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HEAD START POLICY COUNCIL Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given that the CMCA Head Start Policy Council will conduct its next regular meeting on Thursday, October 29th, 2009 in the Central Missouri Community Action Central Office, Large Conference Room, 807-B North Providence Road, Columbia, MO. Tentative Agenda Policy Council Training – (5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.)

Regular Meeting (7:00 p.m. or immediately following the training) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Call to Order Seating of New Members and Role Call Approval of October Agenda Approval of September 2009 Minutes Human Resources Report Budget Report – Anita Sanderson, Finance Director A. Budget Development Director’s Report – Mernell King, Early Childhood Program Director A. Enrollment and Attendance Report—Melissa Chambers, Director of EHS Operations B. Ongoing Monitoring Report—Beth Vossler, Director of HS Operations C. Program Instruction (PI) and Information Memorandum (IM)—what’s new 1) Information Memorandum: Centers of Excellence 2) Program Instruction: Emergency Preparedness Survey Report from Sites Old Business New Business A. Approval of revised By-Laws Business from the Floor Adjournment

CMCA is committed to equal opportunity. If you are disabled and need an accommodation such as an interpreter for the hearing-impaired, please contact our office. A three-day notice is required for scheduling. Representatives of the news media may obtain copies of this notice by contacting: Leah Patrick CMCA, 807B N. Providence Road, Columbia, MO 65203 Phone: (573) 443-8706 ext. 226, TTY: (800) 735-2966


Central Missouri Community Action Early Childhood Program - (Head Start and Early Head Start) Passion – Commitment – Excellence Policy Council Orientation October 29, 2009 5:00PM -7:00PM

I.

Welcome and Introductions (HELLO) Activity (Mernell King) 10 mins.

II.

Today’s Learning Objectives Presented (Mernell King) 2 mins.

III.

Watch Nurturing the Promise video and enjoy dinner (Melissa Chambers) 15 mins.

IV.

Brief Overview -Head Start 101 and continue to enjoy dinner(Beth Vossler) 15 mins.

V.

Policy Council Binder Review (Mernell King) 15 mins. Review of sections PC sign Conflict of Interest Policy Statement PC sign Confidentiality Policy Statement

VI.

Policy Council Orientation (Mernell King & Anita Sanderson) Program Governance Requirements (20 mins) New from HS ACT ( 10 mins) Fiscal Requirements of Policy Council (15 mins) Policy Council Job Description (to/from forms for information sharing) (10 mins) Duties of officers & standing committees (self nomination form) (5 min)


V.

Wrap up and PC meeting begins at 7:00 PM

* note, in lieu of committees, we will have training as above for new members.


CENTRAL MISSOURI COMMUNITY ACTION  HEAD START  Policy Council Meeting  September 17, 2009    Policy Council Members Present  Tamara Sutton  Kimberly O’Connor 

Charita Henderson  Brad Drew 

Lisa Thomeczek    Policy Council Members Absent  Debbra Allen  Kristal Charles    Staff Present  Nicole Meyer  Melissa Chambers  Anita Sanderson  Amy Rhodes    Others Present   

Laura Thomas 

Chrisma Edward  Jamie Leeling  Jamie Wolf   

Susan Phillips  Tonya Jaegers 

Beth Vossler  Mernell King  Ludi Yocum  Darin Preis 

Committee Meetings  I. Beth Vossler began the meeting with the Human Resources report  prepared by Julie Kratzer.   A. There were many new hires in the past month.  Some were  approved  by  Policy  Council  before  the  end  of  the  school  year in May.    ¾ For instance, we polled Policy Council in May for the  CFDA  hired  for  our  Park  Avenue  site.    She  appears  on  this  month’s  personnel  report  because  she  didn’t  start until this school year began.  ¾ One  of  our  Fulton  CFDAs  wanted  to  stay  at  home  with  her  children,  so  we  needed  to  hire  a  replacement.    ¾ We  hired  a  CFDA  for  Moniteau  who  has  a  Bachelor  Degree in Child and Family Development. 

‐ 1 ‐ 


¾ Central  Office,  through  our  Quality  Improvement  Grant  money,  hired  an  Intervention  Specialist  and  a  Compliance Specialist.  These are one year positions.  ¾ There  was  an  emergency  hire  for  Linn  at  the  end  of  last year so we have kept her on as a Teacher Aide.  ¾ WFSC  needed  another  CFDA  because  of  expansion,  not because of a turnover.  ¾ We  hired  a  CFDA  for  Cole  East,  but  this  individual  only worked for three days.  In turn, you will see the  listing of Cole East under terminations.  ¾ We  also  had  to  dismiss  a  Teacher  Assistant  at  Tiger  Paws.  B. We  still  have  many  positions  that  still  need  to  be  filled.   The  CMCA  Employment  Opportunities  can  be  found  on  our website www.showmeaction.org.  ¾ We desperately need a custodian to work at Moniteau  8‐10 hours a week so if you know someone send them  our way.  Only 15 minutes from Jefferson City.  ¾ We  have  two  potential  hires  who  we  need  approval  from Policy council Executive committee.  One is for a  CFDA  for  Cole  East  who  has  a  Bachelor’s  in  Child  Development  in  Human  Studies.    We  also  need  an  Aide  at  Tiger  Paws.    She  is  a  current  parent  and  felt  that this could be a career.  C. Mernell  King  went  over  the  Community  Complaint  Process Policy.  ¾ Housing, Weatherization and other programs all have  Community complaint processes.  The Board does not  have  a  process  on  when  to  help  with  a  problem  that  cannot get resolved.  ¾ We  took  10  minutes  to  read  over  the  Board’s  Community Complaint Process.  II. By‐Laws  A.  Beth  Vossler  discussed  revision  of  By‐Laws.    We  are  testing an email system where comments are discussed.  If  we cannot run the committee via email then we will have  to meet to discuss the revision.    ¾ We  are  shooting  for  the  revised  By‐Laws  to  be  completed by November 1. 

‐ 2 ‐ 


¾ We  should  also  know  about  our  expansion  by  that  time.  III. Grants/Budget  A. Anita  Sanderson  discussed  the  Head  Start  budget  summary.  ¾ We  revised  the  Head  Start  budget  because  of  the  waiver  of  In‐kind.    Instead  of  the  $953,137,  we  need  $925,470.  ¾ The COLA money has been added to the budget this  month which increases the budget.  ¾ The  budget  covers  four  months  of  expenses  made  through August.  ¾ In T & TA subsection Travel, the budget is overspent  but will taper down over the next few months.  ¾ The grand total spent for this month is $244,594.  We  spent  $1,013,413  for  four  months  so  we  are  over  budget by $17,643.  B. Early Head Start is in the same situation as Head Start.  ¾ In‐direct in PA 71 are overspent by $2768.  ¾ Personnel  and  Fringe  are  overspent  for  this  time  frame also.  ¾ Under Other we have spent $13,610 for repairs, paint,  etc.    Anything  that  needed  repaired  or  painted  over  the summer.  C. Early  Head  Start  state  has  a  non‐state  match  which  is  85/15.  ¾ EHS  State  award  amount  is  within  $12000  of  being  the same as EHS regular.  ¾ We spent $2446 in August and $2563 for the past two  months.  ¾ The Fiscal Year goes from July to June.  D. I Can is on an October through September cycle.  I Can is  on the next to the last month.  ¾ We have $10,397.81 left to spend for salary, fringe, in  direct and very few supplies for one month.  ¾ We have all In‐kind but it is not all entered.  We have  more In‐kind than we needed.  E. Healthy Marriage has enough for one more month.  They  run from October through September. 

‐ 3 ‐ 


¾ HM budget is $537,735.  The over/under for the last 11  months  shows  that  we  have  overspent  $5470.    We  have enough left for the last month. The $42,577 will  be just enough for the last month.  F. Anita  discussed  the  credit  card  statement  from  the  past  month.  ¾ Anita clarified the cost for flash drives and computer  monitors.    The  description  does  not  specify  the  number  that  we  receive.    We  received  four  flash  drives for $24, not just one drive.  Regular Meeting  IV.  Kim O’Connor called the meeting to order at 6:59pm  V. Kim  O’Connor  conducted  the  role  call  and  the  seating  of  a  new  member.  A. Chrisma  Edward  from  Bear  Creek  was  introduces  as  a  new member of Policy Council.  B. Jamie  Leeling  moved  to  approve  the  seating  of  the  new  member.    Charita  Henderson  seconded  the  motion.    The  motion was passed.  VI. We  needed  to  add  the  Human  Resources  Report  and,  under  New  Business,  we  added  Review  of  Eight  Week  cycle  menu  and  the  approval  of  the  Community  Complaint  Process.    Jamie  Leeling  moved  to  approve  the  September  Agenda  with  the  changes.   Charita seconded the motion.  The motion passed.    VII. Tamara  Sutton  moved  to  approve  August  minutes.    Laura  Thomas seconded the motion.  The motion passed.  VIII. Tamara  Sutton  called  to  approve  the  two  new  hires  previously  discussed.    Charita  Henderson  seconded  the  motion.   The motion passed.  IX. Charita  Henderson  moved  to  approve  the  budget  summaries.   Tamara Sutton seconded the motion.  The motion passed.  X. Director’s Report was summarized by Mernell King.  A. Charita Henderson received the Parent of the Year award  and the Region VII Parent of the Year!!   B. Chrisma  Edward  was  awarded  the  Beating  the  Odds  Award  for  the  state.    The  winner  is  someone  who  has  overcome  many  hard  challenges.    Chrisma  discussed  her  challenges of growing up in Foster care.  She will age out  December  10.    She  used  stepping  stones  to  overcome  the  challenges  in  her  life.    She  graduated  from  Cosmetology  ‐ 4 ‐ 


C.

D.

E. F.

G. H. I. J.

School  and  is  currently  attending  Stephens  College  to  become a Fashion Designer.   We  have  Federal  Peer  Review  that  comes  tri‐annually  (every  3  years)  to  ensure  we  are  in  compliance  with  all  systems, all 1600 regulations. We are a first quarter review  which  means  they  will  be  here  somewhere  between  the  third  week  in  October  and  the  end  of  December.    Seven  individuals will come on site to look at Human Resources,  Finance, the Board, etc.  ¾ They  are  using  a  new  tool  called  CLASS  which  is  a  classroom  assessment  tool.    Look  at  all  dynamics  within the classroom  ¾ They  are  particular  interested  in  safety  in  the  classrooms.    Mernell  pitched  an  idea  for  Policy  Council  members  to  be  involved  as  the  Safety  Committee  for  the  site.    This  idea  will  be  discussed  further in October.  The  Program  Enhancement  Report  (small  version)  was  handed out and discussed by Mernell King.   ¾ The  Self  Assessment  Analysis  is  included  along  with  the  Corrective  Action  Plan.    Self  Assessment  looks  inside.    ¾ Most  of  the  Corrective  Action  Plans  have  been  fixed  already.    Some  are  changes  that  can  take  place  instantly  others  are  processes.    For  example,  the  Community Complaints Policy.  I  Can  goes  national  in  October.    The  second  week  of  October there is training in Atlanta.  Connecting  for  Children  is  beginning  their  third  year.   They have a Kick Off Homecoming Event October 24 & 25.   They also had the Superpalooza.  Fathers First is up and running.  Real  Dads  will  have  Community  Trainers  this  year  and  will be getting curriculum out in the counties.  We  need  36  partnership  agreements  with  schools.    We  have 30 right now.  We will get the Head Start Expansion grant!  We will have  one  new  classroom  at  the  Glasgow  School  District.    They  are  providing  office  space,  internet,  paper  products,  etc.  

