Page 1

SUMMER 2018

The Journal of Professional CM/PM Practice


TABLE OF CONTENTS Board Chair Chris Payne, PE, CCM MBP

4

President and Chief Executive Officer Andrea S. Rutledge, CAE

The No. 7 Line Subway Extension in Western Manhattan is one example

Editor Danelle Prezioso CMAA Advisor, published quarterly by the CMAA, reports on and follows the industry as a service to its members. Submission of articles, ideas and suggestions is appreciated and encouraged.

of how an MTA mega-project can benefit the entire city, and do so far beyond the rail and transit components.

7

Following—and Forecasting—the Money: Financial Modeling for Project Managers With construction costs comprising between 60% and 85% of the budget for commercial developments, the need to efficiently oversee and

The Mission of CMAA is to promote the profession of Construction Management and the use of qualified Construction Managers on all capital projects and programs The Vision of CMAA is that all owners will realize capital project and program success by using professionally qualified Construction Managers.

Manhattan’s West Side Story: The #7 Line Subway Extension

balance resources is a top priority. Key to this challenge is the project manager (PM), who synthesizes data on costs, materials, and time to maintain the integrity and momentum of the job.

9

Seven Secrets to Employee Retention Companies routinely conduct exit interviews to determine why employees are leaving the company. Unfortunately, at this point, the reasoning is less important than the result: You have already lost. You’ve lost the time you put into onboarding this employee and you’ll lose

7926 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 800 McLean, Virginia 22102-3303 USA Phone: 703-356-2622 Fax: 703-356-6388 Email: info@cmaanet.org Web: www.cmaanet.org

more time, money, and momentum as you search for and train his or her replacement.

12

CMAA© Copyright 2018, ISSN 1084-75327

Perhaps one of the most significant legal issues confronting the CM community nationally just occurred in the State of Louisiana. No less

Reproduction or redistribution in any form is forbidden without written permission of the publisher. Advertising opportunities are available for each issue. For subscription or advertising information, contact Mark Gedris at mgedris@cmaanet.org.

Legal Corner: “Near Miss” Averts Disaster in Louisiana than the future of the CMAA’s “certification” process was put at risk by a bill circulating in the Louisiana legislature.

14

CMAA Rejects Proposed Changes to WVSBA Policies and Procedures

15

CMAA News


FROM THE CHAIR

Framing the Future The CMAA Board of Directors’ Spring Board Meeting is traditionally our opportunity to cast a strategic eye to the future, envisioning how the industry and our association might evolve in the years ahead. During my time on the Board, we have held a number of planning workshops led by professional facilitators, guiding our collective vision and establishing key organizational priorities for the next few years.

This year at our spring meeting, our CEO, Andrea Rutledge, and the Board went a different direction, turning our attention to CMAA’s policies— what does CMAA believe, and how should those beliefs be articulated? In reviewing the broad topic of policy, we discovered that CMAA had developed only a limited number of statements voicing CMAA’s position on specific topics important to the construction industry.  We have been justifiably proud of our Body of Knowledge, and our delivery method neutrality, but our “Body of Beliefs” is neither broad nor well publicized.  Apart from our policy on construction site safety developed two years ago, we had not developed any new policies in years. Continued on page 11

ON THE COVER Governor Iloy S. Inos Peace Park (formerly known as the Puerto Rico Dump), Saipan 2017 Project Achievement Award Winner, Environmental: Construction value less than $50 million; CM: GHD Inc.; Owner: U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

BACK COVER Pepsi Center Club Lexus and Storage Annex, Denver, CO 2017 Project Achievement Award Winner, Commercial/ Sports/Entertainment/ Hospitality: Construction value less than $50 million; CM: Turner Construction Company; Owner: Kroenke Sports and Entertainment

CHRIS PAYNE, PE, CCM Mr. Payne is Executive Vice President/ Chief Operating Officer with MBP. He has more than 30 years of experience in construction management and design, performing a wide variety of services such as construction project management, inspection, CPM scheduling, and cost estimating. He has specialized experience in the resolution of construction disputes to include analysis of delays and expert testimony. He began his career as a structural engineer performing bridge design and consults on a variety of building and transportation programs, providing direct client coordination and strategic counsel.

| Advisor Summer 2018

Each planning session has been productive and resulted in program advances, such as our ABET accreditation program, the Technology Committee, and revamping our educational offerings. What we as an organization stand for is represented through such programmatic and pragmatic actions.  Sometimes, however, this meant that many excellent discussion points were left unaddressed by the Association.

