professionally and socially, but also to contribute to the development of their immediate environments, be it in the United Kingdom, the United States, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean, Australia or indeed here in Guyana. I am

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particularly heartened by the continued support and contributions of my colleagues and alumni in New York and other parts of the US, who give back to their alma mater via the New York Tutorial Support Group’s many functions. Indicative of the concerns for others less fortunate inculcated in many of us as students of Tutorial, those contributions have made the New York Tutorial alumni chapter one of the most vibrant of the many Guyanese high school alumni associations in the USA. And NYTSG has in turn consistently and financially supported many initiatives at THS. It is my fervent wish that, as we engage in Celebrating the Past, Challenging the Present, Creating the Future during this week when we honor the 75th anniversary of the founding of Tutorial High School, that spirit of reciprocity and collaboration would prevail among us throughout this Reunion week such that a new Tutorial maxim of service to our alma mater could hereafter be firmly established in Guyana. Congratulations to the Guyana chapter, friends and supporters of Tutorial High School for all their hard work in organizing and planning this milestone reunion event. Many of us look forward to visiting local places of interest, reconnecting with family and old friends throughout Guyana, as well as generally enjoying the now fabled Guyanese hospitality. Happy Reunion 2014! Keith Cadogan President New York Tutorial Support Group, Inc.


12th Triennial International Reunion

TORONTO CHAPTER EXECUTIVE Sitting from left: Joan McLean, Treasurer; Dale McRae, Yvonne Prince & Roxanne Adams. Standing from left: Shirland Daniels, Secretary; Danny Mason, Michael Parris, President & Jerry Walters

Michael Parris, President Toronto Chapter THSAA

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s you stand poised to celebrate the 12th International Reunion of our fellow alumni, we extend to you our sincere wishes for complete success in all your undertakings. Having ourselves gone down this road twice, we know that this in itself does not make the job easier. The satisfaction is in realizing when everything is over that there were no major gaffes, and that all your guests enjoyed themselves. We are confident that you and your dedicated group of helpers will arrive at this very conclusion when the final curtain comes down. Not to be remiss, please note that we consider your choice of the Reunion Theme to be truly inspiring: “Celebrating the Past, Challenging the Present, Creating the Future.” Without articulating it in this way, this is precisely what we have been doing for the past 32 years. Now that you have removed the blinkers we can clearly see the individual as well as the collective power of these ideals. Let’s ensure that we continue to hold these Reunions and do whatever it takes to keep the Castello vision alive. We wish you Godspeed and also take this opportunity to extend warm Birthday greetings to our alma mater on its upcoming 75th Anniversary. Michael Parris President Toronto Chapter July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Rudyard Ceres, President, UK Chapter THSAA

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n behalf of the Officers and Members of the United Kingdom Chapter, I extend to you sincere congratulations and best wishes on your hosting of our Twelfth Triennial International Reunion. We are confident that your hard work and dedication will produce an event rivalling that very successful function staged by your Chapter in 2002. In this, the Seventy-Fifth year of the founding of the school, we look forward once again to renewing old acquaintances, reminiscing about the past and re-dedicating ourselves to the task of honouring our Alma Mater and supporting the current and future students of Tutorial High School. Rudyard W. Ceres President UK Chapter

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12th Triennial International Reunion

Executive Members of the THSAA Guyana Chapter

Front row from left: Barbara King, Felice Munroe, Faye Caleb, Dawn Dutchin, Margaret Jefford, Pamela Joseph Back row from left: Immediate Past President W. Hans Barrow, Kenneth Hazlewood, President Desmond Sears, Vice President Gregory Blyden and Claude Blackmore.

July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

A Vibrant School Board

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he key roles of the Board of Governors include ensuring that order is maintained throughout the execution of all curricular and extra-curricular activities. The body which comprises alumni, members of the School’s administration and representatives of the Education Ministry, must also manage the ‘business’ of the school, ensure that policies are articulated and implemented, and that staff members are properly trained for development. The Board plays an integral role in the maintenance of the physical facilities and must ensure that the students continuously receive the best and broadest education possible in the most conducive environment. This body takes on the responsibility of promoting participation in inter-house and inter-school debating competitions and oversees the Girl Guiding and Sports programmes. Every year a group of students is chosen to participate in the annual sports meet in Barbados. The Board is charged with ensuring that all prerequisites are met. “We are resolute in our conviction that every student graduating from Tutorial is able to go on to the next stage of their young lives armed with a solid foundation of discipline, ambition and knowledge to enable them to become global citizens,” Mr. Blyden stated. The benefits they derive from their secondary years must provide the foundation that allows them to become meaningful contributors to national development.

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The Tutorialite

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12th Triennial International Reunion

Announcing the publication of a new book entitled

ENGLISH-SPEAKING CARIBBEAN IMMIGRANTS: Transnational Identities by alumnus Dr. Lear Matthews.

Published by University Press of America (Rowman & Littlefield). ISBN: 978-0-7618-6202-4. On Amazon or special: US $40 - Lear.Matthews@gmail.com; 718-216 -4505.

Table of Contents: 1. Transnationalism: Trends & Practices among English Speaking Caribbean Immigrants 2. Migratory Patterns and Experiences of Anglophone Caribbean Women; 3. Migration & Occupational Change; 4. Transnational Parenting in the African Caribbean Community; 5. Transnational Migration: The Elderly & Healthcare; 6. Caribbean Immigrant Families: Transnational Identity. 7. Hometown Associations: Needs & Challenges; 8. English Speaking Caribbean Immigrant Students: Providing Culturally Competent Educational Services; 9. Indo and Afro Guyanese Immigrants: An Analysis of Selected Experiences. This book highlights a range of issues relating to the transnational experiences and identity of English Speaking Caribbean Immigrants in the United States, with implications for immigrants in general. Few students of international migration envisioned the changes in migration trends, policies and events that have shaped the immigration process at the onset of the 21st Century. Informed by their experiences as educators, researchers and community advocates, the chapter contributors focus on the successes made and challenges that confront this population as they sustain connections and identities with the home country. At the core of these presentations is the exploration of the lived experiences of Caribbean immigrants and the institutions through which they bridge nation-states while maintaining a transnational life style. Drawing from empirical data and theoretical assumptions on the topic, the intent is to continue the tradition of international migration scholars who recognize the centrality of the impact of contemporary migration on the lives of people, thus providing a lens for understanding current and future transnational relationships. Possible solutions and intervention strategies to emerging problems are presented. “This book is a welcome addition to the literature on transnationalism and the immigrant experience. A must read for scholars and practitioners with an interest in the Caribbean, the volume offers new insights to all in the field of migration studies.” — Lynne M. Healy, Ph.D. Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor, University of Connecticut.

July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Snapshot

OF OUR FOUNDERS then government Minister and past student Kenneth Denny said that “he brought education to the poor man’s child”.

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ustin Cosmo Castello, first son of Joseph Stewart and Beatrice Lucinda (nee Austin) was born in 1912 in a house at the corner of Alexander and Thomas Sts., Kitty, site of the erstwhile Hollywood Cinema. He received his early education at Blankenburg Congregational School, the Albouystown Congregational School, and in Berbice at the Auchlyne, Alness and Rosehall Congregational Schools before returning to Georgetown to the Collegiate High School.

“Tookie”, as he was fondly referred to by students and staff alike, said then that if he had another chance he would be a teacher again. His Deputy and brother, Joseph “Boops” Castello, said, “Tutorial was intended to be a school of work, discipline and happiness, and 40 years proved this”. Austin Cosmo Castello left this earth on 23rd August, 1991

Upon graduating, he entered the teaching profession and taught at Collegiate High, Progressive High, St. Joseph’s Intermediate College and the Modern Educational Institute, all before founding Tutorial High School. His marriage in 1956 to Geraldine Moore produced one daughter, June-Ann. In the intervening years until his retirement in 1980 he was President of the Private Secondary Schools Association, Treasurer of the Association of the Headmasters and Headmistresses of Secondary Schools, Deacon and Secretary/Treasurer of the Ketley Congregational Church, Trustee of the Sunbeam Friendly Society, and member of the Ancient Order of Foresters. In 1980 he received a national award, the Golden Arrow of Achievement, for long and dedicated service to Education. At a formal dinner hosted by the newly formed Past Students Association to mark the 40th anniversary of the founding of THS and his 50th year as a teacher, Austin was described as Guyana’s “First Socialist Educator”. Past student, Dr. Gunraj Kumar described him as a “pioneer in nation-building” while

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THE SECOND IN COMMAND

J

oseph Waterton “Boops” Castello, 3rd son of Joseph and Beatrice, was born on 14th November 1916 at Fellowship Post Office, WCD. He received his early education at the Albouystown, Charlestown and Auchlyne Congregational Schools, Smith Memorial, the Collegiate


12th Triennial International Reunion

High School and Modern Educational Institute.

and Malteenoes Sports Club.

He attended teachers’ training college from 1936 to 1938 and went on to teach at the Agricola Methodist School, Grove Anglican, Smith Memorial and later H.S. Jackson. He joined his brother at Tutorial as his deputy in 1945.

He succeeded his brother as Headmaster of Tutorial and retired officially in December 1981. The next year he was awarded the President’s Gold Medal for Long and Dedicated Service (38 years) to Education.

“Boops” played cricket, football and table tennis. He was Secretary of the Modern Educational Institute’s Debating Society, Chairman of Smith’s Church Young People’s Movement, President of the British Guiana Teachers Association, and Secretary of the Association of Private Secondary Schools. He served on the Wight Commission for the Improvement of Teachers’ salaries and on the Education Committee representing teachers in private schools. He was a member of the Scouts Movement, the YMCA, the BGCC

“Boops” recalled his ‘most exciting experience’ as the preparation of the first batch of six (6) Tutorial candidates for the Higher Senior Cambridge exams (equivalent to GCE Advanced level), from which four (4) students obtained passes. He believed that the government of the day had ‘done a great thing’ by making education free from nursery to university. “Boops” departed finally on 16th February, 1986.

THE FIRST SEVEN PUPILS • Enid Castello • Beryl French • John Hercules • William John • Harold Phillips • Josephine Spencer • Denis Williams

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“Where Experience is Always at Your Service”

July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Dr. Jacob Bynoe June Ann Castello, daughter of Austin Castello, stated

“My father thought very highly of Jacob. He described him as the ‘Consummate Scholar’.”

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r. Jacob Bynoe was born in Nurney, Berbice, Guyana. A former teacher at Tutorial High School, he now holds a PhD in Education from the University of British Columbia, a Master of Arts degree (M.A). in Philosophy and Education, a Bachelor’s degree from the University of London, with concentrations in Logic, History of Philosophy and Ethics. He’d previously earned a Diploma in Education from the University of the West Indies (UWI) and completed a Graduate Seminar in Educational Planning at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, England. Over a 21-year span he served as Education Adviser, Consultant and College Principal in various Caribbean countries. He was Dean in the Faculty of Education, University of Guyana, prior to which he was Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Education. Dr. Bynoe lectured as a Research Fellow in Philosophy of Education, Faculty of Education, UWI and in addition, he taught at the Guyana Teachers College. But all this was preceded by a very successful 8-year stint as a Mathematics Teacher at Tutorial High School. Dr. Bynoe has won numerous awards and honors including the British Council Scholarship; and Fellowships from the British Commonwealth, the University of British Columbia as well as from UWI. Dr. Bynoe’s success bears witness to the truism that dedication and hard work are crucial to success in education, manufacturing, administration, arts and craft, whatever the venture. He is sees education as much more than a vehicle for upward social mobility. For him, learning has to be an ongoing life adventure, filled with reflection, analysis and deep discussion.