‐ 5 ‐ 


We  will  need  to  hire  new  staff  and  update  their  fire  system.  ¾ We  are  also  getting  over  $200,000  mostly  for  playgrounds  for  Boonville,  Centralia,  Linn,  Chamois  and Fulton.  ¾ We are also purchasing new  safety harnesses  for  our  bus trips.  K. Mernell  went  over  two  Information  Memorandums  and  one Program Instruction.  ¾ Accessing Professional medical and dental services  ¾ Child  Health  Safety  and  Supervision  bothered  Mernell  the  most  because  it  spoke  of  children  being  left on buses, counting kids heads going in and out of  buildings.    So,  something  has  happened  to  force  this  issue.  ¾ One Time Program Improvement funds lets us know  that we can apply for the funds.    L. Mernell  wanted  to  acknowledge  the  Training  Calendar.   Anita’s trainings are in red.  XI. Melissa  Chambers  discussed  the  Enrollment  and  Attendance  reports.  A. Early Head Start was fully enrolled.  B. We  will  receive  an  amended  report  at  next  month’s  meeting  because  of  the  delay  in  getting  meal  counts  entered.  C. The Average Daily Attendance (ADA) is not too bad with  Tiger Paws being the lowest at 78%.  This causes no major  concerns.  D. Our  DSS  child  Care  Subsidy  continues  to  increase  which  can be good and bad.  Easier for us to get money from the  state if needed.  Bad that there are more and more families  that need to access that money.  XII. Melissa  Chambers  pointed  out  the  Program  Information  Reports  that  were  sent  with  the  packet.    This  is  a  required  report  needed for the Federal Government.  She charted the results into a  power point to cover at the meeting.  The cover page of the power  point should say 2008‐2009 not 2009‐2010.  This was changed after  the meeting and is reflected on our website.  A. Income Eligibility of Program Participants 

‐ 6 ‐ 


B.

C.

D. E.

F.

G.

H.

¾ We  were  8%  over  income.    We  can  go  up  to  10%  if  needed.  Ages of Preschool Participants  ¾ There was an oversight concerning a 5 year old child  being allowed to continue in Head Start.  So you will  see the sliver that pertains to 5 years and older on the  chart.  ¾ Because of selection criteria, you can see that we had  48% that were 4 years of age.  Ages of Infant‐Toddler Participants  ¾ You  can  see  another  example  of  how  our  selection  criteria works because the majority of the children are  under  1  year  old.    Our  goal  in  EHS  is  to  get  the  children  in  as  early  as  possible  so  we  have  the  full  three years to work with them.  Participant Race  ¾ This chart shows the Federal categories for race.  Head Start Families  ¾ Broken  down  by  single  parent  and  two  parent  families.    Once  again  our  selection  criteria  gives  priority to single parent families.  Family Education Level  ¾ Another  good  example  of  how  Mernell  spoke  of  getting  data  and  from  that  implementing  a  plan  to  strengthen families.  ¾ Kim  O’Connor  asked  if  there  was  a  way  the  families  could  approach  the  teachers  without  being  embarrassed  about  their  education  level.    Beth  Vossler said that if a parent is interested in increasing  their  education  that  this  should  be  discussed  on  the  Family  Goal  Plan.    Our  teachers  have  information  to  give  out  to  the  parents  to  help  them  further  their  education if desired.  Family Support Services Received  ¾ This  shows  the  services  that  families  accessed  last  year.  The light green column on the right shows that  422 families accessed at least one service last year.  Ongoing Source of Continuous Accessible Care 

‐ 7 ‐ 


XIII.

¾ This  chart  shows  how  many  families  has  access  to  medical/dental  services  at  the  beginning  and  end  of  enrollment.  ¾ You  can  see  the  percentage  of  change  that  our  staff  was able to help support families.  I. Infant‐Toddlers with Up‐to‐Date Health Services  ¾ This  chart  shows  that  we  have  94%  of  children  who  are up‐to‐date on all health services.  ¾ The  blue  sliver  shows  that  6%  were  not.    That  could  be  that  they  had  only  one  health  services  completed  but not all.  J. Preschool Children with Up‐to‐Date Health Services  ¾ Once again we were above 90% which is what we aim  for.  K. Preschool Dental Exams  ¾ 592  children  received  a  dental  exam  last  year.    The  reason  that  there  is  another  column  is  because  the  Federal  government  changed  the  question  on  the  report.    They  wanted  the  exams  to  be  within  certain  dates.    According  to  their  question  we  could  only  report 427 children received a dental exam last year.  L. Dental Treatment  ¾ Major area of concern is that 81% of the children did  not  receive  dental treatment.  If a  child needed more  than  one  appointment  and  didn’t  have  the  appointment  until  after  the  reporting  dates  they  would not count as complete.  M. 99% of our kids received their immunizations!  N. 11%  of  our  kids  had  a  qualified  disability  which  means  they  had  an  IEP/IFSP  on  file.    10%  is  required  by  the  Federal government.  O. We  have  30  out  of  36  agreements  with  LEA  (Local  Education Agency).  P. We have a Mental Health Administrator on staff now and  we  are  proud  of  the  development  over  the  past  year.    Of  the  705  children,  130  received  consultation.    Large  decrease in behaviors in classrooms.  Reports from Sites  A. Brad  Drew,  Clubhouse,  commented  that  they  enjoy  the  shade  over  the  playground.    But  there  are  mushrooms  ‐ 8 ‐ 


XIV.

around the site and there is a trench at the entrance of the  parking  lot.    The  trench  cuts  the  entrance  down  to  one  lane.  Only one car at a time can go in or out of the lot.  B. Worley, Linn and Bear Creek have new signs.  New Business  A. Tamara  Sutton  moved  to  approve  the  Conflict  of  Interest  Policy.      Tamara  Sutton  withdrew  motion  to  approve.   Discussion  ensued  to  clarify  if  the  Policy  Council  should  be  inserted  into  the  document.    The  result  of  the  discussion  was  that  the  Policy  Council  By‐laws  should  reflect  that  the  Policy  Council  adheres  to  the  Board  of  Directors’  Conflict  of  Interest  Policy.    Tamara  Sutton  moved to approve the amended By‐laws that will state the  Policy  Council  will  adhere  to  the  Board  of  Directors’  Conflict  of  Interest  Policy.    Charita  Henderson  seconded  the motion.  The motion passed.  ¾ Policy  council  members  signed  the  back  page  of  the  Conflict  of  Interest  Policy  and  handed  the  page  to  Anita Sanderson.  B. Annual  Dinner  is  October  22  at  the  Peachtree  Banquet  Center.    The  gathering  begins  at  6:00pm.   Acknowledgement  of  the  Policy  Council,  Board  of  Directors, etc., help throughout the past year.  Director of  the  Department  of  Social  Services  will  be  the  keynote  speaker.  C. We have an 8‐week cycle menu for the sites this year.  Our  registered  dietician  along  with  Melissa  Scheer  developed  the menu.  The typos discussed will be changed.  D. Charita  Henderson  makes  a  motion  to  approve  the  Community  Complaint  Process.    Jamie  Leeling  called  for  an  amendment  to  fix  the  typo  under  “b”.    “Director’s”  should  be  “Directors’”.    Jamie  suggested  that  we  change  the word “prescribed” to “defined” in the last sentence of  the  third  paragraph.    Charita  Henderson  moved  to  approve  the  amended  motion  with  changes  to  the  Community Complaint Process.  Tamara Sutton seconded  the motion.  The motion passed.  E. Mernell  discussed  starting  the  training  for  new  Policy  Council members before the next meeting at 5:00. 

‐ 9 ‐ 


F. Tamara  Sutton  moved  to  adjourn.    Charita  Henderson  seconded the motion.  The motion did not pass  ¾ Darin  Preis  began  discussion  on  the  Community  Complaint Process stating that the word “prescribed”  should remain.  The funding sources don’t define but  do  prescribe.    Charita  moves  to  approve  the  Community  Complaint  process  with  no  change.   Tamara  Sutton  seconds  the  motion.    The  motion  passes.  ¾ Tamara  Sutton  resends  the  motion  to  adjourn.   Charita  Henderson  seconds  the  motion.    The  motion  passes. 

‐ 10 ‐ 


CMCA Employment Listings

1 of 1

http://www.showmeaction.org/employ/employment.php

CMCA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES UPDATED 10/16/2009 Position Open Child & Family Development Advocate Child and Family Development Advocate Custodian Substitute Teacher Substitute Teacher Aide Teacher Aide

Area Boone County Cole E Head Start Moniteau Head Start 8 County Service Area 8 County Service Area Cole E Head Start

Hrs/Wk 40 40 8 per week As Needed As Needed 40

Type In-House/Public In-House/Public In-House/Public In-House/Public In-House/Public In-House/Public

Ann/Reg Regular Annual Annual n/a n/a Annual

App Deadline Until Filled Until Filled Until Filled Until Filled Until Filled Until Filled

Click here to print the employment listings

To apply for a position, mail your application to CMCA, Attn: HR, 807-B N. Providence, Columbia, MO 65203, fax 573-875-2689 or email to HRAssistant@ShowMeAction.org.

Applications must be filled out completely. Applications must be turned in by the closing date in order to be considered for a specific position. If sent by mail, applications are accepted only if the postmark on the envelope meets the above guidelines. Click on the position title to see the job description. Applications can be printed off from our employment link. When applying for a position, please specify the title and location of the position.

Note: “Annual” positions are defined as positions that are expected to be active for approximately 9 months of the calendar year. “Regular” positions are defined as positions that are expected to be active for approximately 12 months of the calendar year.

Copyright ©:Central Missouri Community Action, 2007 - EOE

10/16/2009 8:13 AM


CONFIDENTIAL PERSONNEL REPORT TO THE HEAD START POLICY COUNCIL 10-21-09 CMCA HEAD START NEW HIRES FROM 09-10-09 to Accepted to Date (Includes 3 hires not listed on last month’s report.)