3


MANHATTAN’S WEST SIDE STORY: THE #7 LINE SUBWAY EXTENSION

BY S A I B A L B A S U ROY, PM P

the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) undertakes improves service for riders and makes the system more efficient; however, some projects go far beyond making the trains run on time. The No. 7 Line Subway Extension in Western Manhattan is one example of how an MTA mega-project can benefit the entire city, and do so far beyond the rail and transit components.

| Advisor Summer 2018 | Advisor Spring 2017

EVERY PROJECT

44

“I don’t know of any other project that has received as many awards as this one,” said Mark Schiffman, PE, Esq., Senior Vice President and Program Executive of the MTA’s No. 7 Line Subway Extension Program. “The subway itself is beautiful, and a technical marvel in many ways. But go over to the [Hudson Yards] neighborhood where the subway is – you’ll be amazed at the level of development.”


Located on the West Side of Manhattan, the extension travels 1.5 miles from its former terminus at Times Square and is complemented by an underground station that can accommodate up to 25,000 people during peak hours, providing a link to Javits, as well as the High Line and Hudson River Park. The new subway terminal at 34th Street improves service reliability for all riders of the No. 7 Line in Queens and Manhattan, and provides additional storage space for trains. The MTA’s 469th subway station was the first addition to the subway system in 26 years. In addition, the $2.4 billion project finished under budget, with notable achievements in safety and security, quality, and environmental considerations along with realizing several “firsts” in subway construction.

redevelopment environments. We have 50 million square feet under development. Now, if you want to put that into perspective with the largest central business districts in the country, if you placed the Hudson Yards district in any other city, that city would have the fourth-largest central business district in the U.S. The project connected the neighborhood to the rest of the city for our riders. And now we’re seeing the results.”

The Hill/LiRo/HDR Tri-Venture provided management services during final design, construction, and closeout. The team cultivated cooperative relationships with the MTA and New York City Transit, the project’s six general contractors, the designers, as well as among each other. The result was a project recognized for its beauty and functionality, highquality construction, and completion

| Advisor Summer 2018

Prior to the extension, the area along 34th Street between Penn Station and the Jacob Javits Convention Center was largely cut off from the rest of the city, despite its prime location in Midtown Manhattan. “That area was so underutilized, and if you walked around there 10 to 15 years ago, well, it was a rough neighborhood,” says Schiffman. “Go there now and the whole area has been transformed into one of the nation’s most inspiring

“There’s no arguing the uniqueness or success of this project, and while there has been lots of discussion and comment about the viability of mega-projects, the No. 7 Line is a hands-down success at all levels,” said Hill International’s John Drygulski, Vice President and Project Director, which with LiRo and HDR formed a Tri-Venture to provide management services for the project. “This project is changing the skyline of Manhattan. This is bigger than just the subway. This is about the impact the project will have for decades and decades.”

5


under budget. MTA, with the support from Hill/LiRo/HDR, enhanced the industry’s methodology for confirming the reliability of highly complex facilities, and are being utilized in other mega-projects by New York City Transit and the Long Island Rail Road. Acknowledged as an industry marvel by several publications and organizations, the project is also celebrated as much for tunneling through the hard bedrock in one of the world’s largest cities as for the careful planning and maneuvering needed to avoid the maze of underground utilities and infrastructure. With hundreds of buildings, streets, track, and sidewalks literally on top of this project, the challenges and obstacles were significant. The project’s highlights include:

| Advisor Summer 2018

• The platform of the 34th Street-

6

Hudson Yards Station is more than 100 feet underground, making it one of the deepest MTA stations. • The longest escalators in the MTA system. • Two American with Disabilities Act (ADA)-compliant, high-rise inclined elevators, which carry passengers up or down some 80 feet on a smooth, diagonal descent (or ascent) to the lower mezzanine below. The glasswalled inclined elevators are the first to be used commercially in New York City. • State-of-the-art Station Service Center and MetroCard kiosks and turnstiles. • Lower mezzanine 70-inch, touchscreen-compatible plasma panels that broadcast MTA news, information, maps, and advertisements. These screens will be transitioned to touch screens that commuters can use to check the weather, find restaurants, or learn more about the city. • The track along the extension is insulated with rubber to provide a