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Since migrating to the United States, several universities have been benefitting tremendously from his razor-sharp intellect. He’s an Adjunct Professor at the New Jersey City University’s Department of Philosophy & Religion, and at Montclair State University, Dept. of Classics & Humanities. He stated, “Since coming to America, I have also wandered into the corporate business world of retail sale, a most valuable, interesting, and educative experience about which I am resolved to write before I die, God willing.” Dr. Bynoe was the keynote speaker at the 2008 Tutorial High School Reunion in New York. He resides with his family in Brooklyn, New York City.

LOCATIONS OF OUR ALMA MATER 1939 – 17 North Rd, Bourda 1941 – 233 Soth Rd., Bourda 1942 – ‘GG’ Bent St., Wortmanville 1952 – Branch opened at 67 Croal St. & Brummel Place 1955 – 52 Fifth St., Alberttown 1957 – Branch opened at Malteenoes Sports Club 1980 – Woolford Avenue


12th Triennial International Reunion

Of Mini Skirts I

t’s the 1970’s and the rage in the world of fashion is the mini skirt. Everyone is wearing it, so why shouldn’t I? And who am “I”? I am in HIGH school and all the girls are shortening their skirts - their school uniforms, their party skirts, their casual wear, so why shouldn’t I raise my hemline? Must I run the risk of being labelled the “Old Maid” in the class and have everyone pity or scorn me in class? No, not me! It’s Monday morning at Tutorial High on Fifth Street, Alberttown. I’m a little late but early enough to hear Principal “Toukie” (or is it Deputy Principal “Bups”) thundering out the school’s rules pertaining to modesty and decency, and the proper length for female dresses, and the need to maintain the high moral standards and reputation of the school and all it stands for ... and so on and so forth. My fellow late-comers, mostly Form 4 girls, look down at their own skirts, and so do I. Together we smile, toss our collective heads with the more precocious of us saying, “That’s for him. Who is going to let girls from other schools laugh at us?” The timid one whispers, “What if Ms. Richardson catch us? She’ll take us up to Bups and Toukie, or maybe Lall-Lee or Mr. Knights”. So I reply, “Girls, forget about them. I know what we can do”, followed by a chorus of, “What can YOU do?” “Listen,” I say with our way too much bravado, “you know our parents are just like the ‘old’ teachers in this school, so we’ll just leave home with their long skirts, but when we get out of sight, we can just turn up our skirts, you know, roll it under our belt. That way, we have our mini skirt length. Then we can walk into school looking like everybody else”. “But, but ...” came from Ms. Timid. “But what?” say I. “OK then, when we get close to school, say near Church and Cummings Sts., we could let it down a little and walk into school looking the prim and proper way they want us to look, OK?” The girls all laugh heartily saying, “Good plan, good plan”.. Ms. Timid pipes up again, “But how ...” Anticipating her query I finished her question, “Oh, how will we change back to mini skirts before leaving school? Good question. When the dismissal bell rings at 3 o’clock, we just go to the Girls’ Room and roll in reverse, then we’ll be back on the road in style”. The girls are elated with this plan.

And Rules By Joyce Richardson

But we needed to learn an important lesson from the ‘old’ sages who said, “Cow caan get mo’ sense dan cow min(d)er” One afternoon several weeks later, I noticed Ms. Richardson paying attention to us, more than usual. I’m sure she noticed the speed with which several fourth formers dashed simultaneously into the Girls’ Room and must have been wondering why. She was curious, that Lady, so she comes over after a few minutes and knocks gently on the door. “Come in” we say in a sing-song chorus, thinking that it is one more of our friends. We open the door. Shock attack!! She is the last person we expect, and we are in no mood to explain why our skirts are shorter than they were an hour ago. Right around the room a lot of mouths fell open and hands dropped from the skirt waists. We’re fairly caught. She seems to be equally shocked at this blatant flouting of the school’s sacred rules, and right on the school grounds to boot! But she is the first to recover and in her sternest tone, she scolds, “So this is it? This is what you girls do ... exposing yourselves to the public”. A few seconds tick by (felt like minutes) then she had cause to be stunned all over again. The bravest of us coolly replies, “Miss, you only hide what you don’t want to be seen!” Take that! What followed is anybody’s guess ... but I can tell you, the rules did not change! July 27 - August 2, 2014

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The Good Ol’ Schooldays A Tribute to Our Teachers By Dr. Lear Matthews

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eminiscing about our school days conjures up a nostalgic, if not euphoric comfort. Indeed, we may leave home, but home never leaves us. It was the way we were in the good ol’ days that established the foundation for who/what we have become. Those who were of primary or secondary school age in Guyana during, before, or even after the 1960’s, would remember the following attributes, adages and parlance:

a duck-egg; Sheh used to ride a “preggy” to school, but e had a “cornstunce bike”; Ah used to wear yattin boots and shart pants to school; De spectacles mek e look like a real teachuh boy; Duh teacher used to give hard “Dictayshun” and Mental, pun tap a duh, e does beat bad; Ah wan “skult” from school today; E get baad licks yesterday; Town boy; Dem ‘country children’ bright; He forget e food “cyarriuh” on de train; Ah bring fuss; E bring lass; E fail de exam; Sheh pass with ‘flying Blackboard and easel; eraser; fountain colours’; wuh space yo bring? Meh pen and inkwell; blotting paper; slate; pen “nib” break; Alvin book got “daug slate pencil; lead pencil; exercise ears”; Ah give e “adge” and ah still beat book (times tables on back cover); e; champion gyerl and champion boy; Li’l ABC, Big ABC; First Standard; when yuh going to school mus walk in ruler; wild cane; “licks”; boys getting de corner before cyar lick yuh down; benched; Sums; Nursery Rhyme; walk pon de pavement; Micase before Shilling Arithmetic, Royal Reader, yuh late fuh school; Lennox nearly fall Students’ Companion, Silas Mariner, in de guttuh; leh we play catchuh; Ah Spell Well, Caribbean Reader; Latin; tecking a shart cut; I was in gool fus; E “Recreashun”; School bell, School callyattin laughing; Ah gat to go home an in, School over; Class Stand! Hands starch and press meh uniform; meh Dr. Lear Matthews out! In! Up! Down! Sit!; “line up”; faduh bicycle pouncha, so e couldn;t Miss or Sir; Lass lick; Pupil Teacher; drap meh to school; e always wearing Common Entrance; Scholarship Class; CP; “School Leavin”; duh lime skin pon e head; dem boys taanlize eh till e cry; GC; Senior Cambridge; P Form; Lessons (after school); School Bannah why yo so pagalee? You is a mook or wuh? you bin Sports; “Late-fo-school”; Rounders; hop scotch; jum-in; to school in August or wuh? De teachuh beat e till e wee wee taw; Woodwork Class; Sewing Class; Gyardening; Home e skin; sheh uniform always neet neet; You school clothe Economics; Short hand and typing lessons; debating society; always rumfle up – you gon get a good cut tail; When you leff bottom-house school; ribbon-bow; sweetie lady; ice-block Tutorial? (graduated). and flutie…. Here we are, from slate and pencil to mouse and IPod; Ah skip second standard; E fail; E is a dunce; Sheh was a nice from face-to-face to Facebook; from smart student “prefect”; E is a bright-boy; Sheh pass with “distingshun”; E to smart phone. As we celebrate this 75th anniversary get ten subjects; study yuh book; learn yuh tables; Ah get of the founding of THS, having been influenced by such

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12th Triennial International Reunion

You can never go home again, but the truth is you can never leave home, so it’s alright. (late) Maya Angelou

transformations, let us remember the groundings that helped us adapt to our current life space - how we got from there to here. THS has provided the foundation for that proverbial bridge. It is incumbent upon us to pay tribute to those who were instrumental in giving meaning to a school environment in which we were socialized and sometimes wish could magically return. As we reach back to help others move forward, displaying our altruistic nature by providing opportunities for current students, the connection also symbolizes a nostalgic re-creation of the past that engenders a therapeutic release that helps us to ‘carry on’. The quality of education acquired at THS, one of the most reputable educational institutions in Guyana led by the Castello brothers and under the tutelage of a cadre of dedicated teachers, is exemplary. Constantly promoting moral virtues with disparate communication styles and levels of prudence, they taught, challenged, nurtured and elevated us. They often served as surrogate parents. Teachers such as Mother Dey and Ms. Madison would offer comfort in the form of confidential advice to female students experiencing personal crisis. However, they also humiliated us, some arbitrarily using harsh disciplinary measures. Examples of the latter abound (engaging the “wild cane” and summarily sending home students who were not in uniform). In response, many of us fretted, but guided by traditional parental upbringing, we acquiesced, sometimes painfully so. In the end, those teachers meant well, and most of us turned out reasonably unscathed, maturing into self-actualizing global citizens. They helped to create the foundation for discovery and critical thinking. Partly due to their dedication and contributions, THS at times surpassed the “elite” high schools in both academic outcome and “athletics”.

Some of those remarkable teachers (circa 1950-1970) we would like to honor are: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Austin “Tookie”Castello, Principal (Latin, English) Joseph “Bops” Castello, Deputy Principal (Latin, English) Michael Aarons (English, Religious Knowledge) Leila Adams (English) Marcus “Piggy” Agrippa (Latin, Spanish) Michael “Cole” Albert (Math) Connie Alexander (French) Laurie Alexander (Literature) Handel Andrews (History) Hutton Archer (French, Spanish) Cecile Azores (Math) Edmund “Billy” Beck (History) George “Bogus” Benjamin (Math, Hygiene) Neil Blackman (French); Mr. Bourne (Chemistry) Doreen Brewster (French); Jacob Bynoe (Math) George Cadogan (Math) Ms. Cameron (History) Lawrence “Lally” Castello Edwards (Religious Knowledge) Tessa Clark (Religious Knowledge) Oswald Collymore (Science) James P. Croal (Math) Patrick “Constab” Cummings (Math) Clifton “Browsie” David (English) Mr. Dennison (Math) Kenneth “Crispus” Denny (Latin, Religious Knowledge) Adele “Mother” Dey (Religious Knowledge) Oclive Dey (Math) H. Denroy Dookway (Science) Egbert “Eggy”Duncan(Math) Olney Edwards (Math, Latin) Ms. Edwards (Literature) July 27 - August 2, 2014