Site

Hire Date

Job Title

Status

Degree

TEAM LEADER CFDA

Progr am HS HS

Tiger Paws Worley

9/1/2009 8/18/2009

RFT RFT

9/2/2009 9/2/2009 9/11/2009 9/17/2009 9/29/2009

CFDA TEACHER AID COOK ASST/CUSTODIAN CUSTODIAN TEACHER ASSISTANT

HS HS HS HS HS

RFT RFT RFT APT RFT

BS Education BS Human Development BS Child Development

Tiger Paws Tiger Paws Cole East Howard Cole East Cole East Tiger Paws Cole East Worley

9/29/2009 9/29/2009 10/1/2009 10/7/2009

CFDA TEACHER AID CFDA COOK ASST

HS HS HS HS

AFT RFT RFT APT

Certificate in Early Childhood BA Psychology BS Child Development

CMCA HEAD START TERMINATIONS FOR 09-10-09 to 10-21-09 THERE ARE NO CMCA HEAD START TERMINATIONS FOR 09-10-09 to 10-21-09.

Note: Status refers to Annual Full Time as AFT and Regular Full Time as RFT. “Annual” positions are defined as positions expected to be active for approximately 9 months of each calendar year. “Regular” positions are defined as positions expected to be active for approximately 12 months of each calendar year. FT = Full-Time. NE = Non-exempt.


Central Missouri Community Action QUALITY IMPROVEMENT-ARRA Summary Budget Comparison From 9/1/2009 Through 9/30/2009 Account Account Title

Code

QI-ARRA QUALITY IMPROVEMENT-ARRA 122 HEADSTART - QI-ARRA 100 Personnel 110 Fringe Benefits 120 In-Direct 180 Contractual 200 Other Total 122 172 100 110 120 200 Total 172

TOTAL HEADSTART - QI-ARRA EHS - QI-ARRA Personnel Fringe Benefits In-Direct Other TOTAL EHS - QI-ARRA GRAND TOTAL

Spent this Month

Spent Overall

CAN Spend for 3

Under or (Over)

Total Budget for 15

Under or (Over)

Months

Spent for 3 Months

Months

Total Budget

9,980.01 3,194.64 1,948.43 0.00 615.87

13,535.19 4,201.75 2,625.07 0.00 4,398.00

13,859.43 3,241.34 2,530.89 5,000.01 5,000.01

15,738.95

24,760.01

406.96 156.68 83.42 7.10

1,803.36 435.76 331.39 4,375.37

654.16

6,945.88

7,130.77

184.89

28,523.00

21,577.12

16,393.11

31,705.89

36,762.45

5,056.56

297,260.00

265,554.11

29,631.68

1,331.18 172.73 222.60 5,404.26

324.24 (960.41) (94.18) 5,000.01 602.01 4,871.67

(472.18) (263.03) (108.79) 1,028.89

128,116.00 71,132.32 29,488.68 20,000.00 20,000.00 268,737.00

5,324.00 691.68 890.32 21,617.00

114,580.81 66,930.57 26,863.61 20,000.00 15,602.00 243,976.99

3,520.64 255.92 558.93 17,241.63


Central Missouri Community Action EHS STATE Summary Budget Comparison From 9/1/2009 Through 9/30/2009

Account Code

Account Title

EHS-ST 105 100 110 120 130 160 180 200

EHS STATE EHS STATE Personnel Fringe Benefits In-Direct Travel Supplies Contractual Other

Total 105

Spent this Month

Spent Overall

CAN Spend for 3

Under or (Over)

Total Budget for 12

Under or (Over)

Months

Spent for 3 Months

Months

Total Budget

6,814.67 1,642.84 1,251.71 0.00 1,593.61 0.00 201.92

7,266.47 1,764.10 1,336.52 0.00 3,239.69 9.98 676.52

25,306.17 8,141.37 4,950.24 915.00 3,766.26 45,384.39 7,661.79

EHS STATE

11,504.75

14,293.28

96,125.22

81,831.94

384,500.52

370,207.24

GRAND TOTAL

11,504.75

14,293.28

96,125.22

81,831.94

384,500.52

370,207.24

In-Kind Additional EHS-ST In-Kind needed through September 2009:

0.00 $

2,143.99

18,039.70 6,377.27 3,613.72 915.00 526.57 45,374.41 6,985.27

101,224.65 32,565.44 19,800.93 3,660.00 15,065.00 181,537.50 30,647.00

57,675.08

93,958.18 30,801.34 18,464.41 3,660.00 11,825.31 181,527.52 29,970.48


Central Missouri Community Action EARLY HEAD START Summary Budget Comparison From 9/1/2009 Through 9/30/2009

Account Code

Account Title

Spent this Month

Spent Overall

CAN Spend for 5

Under or (Over)

Total Budget for 12

Under or (Over)

Months

Spent for 5 Months

Months

Total Budget

EARLYHS 70 130 160 200

EARLY HEAD START EARLY HEAD START T&TA Travel Supplies Other

0.00 0.00 0.00

1,499.00 0.00 653.30

2,285.40 20.85 1,603.35

Total 70

EARLY HEAD START T&TA

0.00

2,152.30

3,909.60

1,757.30

9,383.00

7,230.70

215.65 53.29 4,550.90 0.00 0.00 11.68

1,068.49 268.43 21,643.51 0.00 4.02 65.17

1,053.05 252.55 17,904.36 147.10 77.10 87.85

(15.44) (15.88) (3,739.15) 147.10 73.08 22.68

2,527.25 606.10 42,971.00 353.00 185.00 211.00

1,458.76 337.67 21,327.49 353.00 180.98 145.83

4,831.52

23,049.62

19,522.01

(3,527.61)

46,853.35

23,803.73

22,015.10 8,465.30 0.00 979.57 0.00 115.92 2,736.67

107,008.76 37,894.28 0.00 4,488.92 0.00 761.32 16,787.41

88,275.66 31,398.30 1,213.35 7,794.60 8,987.10 583.35 12,375.05

(18,733.10) (6,495.98) 1,213.35 3,305.68 8,987.10 (177.97) (4,412.36)

211,860.75 75,355.90 2,912.00 18,707.00 21,569.00 1,400.00 29,700.00

104,851.99 37,461.62 2,912.00 14,218.08 21,569.00 638.68 12,912.59

EARLY HEAD START PROGRAM

34,312.56

166,940.69

150,627.41

(16,313.28)

361,504.65

194,563.96

GRAND TOTAL

39,144.08

192,142.61

174,059.02

(18,083.59)

417,741.00

225,598.39

71 100 110 120 130 160 200 Total 71 72 100 110 130 160 170 180 200 Total 72

EARLY HEAD START ADMINISTRATION Personnel Fringe Benefits In-Direct Travel Supplies Other EARLY HEAD START ADMINISTRATION EARLY HEAD START PROGRAM Personnel Fringe Benefits Travel Supplies Equipment Contractual Other

In-Kind Additional EHS In-Kind needed through September 2009:

1,481.71 $

46,553.94

786.40 20.85 950.05

5,485.00 50.00 3,848.00

96,172.00

3,986.00 50.00 3,194.70


Central Missouri Community Action HEAD START Summary Budget Comparison From 9/1/2009 Through 9/30/2009 Account Code

Account Title

Spent this Month

Spent Overall

CAN Spend for 5

Under or (Over)

Total Budget for 12

Under or (Over)

Months

Spent for 5 Months

Months

Total Budget

HS FY00 20 130 160 180 200

HEAD START HEAD START - T & TA Travel Supplies Contractual Other

627.50 0.10 0.00 10,486.93

11,324.50 14.68 90.00 16,342.11

Total 20

HEAD START - T & TA

11,114.53

27,771.29

21,644.15

(6,127.14)

51,946.00

24,174.71

10,723.67 2,939.96 36,540.26 0.00 311.26 610.32

54,372.49 15,195.61 134,503.30 821.45 657.60 3,698.23

54,695.50 15,225.55 131,177.07 282.05 1,839.15 5,021.30

323.01 29.94 (3,326.23) (539.40) 1,181.55 1,323.07

131,269.42 36,541.43 389,298.13 677.00 4,414.00 12,051.00

76,896.93 21,345.82 254,794.83 (144.45) 3,756.40 8,352.77

51,125.47

209,248.68

175,758.73 57,452.10 0.00 13,678.39 0.00 663.13 36,408.36

626,037.96 213,200.04 1,500.70 53,111.12 8,480.00 6,375.55 218,132.91

283,960.71

1,126,838.28

21 100 110 120 130 160 200 Total 21 22 100 110 130 160 170 180 200 Total 22

HEAD START ADMINISTRATION Personnel Fringe Benefits In-Direct Travel Supplies Other HEAD START ADMINISTRATION HEAD START - PROGRAM Personnel Fringe Benefits Travel Supplies Equipment Contractual Other HEAD START - PROGRAM

8,183.75 160.85 0.00 13,299.55

208,240.62

610,818.80 205,594.02 848.35 60,758.35 63,646.70 9,013.35 223,439.50 1,174,119.07

(3,140.75) 146.17 (90.00) (3,042.56)

19,641.00 386.00 0.00 31,919.00

(1,008.06)

574,250.98

365,002.30

(15,219.16) (7,606.02) (652.35) 7,647.23 55,166.70 2,637.80 5,306.59

1,829,922.04 632,661.98 2,036.00 145,820.00 152,752.00 21,632.00 536,255.00

1,203,884.08 419,461.94 535.30 92,708.88 144,272.00 15,256.45 318,122.09

47,280.79

3,321,079.02

24S 100 110 120 160 180 200

HEAD START - HEALTHY SMILES Personnel Fringe Benefits In-Direct Supplies Contractual Other

402.07 104.61 73.57 0.00 0.00 3.52

2,020.91 530.55 377.62 0.00 0.00 3.52

Total 24S

HEAD START - HEALTHY SMILES

583.77

2,932.60

18,229.10

15,296.50

43,750.00

346,784.48

1,366,790.85

1,422,232.94

55,442.09

3,991,026.00

GRAND TOTAL

81,862.65

In-Kind Additional Head Start In-Kind needed through September 2009:

$

259,835.06

1,895.20 488.95 352.85 2,096.25 833.35 12,562.50

8,316.50 371.32 (90.00) 15,576.89

(125.71) (41.60) (24.77) 2,096.25 833.35 12,558.98

4,548.54 1,173.59 846.87 5,031.00 2,000.00 30,150.00

925,470.00

2,194,240.74

2,527.63 643.04 469.25 5,031.00 2,000.00 30,146.48 40,817.40 2,624,235.15


Central Missouri Community Action HEALTHY MARRIAGE Summary Budget Comparison From 9/1/2009 Through 9/30/2009 Account Code 88

Account Title

Spent this Month

Spent Overall

CAN Spend for 12

Under or (Over)