“This project is changing the skyline of Manhattan. This is bigger than just the subway. This is about the impact the project will have for decades and decades.” smoother, quieter ride than traditional subway systems. • In the future, trains will be monitored and controlled by a Communications-Based Train Control System, one of the first of its kind in the U.S., the precision of which will allow the MTA to run more trains at closer intervals. • The new station is the first of its kind to be equipped with a Situation Awareness Security System. When a fire or emergency signaling device is activated, the system automatically broadcasts video feeds, voiceactivated intercoms, and intrusion alarm information directly to security at the Rail Command Center. Here, all the relevant information is processed to determine the crucial “next steps” actions. If required, the Command Center can remotely evacuate the station, manipulate

the direction of escalators, and send zone-assigned instructional messages over the public address system. • For safety and security, the station was designed to be open, leaving no “places to hide,” while temporary power systems keep everything from lights to computer systems running. • The construction of ancillary buildings and facilities that support the No. 7 Line’s current and future needs, including four ventilation buildings. • Maintaining and protecting existing services and operations during tunneling, drilling, blasting, and removal of more than 400,000 cubic yards of rock. “This is a ‘League of Nations’ project that was delivered by people from all around the world. And what a great team it was,” Schiffman said. “Everyone who worked on this job should be really proud. The legacy the team is leaving to New York City is undeniable.” Saibal Basuroy, PMP, served as Project Manager for Hill International on this project. He can be reached at saibalbasuroy@hillintl.com.


FOLLOWING—AND FORECASTING— THE MONEY:

Financial Modeling for Project Managers BY PAU L B R U SS OW

WITH CONSTRUCTION COSTS comprising between 60% and 85% of the budget

for commercial developments, the need to efficiently oversee and balance resources is a top priority. Key to this challenge is the project manager (PM), who synthesizes data on costs, materials, and time to maintain the integrity and momentum of the job.

| Advisor Summer 2018

An independent project management team can serve the owner as well as other stakeholders—including architects and contractors—by prudently shepherding the schedule and proactively monitoring costs. In order to extract the full value a manager can bring to a project, it’s wise to have them on board at the earliest stage of design. To wait until there’s a problem affecting design and construction before consulting with a PM wastes valuable time when a project is at its most vulnerable point.

7


Performance and Precision

• Currency conversion: A new

development is located in Dubai, financed with US dollars, EU consultants are on board, and materials are ordered from Asia— international construction projects pose unique payment problems. The ability to seamlessly resolve complicated currency scenarios is a must for accurate modeling.

It’s essential for PMs to have reliable, up-to-date information on which to base their counsel and recommendations to owners. While sophisticated software programs have simplified data collection, it’s the degree of skillful interpretation and application brought by project managers that is often the telling factor in the successful delivery of a job. Computerized project management can take many forms, from using offthe-shelf software to working with clients to develop exclusive programs that address specific issues. The common goal is to streamline the process of project management, while also achieving the highest levels of flexibility and integration. One program I have found effective ties the financial modeling of a project into one robust software package that provides clients with a real-time picture of their budget, expenditures, and financial risks. By linking six key functions—contract management, invoice management, project forecasting, change management, cash flow management, and executive reporting—into a single system, clients are able to make informed, timely decisions about the direction of complex projects. Among the dynamic forecasting features that are particularly helpful in effective modeling:

| Advisor Summer 2018

• Inclusive vendor interaction: Large

8

projects typically have an extensive consortium of consultants and vendors, each generating its own stream of transactions. It’s critical to manage the execution of each individual contract against the overall construction budget. • Big-picture view of change orders: Change orders are a

While sophisticated software programs have simplified data collection, it’s the degree of skillful interpretation and application brought by project managers that is often the telling factor in the successful delivery of a job. time-consuming reality of construction; typically, by the time they are agreed upon, drawn up, and ordered, up to three months may pass, putting progress at risk. Programs that can forecast fiscal impacts at the time changedecisions are made and track their implementation enable owners to have an accurate budget in real time. • A calendar for cash: To assist in financial reporting, benchmarks and milestones are used to track and forecast the cash flow of a project.