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The Good Ol’ Schooldays

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Tutorial High Alumni Association • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Juliet Emanuel (English Language, Literature) Ronald “Pi R” Fraser (Math) Ms. Fraser; Phillip Garret (Science) Murtland Gordon (Math); Keith Gordon (Science) Patty Gray (Religious Knowledge) Mr. Greaves (Science) Michael Griffith (Math) Ms. Harding (Algebra) Lynette Harvey (French) Barbara Henry (Spanish) Lynette Hinds (French) Sam Hinds (Math, Science) Maksood “Lout” Hussein (Chemistry) Rita Hussein (French) Roy Ibbot (Math) Nigil Jackman Janice Jackson (French) Beryl Johnson (Algebra) Megan Joseph (French) Ms. Kennedy (Health Science) Vesta King (History) Ms. King (French, Literature) Joyce King-Richardson (Scripture, Geography) Hilbert Knights (English Literature) Pat A. “Baldy” Lawrence (English) Doris Lawrence (Literature) Myrtle Liverpool (History) Doris London (English) Roger “Skelly” Luncheon (Biology) Sandra Lynch (English) Aubrey Mars (Algebra) Vesta Matherson Lancelot McCaskey (Economics) Terrence “Quarry” McClean (British Constitution, Religious Knowledge) Fritz Mc Lean (Math) Mr. Meerabux (History) Clive Montouth (Math) Denise Nelson (English) Wilton Noble (Math) Narvan Persaud (Math) Thakoor Persaud (Science) Alan Persico (Literature) Ms. Persico (Math) Oscar Pollard (Science) Connie Prince-Bascom (French) Arthur Rhodius (Math) Lenny Richards (Math) Ms. Richardson (History) The Tutorialite

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Barbara Roberts (History) Clive “Robbie” Roberts (Science) George Robinson Valery Rodway (Literature, English) Ms. Saunders (Health Science) Claudette Schmidt (Latin) Keith Simon (Math) Julian Skeet Maggie Smith (French) Claudette Smith (Latin) Keith “Stully Boy” Stull (French) Mr. Thomas (Chemistry) Rosamond Watson (History) Iris White (French) Winston Wray-Gittens (Math) Joan Yaw (Music); Maggie Yeats (Latin), and more….*

*NB. Since it was customary to hire teachers while they awaited results of the Senior Cambridge exam, some taught for just one or two terms. Others left Queen’s College or Bishops High to join the THS faculty for a short period to accumulate “small change” before attending universities overseas. In addition, we had the benefit of teachers from the United Kingdom who participated in a British Overseas program. We honour ALL former THS teachers. Any omission or inaccuracies is not deliberate, but the casualty of time and the inevitable erosion of memory. Although Mr. “Breadfruit” Ogle was not a teacher, he had a penchant for enforcing discipline. Some may have viewed him as a “custodian/security guard with an attitude”, who took his job too seriously. The “Games Master” Mr. Noel also made his contribution and so did the Secretary, Ms. Callender, who was efficient with a quiet demeanor. We honor them too.

Special Tribute

Representing an era of outstanding teachers, the late Clifton Adolphus David was a notable stalwart of traditional education, who, like others of that era was known to be committed to the intellectual development of students and dedicated to the ideals of THS. He exemplified the consummate educator - a good communicator, knowledgeable, ebullient in manner, a good raconteur, and promoter of principled values. He pursued his profession with passion, vibrancy and a paternalistic demeanor that set him apart from other educators. He was a known


12th Triennial International Reunion

disciplinarian with an unconventional style which could evoke compliance, hilarity or fear in his youthful learners. During the 8th Triennial Reunion in Guyana (2002), former students including hundreds residing overseas, had the rare opportunity to see and interact with Mr. David. That was indeed a cherished electric moment for those students, many of whom had not seen him since they left school. They appeared to be in awe as the still sharp minded centenarian (he was 100+ years old when he passed in 2007), delivered a flawless speech in that unique “Browsie” tone of articulation, which no doubt brought back a flood of memories. His presence at that event symbolized the strength and determination of a generation. To many, he represented one of the pillars of the educational foundation that influenced their accomplishments. There are many interesting stories about the origins of our teachers’ “false names”. Regardless, with the utmost respect

and nostalgic yearning, let us honor the name, “Browsie” one more time. Along with the Castello brothers, he has become part of the best education team in Heaven. Postscript: For those students who may not be familiar with some of the above-mentioned terminologies, names and events, know that they represent the constituents of your educational roots. We hope that you now have some insight into the communication style, symbolism and significance of that era. You too must have moments of school days eccentricities which bring joy, laughter and tears as you reminisce. Share them with your children and grandchildren. Continue the legacy! Enjoy this milestone gathering. Time and distance may have altered the “home culture” we knew. Nevertheless, make new friend and engage in nostalgic camaraderie with classmates you have not seen in years, some you may never see again.

Some Early Achievers 1945 – Frederick Debidin, Government Junior Scholarship 1946 – Lancelot Thom, Government Junior Scholarship 1949 – Leila Persaud, Government Junior Scholarship 1949 – Marjorie Forsythe, Overseas Junior Certificate with 7 Distinctions 1950 – Jacob Bynoe, Cambridge Overseas Senior Certificate & in 1957 as a teacher he obtained a First Division Pass at the London BA 1950 – Henry Josiah (fmr. Student) was awarded BG’s first Colonial Development & Welfare scholarship for training in Journalism in the UK 1952 – Frederick George, Egbert Gittens, Gunraj Kumar, Stanley Moore - First 4 students to obtain passes at the Higher School Certificate Examination 1953 – Olive Simon, first Government Senior Scholarship 1954 – 1969 – Stanley Banarsee, Fritz McLean, Rudolph Singh, Maisie Selman, Douglas Scott, Dasmayante Persaud, James Croal, James Smith, Thomas D’Anjou, Lynette Deebing, David Griffith, Mohamed Khalil, Claudette Smith, Godfrey Procter, Joyhn Hinds, Lorraine Irving, Joseph Caesar, Kenneth Boyer, Louisa Crawford, Ronald Gordon, Nigel Blackman, John McAlmon, Hasood Hussain, Janet Gibson, Donald Roach, Shira Khan, Hilaire Imhoff, Earl Alexander, Rabindranauth Narayan, George Robinson - Government Senior Scholarships.

July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Tutorial Lives On By Anna Kokaram

Long Serving, Amicable Friend and Confidant

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y first encounter with Tutorial High School was in September 1979 when I started to teach there as a Temporary Qualified Mistress. The school was then in Fifth St., Alberttown, a gaunt faded three storeyed building with steps running diagonally across the front. Many years have passed since then, but Tutorial still exists, not JUST exist, it here, vibrant fulfilling its objectives. The school holds its own among other junior secondary schools in this country in academic performance, sports, and other co-curricular activities such as music and dance. And it draws its strength from its long history. I do believe that the year 1979 signalled the end of an era for Tutorial High School. I count myself privileged to have been a part of that era, even if it was at the very end, for it was an experience that I would not have wanted to miss. It was the last year that Mr. Austin Castello, founder of the school, held the position of Headmaster there, then he retired. Mr. Castello was 69 years old and was suffering severely from arthritis. Yet his love for his school and his commitment to the job was evident. In spite of his pains, he was present every day and would patrol the corridors, keeping an eye on what was going on. He had his brother, Joseph, who was the Deputy Headmaster, and such stalwarts as Mr. Trotman, Mr. Clifton David and Mr. Knights on his staff. These men, though aged, held on to their professionalism. With such examples to follow, the younger members of the staff could do no less than give a full day’s work. Today our teachers may be more qualified and are certainly skilled in areas that did not even exist thirty years ago. Yet many of the values and standards of the past have been lost, and even as we applaud the progress we have made, we regret what we have lost. The building in Fifth St had become overcrowded by 1980 and was in urgent need of repair. During the first half of the 1980’s, some schools had been closed because of inadequate accommodation. Tutorial was one of the schools slated to be closed. However, through the intervention of the Alumni (and other interested people) this did not happen.

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Instead, in 1984, about 200 students and half of the staff, those who had served longest at the school, were relocated to a building in Woolford Avenue, which was originally a branch of Central High School. This building was small and square with a veranda running halfway along the eastern side of the upper flat. There were no walls dividing the classes upstairs except for one classroom at the back. In fact, because of its appearance it was known as “the stable”. But, there was a huge grass field and an abundance of fresh air, both of which the students did not have in Fifth St. And how they loved it! Over the years the building was renovated and extended, and as it was extended, the student population grew once again. Plans were made to construct a modern complex for the school. The first block was built at the eastern end of the playfield. For three or four years the fourth and fifth forms were housed there, and then the rest of the complex was constructed, taking up the entire grass field. The school began to occupy the complex in 2005 and took full possession of it in 2006 when the Administration Block was completed. There are many former students who lament the loss of the grass field, and look back with fond memories at whose days when they had such fun playing on it. Needless to say we sympathize with them and mourn the loss of that playfield, but it gained for the school population modern facilities and equipment to provide students with a better quality education. But, just as teachers and buildings changed over these years, the students have changed as well. This, of course, was inevitable since society is always changing. I remember carefully observing another teacher, Mr. Trotman, during my first year. One day he was sitting at his table, the students were lined up in front of him, and as each one reached the front of the line, they handed over their books to be markede. Perhaps he was unwell, or what he was reading was not very interesting because he kept nodding off while he marked, yet not one student made a sound or moved out of places while Mr. Trotman napped. Whether it was out of respect or fear, it certainly would not happen today! I remember students in the past pursuing us, teachers, asking us for more help, more lessons, more work. Now


12th Triennial International Reunion we have to pursue students, asking to give them some help, some lessons, some work. It is not that we do not have good students today. Every year we get the good, the bad and the indifferent. Last year (2013) in particular, our results at the CSEC examinations were excellent despite the many added distractions of today that compete for our students’ attention. Mr. Joseph Castell, who became Headmaster in 1980 and functioned in this position for one year, used to go to classes and tell the students, “Make yourself teachable”. This is still applicable today. As long as children are willing to learn, they will succeed. In 1989, Tutorial celebrated its Fiftieth anniversary. There was a special Anniversary Programme at the school. One of the more memorable items was a poem which ended rather dramatically with the words “Tutorial will live on!” Mr. Austin Castello at that time was unable to walk and had to be carried into the building and recline in a bath chair because he could not sit up. When the student said those words, he stood up and repeated with fervency, “Tutorial will live on!” Such was his love for his school that it transcended even his infirmities. Twenty five years have passed since that day, and although the founder is gone, the school lives on. The lyrics of the school song which were written in 2007 encourage students to develop good qualities so that they could become useful citizens when they leave. The lyrics also encourage students to love their school and to be grateful to the institution where they spent such an important part of their lives. Inspiration for these lyrics must have come from the exemplary qualities displayed day after day by certain older members of the Alumni such as Malcolm Parris, W. Hansel Barrow MS, Oswald Kendall, Ms. S. Cort and Fritz McLean.

Even today, there are younger members of the Alumni who are following the examples set by the previous generation, and I am sure that in the years to come there will always be past students who will care for this school enough to contribute to its progress. And so, I have no doubt that in the next twenty-five years, when the school celebrates its Centenary, someone, somewhere will say as Mr. Austin Castello said 25 years ago, “Tutorial will live on!”

Congratulations! ON THE OCCASION of the 12th International Reunion of Alumni and 75th Anniversary of the Founding of Tutorial High School – an institution created from the vision of the Castellos whose insight, Christian forebearance and accomplishments we seek to emulate at The Guyana Education Trust College Samuel Tross FCCA – Chariman of School’s Board Malcolm Parris M.A;C.C.H. Secretary of School’s Board 108, Carmichael St. North Cummingsburg, Georgetown. Tel: +592-225-5279 / +592-226-9717 +592-223-7602 / +592-223-7603 Email: getc108@gmail.com

July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

The Girl Guides Unit

Enrollment

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utorial High School’s Girl Guides’ Unit was initiated by Ms. Gloria Thompson (current President of the Guyana Girl Guides Association and Alumnus of Tutorial). Ms. Felice Munroe, Teacher and Assistant Secretary of the Guyana Chapter of the THS Alumni Association, is serving as the Guide Leader.

self- development - of character, responsibility, citizenship and service in their own worlds and communities. The Unit meets every Friday at 15:30 hours on the school’s premises.