Total Budget for 12

Under or (Over)

Months

Spent for 12 Months

Months

Total Budget

100 110 120 130 160 180 200

HEALTHY MARRIAGE - PROGRAM Personnel Fringe Benefits In-Direct Travel Supplies Contractual Other

12,102.30 3,845.62 2,360.29 0.00 3,421.75 5,176.72 4,499.84

153,900.13 44,853.21 29,286.17 6,234.11 25,221.64 150,922.47 121,410.06

Total 88

HEALTHY MARRIAGE - PROGRAM

31,406.52

531,827.79

537,735.00

5,907.21

537,735.00

GRAND TOTAL

31,406.52

531,827.79

537,735.00

5,907.21

537,735.00

123,129.54

In-Kind Additional Healthy Marriage In-Kind needed through September 2009:

$

(69,423.54)

159,920.00 48,118.00 30,790.00 4,924.00 16,393.00 174,046.00 103,544.00

6,019.87 3,264.79 1,503.83 (1,310.11) (8,828.64) 23,123.53 (17,866.06)

159,920.00 48,118.00 30,790.00 4,924.00 16,393.00 174,046.00 103,544.00

53,706.00

6,019.87 3,264.79 1,503.83 (1,310.11) (8,828.64) 23,123.53 (17,866.06) 5,907.21

5,907.21


Central Missouri Community Action I CAN Summary Budget Comparison From 9/1/2009 Through 9/30/2009 Account Code 89 100 110 120 130 160 180 200 Total 89

Account Title

Spent this Month

I CAN - PROGRAM Personnel Fringe Benefits In-Direct Travel Supplies Contractual Other

Spent Overall

CAN Spend for 12

Under or (Over)

Total Budget for 12

Under or (Over)

Months

Spent for 12 Months

Months

Total Budget

4,365.14 1,113.28 810.80 670.85 2,584.24 0.00 453.02

49,563.52 15,382.43 9,337.12 27,677.84 32,950.61 130,840.00 75,238.48

I CAN - PROGRAM

9,997.33

340,990.00

340,990.00

0.00

340,990.00

GRAND TOTAL

9,997.33

340,990.00

340,990.00

0.00

340,990.00

59,339.85

In-Kind Additional I CAN In-Kind needed through September 2009:

$

25,907.65

52,500.00 15,096.00 10,275.00 46,369.00 25,500.00 131,250.00 60,000.00

2,936.48 (286.43) 937.88 18,691.16 (7,450.61) 410.00 (15,238.48)

52,500.00 15,096.00 10,275.00 46,369.00 25,500.00 131,250.00 60,000.00

85,247.50

2,936.48 (286.43) 937.88 18,691.16 (7,450.61) 410.00 (15,238.48) 0.00

0.00


Central Missouri Community Action Early Childhood Programs - Head Start and Early Head Start Passion – Commitment – Excellence

CMCA Head Start Director’s Report October 21, 2009 CMCA Head Start 2009-2010 “The Year of Leadership Development” WELCOME all new Policy Council Members! Thanks to everyone who was able to attend the Annual Dinner of Central Missouri Community Action on Thursday, October 22, 2009. We hope that those of you who were able to attend had a great time! IMPORTANT REMINDERS: October 2009 Policy Council Meeting will begin at 5:00PM at the Central Office of CMCA. Policy Council orientation will take place from 5:00-7:00PM. We will not hold committee meetings this month. The committee meetings will resume in November. REMINDER CMCA Head Start will have an onsite Federal Peer Review in FY’10. All required pre-review items have been provided to the Feds. CMCA Head Start is to be a first quarter review. Therefore, we will be having the review before 12/31/09. The Policy Council, Board of Directors, staff and all other stakeholders will be informed of the Peer Review information as soon as we receive it at CMCA Head Start. At this time, it is clear that our review will be in late November or in December. Have you heard? The Healthy Smiles training program will be held on Thursday, December 10th in Columbia, MO. We will be identifying a location within the next few days. Your center’s Team Leader will be providing you with the information that you need to be a part of this Annual Oral Health Training event!


PROGRAM UPDATES: I CAN….Help My Child Stay Healthy We have begun our 2nd year of the I CAN program. During year 2, grantees from Missouri and from the East Coast (23 grantees) will be using the training methods from the Health Care Institute at UCLA. CMCA Head Start’s I CAN program hosted the 23 grantees at a two-day Train the Trainer in Atlanta, GA October 15-16. Please take a look at the CMCA website for the I CAN “tab” ….there are always updates about the I CAN program at www.showmeaction.org then click I CAN! This “tab” is updated continually - it is awesome to see all of the pictures of the programs training Head Start families! CFC (Connecting for Children) Connecting for Children is busy gearing up for Year 3! They will be kicking off the new year with a sports-themed Homecoming Event in Columbia on October 24th and 25th and following it with a SuperPalooza training event in Jefferson City on November 14th and 15th. There will be something for everyone- for couples, co-parents, individuals, and Spanishspeaking families. Parents are signing up now! There will be a national meeting for the Healthy Marriage grantees November 4 & 6 in DC. Tera and Mernell will be attending to represent the CFC program. Thanks to the Policy Council for helping spread the word about Connecting for Children! Want more information about Connecting for Children (CFC)? Call 573.443.8706 (x 230)

FAMILY DEVELOPMENT UPDATES: Fathers First- Fathers First continues to promote strong father-child relationships and the engagement of men in the early development and educational processes of their children. Events are already planned and scheduled for the entire year. As our “kick-off” Fathers First will be hosting a Family Fun Carnival on October 3rd from 10:00-2:00 at the Ashland Optimist Club. The event will not only provide an outlet for free family fun, but will also be advantageous in connecting families to each other and to valuable CMCA and community resources. Informational booths will be available and families will be given the opportunity to register for services. In addition, they will be provided with lots of great information to help them in their parenting journeys. Please plan to join in the fun. We would be honored to have you! Family-child centered activities promote resiliency development in children – Together we are growing socially and emotionally competent kids! Have you ever known a person who could “bounce back” from anything that life threw their way? Maybe they grew up in poverty without the support of a loving family but something allowed them to overcome and succeed. Have you ever met the


person who can identify problems, determine ways to address them, recover quickly, and move on? Have you ever met the person who seems to have consistent emotional stability, no matter what? They are the people everyone loves and they seem to have it all don’t they? What they actually have are called strong “protective factors”. Research (Werner, E. 1982) as reported by the Devereux Early Childhood Initiative, concluded that protective or “resiliency factors” securely developed during the first five years of life are predictive of successful adulthood. Those resiliency factors are; Attachment, Initiative, and Self-Control. During our last school year, each family enrolled in our 3-5 year old program was given “homework”, specifically family-child centered activities to be completed on a monthly basis to promote these resiliency factors. This initiative was very successful and engaged the majority of our families in intentional efforts to build socially and emotionally competent children. With the expansion of our Early Head Start program, we have extended the initiative to include activities to build resiliency during infancy and toddler-hood. We look forward to educating our Early Head Start families in building resiliency and have developed activities to help them in the process. Another great advantage of our Early Head Start program R.E.A.L. (Responsible, Engaged and Loving Dads) curriculum train-the-trainers will be held for community trainers (contractors and partner agencies). Dr. Brian Bowles, MSW, PhD will provide training to trainers from the community in 16 hour training for trainers on September 25th and 26th. The Community Trainers will train interested fathers in local communities. Head Start fathers will be the target for the training events; however, community “dads” will be included wherever possible. It is exciting to be able to take this to a broader community with our partner agencies and contracted trainer’s help! More to come as the communities are identified where the local training events will be help. LEA/MOU Meetings and Partnership Development: Wendi Matlick continues to meet with school districts from across the program in an effort to forge new early care and education partnerships wherever possible. This is critical as we begin to provide more EHS services through our EHS State Grant. We have always been required to have LEA agreements with public schools to address the specific needs of children with disabilities. The purpose of the new Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) is to create even closer relationships with our public schools and other programs that receive federal funding. In times where budgets are at issue, it is critical for programs (such as Head Start, Title I and Missouri Preschool Project (MPP)) to coordinate services wherever possible. The coordination of these services is critical to make the most of public funding and assure that duplication of services in local communities is not taking place. Reports of these partnerships being developed are shared with the Head Start State Collaboration Office as well as with our Program Specialist at the Office of Head Start.


We are currently developing Head Start partnerships with Glasgow and Columbia Public schools for the possible use of money from the Stimulus (ARRA) funds for Head Start expansion in the areas where school district partnerships can become a reality. We are also developing a partnership with Community R-6 School in Laddonia where we hope to develop a program for EHS children and their families. In addition, Melissa Chambers has begun meeting with potential EHS child care partners in Cole County (Jefferson City). Partners have interviewed and have received information relative to the requirements of the contracts for service we will be developing. We have selected a number of community child care partners for the state project. Once contracts are finalized, we will share the names of these community childcare centers. Once start-up has concluded, we will begin to finalize applications for the EHS children in the state project with the intention of serving families as soon as is possible. Partnership Updates: Howard County – CMCA Head Start will, pending funding, develop a Head Start Expansion classroom in Glasgow, MO. In addition, we will continue to have a “transportation partnership arrangement – sharing busses” with the Fayette schools in the coming year. Community R-6 – we will, pending funding, expand our partnership to include infants and toddlers. Currently we have an MPP-Head Start classroom and a transportation (equipment) partnership – sharing busses. Lincoln University in Jefferson City – we will, pending funding, develop a partnership, for space initially, with Lincoln University for services to infants and toddlers. Lincoln also has an ECE degree and we would like to work with them on developing a program for Infant/Toddler CDA credentialing with “hours” that would articulate in to degree hours for staff seeking an AA or BA in ECE infant/toddler. Moberly Area Community College – we will continue to work with the college to assist in staff of the EHS program receiving infant/toddler CDAs and to develop a program for the future to “grow our own” staff for the infant/toddler EHS expansions while assuring that all EHS staff meet, or exceed, educational requirements as per the Head Start Act. Chamois Public Schools – we are working with the school district in Chamois to expand our partnership by placing a larger modular classroom unit on the school grounds in order to serve infants and toddlers. We have had a long relationship with the schools in Chamois and we look forward to expanding this partnership. Columbia Housing Authority – we are discussing space needs with the Columbia Housing Authority. They are interested in assisting our program meet space needs for the EHS program, pending funding.


Centralia Fair Board and CMCA Head Start have negotiated another contract for use of the Fair Board Building in ’09-’10. Eligibility – Recruitment- Selection - Enrollment and Attendance (ERSEA) Activities – Enrollment for ’08-‘09 continued to meet expectations throughout the summer months of our program. We will provide an updated enrollment report at the Policy Council meeting on September 17th.