Coupling these capabilities with a construction-cost management tool that allows accurate estimates and bills of quantities to be prepared from diverse information sources, (including BIM models, 2D and 3D CAD drawings, illustrations, schedules, and other project documentation) rounds out the package. In the same way that BIM and CAD models are facilitating re-use and integration, a computer application that takes a modular approach to build a working cost model of a project offers tremendous flexibility. Complete costings can be prepared from minimal project information, and can be continually improved and refined as the project design is further developed. The cost model makes it easy to analyze alternative scenarios, helping clients to spend less money and delivering more efficient, cost-conscious, and environmentally sustainable results. The right software can bring clarity and economy to the increasingly complex task of construction management, and contribute to the science—and art—of modern architecture while advancing the central role of the project manager. Paul Brussow is Executive Vice President of Rider Levett Bucknall and is the Project Management Service Line Manager in North America. He can be reached at paul.brussow@us.rlb.com.


SEVEN SECRETS TO EMPLOYEE RETENTION COMPANIES ROUTINELY CONDUCT exit interviews to

determine why employees are leaving the company. Unfortunately, at this point, the reasoning is less important than the result: You have already lost. You’ve lost the time you put into onboarding this employee and you’ll lose more time, money, and momentum as you search for and train his or her replacement. With construction unemployment at its lowest rate in 18 years, new employees are hard to come by and therefore it’s more important than ever to make sure you’re retaining your key employees. Rather than focusing on gathering data when it’s too late, your focus should be on solving issues before they arise and keeping your employees happy, committed, and engaged. At Kimmel & Associates, we have a unique perspective on this issue because we act as a trusted career advisor to thousands of employees who regularly share with us their reasons for leaving (or staying with) a job. Here is what we’ve learned after 36 years in the executive search industry.

IS SALARY THE SECRET TO RETENTION? Businesses often assume that money is the most important consideration with regard to employee retention. While salary certainly is a key factor, there are other motivators that influence retention. Firms often overlook the value of small considerations that impact employee satisfaction in a major way. Extensive research and experience have taught us that it’s NOT all about the money. At Kimmel, we talk with over 800,000 contacts each year—over 3,000 a day! We have developed personal relationships with over a million top candidates. We have listened to what they tell us about why they are dissatisfied in their current positions, and we know what they hope to find in their next role.

| Advisor Summer 2018

BY C H A R L I E K I M M E L

9


We’ve heard the same story over and over again. Here are seven factors that can help you recruit new talent and retain your current staff longer. And all seven of these factors lead up to what we believe is the Golden Rule of Retention.

1

Communication

Remember the signature line from the movie “Cool Hand Luke”? “What we have here is a failure to communicate.” Communication in the workplace is vital to employee retention. A failure to communicate leads to frustration. Employees want to know what is happening. Is the company solid? Are you going to expand or tighten your belt? Company leaders should share both good news and bad; uncertainty is worse than bad news. When faced with silence in a time of uncertainty, people will draw their own conclusions and these are generally much worse than reality. Clear communication in the hiring process, times of company change, and at every step of an employee’s training and growth is critical to ensuring that your employees are happy and feel secure with your company.

| Advisor Summer 2018

2

10

Opportunity

People need to know they have a future at your company. There should be no doubt that your plan is for them to remain with you over the long haul. You should make it clear to employees that you see them in your company’s future. This gives them the confidence they need to “nest” and begin to put down roots in your company and in the community. Start by conducting more frequent reviews or career conversations to keep your employees aligned with long-term goals, and make sure employees know they are free to ask questions or express concerns at any time. By carving out specific career development plans for each employee

You can prove to employees that their future with your company is not just a passing thought, it is a priority to you. and following up regularly on their progress, you can prove to those employees that their future with your company is not just a passing thought, it is a priority to you.