TOURMALINE (PINK) - Breana Nicholas

Tutorial’s Girl Guides have been involved in a multitude of activities over the years, including:• Outings • Christmas Socials • Exhibition for World Thinking Day • Learning whistle and hand signals • Craft • Concerts & Singing • Camping • Impromptu Speech competitions • Indoor and outdoor Games • Girl talk sessions and discussion of Social issues - Drugs & Adolescence, Teenage Pregnancy, HIV/AIDS and other general issues that affect youth.

The overall objective of Girl Guiding worldwide is to provide girls and young women with opportunities for

From September 2010 to date, the girls have learnt the ‘Promise’ Motto as well as international Guide Laws and

Tutorial High School’s Girl Guides’ Unit started in September 2010 with approximately thirty (30) girls. In 2014, the Unit boasts a register of Twenty-three (23) girls ages 11 – 16. Tutorial’s unit has three Patrol Leaders and these patrol groups are named after precious stones: EMERALD - Trechell Jarvis SAPPHIRE - Whitney Prowell

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12th Triennial International Reunion

Outing Guide songs. We continue to encourage them to behave at all times like proper young ladies while they ‘reach for the stars’. There has been striking evidence of behavioural changes in many of our Girl Guides since they joined up and became part of the Tutorial High School’s Girl Guides’ Unit.

Some of those who used to perform poorly academically have improved noticeably since joining the Girl Guides. Our curriculum includes various exercises designed to encourage them to study harder, to compete with each other academically, to be polite in speech and properly attired at all times. Many of them are showing more interest in their

Fun Day July 27 - August 2, 2014

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The Girl Guides Unit

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Guides pose with staff and alumni. Executive Malcolm Parris is sitting centre. work and their general deportment has improved. A few parents also reported that they too have observed improvements in their girls’ attitudes towards their own families and to their domestic responsibilities. The guide leader rewards Guides every year at Prizegiving/Graduation and throughout the year, mostly during general assembly. They receive prizes and trophies for outstanding academic performance, for the most improved guide, for dedication and hard work, among other achievements. Each week we also openly identify the “Girl Guide of the Week”. Because of the zerotolerance policy for fighting and other offences in school, the Guides are encouraged to be the change they want to see in their school. They are sometimes rewarded when they do exceptionally well by being taken out for ice cream, chicken or pizza. They especially love these times. Tutorial High School Girl Guides (THSGG) has competed with other units in Guyana during “National Thinking Day” observances. In recent years they dramatised and prepared posters (poster competition) depicting the lives of women and girls in other countries and they were quite successful. Unfortunately, THSGG has not been able to participate in any international jamborees due to financial constraints.

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Guide Leader Felice Munroe with Mrs. Thompson, President of Guyana Girl Guides Association


12th Triennial International Reunion

Frederick Debidin T

One Outstanding Alumnus

wo momentous events occurred in 1939. In Europe World War II was declared. In Guyana, Mr. Austin C. Castello at the age of 27 years, an experienced high school teacher, opened the doors of the building on Bent Street, Wortmanville, Georgetown and welcomed the first students to the new Tutorial High School. His vision and experience enabled him to prepare a fertile ground for the cultivation of disciplined minds which would fulfil the promise of then British Guiana. His legacy prevails. Alumni groups in the USA, UK and Toronto have been active in supporting Tutorial High consistent with the tradition followed by Mr. Castello, and with the School’s Motto: “We receive that we may give.” In 1942, the late Mr. J. Barry-Austin of Salem Congregational School in Lodge Village, advised my parents to send me to High School. He recommended Tutorial High School which fortunately was located a short distance from Lodge where the family lived. He was accepted into Tutorial High located in Bent St. Georgetown, In May 1942, and the move would allow two opportunities to compete for a scholarship to attend Queen’s College. Some students travelled daily from areas outside of Georgetown to attend classes. Despite the war, they were devoted to achieving the best in a friendly but competitive environment. Mr. Castello had made it clear that he expected Frederick to earn one of the scholarships. In 1945 as a result of his success at the Junior Cambridge Certificate examination, he was awarded one of the four Government Junior Scholarships and started attending Queen’s College. The War ended that same year. The following year Frederick succeeded at the Oxford and Cambridge certificate exams, and in 1948 successfully completed the University of London certificate examination, excelling in the main subjects – Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry. He re-wrote the examination the following year in order to compete for the Guyana Scholarship, but was not successful this time.

He graduated from school and joined the Public Works Department as an Apprentice Engineer. At the end of the war, the British government provided six (6) scholarships for Guyanese to study Engineering at a university in England. Frederick was the first person selected. As part of the arrangement, each awardee agreed to return to Guiana to serve in a suitable position for at least five (5) years. He

began his studies at the King’s College in 1950. On his return in 1954, he was appointed Assistant Engineer and assigned to the West Demerara District. In 1955 he was the Engineer (ag.) in Essequibo, returned to West Demerara after a year and was confirmed in the position. Frederick became the second Guianese Engineer to be selected for a scholarship by the International Road Federation for study of Highway Engineering at a university in the US with a contractual commitment for two years of service upon graduation. In one year, Frederick completed the requirements for a Master of Science Degree in Civil Engineering. His main areas of study were Soil Mechanics and Foundations, Pavement Design, Construction Planning and Equipment. From among the group of 40 international engineers who participated in the program, Frederick was selected as the Outstanding International Road Federation Fellowship student for the year 1959-1960. After a short stint at the Head office on his return to Guiana, he was sent to the Bartica-Potaro area to serve as District Engineer from 1961 to 1963. In the following year he moved over to the Roads Division Materials Laboratory in Georgetown. Not long after he made another momentous move. He migrated to Canada and found employment with a consulting firm, then with Ontario Hydro as a Soils Engineer engaged in design, construction and safety evaluations of earthen dams and foundations for major structures. After some 27 years, Frederick retired from Ontario Hydro in the capacity of Supervising Engineer, Geotechnical Design. Since then he has been busy volunteering in a computer recycling programme and other community-related activities in Toronto. He is now a Registered Professional Engineer in the Province of Ontario, Canada, is a Life member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of the Canadian Geotechnical Society. Frederick never forgot his roots. He continues to serve as a member of the Toronto Chapter of the Tutorial High Alumni Association.

July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Tutorial High School IS 75 YEARS OLD A Rich Historical Trip Down Memory Lane

The “:Sunbeam” Hall at ‘GG’ Bent Street, Wortmanville

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he Tutorial High School which first opened its doors on 1st September 1939 by one man, Austin Cosmo Castello. A Visionary and a consummate educator he was, taking a huge leap of faith in then British Guiana in response to a very pressing need for secondary level education for children of working class parents. Ironically, this exact date was the day the German Fuhrer Adolf Hitler invaded Poland, a signature act that blossomed into World War II. The effects of this catastrophe had not

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yet filtered down to this hemisphere, although our Colonial ‘owners’ were participating. British Guiana remained relatively calm under colonial rule at a time when the secondary education system as it were catered only for the children of colonists, the wealthy migrant owners of sugar cane, cotton and tobacco plantations, and the commercial business class. Tutorial High School began its illustrious history quite inauspiciously with just seven (7) students in a cottage


12th Triennial International Reunion at 17 North Road, Bourda. Austin Cosmo Castello was indomitable, determined to educate as many children as he could. By 1946 the War was over, British Guiana was in the throes of a multitude of material shortages and deprivation, yet the population of Tutorial had swollen to several hundreds and had outgrown its initial location. Austin, called “the Toucan” everywhere else but to his face, secured a larger building aptly called “The Sunbeam Hall” at ‘GG’ Bent Street, Wortmanville. It was owned by a Friendly Society. Soon enough this two-storeyed building was bursting at its seams as the number of entrants kept on growing. Though the school was located in Georgetown, many of the students came from villages on the East and West Coast of Demerara, and West Coast Berbice, from Hopetown to Stewartville. At the time, the school was figuratively in competition for students with Central High, Washington High, Wray Enterprise and Chatam High schools to name a few, yet the halls of Tutorial kept on swelling. One may surmise that “the Toucan’s” easy approach to fee paying was a major contributory factor. The monthly fee in those pioneering days was Two Dollars (BG$2.00) yet many parents struggled to meet it. Some had four children attending the school, others travelling from the rural villages were faced with additional costs for snacks, transportation and contingencies. In the spirit of his cause – an education at any cost – Austin Castello waived and reduced fees and offered full scholarships for high performers. Late alumnus, Peter Britton, A.A., LLb (Lond) once wrote in an historical review, “I vividly recall that September morning in 1946 when about two hundred of us descended on that two-storeyed ‘GG’ Bent Street building. We came from as far East as Hopetown, West Berbice, and as far West as Stewartville, West Coast Demerara, whilst … encompassing those from Mahaicony, Beterverwagting, Plaisance, Kitty and central Georgetown. “Most of us were armed with letters of introduction from our erstwhile headmasters and notifications of our scholarship awards, and were accompanied by our parents/guardians, most of whom were making their initial trip to the capital city. Anxiety was most high. Uniforms were stiffly starched and shining. The girls were all bedecked in ribbon bows, the boys in shoes and socks, some of them donning these for

Tutorial High School will commemorate its 75th Anniversary on 1st September, 2014. This significant milestone coincides this year with the 12th Triennial Alumni Reunion of the four (4) Alumni Chapters from Guyana, New York, Toronto and London. The Guyana Chapter will preside over a week of celebration slated for 27th July to 3rd August. The activities include Courtesy Calls on local dignitaries by the visiting executives of the overseas-based alumni chapters, active participation in Emancipation Day activities and a Gala Ball and Dinner. There is high expectation that former students resident in Guyana will seize the opportunity to participate in the diverse events. the first time. “The sum of $2.00 per month was far beyond the reach of many parents, yet I do not recall a single student being turned away for non-payment of school fees. I certainly do remember many who were able to complete their schooling without making a single payment after the first term’s fees. We (the alumni) remain conscious of the fact that we were able to secure a quality secondary education by the gift of our Founders.” Perhaps it was the palpable generosity of Austin Castello who was eventually joined in this noble endeavour by his brother Joseph, known fondly among generations of students as “Bups”, which engendered the immense popularity of Tutorial High, that and the highly acclaimed athletic prowess of the students. July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

The alumni from the era of the 1940’s and 50’s cannot help but recall with vivid detail the stringent regulations that kept the male population physically separate from the female, and the laws of personal and social etiquette that became par for the course. The late Senior Counsel Peter Britton wrote, “Our association with and proximity to the female population ended at the gate of the school. Any infraction of this rule was treated almost as a treasonable offence to be visited with the greatest severity on the sinner and the sinned alike”.

EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION & SPORTS Mr. Britton went on to juxtapose the education system of today with yesterday’s especially in the context of corporal punishment, noting that it was a firm and inflexible rule at Tutorial over 60 years ago that only the principal, or his deputy, or a senior member of staff in his presence and with his permission could administer corporal punishment, whatever the student’s infraction. The students flourished in this environment that carefully nurtured development of the mind and body. The path chosen was competition – debates, elocution and quizzes for the ultimate prize of a Government Junior Scholarship to one of the elite secondary schools and junior colleges. The first Grade I certificate at the Cambridge Overseas Examinations was obtained by the young Denis Williams who later went on to the United Kingdom on a British Council scholarship and earned international renown in Art and Anthropology. He was among the first 7 pupils who inaugurated THS as was Lancelot Thom followed in 1941. Students continued to win distinguished Government scholarships and awards for outstanding academic achievements. Between 1945 and 1969 a number of Tutorial students won national scholarships and awards including Frederick Debidin, Jacob G. Bynoe, Shira Khan and Donald Roach. Tutorial’s Debating Team rose high in the local standings, often defeating teams from the more “elite” schools. From the basics, the Castellos kept the curricula up to date with what obtained in the high-brow schools here and abroad. Science was taught almost from the inception, but the first fully outfitted science laboratory was opened in 1959, with facilities for tutelage in Biology, Physics and Chemistry.

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Tutorial’s tradition of excellence in sports was just as consistently demonstrated throughout the 1950’s to the early 1970’s. In 1963 the Tutorial Girls team won the Roy Wong Basketball Trophy, and the boys won the ‘Juice’ Basketball tournament. Individual athletes excelled in their respective sports, including track and field, cricket, rounders, football and rugby. In 1970 the school won the O.T. Donald Under 16 Football Cup, and in 1971 the rugby team snagged the Hardy Timmerman Trophy. Tutorial athletes represented Guyana in the Junior Carifta Games and the International Texaco Games in neighbouring Trinidad and Tobago in that era. The single most outstanding accolade that alumnae hold on to is the achievements of the now late Claudette Masdammer-Humprey, British Guiana’s first female Olympian. Claudette entered Tutorial High on an Athletic Scholarship and her athletic ability was nurtured by the Castello Brothers. In 1956 soon after she graduated, she was selected to represent the country (colony) at the Olympic Summer Games in Melbourne, Australia in the 100m and 200m races, and was the only female West Indian athlete who qualified for these premium sprinting events. In 1958 she went to the Commonwealth Games and the following year copped the 100m Bronze medal plus Silver in the Long Jump at the British West Indian Championship Games held here in British Guiana. Claudette’s performance earned her the national Sportswoman of the Year (1956) award in British Guiana. It became a tradition for new entrants each academic year to become acquainted with the accomplishments of past students so they could endeavour to surpass them. “Excellence in all fields of Endeavour” was one motto, and they were never allowed to forget the intellectual giants who had graced the “Sunbeam Hall”. This aura of success hung around Tutorial for almost three decades. It had become one of the most popular urban secondary educational institutions with a reputation for high academic achievements, and for fearsome sports competitions. The younger Joseph Castello officially retired in 1981 and Tutorial High became a fully government-controlled institution. In September 1984 the population was fractured,


12th Triennial International Reunion dislocated. Half of the student body was placed in the former Central High School building in Woolford Avenue (its current location), and the remainder in other extant secondary schools. In the 1990’s a series of renovations were undertaken in the Woolford Ave. building to add classrooms, Home Economics, Science & Information Technology laboratories. A mid-afternoon fire in 2007 destroyed a relatively large wing and the school lost a huge portion of its historical records. The burnt out buildings have since been rebuilt and more modern facilities installed. The four Chapters of the Tutorial High School Alumni Association are now very determined to restore the high level of achievement, academic and otherwise, for which Tutorial was well known. The Alumni Chapters in Guyana, London and Toronto along with the Support Group in New York have been raising funds for many years and transmitting those funds and materials to improve the fortunes of their Alma Mater.

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The Castello

Commemorative Fund

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“Celebrating The Past, Challenging The Present, Creating The Future”

he ethos of the Castello brothers, Austin Cosmo and Joseph, was an education at any cost. Hundreds of students from the pre-1976 era had the privilege of attaining a quality secondary education at this private school free of cost just because of the brothers’ generosity. Two Dollars ($2.00) per term in the 1940’s was a lot of money for many poor working class parents. The fee rose to $30

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in 1960. Consider the circumstances extant in colonial British Guiana, then factor in three or four children from one household and the picture that emerges records a family in dire financial straits with children of exceptional academic ability. There were quite a few families in this condition, workers


12th Triennial International Reunion

Cassandra, her father Dereck and sister Dacia display her prizes.

Cassandra received the CCF award from Board Chairman, Gregory Blyden.

who were simply unable to pay ‘school fees’ after the first term. In true Castello fashion, the children were allowed to continue their classes, some quite unaware of the fact that their parents had communicated their hardships to Austin and his likely response was, “OK. You will pay when you can. Your child(ren) just can’t stop going to school”. His generosity was not confined to this cluster. Scholarships were awarded to deserving children “left, right and center”, to children from rural areas as far away as Mahaicony and Hopetown in West Berbice, from Wales to Uitvlugt at West Demerara, and to outstanding students living in Georgetown who had excelled at the Junior Cambridge examination, or in sports. Tutorial was among the highest ranking second tier secondary schools of the time, of course after the tier 1 top five led by Queen’s College.

Parris, Gregory Blyden); others function in diplomatic circles (Honorary Consul General of the Kingdom of Norway, Desmond Sears and formerly of Japan, Hans Barrow); in public sector institutions (Dr. Barton Scotland and Fritz McLean), and the media (Mark Watson, Nazeema Raghubir, Esan Griffith). Many have migrated and joined religious orders (Monsignor Paul Jervis) while others acquired Doctoral degrees in a wide assortment of disciplines.

Many Tutorialites, from 1944 when the first intake graduated, to 1976 when the school was absorbed under the umbrella of the Ministry of Education, went on to play very significant roles in the development of Guyana, in public and private capacities. Some became Ministers of Government and Parliamentarians (the late Kenneth Denny and Mr. Malcolm Parris); University of Guyana lecturers (Michael

This formerly high flying educational institution lost its status for a plethora of reasons and it even came close to being shut down by the government of the 1970’s. Education was made free in 1972 so it was left to the Ministry to effect repairs to school buildings. Tutorial High located on 5th St. Alberttown did not feature on the priority list. The Castello brothers, now at ages 68 (Austin) and 65 (Joseph) although beyond the newly established retirement age of 55, stayed on at the school and Joseph was appointed Head Master three years before he retired officially in 1981/82. For obvious reasons, scholarships were no more. THE CASTELLO COMMEMORATIVE FUND & AWARD Just over a decade ago, the Alumni Association of four July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association chapters (London, Toronto, Guyana, New York) floated the idea of reviving the Castello legacy of providing scholarships and academic awards to the school’s graduates who have won places at tertiary institutions in and outside of Guyana. The plans foundered a bit and lay dormant for a few years, but some members were quietly researching the legal ramifications, identifying possible sources of funding for continuous replenishment, and crafting constitutional requirements for its management. They then decided that the sources of funding would include contributions from the Alumni Chapters in Guyana and overseas, revenue from fund raising events, from gifts donated by past students, resources provided by the Education Ministry, and from the proceeds of the net revenues realized by each Alumni Chapter hosting a Triennial Reunion. The school’s 74th Anniversary rolled around on 1st September 2013, and during the month-long commemorative activities, the Alumni Association launched the Castello Commemorative Award and Fund at a ceremony that featured high ranking officials in the Education Ministry.

That was not all she wrote – literally. Cassandra had been simultaneously enrolled in the Morgan Learning Center from the third form level and she performed creditably at CXC English Literature and Integrated Science (2013). The school and Alumni tangibly rewarded her groundbreaking achievement in Agri Science with monetary gifts and trophies donated by the New York and Toronto Chapters. This humble, self-effacing young woman still believes that there was much more she could have done with her examinations to earn distinctions in all the subjects she wrote. Though currently enrolled in the Biology degree programme, she is holding on to her dream of studying Medicine and one day becoming a specialist in Osteopathy. This year’s recipient of the Castello Commemorative Award would be identified and bestowed during the September celebrations marking the school’s 75th Anniversary.

In his feature address, President of the Guyana Chapter, Desmond Sears, explained that the Castello Commemorative Fund is a Tertiary Education resource that would be used to sponsor one Tutorial graduate every year who has performed creditably at any level of the Caribbean Council of Examinations (CXC) and gained admission to the University of Guyana, the University of the West Indies or any other institution offering tertiary or vocational study. The fund will also be used to supply educational facilities for the school, and should serve as a catalyst for students to aim for greater achievements. The Guyana chapter is managing the fund in tandem with representatives of the Student and Parent-Teacher bodies, overseen by the Ministry of Education. The very first recipient of the CCF four-year Scholarship award was 17 year old Cassandra Bovell. She had just gained admission to the University of Guyana to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Biology. She has the distinction of being the first Tutorial CXC Candidate to achieve a ‘double award distinction’ in Agriculture Science, and scored Grades I and 2 in English Language, Human and Social Biology, Mathematics, Social Studies and Information Technology.

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Monetary awards from the New York Chapter being presented by Mr. Desmond Sears (President of the Tutorial High School Alumni Guyana Chapter)


12th Triennial International Reunion

Legacy of the School Vendor The Way We Were

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By Lear Matthews

treet vending as an occupation, considered the cornerstone of many cities’ historical and cultural heritage, has existed for a very long time. However, the school vendor’s role is unique and deserves special recognition. Little is known of the working conditions these small-scale entrepreneurs endure or the joys, influence and satisfaction of interacting with children. Whether it was Ms. Murray, Ms. Stefie or Auntie Gertie, her presence represented an impressionable dimension of the educational environment of primary and secondary students in Guyana since the 1950’s and to a lesser extent, today. She was a daytime fixture occupying an unsolicited “spot” outside the school building. She would “set up” a make-shift stand near a lantern post on the parapet, under one of Guyana’s massive trees or with a tattered umbrella for shelter from the hot equatorial sun or torrential rain. Typically, she was an unassuming middle-aged woman wearing a plain dress, matching “head tie” or straw hat and apron with side pockets. Fondly known by some of her youthful patrons as “the sweetie Lady”, this veritable street vendor was a beloved seller of a potpourri of local snacks. She peddled a variety of succulent, tart indigenous fruit (arguably of some nutritional value), sweets and beverages displayed on a shallow, well-worn, unpainted wooden tray. Popular items were green mango slices, tamarind, golden apple, guinnep, dunks, sugar-cakes, coconut ice, chip chip, hard sweetie (nevah done), lump, tamarind balls, plantain chips, chicken foot, mettai, fudge, channa, phulourie, flutie, and custard block, the latter stored in an oversized thermos flask. Favorites included “tambrun”, plum and gooseberry syrups served on brown paper, which was often chewed when the savory snack was devoured with little concern about the health consequences. Although “stinkin toe” (locus) was not a preferred choice due to its pungency and clamminess, it was occasionally sold by this solitary vendor. Salt, pepper and “sour” were an essential part of her repertoire of flavoring condiments. She carried a sharpened kitchen knife used primarily for peeling and “cuttin’ up” fruit, which she did with well-honed culinary skill. As if those indigenous goodies provided extra vitality or mental alertness, pupils would swarm her ‘stand’ during mid-morning “recreashun” and at lunch time. Seemingly energized, many could be seen standing around or gleefully playing while chomping, savoring and sharing snacks, for which they paid no more than a few pennies, or they got by “trust (credit) until Friday”. Others patronized her on their way home, licking sticky fingers and wiping them on khaki short pants or well-pleated uniform dresses.