We are fully enrolled for the 2009-2010 program year! This year, and with the use of stimulus (ARRA) funds, we were able to bring our Team Leaders back to work for the full month of August. This was extremely helpful in reaching full enrollment earlier. Staff have commented that the orientation of families into the program has gone much smoother with the extra time that has been provided. Other Required Reporting – Attendance, USDA Meals Served, % Children with Disabilities Served and Monitoring reports – are all included in this mailing. IM/PIs – Information Memorandums and Program Instructions which are new (from the Office of Head Start) since our last PC meeting have been included, for your review and information, with this mailing.

Education staff of the Head Start program have been in training all week (9/89/11) to attend High Scope training provided by a national trainer. Staff have enjoyed the training opportunity and children will see many new classroom activities as a result of the learning. Early Head Start staff continue to receive infant/toddler training on a variety of topics and are developing strategies to improve services for both children and families as we increase our number of families serviced. Mental Health and Wellness Updates - Avenues into Postpartum Depression are being made this year as we increase our education and responsiveness to women giving birth. Information regarding risk factors, treatment options, and the use of the Edinburgh a nationally recognized scale to define postpartum depression will be a part of this year’s responsiveness. We will also collect data this year to guide us in what types of partnerships and interventions would be wise for us to grow into in subsequent years.


A child abuse and neglect and child abduction prevention program is being developed with the intent to pilot in several of the sites. The program will be a curriculum for teachers to introduce in the classroom in collaboration with mental health staff. Information will also be given to parents to help them with discussing child abuse and neglect and abduction with their children. More to come…..as it develops! Health Service Advisory Committee (HSAC) – will be meeting in the month of September. Of particular interest is the H1N1 discussion that they will have. We will have updates on the concerns of the swine flu outbreak (as expected) in our region, what parents can do to prepare and protect their children, etc. In addition, we have attended Webinars relative to this issue and are developing informational items for both staff and parents….more to come… MONITORING CONCERN AREAS NOTED by Program Director: We continue to struggle with follow-up for child identified health and dental needs. Program Information Report (PIR) noted concerns with follow up care and, therefore, we are targeting follow up as a major part of our ongoing monitoring system in this program year. If your child has been noted as needing follow up care, are they receiving it? The EHS budget will need to continue to be monitored for personnel costs as the budget reflects we are running close and with summer subs this may become an issue. It will be monitored monthly and reported.

GRANTS Updates: EHS Missouri State Funded Grant – We began this program, officially, on July 1, 2009. We are pleased to inform you that EHS State has been “spared” the funding cuts that were previously discussed! Missouri Governor, Jay Nixon, did not take any funding away from the state EHS! We are so excited! Cola/Quality Improvement Grants – have all been approved! We have hired all staff that we intended to hire with the quality funding and all other approved activities and expenditures are in the process of completion* I CAN (year 2) grant has been approved and fully funded! Still Pending Approvals: CFC Year 3 grant Program Improvement grant (competitive) EHS Expansion (competitive) HS Expansion (competitive)


First quarterly report of ARRA funding will be due October 2009. The accounting department has registered us for the input of our required reporting. The accounting department recently joined the HS/EHS Directors’ of Operations and ECP Director in a webinar from NHSA to understand the reporting requirements.

REMINDERS: Facility Updates: Cole East – New sewer lines have been installed and other plumbing repairs have been made. We are in hopes that the work will be completed and we will be back in the site next week (when the regular school year begins). WFSC – plans continue to be developed for the conversion and upgrade of the facility to accommodate infants/toddlers from our EHS state grant. The Williams Family has been very helpful every step of the way and we are indebted to them for all their support. Tiger Paws – has had some sprucing up recently with classrooms being painted, etc. Staff of the site have assisted with this activity! Thanks to all! Strategic Planning at CMCA Head Start Staff continue to assist with the agency-wide strategic planning process. The committees have completed the 10-year outcomes and the 3-year outcomes. The next step is the Implementation process which will be guided by a Coordinating Team which consists of the CMCA Leadership team and other leaders from across the agency. Work plans for all 5 Strategic Commitments will be developed by cross-functional teams from across the 8 county service area! CMCA Leadership Team continues to meet and discuss ARRA funding and the expansion of the agency at large and the various programs we operate. Lots of growth at this time! ACTION ITEMS: N/A for this month – as a part of the orientation training, we will be sharing the By-Laws, with proposed revisions, for your consideration and approval at the November Policy Council meeting. NOTICES: None at this time


Other REQUIRED INPUT/Approvals: ERSEA Report Credit Card Report USDA Meal Count/Report Attendance Report Monitoring Report – we will present the PIR (program information report) results in lieu of the regular monthly report. All items as listed above will be presented in “real time”/up to the minute at the meeting of the Council.

IM/PI: Information Memorandums and Program Instructions – those we have received since our last Council meeting are found for your information and review within this mailing. In addition, they can be found on the eclkc web site: www.eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov. Web Sites of Interest to Policy Council Members: www.moheadstart.org - this is the official web site of the Missouri Head Start Association. Missouri Head Start Association works for children, families, staff and communities regarding issues of interest to Missouri’s Head Start programs. The site gives detailed information on all of Missouri’s Head Start and Early Head Start Programs. www.ECLKC.ohs.acf.hhs.gov – this is the Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center. This web site is the complete repository and library of all items from Head Start since 1965. This is a great web site and if you have access to a computer –check it out! www.showmeaction.org – this is our Central Missouri Community Action web site – check it out for job opportunities and other “happenings” across the 8-county region. Central Missouri Community Action’s Mission: “To empower individuals and families to achieve self-reliance” Vision Statements of the Agency are: *Individuals and families live extraordinary lives in decency and dignity *Communities are thriving, vibrant safe places to live embracing all individuals and providing opportunities for growth *Central Missouri Community Action is the recognized leader in ending poverty and building strong communities.


CMCA’s Strategic Commitments are as follows: 1)

Engage the community to assure that all people have their basic needs met.

2)

Enhance community capacity to ensure all individuals have lifelong learning opportunities.

3)

Build community capacity to enhance economic and community assets.

4)

Build relationships across class and race lines.

5)

Develop an innovative, caring agency dedicated to being an influential leader in our communities.

The Mission Statement for CMCA Head Start is as follows: CMCA Head Start provides high quality, comprehensive services in partnership with local communities so that children, families, staff and community members embrace life-long learning leading to selfesteem and self-sufficiency. The “Motto” for CMCA Head Start: Passion – Commitment- Excellence

We are featuring a “living the strategic commitments at CMCA Head Start” section. This month we are focusing on Strategic Commitment #1 – “ENGAGE the community to assure that

all people have their basic needs met” The CMCA Head Start program assures the basic needs of people are met in a multitude of ways…..for some examples: Health Screenings – did you know that every child in Head Start and Early Head Start must receive a comprehensive health screening during the first 30-45or 90 days of the program. Some health screenings are required before children enroll (physical examination and shot records) others are a part of the orientation process (health and nutrition information provided by the families) and yet others are required within specific time-frames in the Head Start Act (Dental Exams, for example, must be completed on each child within the first 90 days of the program year). In addition to these specific screenings, we must also assure the screening of children for high Lead levels, for appropriate growth and development (via heights/weight charting) and must assure hemoglobin and hematocrit blood levels are reviewed so that we can determine if children are anemic. Vision and hearing screenings are completed within the first 45 days of the program. We also screen for social/emotional (mental health) issues. Planning services – CMCA Head Start must assure that any child who has a specific health concern has a working “plan” to be implemented within the Head Start program... Follow-up care is monitored and required for children who have plans or who have referrals for follow-up care. When children must take


medications at HS, a very thorough Action Plan must be in place and requires the approval of both physician and parent. Special Dietary menus are available to children who need them and special training for parents regarding health, nutrition, mental health and all topics “health” are provided. CMCA Head Start is also charged with making families aware of the importance of establishment of a medical home. While this is challenging we must track our success. As a way of assuring families have the tools that they need to do home care when appropriate, we have offered Healthy Smiles and I CAN which are both health literacy training programs for families. Though an intervention model of service delivery, FDA IIs are assigned when families need assistance in assuring all health requirements are met and that all children remain or achieve the highest level of “health” possible while in the program and for life!. Due to the increase in the number of over-weight preschool children, CMCA Head Start has implemented the IMIL (I am moving I am learning) curriculum to our classroom approaches. This year we hope to add the “Healthy Choices for Little Voices” curriculum to our EHS program. The serving of health meals and exercise while in Head Start builds great habits that can last a lifetime! CMCA Head Start is responsible to implement IEP (Individualized Education Plans), IFSP (Individualized Family Support Plans) and other plans (such as 504 plans) as they relate to the provision of programming to children with special healthcare needs within the Head Start environment. Over the past several years, we have served children who have a variety of special healthcare needs (deafness, blindness, etc.). Each year, more than 10% of total enrollment “slots” must be provided to children with identified special needs (this includes health care needs).

We provide Health Literacy Training (I CAN and Healthy Smiles) for Head Start and Early head Start family members. I CAN is a basic health literacy training aimed at teaching basic health care skills that can be done in the home. This program, using the training methodologies of the HCI – Health Care Institute at UCLA, is low-literacy (3rd grade reading level) and provides a book, thermometer, medication spoon and other incentives for those who receive the training. Last spring, we trained more than 300 persons at our first ever I CAN local training. Healthy Smiles has been a parent training initiative for the past 4 years. In December, we will complete 5 years of training using the book, “What to do for Healthy Teeth”. The book, and training, is the second tier of training offered by the Health Care Institute. CMCA Head Start was awarded an OHS Oral Health Initiative grant in 2004 and to date we have trained more than 1,200 people on how to better care for the oral health needs of their children in the home.


CMCA Head Start is beginning a training program, "What to do when Your Having a Baby� which follows the same format at I CAN and Healthy Smiles. This program will be targeted for expectant mothers and families. It is believed that having this trio of health literacy training programs at CMCA Head Start we can assist parents in achieving the skills that they need to make better health care decisions at home. This will save the health care system money and will assure that families, who know their children the best, have the tools that they need to keep their families safe and healthy. CMCA Head Start is also the Innovation and Improvement Project (IIP) grantee for the I CAN‌Help My Child Stay Healthy Program nationally. Now in our second year of training programs using the Train-The-Trainer model, we have trained 18 grantees in Missouri and another 23 grantees from the East Coast (on October 15-16).

Respectfully submitted, Mernell T. King Mernell T. King Early Childhood Programs Director CMCA Head Start


HEAD START

Monthly Totals:

Sep-09

Income Eligibility Site Name

F.E.

Last Day

WFSC

40

40

42

Lakeview

20

20

21

2103

Community R6

20

20

20

2202

Centralia

30

20

20

Local ID

County

2102 2101

AUDRAIN

2000

Enrolled

Waitlist 18 2 10

0-100%

101-130

>130

Foster

Homeless

Public Asst.