3

Family and Quality of Life

Years ago, one of my kids were shocked when she saw her teacher at the grocery store. She had never imagined that the teacher had a life outside of class. Remember that your employees have a personal life outside of work. Their outside life greatly impacts job satisfaction. Your employee’s spouse may account for 51% of any career decision, whether that decision is to stay or to go. Show your employees that you care about their families and their quality of life. Of course, that care should be genuine, not fabricated. Authentic, caring managers can make your employee much less likely to consider other opportunities. Include spouses and children at company events and parties, and send cards or flowers to acknowledge major milestones in family members’ lives such as birthdays, graduations, and weddings.

4

Culture of Fellowship

5

Challenging Work

It’s easy to leave a job but much harder to leave your friends. Creating an atmosphere of friendship and fellowship is one of the most important things you can do to generate company loyalty. Sponsor company events that let employees have fun together (and be sure to engage the employee’s family). Establish a running club or fantasy football league or host lunches that allow employees to take a break and get to know their coworkers. You might also consider starting or strengthening a goodwill program that creates opportunities for employees to volunteer within their community. And encourage company-wide participation! Building a company culture where your coworkers are your friends is one of the most overlooked and underrated retention strategies.

Nothing is more frustrating than hitting a wall professionally. Often, employers unintentionally create barriers by not providing challenging work. Talented people feel accomplished when they rise to a challenge. Benjamin Franklin provided amazing insight when he said: Money has never made a man happy, nor will it. Talented people want an opportunity to excel. They want to be able to list milestones and accomplishments on their performance reviews or resumes. Companies who are most successful at retention set a high bar, help employees jump over it, and then set it again. Create internal training programs and allow any interested employee to participate, or host professional development seminars and workshops. Identify employees’ key strengths and challenges


and assign them to projects that will stretch their skill sets. Make sure to provide support and encouragement to prevent frustration or burnout. If employees do not have opportunities to grow professionally and excel in their work, they will move on.

6

Appreciation, Recognition, and Value

An important component of communication is recognition. Be sure you regularly do things to show your appreciation for a job well done. This is the area where most companies have the greatest opportunity to improve. Recognition fosters loyalty and trust. And it costs only a small amount of time and money. It’s one of your best retention strategies. Try making a congratulatory phone call or personally passing by an employee’s desk to express your appreciation for the work they do. Never underestimate the powerful effect this has on employee retention. Other forms of recognition might be a personal email, gift card, or an invitation to dinner. How about tickets to a sporting event or a concert? Whatever the method, be sure you regularly communicate appreciation

FROM THE CHAIR

Continued from page 3 For CMAA to continue to gain influence in the construction industry, we need to be both clear and articulate in our positions on a variety of topics. In short, we need a policy framework.  This framework will accomplish the following objectives:

• Affirm our organizational values and translate these values into action. • Position CMAA to act in response to industry events, clear in our purpose. • Raise the relevance of the organization.

and recognition to employees. Let them know you value them. A small effort pays big dividends when it comes to employee retention, and it’s the right thing to do!

7

Trust and Integrity

Company leaders should personify personal integrity. Their lifestyles should reflect company values. A character breach within a company’s leadership is one of the most damaging events for employee retention. If you make a promise, keep it, no matter how small it may seem. Make sure that your company values are in line with how you live, and how you expect and encourage your employees to conduct themselves. Many of your employees have grown up and entered the workforce during a time where corruption, bribery, and economic crises have flooded the news, so they are particularly concerned about working for honest, ethical leaders. Good people will not work for someone they cannot trust implicitly. But they will remain loyal and committed to someone who has earned their absolute faith and trust, even through times of challenge and uncertainty.