Some retrospective observations about the interaction between vendor and pupil are noteworthy. This extraordinary matron of commerce was not only well respected, but known to defuse conflicts, often with a calm, yet stern “yah’ll don’t fight, man”, offering solicitous, motherly advice to her unwitting juvenile female and male patrons. Her personality, characterized by patience and caring, reflected in her trade. Unheralded, she was like an extra-mural school attaché. However, of no significance to us was that this adorable seller intermittently wiped her hands on what appeared to be a permanently smudged apron, repeatedly collecting money and making change while handling the delectable snacks. She also broke “hard candy” with the sweatsaturated wooden knife handle. There must have been moments of ambivalence about the sanitary conditions under which those appetizing building blocks of our youthful biological make up were prepared and stored. Notwithstanding any of that, we survived! Some believe that immunity to such potential nutritional hazards was developed over time. Although they co-existed amicably, her only real competition was the shave-ice man. Precariously balancing a huge crocus-covered block of ice on a Carrier Bike, he provided a treat that helped to cool us down from the broiling sun and tiresome school yard activities, such as lass lick and catchuh. The first few sucks on a piece of shave-ice, partially molded with his bare palm, doused in thick red syrup (whatever the source of that ruby brew) was a heavenly experience. How sweet it was! Do you remember the time when a desperate pupil would hurriedly “lick” his/her shave ice or otherwise contaminate it to avoid sharing a piece? Or (as one of our readers mused) when a young man could afford to be extravagant and treated his girlfriend to a sugar cake or a shave ice? Oh yes, it was a time of true innocence. The days of that brand of school vendors may be gone but not forgotten. I trust that this re-created journey down memory lane has whetted your appetite to re-live the way we were. Post Script: This author’s research revealed that school vendors today are subject to health checks and food hygiene certification as prescribed by the Ministry of Health and the City and Town Councils. July 27 - August 2, 2014

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First Guyanese

Female Olympian Claudette Izel Masdammer-Humphrey

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laudette Izel Humphrey (nee Masdammer) became the first Female Olympian f ro m B r i t i s h G u i a n a (Australia 1956) while she was still a student of Tutorial. She was born on March 30, 1936 and attended the St. George’s Anglican School. She secured an Athletic Scholarship to Tutorial High School and literally blossomed. Her athletic ability was meticulously nurtured by the Castello Brothers. She participated in the annual public schools’ sports meets and in inter-house competitions. Her sprinting prowess led to her selection to represent British Guiana at the 1956 Olympic Summer Games in Melbourne, Australia. During the games, the students were promised a holiday if she performed exceptionally against world class athletes from countries all around the world. Unfortunately, Claudette failed to qualify for the finals. The Tutorial student population, though disappointed that they did not get that holiday, was extremely proud of their school mate. It is apposite to note that at those 1956 Games Claudette was the only female West Indian athlete to qualify for the premium sprinting events – the 100m and 200m.

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She finished in fifth place in the 100 meters heats with a time of 12.87 seconds, running against competitors from Germany (11.7 seconds); Great Britain (11.9 seconds), New Zealand (12.3 seconds) and South Africa (12.5 seconds). The countries competing in the 100 metres were Australia, Great Britain, Germany, the Soviet Union, Italy, the USA, France, South Africa, Poland, Canada, Malaysia, Singapore and British Guiana. The standing Olympic record at the games was 11.5 seconds. (USA). In 1960, Claudette became a Student Nurse at the Georgetown Hospital. She spent approximately one year nursing before migrating to England in 1961 to further her studies in Nursing at Central Middlesex Hospital in London. There she met and subsequently married Winston Humphrey, a fellow Guyanese military man in the British Navy. From that union they bore three children, Abigail Sharon (Southampton 1966), Karen Allison (Singapore 1967), and Ian Spencer (Hong Kong 1973). In 1975, Claudette moved back to England with her family and continued her nursing career at Southampton General Hospital. With the goal of becoming a housewife, she joined the St Mary’s clinic in Portsmouth. She passed her Finals in 1979 and was employed as a midwife at Hyde General Hospital. Claudette moved up to Sister-in-Charge of the Maternity Unit at Hyde General Hospital and delivered hundreds of babies up until her retirement in 2002. The former sprinter and midwife passed away on November 13, 2013 at the age of 74 after bravely fighting a terminal ailment.


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Celebrating the Past

Challenging the Present Creating a Roadmap for the Future By Malcolm Parris

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n retrospect, I would hardly have given thought, as a school boy, as to the length of time our alma mater would have been in existence. But as we become aware of the number of secondary schools which are now only memories –we are assailed by a variety of reflections, much nostalgia, very few regrets and most of all, overwhelming gratitude. As we convene our 12th International Reunion, coincidentally with the 75th” Anniversary of Tutorial High, we have adopted a theme which appropriately reflects a celebration of this nature. We glory in the achievements and, to be worth our salt, devote some time and thought to the formulation of plans and objectives as well as concepts, which should guide the future. For Austin and Joseph Castello, (“Toucan” and Bops”), there were the challenges of the present which would have allowed them to create the future. Their pioneering spirit was guided by a vision which enshrined education as the vehicle for liberation from the constrictions imposed by poverty. Scores of former students are eternally grateful to Austin Castello for the “pay later” facility and the athletic scholarships they enjoyed while he donned his thread-bare suits and created an atmosphere of modesty and frugality in order to keep the ship of Tutorial afloat. The sartorial elegance displayed by Joseph the sibling Deputy Principal, was in direct contrast. The Castellos strove to create the rounded student. Proof of

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this lies in the number of times the school’s teams engaged other top schools in the ‘Finals’ for the various ‘Cups’ and ‘Shields’ in the different sports and athletic meets. Some of our alumni still boast about the Rugby team. And of course, incontrovertible evidence is the legacy of the now late Claudette Humphrey nee Masdammer, the first female to represent the then British Guiana at the Olympics in 1956. In the academic arena, the plethora of professionals, supervisors, employed and self-employed workers in the work forces, now more abroad but still ‘at home’, provides ample proof of the resounding success in their quest to meet the challenges of preparing their students for the world of work. And so it now becomes our task, as self-appointed guardians of the Tutorial heritage, to ensure that we are working steadily at “creating the future” by adequately and imaginatively “challenging the present”. “We are preparing our children for a future we will never see” This statement implies that the sufficiency of intellectual and functional knowledge must be matched by the over-riding provision of moral guidance inculcated through instruction and everyday practice. Thus material gains would be automatically enjoyed in an environment of mutual trust having been earned through co-operative, honest effort. In this way our future alumni can play their part in the enhancement of the quality of life of the nation. In this regard, there is urgent need for our students to be taught to save money in an organized way. The school’s Thrift Society should be resuscitated, soonest possible.


12th Triennial International Reunion

This practice of saving would not only allow the children to inculcate the habit, but also give the Business Department of the school opportunities to execute practical exercises. Students would be encouraged to continue saving even after graduating and in this manner, maintain contact with their alma mater. Let us think also about the possibility of this being the basis for a modest business venture in conjunction with the Visual Arts Department of the school. This practical, co-operative activity should be underpinned by greater use of the “group method” in everyday classroom practice. We know of the group presentations at the university level. We need to begin this practice in earnest at the secondary level. I do not think that we have to spend too much time defending the benefit of nurturing this practice as a concept which should inform more of our everyday activities. We will learn to truly be our “brother’s/sister’s keeper”. A pet project of mine is the establishment of a Language Laboratory at Tutorial High. I feel certain that this is the most lasting tribute that could be paid to the memory of Austin and Joseph Castello. We who have had the good fortune of being tutored by these two mentors would appreciate how much “language” meant to them. However, my proposition does not rest on this alone. I think that we can make our contribution to our country’s development first, by seeking to produce students who can be employed at the headquarters of CARICOM as translators. We should also be able to speak with confidence, the languages of our neighbors. Then we should begin to communicate proficiently with our trading partners. In doing so, the size of our country relative to its population must be seriously considered. Our graduands should pass at least an internal examination which certifies that they could effectively conduct a conversation in Spanish or Portuguese or French. This process should continue during the first two years of school. Another crucial ingredient must be the physical environment. We have to become more concerned about caring our surroundings and equipment in its entirety. If we give this issue sufficient attention, we would positively influence the home environment of our students. In addition, we should keep our eyes on the Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) so that we could be an active partner when the need arises. Any serious proposition about creating the future, must address the issues of ethnic relationships even at this level. Space must be found to accommodate meaningful formal instructions on the cultures of our six peoples and significant facts about the various religions as a means of encouraging appreciation and reducing intolerance. This may even

contribute to the identification of analogous practices. In this regard, the molding of national consciousness through the teaching of history cannot be overstated. The co-operative concept can be extended across institutions by maximizing scarce resources through sharing with other Secondary Schools in the immediate geographic area. To effectively execute such a plan, we should think of curriculum areas in which cooperative efforts can be successfully pursued. Music Education commits itself to this process easily, given the shortage of teachers and the required equipment. This approach can facilitate intellectual and cultural development among students. This attempt at provoking deeper introspection about the future of our alma mater would be seriously lacking if mention is not made of the growing importance of the alliance between the school and the home as manifested in the PTA. No longer is the student a “child/ward of the village” as we used to be. Very often it takes the combined efforts of parent and teacher to give guidance or even counter the influences of untoward forces, in the interest of the student’s progress. Fortunately, the child could be equally guided to benefit from the better influences. In order to facilitate and strengthen the connection between the school and parents, it would be important to organize Parent Workshops at the beginning of each term. This partnership between home and school would not only encourage the involvement of parents, but could potentially increases the capacity of parents to appreciate the nexus between parental responsibilities and teachers’ expectations. It would also give parents a greater role in the education of their children and elevate their awareness and participation in key aspects of the school’s curricula. We should not forget the functions of the alumni in relation to the reunion’s theme. Among us are a significant number of persons who came under the direct influence of the founders of the school. We must consider ourselves fortunate. Having the school as a living entity gives us the opportunity to honour their memory, and emulate them by helping to provide the requisite facilities and enhancing knowledge. Our aim must be to foster an atmosphere in the school that encourages both students and teachers to enjoy the time they spend together, and that after graduating, students would maintain association with and contribute to their alma mater. As alumni, we would have achieved our purpose when future students of the school become parents, and clamour for their children to become part of the Tutorial tradition. I close with hope that the future of Tutorial High School will remain in hands that appreciate the role this icon has played in the lives of literally thousands and the blessings it could continue to be to many more. July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tertiary Education Bursaries for 2013 & 2014 Graduates

Headmistress Audrey Abrams -Thomas (L) and Teacher Felice Munroe (R) with awardees