Concern

Disability

1

2

4

0

2

30

3

3

13

1

0

6

2

0

3

9

2

0 9

0

0

1

0

2

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

NA 3

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

1

1

20

0

4

1 0

0

4

11

0

4

0

0

14

0

4

15

Central Office

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Park

60

60

60

32

3

2213

Tiger Paws

30

30

30

16

1

2209

Worley

30

35

37

2203

2301 2401 2406

BOONE

CALLAWAY COLE

Callaway County

36

40

41

Cole East

80

76

84

40

40

40

Cole West

90

27 16 59

2

28

0

0

0

1

16

0

1

58

3

2

1

4

30

0

4

27

2

0

0

3

13

0

3

2501

COOPER

Clubhouse

40

40

40

10

31

1

1

0

4

9

1

3

2601

HOWARD

Howard County

36

32

34

4

25

4

0

0

7

0

4

2701

MONITEAU

Moniteau County

36

37

41

12

31

0

1 0

2

1

12

0

2

Linn

17

18

18

2

12

2

0

4

2

0

0

Chamois

20

19

19

2

10

3

0 5

0

0

1

0

2

535

535

547

225

364

27

25

5

30

146

1

38

5.05%

4.67%

0.93%

5.61%

27.29%

0.19%

<35%

<10%

2851 2852

OSAGE

100.00% Mandated Requirements

42.06%

68.04%

>97%

EARLY HEAD START

Monthly Totals:

Sep-09 Local ID

Income Eligibility County

TBD TBD

AUDRAIN

TBD TBD

COLE

1200 1211 1213

7.10% 10% or >

BOONE

Site Name

F.E.

Last Day

WFSC

NA

NA

NA

0

Pregnant Moms

NA

NA

NA

0

TBD

NA

NA

NA

Enrolled

Waitlist

JC Day Care

NA

NA

NA

0

Pregnant Moms

8

7

7

0

Bear Creek

8

8

8

Tiger Paws

24

24

25

40

39

40

97.50% Mandated Requirements

>97%

36 36 90.00%

0-100%

101-130

>130

Foster

Homeless

Public Asst.

Concern

Disability

4

0

0

NA

2

1

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

2

2

3

0

0 0

6

0

17

0

0 0

27

0

0

2

4

7

0

0.00%

0.00%

5.00%

10.00%

17.50%

0.00%

<35%

<10%

67.50%

1

Enrolled =any child that was enrolled for at least one day during the month, including children that were enrolled but terminated during the month.

2

All Terminated Children were replaced within 30 Days. See Child Plus Report #2210 in the Enrollment Binder.

Last Day:

# of children/pregnant mothers enrolled on the reporting date or terminated and still in 30-day replacement window prior to reporting date. Reported on-line to ACF each month.

0.00% 10% or >

Enrolled:

Cumulative number of children served during the reporting month.

Vacancies:

All Terminated Children were not replaced within 30 days; the end of the part-day program option is less than 60 days away. In accordance with PS 1305.7. See ChildPlus Report 2210 in Enrollment Binder.


HEAD START AND EARLY HEAD START Sep-09

CACFP MEALS PROVIDED

Local ID County

Site Name

F.E.

Enrolled

ADA

#DSS Child Care Subsidy

# Breakfast

# AM Snack

# Lunch

# PM Snack

7

420

0

432

337

177

0

177

0

NA 127

NA 0

NA 127

NA 0

2102

WFSC

40

42

88.39%

2101 AUDRAIN

Lakeview

20

21

86.47%

2103

Community R-VI*

20

20

95.67%

0 0

2202

Centralia

30

20

2203

Park

60

60

87.58% 89.05%

0 0

850

0

874

776

Tiger Paws

54

55

87.56%

28

563

0

626

571

Worley

30

37

80.63%

0

264

127

1211

Bear Creek CFDC

8

8

88.76%

0 5

117 NA

NA

NA

NA

1200

Pregnant Moms

8

7

Callaway County

36

41

NA 89.86%

NA

2301 CALLAWAY 2401 COLE 2406

NA 188

NA 0

NA 355

NA 297

Cole East

80

84

84.93%

458

0

633

460

Cole West

88.45%

0

166

0

329

159

Clubhouse

40 40

40

2501 COOPER

40

85.97%

0

144

0

282

134

2213 2209

BOONE

0 16

2601 HOWARD

Howard County

36

2701 MONITEAU

Moniteau County

36

34 41

95.02% 80.00%

0 0

127 142

0 0

243 258

116 119

2851

Linn

17

18

92.78%

0

164

0

164

143

Chamois*

20

19

87.50%

0

NA

NA

NA

NA

TOTAL

575

587

88.04%

56

3643

0

4764

3239

2852

OSAGE

*Reimbursement collected by partner. ADA:

Average Daily Attendance (ADA) is tracked and analyzed in accordance with 1305.8 of the Head Start Performance Standards.

DSS Child Care Subsidy:

For the purpose of this report, we are only reporting the children for whom we receive DSS reimbursement. (Those that are enrolled in a full-day classroom.) For more information on the DSS/Child Care Assistance Program, please visit http://dss.mo.gov/cd/childcare/pdf/ccare.pdf.

CACFP Meals Provided:

For more information regarding the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), please visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/CND/Care/CACFP/aboutcacfp.htm.


Central Missouri Community Action HEAD START PROGRAM

Quality Assurance Summary Report

ONGOING MONITORING for the Month of: September 2009 SUMMARY OF ONGOING MONITORING ACTIVITIES  Different data sources were utilized by the team during this monitoring period; review of Participant Files,  classroom observations, review of Child Plus reports (database), etc.  Strengths were identified by the team along  with areas needing improvement.  The monitoring emphasis for the month is reviewed using the OHS Monitoring  Tool, review of the program work plan, policy, procedure, forms and formats.  Monitoring Emphasis for the month:  Governance  PROGRAM INFORMATION REPORT (PIR) – Comparison of Performance Indicators  HEAD START EARLY HEAD START  As of

2008-2009

2007-08

As of  

2008-2009

2007-08

01. Children up to date on a schedule of Preventative and Primary Health Care:

*

91%

93.20%

94%

88.68%

02. Children needing medical treatment:

*

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

2.13%

03. Children receiving medical treatment:

*

--

--

--

100.00%

04. Children completing dental exams: (Preschool Only) 05. Children needing dental treatment: (Preschool Only) 06. Children receiving dental treatment: (Preschool Only) 07. Children with up-to-date, or all possible, immunizations: 08. Children enrolled in Medicaid, SCHIP, or Paid Health Insurance at EOY: 12. Classroom teachers with an ECE or related degree ( AA, BA or graduate):

*

91.42%

--

--

*

31%

22.30%

--

--

*

18%

36.51%

--

--

*

101%

104.69%

73%

100.00%

*

94%

91.28%

89%

100.00%

*

77%

80.33%

100%

83.33%

Strengths     The following are the strengths identified by the monitoring team:  x Sites are on target to meet the 45 day requirements.  x Data Entry of Health Requirements is current; reports from ChildPlus are accurate and can be used as a  monitoring tool.  Areas in Need of Improvement   x Completion and submission of the Parent DECA (not a health requirement, but is a practice of our program).  Possible Systems Issue(s)    x Lead Screens continue to be a concern in multiple counties.  x Ability of Sites to complete requirements when they are short‐staffed.  Plan of Action  x Develop a “Rescue Team” of Central Office Staff that can be sent in to support centers/classrooms when  they are short‐staffed, by monitoring health requirements, completing screenings, maintaining files/data  entry.    x Develop a plan to deliver positive reinforcement to the sites that are meeting/exceeding program  expectations. 

Page 1 of 1

QA Monitoring Report-Sept 09 (2)


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ACF Administration for Children and Families

1. Log No. ACF-PI-HS-09-09

2. Issuance Date: 10/06/2009

3. Originating Office: Office of Head Start 4. Key Words: Emergency Preparedness Survey

PROGRAM INSTRUCTION TO: All Head Start and Early Head Start Grantees SUBJECT: Head Start/Early Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey INSTRUCTION: Section 649(m) of the Head Start Act requires that: "The Secretary shall evaluate the Federal, State, and local preparedness of Head Start programs, including Early Head Start programs, to respond appropriately in the event of a large-scale emergency, such as the hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, or other incidents where assistance may be warranted under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.)." There is currently no uniform information collected on how Head Start programs have or have not developed policies and procedures for such situations. Such information is crucial to the Office of Head Start (OHS) in responding to the Congressional requirements in the 2007 Act. For this purpose, the Office of Head Start developed and obtained OMB approval of the Head Start/Early Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (OMB Control No. 0970-0368). The survey is now available to grantees in the Head Start Enterprise System (HSES) in the tab titled "Emergency Preparedness." Grantees are required to complete and submit the survey no later than December 30, 2009. Submission questions can be directed to HSES Help at hseshelp@acf.hhs.gov or 1-866-771-4737. It is essential that this survey accurately represent Head Start and Early Head Start program's emergency preparedness and response activites. The Office of Head Start understands that programs are in various stages of planning and preparing for large-scale emergencies. It is important that the survey results capture this variability so that OHS can better plan for technical assistance and guidance. Please direct any questions on this Instruction to your OHS Regional Office. / Patricia E. Brown / Patricia E. Brown Acting Director Office of Head Start


HEAD START EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SURVEY OMB NO. 0970-0368

DIRECTIONS Please complete the following questions to the best of your ability. The Office of Head Start is interested in learning about your programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emergency preparedness policies and plans for largescale emergencies. If there is a question that you can not answer, please consult with others in your program to obtain the answer. The information you provide will be very helpful for the Office of Head Start, and we thank you for your participation. For the purposes of this study, a large-scale emergency refers to circumstances of hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma; the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001; or other incidents where assistance may be warranted under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.).