The Board has now embarked upon an effort to develop our first comprehensive policy framework, anticipated to be delivered by our National Conference in October. The categories selected by the Board as demanding the most attention include:

• Advocacy, how CMAA will advocate for professionalism in project management and other matters of interest and importance to the profession. • Continual improvement in industry techniques and methods.

GOLDEN RULE Recruiters will inevitably approach some of your key employees. When this happens, remember that retention really is about more than just salary. Your employees will likely create a pro and con list. On one side will be all the reasons why he or she loves your company and wants to stay. On the other will be reasons why your employee may want to move on. As an employer, you want to be sure the pro side is loaded with reasons why the employee wants to reject that offer and stay with you. What’s the secret to employee retention? Make them feel special! Use the seven points above to continually reassure your employee that you need him or her and appreciate the work they do. Be sure you shine a light on your star employees and make every effort to develop and support new or struggling employees. Everyone wants to feel like their employer recognizes their unique talents and sees them as worth an investment. Make them feel special, and the pro list will always be weighted in your favor. Charlie Kimmel is President/CEO of Kimmel & Associates. He can be reached at charlie@kimmel.com.

• Equity, diversity and inclusion in our workplaces and project teams. • Ethical behavior. • Project delivery methods, and the CM’s role in optimizing the process. • Workforce development. • CMAA’s own governance.

This effort has created a new opportunity for our entire Board to engage and turn the always-rich discussions at the Board level into something meaningful and lasting. I look forward to the finished product and to sharing it with our entire membership later in the year.


LEGAL CORNER

“NEAR MISS” AVERTS DISASTER IN LOUISIANA BY H E N RY L . G O L D B E RG , E S Q .

Perhaps one of the most significant legal issues confronting the CM community nationally just occurred in the State of Louisiana. No less than the future of the CMAA’s “certification” process was put at risk by a bill circulating in the Louisiana legislature.

| Advisor Summer 2018

I consider this particular legal development so significant, that as I sat down to write my current column, I changed the topic to publicize this potentially dangerous development in Baton Rouge.

12

The Louisiana House of Representatives passed “House Bill 748” (“HB 748”) which virtually outlawed the use of the term “certified” as a professional credential. This matter was brought to the attention of CMAA (National) by the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), the largest organization of its type representing, internationally, the interests of professional associations and their members. ASAE shared CMAA’s view that

voluntary professional certification is essential to increasing the quality and professional standards of the various professional disciplines and that non-governmental professional credentialing has a long, successful history in the United States. Put succinctly, the bill prohibited holders of voluntary (i.e., nongovernmental) certifications from using the term “certified” as a title. This would have done nothing less than eliminate the CMAA’s ability to “certify” CMs in the State of Louisiana. Numerous active CCMs in Louisiana would have been immediately impacted. The bill’s definitions of the critical terms “certified” or “registered” were the source of the problem. In pertinent part, the bill stated: The “certification” may be used by a licensed practitioner to represent expert qualifications only when lawfully authorized in the laws, rules, and regulations of the state entity regulating the profession. (HB 748) As ASAE argued in its April 26, 2018 opposition letter to HB 748:

Non-governmental professional credentialing is vital to America’s workforce. Associations – the largest provider of post-college professional training for workers – administer credentialing programs for many professionals as a means of enhancing their reputation and competence in their respective field. The purpose of these credentialing programs is not to burden skilled workers, but rather to allow them to demonstrate their professional capability and understanding of their field. The very real concern for the CCM movement was that the bill’s limitations effectively prohibited certified professionals from holding themselves out as having a hard-earned professional credential unless such credential is a requirement for state occupational licensure or official registration with the state. HB 748 also posed constitutional law concerns. The U.S. Supreme Court has held, in its landmark decision, Peel v. Att’y Registration and Disciplinary Comm’n.,(1990), that a “State may not… completely ban statements that are not actually


ASAE pointed out that the bill appeared to prioritize economic competition over the protection of consumer welfare when it identified factors to be considered in setting occupational licensing standards. HB 748 should have prioritized public safety and consumer welfare factors as vital factors in establishing such standards. (ASAE “Opposition Memo”)

I am pleased to report that HB 748 was effectively derailed on May 18th in Baton Rouge when the Louisiana State Senate came to its senses. However, this warning shot carried a clear message. We must be ever-vigilant in avoiding such threats in the future. The survival of CCM certification could be at stake.