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leven students of Tutorial High School (THS) were given monetary bursaries to assist in their pursuit of tertiary level education. In keeping with the ethos of the vibrant THS Alumni Association, members of the Toronto Chapter donated the funds to help offset the expenses of the students who wrote CXC and CSEC Examinations in 2013 (6) and 2014 (5). Some of them are already students of the University of Guyana pursuing Bachelor’s degree programmes in Banking, Marketing, Economics and Medicine. Others have commenced certificate and degree programmes at private tertiary institutions including the Aeronautical Engineering institute at the Ogle Aerodrome. At a simple ceremony held earlier this month in the School’s Library, members of the Board of Governors presented bursaries to Davie Beepat, Namanie Singh, Toshana Maloney, Patrick Stewart, Kenisa Sim and Ryan Shim who all graduated in 2013. Five students who are currently writing up to 11 subjects at CXC also received bursary awards. They were Damion Petty, Mahendra Paul, Sonia Grannum, Akesha

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Murray and Treasure Muchennagumbo. Gregory Blyden, Chairman of the School’s Board, used the occasion to officially sign a three-year contract with Ms. Cassandra Bovell, the first recipient of the Castello Commemorative Scholarship Fund which was revived in 2013 to coincide with the 74th Anniversary of the school’s founding. The then 17 year old had just gained admission to the University of Guyana to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Biology. She has the distinction of being the first Tutorial CXC Candidate to achieve a ‘double award distinction’ in Agriculture Science, and she scored Grades I and 2 in English Language, Human and Social Biology, Mathematics, Social Studies, Information Technology, English Literature and Integrated Science. In his remarks, Mr. Blyden, a THS alumnus, spoke of the continuous contributions of books, teaching and learning materials and cash made to the school by past students in their individual capacities and through the Alumni Chapters


12th Triennial International Reunion constitutional requirements for its management. It was then decided that the sources of funding would include contributions from the Alumni Chapters, revenue from fund raising events, from gifts donated by past students, resources provided by the Education Ministry, and from the proceeds of each Triennial Reunion that is hosted in turn by the various Chapters. T h e s c h o o l ’s 7 4 t h Anniversary rolled around Signing of 2013 Castello Commemorative Scholarship Contract. Recipient Cassandra Bovell on 1st September 2013, is at right, VP Gregory Blyden (c) and Head Mistress Audrey Abrams-Thomas. and during the month-long commemorative activities, in Guyana; London, England; Toronto, Canada; and New the Alumni Association launched the Fund. President of the York. The signing of the certificate/contract, he said, was Guyana Chapter, Desmond Sears, explained that the Castello in consonance with the school’s 75-year old motto, ‘We Commemorative Fund is a Tertiary Education resource that Give That We May Receive’. “We live in an age of advanced would be used to sponsor one Tutorial graduate every year technology so wherever in this world Cassandra goes, she who has performed creditably at any level of the Caribbean would be able to give back to the school her time and Council of Examinations (CXC) and who has gained admission resources,” Blyden stated. to the University of Guyana, the University of the West Indies or any other institution offering tertiary or vocational study. This motto in all its permutations has been the school’s The fund will also be used to supply educational facilities bulwark ever since it was founded in 1939 by a consummate for the school. The Guyana chapter manages the fund in educator, Austin Castello, who brought to fruition his vision collaboration with the Student and Parent-Teacher bodies, to provide quality secondary education for the children of and it is overseen by the Ministry of Education. British Guiana’s working class. The monthly fee in those pioneering days was $2.00, and it climbed gradually to $30.00 by 1970. Two years later, education from Nursery to University was declared free. Austin was joined in this noble endeavour by his younger brother, Joseph, in 1956, and together with a cadre of committed teachers, they promulgated the value of higher education. Just over a decade ago, the Alumni Association first floated the idea of reviving the Castello legacy of providing scholarships and academic awards to the school’s graduates who win places at tertiary institutions in and outside of Guyana. The plans for what would be the Castello Commemorative Scholarship Fund lay dormant for a few years while some members in the Guyana and overseas Chapters were quietly researching the legal ramifications, identifying possible sources of funding for continuous replenishment, and crafting

The recipient of the 2014 Castello Commemorative Scholarship Award will be announced in September during the School’s celebrations of its 75th Anniversary. In the meantime, the Guyana Chapter is preparing to host hundreds of THS alumni located all over the world for the Twelfth Triennial Reunion scheduled for 27th July to 3rd August, 2014. A variety of activities have been planned for the one-week reunion including tours to Guyana’s hinterland regions and participation in the annual Emancipation celebrations. The highlights will be a grand Gala Dinner and Ball and an awards presentation event at which several past and present teachers and outstanding personalities would be tangibly recognized. Past students could contact any member of the Guyana chapter for more information and to make reservations. July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Photo Flashback REUNION 2002

Sun. 28 July - Sat. 3 August

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12th Triennial International Reunion

FIRST BOARD OF GOVERNORS • Rev. Gladwin Fraser, Chairman • Harold Phillips, Carlton Weithers, Haroun Bacchus – Barristers • E.E. Cornette, O.W. Glasgow, P.E. Fidell, Una Matthews, May Rodrigues, H.S. Jackson – Government representatives • A.C Castello – Headmaster • J.W. Castello – Secretary

CHRONICLE OF STUDENT ENROLMENT 1939 – 1940 – 1951 – 1952 – 1953 – 1954 – 1958 –

7 172 231 331 420 550 921

1963 – 1966 – 1967 – 1968 – 1969 – 1971 – 1980 –

1,172 1,190 1,240 1,169 1,137 911 532

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A Tribute

to Claudette Masdammer By Fritz Mclean

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laudette Masdammer was among the 3rd formers at the ‘GG’ Bent Street THS building in 1955, when I was offered my first job, after the results of the December 1954 Senior Cambridge exams were published. (For you youngsters, the Senior Cambridge was the equivalent of the GCE ‘O’ level and CXC exams). Mine was only a temporary appointment as Mr Austin Castello expected that I would be going on to QC that September to pursue GCE ‘A’ level certification in Science. The opportunity of showcasing a product of the school in that way was not lost on Mr Castello, as I had entered THS four years earlier on a partial scholarship. He obviously felt that I was an ‘example’ who could motivate and inspire my successors then in their early years at the school. I remember Claudette Masdammer well as a personable young lady who always appeared to be just on the verge of some minor mischief but she never actually crossed the line. I strongly suspected that she was the leader among the girls anyway, of conceiving and executing those little pranks that girls in those days used to play on any young male teacher. There was really very little chance of class-room misdemeanours as the Bent Street school was an open plan arranged in such a way that the Principal and the Deputy had an elevated view of all classes and activities from the stage which was in fact their office. If I may go back in time, some two years earlier while attending St. George’s Anglican Primary School, Claudette’s athletic ability was spotted by the Castello brothers at an annual primary schools sports meeting, which in those days was a big national sports event. In 1953 I believe it was, she was offered an athletic scholarship to THS where she continued to develop her sprinting ability, coached by whatever little expertise was available at that time. But she possessed a natural talent, sheer speed that took her quickly to the top of the ladder. In 1956 she was selected to represent the then British Guiana (B.G) at the 1956 Olympics Games in Melbourne, Australia. Many years after, in 1992, my wife and I had the privilege of travelling to Melbourne for an International Rotary convention and I paid a visit to the Olympic track and field stadium there. It is now part of a vast sports complex encompassing among other venues, the MCG and the Australian Grand Slam tennis courts.

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Claudette’s athletic prowess earned her the national distinction of B.G. Sportswoman of the Year 1956. In those days there were annual British Caribbean Athletic Championships, which was hosted by B.G in 1959. I remember attending every day of these games at the GCC ground, Bourda. Interest in Guiana’s athletic meets was at that time at fever pitch, inspired and motivated by the performances of Claudette Masdammer and a few other notables like George DePena, Clem Fields and Ralph Gomes. Among the women there were already a few lassies who had emerged to challenge her. Competing in the 100m, Claudette got the bronze medal in a I-2-3 finish by Guianese ladies. She also won a silver medal in the long jump and gold in the 4x100 relay won by the impressive Guiana team. I believe the team also medalled in the 4x400 relay. In fact, BG easily emerged the Champion nation at those games. In 1958 I returned to teach Mathematics at Tutorial after completing ‘A’ levels at QC. Two years later I went to the UK to pursue tertiary studies, and it was in that year, 1960, that Claudette became a Student Nurse at the Georgetown Hospital. My next contact with our late alumna was in 2002, the year of her retirement, when our Alumni Reunion was held in Guyana. Claudette, now Mrs. Masdammer-Humphrey, graced us with her presence on that occasion, as did so many of our past colleagues who had returned for that historic reunion. In retrospect, because of the demands of my official Reunion duties, I did not get the opportunity to have a lengthy discourse with her, but my wife did. I later learned that they exchanged family news and shared information on a mutual acquaintance, her fellow Guianese Olympian from the early sixties, high jumper Brenda Archer who now resides in the US. She was my wife Annette’s BHS peer. Although I don’t think that our distinguished alumna attended the intervening Tutorial reunions held abroad, except perhaps in the UK in 2005, she would not have missed this Diamond reunion in Guyana had she lived. My heartfelt condolences and that of my wife, Annette, go out to her immediate family and her close colleagues in the UK Chapter. May her Soul Rest in Peace.


12th Triennial International Reunion

A Tribute

to Dr. Charles Colin Garrett Excerpt of Eulogy by Stephen Phillip Garrett Dr. Charles Garrett was born on 25th June 1950 at Princes St., Lodge, Georgetown, and departed this life after a prolonged illness on 22nd May, 2014. In our quiet moments, we will remember Charles through his deeds. We know that Charles was no slacker in the face of challenge or opportunity. He took several great leaps during his life’s journey. Growing up sandwiched between three older siblings on one side, where the expectations were high for ‘responsibility’ and ‘good examples’, and four younger ones the other side where those demands were less stringent, Charles found himself in the enviable position of being able to choose whether he would run with the ‘hares’ or the ‘hounds’. As you may have guessed, Charles made the decision based on the benefits at hand. When someone announced, “These gifts are for the big ones,” in a flash Charles would be front and center. Whenever the conversation changed to “chores to be done by the big ones” he would just as quickly merge into the ranks of the younger siblings. It was my sister who proposed the familiar term ‘coarsesized’ which was adopted in the household as an official category for capturing the share of privileges and duties expected of Charles. ‘Coarse-sized” as we called him, easily managed to win the hearts of everyone at home and we came to appreciate his focus on personal achievement and scholarship. Charles maintained a competitive presence in athletics and was always among the top five in every academic class throughout his years at Tutorial High School. After finishing his Higher Technical Diploma and Bachelor of Highway Engineering degree at the University of Guyana, he took up an assignment with the Upper Mazaruni Road Project. By this time, he had already worked for several years with the Ministry of Works and Transportation as a Materials Technician. At home, we would get only snapshots of his field adventures for he was not a young man of many words. On one such occasion, our mother was ‘dishing out’ food in the kitchen (this is what mothers do when they have 8 mouths to feed). The amount of food on each plate was carefully measured. In came Charles on a few days off of a rural project. He

walked into the kitchen, looked at the food on his plate and speaking to no one in particular asked, “Where’s the rest of the beef? Do you know in the bush when food is cooked it’s a steak-a-man?” I saw our mother’s hand tighten on the pot spoon for a brief moment and then relaxed as she turned and looked him squarely in the eyes and said, “So when are you going back?” Needless to say, the name “Steak-a-Man” stuck. Charles was a thirsty soul who could not rest comfortably in an environment created by others, or by circumstances. It had to be of his own making. His emphasis on education and career development reached everyone close to him, including every professional in the road construction business in Guyana. He successfully read for a Master’s Degree in Transportation Engineering at California Polytechnic State University. By consistently maintaining a high performance standard while demanding the same from his colleagues, he leveraged his career into the Office of the Chief Roads Officer, Ministry of Works and Transportation, and became a Fellow of the Guyana Association of Professional Engineers (GAPE). Many roads and highways across this country bear his footprints. With a PhD in his sights, he was accepted to the Ohio State University where he successfully read for his Doctorate in Infrastructure Maintenance Management in Civil Engineering. Now at the pinnacle of his career he turned to creating in others a similar thirst for education and excellence in performance, teaching several courses at the University of Guyana. His journey was not achieved in single bounds. He encountered many a challenge, and on each occasion he found a solution, a source of support. He remained overly careful not to be a burden on his family. In one of his rare talkative moments he let slip some details of how he spent one summer raising extra cash. Now, picture the pre-GPS era and some weary anxious traveller in the back of a taxi driven by Charles who is armed only with a Brooklyn A to Z map and a firm determination to find his way in an unfamiliar, dark and potentially dangerous inner city. Such was the life he lived – this scholat, educator and risk taker. We wish him Peace, Perfect Peace. July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Tribute to