TABLE OF CONTENTS The table of contents is active and can be used to navigate. In PDF format, the table of contents entries are also Bookmarks. Section A: Presence of a large-scale emergency plan and emergencies included ...................................................... 2 Section B: Drills of your emergency preparedness plan, policies, and procedures ...................................................... 4 Section C: Communication of your emergency preparedness plan, policies, and procedures for staff, parents, and others ...................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Section D: Financial support of your emergency preparedness plan ........................................................................... 8 Section E: Connecting your program with State and local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols ....... 10 Section F: Coordination with emergency management agencies and organizations for large-scale emergencies ... 12 Section G: Preparing for response and recovery from large-scale emergencies ....................................................... 13 Section H: Emergency preparedness and response planning for localized emergencies .......................................... 15

Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 5, 2009)

Page 1


Section A: Presence of a large-scale emergency plan and emergencies included 1. Has your program developed emergency preparedness and response policies and procedures for large-scale emergencies? Yes No 1A. Which of the large-scale emergencies below are currently included within your program’s emergency preparedness and response plan’s policies and procedures? Check all that apply. Wildfire Flood Chemical/industrial accident (beyond the facility) Severe weather event (for example, tornado, hurricane, ice storm, extreme heat) Earthquake Tsunami (tidal wave) Civil disorder/rioting Terrorist attack (such as nuclear/biological/chemical) Pandemic influenza or other outbreak of infectious disease Widespread loss of electrical power Breakdown of electronic communications (such as widespread failure of phone networks) Other: None of the above 1B. How often is your large-scale emergency preparedness and response plan updated? Monthly Four times a year Twice a year Once a year Other: We have not updated our large-scale emergency preparedness and response plan 2. Which of the large-scale emergencies below has your program been affected by from January 1, 2000, to the present? Check the number of occurrences that apply. Category

None

One

Two

Three

Four

Five

Wildfire Flood Chemical/industrial accident (beyond the facility) Tornado Hurricane Ice storm Extreme heat Earthquake Tsunami (tidal wave) Civil disorder/rioting Terrorist attack (for example, a nuclear, biological, or chemical attack, or the attacks of September 11, 2001) Outbreak of infectious disease in the community Widespread loss of electrical power Breakdown of electronic communications (such as widespread failure of phone networks) Other: Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 – October 5, 2009)

Page 2

Six or more


3. Which of the large-scale emergencies below are required by your State or local statutes, regulations, or policies to be in your written emergency preparedness and response plans? Check all that are required by your State or local statutes. A written plan is not required by our State statutes, regulations, or policies A written plan is not required by our local statutes, regulations, or policies We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know whether a written plan is required by our State or local statutes, regulations, or policies Wildfire Flood Chemical/industrial accident (beyond the facility) Severe weather event (for example, tornado, hurricane, ice storm, extreme heat) Earthquake Tsunami (tidal wave) Civil disorder/rioting Terrorist attack (such as nuclear/biological/chemical) Pandemic influenza or other outbreak of infectious disease Widespread loss of electrical power Breakdown of electronic communications (such as widespread failure of phone networks) Other: 3A. If your State or local statutes, regulations, or policies do not require your program to have a written emergency preparedness and response plan for large-scale emergencies (for example, hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, floods, industrial accidents, terrorist attacks, etc.), what are the reasons for which you developed your own policies and procedures? Check all that apply. Our program experienced a large-scale emergency Our community experienced a large-scale emergency Our community is making an effort to plan for a large-scale emergency Other programs experienced a large-scale emergency Our program wanted to be prepared There is a grant opportunity that we pursued for emergency preparedness Develop or maintain a collaborative relationship with other programs/agencies Other: We have not developed a plan.

Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 5, 2009)

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Section B: Drills of your emergency preparedness plan, policies, and procedures 4. Do your program policies and procedures designate the position of the person (example: director, lead teacher, program supervisor, etc.) who is responsible for each part of the emergency preparedness and response plan for largescale emergencies? Yes No We have no emergency preparedness policies and procedures for large-scale emergencies 5. Do your program’s emergency preparedness and response policies and procedures require that you conduct drills? Yes No We have no emergency preparedness policies and procedures for large-scale emergencies 5A. What do your large-scale emergency preparedness drills focus on? Check all that apply. Drills for a specific large-scale emergency Evacuation “Shelter-in-place” Damage assessment Risk assessment Communication with emergency personnel Other: 6. Which of the following methods does your program use to test procedures to be used in the event of a large-scale emergency? Check all that apply. “Tabletop” exercises (staff discussion of specific assigned roles, responsibilities, and actions in the event of an emergency) Simulated events (fire drills, evacuation drills, shelter-in-place) “After-action review” (review of the effectiveness of communication procedures that were used during an actual event) Other: Currently we do not test procedures to be used for large-scale emergencies 7. Do your emergency preparedness and response drills for large-scale emergencies include simulated and/or actual communication and coordination with emergency management agencies? Check all that apply. Category

Simulated

Actual Communication

Actual Coordination

Federal emergency management agencies State emergency management agencies Local emergency management agencies Non-governmental emergency management organization Other: Our emergency preparedness and response drills for large-scale emergencies do not include simulated and/or actual communication and coordination with emergency management agencies

Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 – October 5, 2009)

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8. Do your emergency preparedness and response drills for large-scale emergencies include simulated and/or actual communication and coordination with relief agencies and other response and recovery resources after the immediate impact of the emergency has passed? Check all that apply. Category

Simulated

Actual Communication

Actual Coordination

Medical organizations or agencies Mental health providers/organizations/agencies, crisis counselors Red Cross Insurance consultants Other: Our emergency preparedness and response drills for large-scale emergencies do not include simulated and/or actual communication and coordination with relief agencies and other response and recovery resources after the immediate impact of the emergency has passed.

Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 5, 2009)

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Section C: Communication of your emergency preparedness plan, policies, and procedures for staff, parents, and others 9. Who receives copies of your emergency preparedness and response plan? Check all that apply. Staff Volunteers Parents Community Partners Other: We do not provide copies of our emergency preparedness and response plan to staff, parents, or others. 9A. How often is your emergency preparedness and response plan provided to others? Category

During orientation/ training

At initial involvement with program

At the beginning of the program year

Twice a year

Monthly

Other

Staff Volunteers Parents Community Partners Other : 10. What accommodations for communicating emergency procedures have you made? Check all that apply. Posted emergency information in English and in other languages representative of the languages spoken by staff, parents, and volunteers Pictograms (such as pictures or diagrams of evacuation routes, locations of essential equipment or supplies) Audible pre-recorded instructions (for vision-impaired staff or volunteers) Tactile guides for evacuation routes for the visually impaired Other: We have not made accommodations for communicating emergency procedures. 11. What are your programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policies and procedures for how to communicate with parents and staff in the event of a large-scale emergency? Check all that apply. Category

Parents

Telephone (including cell phone text messaging) TTY (text telephone devices for the hearing impaired) Email Emergency contacts pre-designated and authorized by the parent/guardian or staff person to receive information regarding the child or staff person on his/her behalf Pre-designated local radio and television stations Specific procedures for communicating with parents of limited English proficiency Specific procedures for communicating with homeless families Other: We do not have policies and procedures for how to communicate with parents and staff in the event of a large-scale emergency.

Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 5, 2009)

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Staff


12. How do you keep contact information for parents, staff, and volunteers? Check all that apply. Category

Hard copy in office

Hard copy kept off-site

Electronic

Electronic backup off-site

Information not kept

Parents Staff Volunteers 13. How often do you update your contact information for: Category

During training/ orientation

When entering the program

At the beginning of the year

Twice a year

Monthly

Other

No updates are made

Parents Staff Volunteers 14. What information are parents and staff informed of in advance? Category

Parents

Staff

The types of emergencies that they will be contacted about How they will be contacted in the event of a large-scale emergency Changes to the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s large-scale emergency policies and procedures when they are made Other: None of the above

Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 5, 2009)

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Section D: Financial support of your emergency preparedness plan 15. Does your program budget include Federal and/or non-Federal-share resources dedicated to emergency preparedness? Check all that apply. Category

Costs of training

Supplies

Equipment

Facilities

No such resources are included in the budget

Federal Non-Federal Other: 16. Are costs/expenses associated with your program’s emergency preparedness planning represented as a line item(s) in your program’s budget? Yes No 17. Are any emergency preparedness services, equipment, supplies, facilities, or financial resources donated or contributed to your program? Check all that apply. Services (ex. training of Head Start staff and volunteers, broadcast of emergency messages) Materials (ex. emergency supplies such as bottled water, long shelf-life foods, equipment such as walkietalkies, weather radios) Facilities (evacuation space, off-site storage of supplies, back-up records) Financial resources (ex. grants) Other: Our program has not received any donations or contributions related to emergency preparedness services, equipment, supplies, facilities, or financial resources 18. How many days of pre-positioned emergency supplies do you have to provide for staff and children, if necessary? Check one response for each row. Category

None

1 Day

2 Days

3 Days

4 Days

5 Days

More than 5 days

Water Food Medications Batteries for flashlights and radios Personal care/toiletry items Other:

Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 – October 5, 2009)

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18A. If you have indicated “None” for water, food, medications, batteries for flashlights and radios, and/or personal care/toiletry items, how was this decision made? Check all that apply. Category

Water

Food

Medications

On-site

Off-site

Batteries for flashlights and radios

Personal care/toiletry items

Not enough money to provide supplies Not enough space to store supplies Not enough staff time to manage the inventory and track expiration dates Not identified as likely that the facility would be isolated for more than a day Not a priority Other: 19. Where are these pre-positioned emergency supplies stored? Check all that apply. Category

Other 1

Other 2

Water Food Medications Batteries for flashlights and radios Personal care/toiletry items Other:

Head Start Emergency Preparedness Survey (Version 1.0 – October 5, 2009)

Page 9


Section E: Connecting your program with State and local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols 20. Which of the following methods does your program use to keep itself up-to-date on State and local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols? Check all that apply. Mailings Email Listserv (through local/State authorities) Direct communication from representatives of local and State emergency preparedness and response agencies or workgroups Program staff participation on local or State emergency preparedness and response agencies or workgroups Other: Our program uses no method to keep itself up-to-date on State and local evacuation and emergency protocols 21. Does the program have policies and procedures for staff training on State and local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols? Category

Yes

No

State protocols Local (jurisdictions) protocols 22. How often does your program provide staff training on State and local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols? Check all that apply. Category

Once a year

Twice a year

Four times a year

When changes are made to evacuation and emergency protocols

Other

No training provided

Staff training – State protocols Staff training – Local (jurisdictions) protocols 22A. Who conducts staff training on State and local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols? Check all that apply. Category

State protocols

Local (jurisdictions) protocols

Program Staff Outside consultants (paid by Program funds) Outside consultants (unpaid local, State, or Federal partners) Other: 22B. Which staff participates in the training on State and local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols? Check all that apply. Category

Teachers

Teacher aids

Support staff

Transportation personnel

Volunteers

Other

Staff training – State protocols Staff training – Local (jurisdictions) protocols

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23. Which of the following methods are used to test the procedures for carrying out State and local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols? Check all that apply. Category

State

Local

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

(jurisdictions)

know

Tabletop exercises (staff discussion of specific assigned roles, responsibilities, and actions in the event of an emergency) Simulated events (fire drills, evacuation drills, shelter in place) After-action review of the effectiveness of procedures for carrying out State and local evacuation and emergency protocols that were used during an actual event Other: There are no State or local (jurisdictions) evacuation and emergency protocols Our program does not test procedures for carrying out State and local evacuation and emergency protocols

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Section F: Coordination with emergency management agencies and organizations for large-scale emergencies 24. Which emergency management agencies/organizations does your program have policies and procedures for communicating and coordinating with in the event of a large-scale emergency? Check all that apply. Category

Communicating

Coordinating

Federal emergency management agencies State emergency management agencies Local emergency management agencies Non-governmental emergency management organizations Other: Our program does not have policies or procedures for communicating and coordinating with emergency management agencies/organizations in the event of a large-scale emergency 25. Were your program’s policies and procedures for communicating and coordinating with emergency management agencies developed for your program or a larger system? Check all that apply. For your Head Start program specifically For a larger system of which the program is a part (ex. school system) Other: Our program does not have policies or procedures developed for our program or a larger system for communicating and coordinating with emergency management agencies/organizations in the event of a largescale emergency 25A. Which of the agencies/organizations below were directly involved in developing your policies and procedures for communicating and coordinating between your program and the emergency management agencies? Check all that apply. Federal emergency management agencies State emergency management agencies Local emergency management agencies Non-governmental emergency management organizations Other: Other agencies/organizations were not involved in developing policies or procedures for communicating and coordinating with emergency management agencies/organizations in the event of a large-scale emergency Don’t know 25B. Did your program inform any of the following agencies/organizations about your policies and procedures for communicating and coordinating with them? Check all that apply. Federal emergency management agencies State emergency management agencies Local emergency management agencies Non-governmental emergency management organizations Other: Don’t know Other emergency management agencies/organizations were not informed about our program’s policies or procedures for communicating and coordinating with them in the event of a large-scale emergency

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Section G: Preparing for response and recovery from large-scale emergencies 26. Does your program have policies and procedures for designating and maintaining access to critical records (for example, medication logs, consent forms, etc.) in the event of an emergency requiring evacuation or shelter-in-place? Category

Yes

No

Evacuation Shelter-in-place 27. Does your program have policies and procedures for communicating with parents and staff during the response and recovery stages of a large-scale emergency after the immediate impact of the emergency has passed? Category

Yes

No

Parents Staff 28. In the case of a large-scale emergency, does your program have partnerships or agreements with individuals/practices in the medical community to provide resources for your: Category

Yes

No

Children Parents Staff 29. In your program communication policies and procedures for the response and recovery stages of a large-scale emergency, what contact information for identified individuals representing relief agencies, by name or by title, is included?" Check all that apply. Individuals in Federal emergency management agencies Individuals in State emergency management agencies Individuals in local emergency management agencies Individuals from non-governmental emergency management organizations Other: Our program does not have policies or procedures for the response and recovery stages of a large-scale emergency that include contact information for identified individuals representing relief agencies 30. Which of the following are included in your program’s emergency preparedness and response policies and procedures for Continuity of Operations planning (planning for the continuing delivery of program services once the immediate impact of the large-scale emergency has passed)? Back-up systems for computer files – on-site Back-up systems for computer files – off-site Provisions for temporary relocation of program classrooms and other center-based services Identification of key equipment for the safe operation of the facility A list of vendors who can provide critical repair or replacement when needed Transportation Other: Our program does not have policies or procedures for Continuity of Operations planning

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31. Do your program’s emergency preparedness and response policies and procedures include preparation through identification of resources and training in: Check all that apply. Identification of resources

Category

Training

How to conduct a facility damage assessment Documentation of facility damage assessment Identification of resource needs to resume program operation Prioritization of resource needs to resume program operation Notification of financial entities (insurance carriers, funding agencies, FEMA) Other: Our program’s emergency preparedness and response policies and procedures do not include preparation through identification of resources and training as above 32. Do your program’s emergency preparedness and response policies and procedures include training of staff in the: Category

Children

Families

Staff

Effects of traumatic events such as large-scale emergencies upon: Provision of mental health support during response and recovery for: Our program’s emergency preparedness and response policies and procedures do not include such training of staff as above

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Section H: Emergency preparedness and response planning for localized emergencies 33. Which of the localized emergencies below are currently included within your program’s emergency preparedness and response plan’s policies and procedures? Check all that apply. Hostage situation in the center Abduction/attempted abduction Violence in the center On-site fire Infrastructure failure (e.g., roof collapse, major plumbing/flood) Other: Our program does not have an emergency preparedness and response plan for localized emergencies 33A. How often is your localized emergency preparedness and response plan updated? Monthly Four times a year Twice a year Once a year Other: Our program’s localized emergency preparedness and response plan has not been updated 34. Which of the localized emergencies below has your program been affected by from January 1, 2000, to the present? If affected by more than once, please indicate by entering number of times this has occurred. Check all that apply. Hostage situation in the center Abduction/attempted abduction Violence in the center On-site fire Infrastructure failure (e.g., roof collapse, major plumbing/flood) Other: Our program has not been affected by a localized emergency from January 1, 2000, to the present 35. Do your program’s localized emergency preparedness and response policies and procedures require that you conduct drills? Yes No 35A. What do your localized emergency preparedness drills focus on? Check all that apply. Drills for a specific localized emergency Evacuation “Shelter-in-place” Damage assessment Risk assessment Communication with emergency personnel Other:

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36. Which of the following methods does your program use to test procedures to be used in the event of a localized emergency? Check all that apply. “Tabletop” exercises (staff discussion of specific assigned roles, responsibilities, and actions in the event of an emergency) Simulated events (fire drills, evacuation drills, shelter-in-place) “After-action review” (review of the effectiveness of procedures that were used during an actual event) Other: No methods are used to test the procedures 37. What are your program’s policies and procedures for how to communicate with parents and staff in the event of a localized emergency? Check all that apply. Category

Parents

Staff

Telephone (including cell phone text messaging) TTY (text telephone devices for the hearing impaired) Email Emergency contacts pre-designated and authorized by the parent/guardian or staff person to receive information regarding the child or staff person on his/her behalf Pre-designated local radio and television stations Specific procedures for communicating with parents of limited English proficiency Specific procedures for communicating with homeless families Other: Our program has no policies and procedures for how to communicate with parents and staff in the event of a localized emergency. 38. Have your program conducted an assessment of potential risks to your facility associated with an emergency, such as: Structural integrity of your building Susceptibility of your facility to loss of electrical power Susceptibility of your facility to loss of water or sanitation Susceptibility of your facility to loss of ability to communicate to the outside Susceptibility of your facility to loss of access to and from the outside Nearby facilities or installations that pose a potential risk (such as dams, nuclear power plants, chemical plants, etc.) Proximity to tree line in the event of wildfire Location on a slope in the event of mud-slide or avalanche Security of center Other: Our program has not conducted an assessment of potential facility risks associated with an emergency. 39. Does your program have individuals on staff or in a consulting capacity who are trained to deal with the emotional response to trauma for: Category

Yes

No

Children Families Staff

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ACF Administration for Children and Families

1. Log No. ACF-IM-HS-09-07

2. Issuance Date: 09/22/2009

3. Originating Office: Office of Head Start 4. Key Words: Centers of Excellence

INFORMATION MEMORANDUM TO: Head Start and Early Head Start Grantees SUBJECT: Centers of Excellence in Early Childhood BACKGROUND: Section 657B of the Head Start Act authorizes Centers of Excellence in Early Childhood to recognize programs of exceptional quality that can serve as exemplary models for other programs. The Centers of Excellence program has been allocated $2 million as part of Head Start’s FY 2009 appropriation [Public Law 111-8]. This Memorandum introduces the Centers of Excellence and explains how a Head Start or Early Head Start grantee will be able to apply for this designation. The Centers of Excellence program will recognize Head Start and Early Head Start grantees that are performing at the highest levels of quality. Excellent and effective programs are those that have achieved and are actively building upon full compliance with the Program Performance Standards. These are programs that are implementing comprehensive, innovative and targeted approaches to enhance program services. Such programs are producing positive, measurable outcomes for children’s school success; families supporting children’s learning, and increased staff competency. The recognized Centers will provide all Head Start programs and other early childhood organizations opportunities to benefit from the practices that guided them on a path to excellence. Programs receiving Centers of Excellence grants will be required to use at least 15 percent of the funds to disseminate best practices. SAMPLE AREAS OF EXCELLENCE The Office of Head Start looks forward to seeing both the breadth and depth of excellence that will be represented among the Centers of Excellence. Some areas where programs may be able to provide evidence of demonstrated excellence include: •

Demonstrating the use of on-going program improvement through self-assessment, community assessment and other program data to improve practices leading to staff competency for positive child and family outcomes;

Implementing established public-private partnerships that leverage additional support for innovative or effective ways to serve children and families;


Implementing innovative evidence-based curricula and teaching practices that are culturally and linguistically responsive and recognized for their effectiveness in demonstrating Head Start children are ready for continued school success;

Demonstrating model collaborations with schools, child care and other community providers to deliver a comprehensive, holistic approach to better meet the needs of children and families including children with disabilities, children ages birth to five and effective transitions to Early Head Start, Head Start, other placements, and to school entry;

Implementing established innovative, culturally and linguistically responsive parent and family practices that lead to improving parent-child relationships, health and well-being and educational outcomes for children;

Creating innovative learning opportunities, such as an “outdoor classroom” that supports the domains of learning and connects children with nature and their culture;

Implementing exemplary partnerships with the child welfare system and/or other systems to better meet the needs of children and families;

Implementing management systems that include family support practices that effectively address the needs of children and families experiencing homelessness and remove barriers adversely impacting their participation in the program;

Demonstrating on going relationships with health care providers that lead to all families, including children with disabilities and special health care needs, receiving on going medical, dental, and other necessary health care; and

Implementing a Learning Communities Model that has impacted staff competency, responsiveness to children and families, or other program improvements.

APPLICATION PROCESS Each Center of Excellence applicant for the national Head Start competition must first be nominated as a prospective Center of Excellence by their State’s Governor. American Indian/Alaskan Native (AIAN) grantees and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) grantees must be nominated by their respective ACF Regional Offices. Each Governor’s office will be informed in a separate communication of this process and of the role they need to play, including the statutory requirement that any grantees they nominate will be determined through a competitive process they design. AIAN and MSHS grantees will be informed of the Regional Office nomination process in the near future. Any Head Start grantee that can demonstrate that it is a program of exceptional quality is encouraged to apply during the competition that will be coordinated by the Governor of each state. Each grantee must be willing to establish collaborative partnerships with other providers of early childhood education, and meet the requirements of Section 657B(c)(B) of the Head Start Act, and ultimately be able to disseminate their best practices to educate others.


Instructions for submitting the full application, once nominated, as well as what must be included in an application will be available on the Grants.gov website, by using the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find Grant Opportunitiesâ&#x20AC;? feature of the website. We will alert all grantees when this application is available on Grants.gov. The Office of Head Start looks forward to working with the designated Centers of Excellence. / Patricia E. Brown / Patricia E. Brown Acting Director Office of Head Start


http://www.showmeaction.org/board/pcdocs/pc101509