Austin Cosmo Castello By (late) Archibald A. Moore

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t gives me great pleasure to pay tribute to the Founder and first Principal, the late Austin Cosmo Castello. Austin was born in 1912 and departed this life in 1991. For most of his 79-year lifespan, he featured as an active campaigner in the cause of education, particularly at the secondary stage, filling with equal facility the roles of Visionary, Pioneer, Educator, extraordinary Administrator, Leader and Animateur. The contributions made by him and others of his ilk through the private secondary school explosion of the 1930’s and 1940’s have not yet been properly documented. Austin was brought up in a humble but educationally conscious home environment. His father was a Postmaster and in that capacity was subject to transfer from one location to another in Guyana. His parents and other relatives were militant Congregationalists. Exposed as he was to that type of socio-cultural influence, he could not help but be imbued with the philosophy and creed of Congregationalism. His campaigning in the field of education therefore, was perhaps inspired to some extent by the Congregational tenets of advocating abolition of all forms of servitude, championship of the cause of the poor and down-trodden, and promotion of education. Austin’s preparation for the role of Educator extraordinaire was largely self-motivated and self-organized. Because of the circumstances of the time, he was not privileged to receive formal graduate status. At the pedagogical level, he was not exposed to institutional teacher training. At both levels, nonetheless, he performed with distinction, seemingly possessed of a divine gift to lead and to teach. On 1st September 1939, the day German forces occupied Danzig thereby precipitating World War II, Austin started Tutorial High School. Undeterred by the uncertainties of the time, but fortified by his vision of the need for more and more secondary schools to meet the rising demand for such education, he ventured forth.

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The educational elite emerging from the system at the time was clearly inadequate to provide the skills and competencies required for the organisation and management of the developing society. Almost universal primary education was producing more and more young people seeking secondary programmes. There was a great opportunity or enterprise and Tutorial became part of the new movement. There were of course challenges that called for responses and conditions and constraints to be overcome. Among the perceived challenges was competition from the Government schools, from prestigious schools run by religious bodies, and from other private schools. Changes in government policies provided opportunities as well as challenges. The system of Government-aided secondary schools introduced in the late 1950’s was reflective of one such policy change. The government provided some support to certain private schools including Tutorial while the private schools, as a quid pro quo had to satisfy certain requirements. The industrial action of 1963, referred to as the 80-day strike, affected the school adversely but it soon recovered. The complete Government takeover of 1976 also brought with it some irritants and anomalies, some of which are yet to be resolved. Tutorial survived all the pressures and problems which affected its development and operations over the period of its existence. The school’s survival had been due in no small measure to the missionary zeal, courage, adaptability and skilful management of Austin (and his Brother Joseph). The school community he guided placed great emphasis on discipline, order, deportment and dedication. The principal was a worthy examplar of these qualities – always neatly attired, dignified, courteous and correct. The character traits he demonstrated were reflected in the demeanour of staff and pupils. Austin Castello’s concept of secondary education was broad and progressive for this time and proved to be applicable


12th Triennial International Reunion for all time. He saw education as a process that involved not only academic development but also experience and activities promotive of social, cultural, ethical, technological and physical maturation. This school he established, while pursuing excellence in the academic field, shone also in the spheres of athletic games and aesthetic and cultural pursuits.

the curriculum. He never ceased his search for greater

In his pioneering work Austin did not travel alone. He always had the support of his relatives. He was, however, made to realise that without love at his side his journey could be much harder. With customary vision, he chose as his life partner Geraldine Euterpe Moore who at home gave him the needed marital and moral support. That domestic support was complemented by the organisational and professional support of his brother Joseph and daughter June-Ann. His dedication to education had such an immense effect on her that she also entered the field and continues to be active in Jamaica.

He found pleasure and satisfaction in exploring the possibility

knowledge. He never missed a seminar or colloquium on education. He always talked about education. When one said to him “tempus fugil” (time is flying) he would respond with a smile, “That’s too elementary, you should say ‘aetas labitur’”.

of trisecting an angle. A pet theme of his was “What could be done to make the Secondary Schools Entrance Examination more valid and reliable and thus facilitate the transition from primary to secondary. I once came across a clipping on a folder containing information on Austin Castello that said: “If we work upon marble, it will perish. If we work upon brass, time will efface it. If we read temples they will

Austin possessed a charisma that enabled him to motivate and interact with relatives in a remarkable way. That charisma also influenced his activities inside and outside of the school. He was a great father-figure, a sort of pater familias. Outwardly, he gave the impression of being withdrawn and self-effacing. Before a class of pupils he was a redoubtable reformer and evangelist.

crumble to dust, but is we work upon men;s eternal minds,

He read widely. He could teach almost every subject on

the life and work of Austin Cosmo Castello – 1912 to 1991.

if we imbue them with high principles with the just fear of God and love of their fellow men, we engrave on those tablets something which no time will efface and which will brighten to all eternity.” These words seem to encapsulate the vision and purpose of

ORIGIN OF NAMES OF TUTORIAL HOUSES • AUSTIN HOUSE -

named for the school’s Founder, Austin Castello

• JOSEPH HOUSE -

named for the Deputy HM, Joseph Castello

• FRASER HOUSE -

named for Reverend Gladwin Fraser, former teacher and 1st Chairman, Board of Governors

• BYNOE HOUSE -

named for former student and teacher

• MATTHEWS HOUSE - named for Mrs. Una Matthews, 1st female member, Board of Governors

July 27 - August 2, 2014

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Tutorial High Alumni Association

Tutorial High School By Sherlock Sampson

Back in September 1964 We attended Tutorial High School Bent Street, Maltenoes then Fifth Street Handsome lads and beautiful young ladies Creams, browns and khaki uniforms We were immaculately dressed for High School Still the age of the cane Your hands or butt in pain Dare you disobey the golden rules It was sweet back then Carefree and a little silly All students bowed to Lolly Excuse us if we missed your particular details This recall is mainly from our time Striving for excellence was a natural focus Students soon found out that Beating the books for them, were not hocus pocus Tutorial won the Inter High Championship of Sports , every year The Castello brothers with vision and drive Grab from the pool of athletes The lion’s share Many athletes did well on track and in class The graduates and scholars from Tutorial Spanned the full spectrum, doctors, lawyers, Engineers, Educators, etc. This school stood for all, the poor, middle class and the rich This blend of students made a perfect sandwich The multifaceted memories of Tutorial High School Will definitely last, way beyond our time Hip, hip hooray for its continued existence Long live Tutorial High School Honourable Mention The French of Stolla boy Benji and his Mathematics The Boops always a word of advice The Toucan took charge Lolly a proponent of Simple Pratice Mrs. London the Latin Princess Mr. Holder Points in Geometry Crispus occasionally Religious Knowledge Breadfruit the all powerful janitor Baldi Big words Cole Albert a sharp dresser and motivator “Don’t let this work defeat you”. These are a few of the teachers who taught during our time.

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Tutorial High School Alumni Association 12th Triennial International Reunion

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Sunday, July 27 - Sunday, August 2, 2014 Georgetown, Guyana

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REUNION CALENDAR OF EVENTS Sunday July 27, 2014

15:00hr

Church Service and Reception Court Yard, Tutorial High School, Woolford Avenue, Georgetown.

Monday July 28, 2014

Morning

Courtesy calls on Office of the President, Ministers of the Government, Office of the Opposition Leader. City Mayor & other Leaders

Evening 19:00—21:00 hr.

Award Ceremony Tutorial High School auditorium. Tours Santa Mission/Arrow point OR Splashmins OR Baganara Island Resort OR Kaieteur/Baganara

Tuesday July 29, 2014

Wednesday July 30th, 2014

20:00 hr

Fold & Wild meat Night Malteenoes Sports Club, Thomas Lands, Georgetown.

Thursday July 31, 2014

09:00 hr

Business Meeting Tutorial High School Auditorium Woolford Avenue, Georgetown.

20:00 hr

Oldies/Back-in-time Dance Thirst Park Car Park Georgetown.

Friday August 1, 2014

National Holiday, Emancipation Day National Park

Saturday August 2, 2014

Grand Gala Dinner & Ball Rahaman’s Banquet Hall Georgetown.

Sunday August 3, 2014

Athletics & Fun Day GDF ground, Camp Ayanganna, Georgetown.

NB: Capacity is limited for the tours and the Gala Ball, as such you are requested to make reservations early. If you would like to be seated with friends or family, you must indicate so on the response/registration card. THS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION CONTACT INFORMATION: PRESIDENTS OF Chapters Mr. Desmond Sears (Guyana) Mr. Michael Parris (Toronto) Mr. Rudyard Ceres (London) Mr. Keith Cadogan (NY Support Group) New York Tutorial Support Group Inc. P.O. Box 511 New York, New York 10014 Tel: 877.576.3052 Email: info@thsny.org Website: www.thsny.org

Felice Munroe c/o Tutorial High School. Tel: 678-6009 e-mail: rosiemon2000@yahoo.com

Tutorial High School Alumni Association – Toronto Chapter P.O. Box 92203 2900 Warden Avenue Scarborough, ON M1W 3Y9 Email: thstoronto@sympatico.ca Website: www.thatoronto.org

THS Guides Coordinator Gloria Griffith 52 Princess St., NewBurg, Georgetown. Tel: 226-3349

Tutorial High School Alumni Association - UK Chapter Contact: Ms Claudette Burnett, Secretary 3 Camden Court 1 Woolwich Road, Upper Belvedere Kent, DA17 5EF Email: rudyard.ceres@aol.co.uk

Chairman THS Board of Directors Gregory Blyden Tel: 223-9576 Mobile 617-4542 Tutorial High School Alumni Association – Guyana Chapter Secretary: Ms. Dawn Dutchin C/O Tutorial High School Woolford Avenue, Thomas Lands Georgetown Email: thsa.gy@gmail.com Website: www.tutorialguyanachapter.com


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The Tutorialite 2014  

The Tutorial High School 75th anniversary souvenir magazine produced by the Alumni Association Guyana Chapter for the 12th triennial reunion...

The Tutorialite 2014  

The Tutorial High School 75th anniversary souvenir magazine produced by the Alumni Association Guyana Chapter for the 12th triennial reunion...

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