Non-governmental credentialing is also vital to America’s workforce. Associations – the largest provider of post-college professional trading for workers – administer credentialing programs as a means of enhancing their reputation and competence in their respective field. “The purpose of these credentialing programs is not to burden skilled workers, but rather to allow them to demonstrate their professional capability and understanding of their field.”

Goldberg Commentary As indicated, the Louisiana House of Representatives virtually outlawed the use of the terms “certified” and “registered,” except where otherwise required by state law or regulation. If allowed to proceed through the legislative process and into law, HB 748 could have created a dangerous legislative precedent impacting on the certification process nationally, and, of course, the certification of construction managers. Thankfully, this was not allowed to happen, as scores of associations from many industries and professions quickly mobilized to prevent such a problematic result.

It also argued that the bill would effectively preclude meaningful access by Louisianans to the recognition offered by many credentialing organizations and, for the few certifications already recognized by Louisiana’s occupational licensing laws. (ASAE “Opposition Memo”) Voluntary professional certification is vital to increasing competition in the marketplace. A prohibition on holders of voluntary certifications using the term “certified” is completely antithetical to this goal. It could be the first step down the slippery slope of eliminating certification requirements that provide important protections to consumers, patients, businesses, and the public. (ASAE “Opposition Memo”)

CMAA’s prompt cooperation in support of the push-back with ASAE and at least two dozen other national associations ranging from the American Medical Certification Association to the Board of Certified Safety Professionals.

Congratulations to the ASAE for sounding the alarm and effectively lobbying against what would have been a clear legislative fiasco.

Congratulations to the ASAE for sounding the alarm and effectively lobbying against what would have been a clear legislative fiasco. Also, kudos to Andrea Rutledge, CMAA President & CEO, for mobilizing

Unfortunately, this issue will always be a state by state matter, as each state is the master of its own indigenous educational and professional regulatory bureaucracy. For CMAA’s part, it is essential that each local chapter monitor any similar developments in its particular state. In this instance, the “CCM” professional nomenclature was protected and preserved. Will it be the next time in a different state? No doubt CMAA will, again, have something to say about that. If you have questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me directly at hgoldberg@moritthock.com. Henry Goldberg, Esq. is a partner with Morrit Hock & Hamroff in Garden City, New York.

| Advisor Summer 2018

or inherently misleading, such as a certification as a specialist by bona fide organizations.” Thus, state governments need to tread lightly in their regulatory efforts.

13


CMAA REJECTS PROPOSED CHANGES TO WVSBA POLICIES AND PROCEDURES On March 19, the West Virginia School Board Authority (SBA) released an initial draft of proposed changes to the SBA Policies and Procedures Handbook. If approved, the revisions would “allow local boards of education to determine the method of project management used on each project” and also “allow the local school board to select the project team.” This proposes a change from current practice where the project team and the management method are chosen by the SBA. Broadly stated, the revisions put all recommendations regarding project management methodology into the hands of the architect. On March 28, CMAA, along with The Contractor’s Association of West Virginia and AIA West Virginia, was invited to participate in a meeting of the SBA Construction Committee on April 19 and to provide comments on the proposed revisions. The April 19 meeting was subsequently postponed.

| Advisor Summer 2018

CMAA submitted comments to the SBA on April 12. A copy was also sent to the West Virginia School Board Association. Broadly speaking, the proposed changes would provide local school boards with an appropriate level of flexibility in meeting the capital program requirements of their districts.

14

Nevertheless, CMAA believes the proposed revisions also remove the ability of local school boards to manage projects effectively, efficiently, and with their interests in project success adequately represented. Further, CMAA contends that absent professional CM services on capital projects, West Virginia school districts are at risk for projects that are poorly delivered with higher-than-anticipated costs. Such scenarios do not represent good stewardship of the resources of the citizens of West Virginia. Overall, CMAA’s comments were built on three core messages:

• Professional CMs are uniquely qualified to provide unbi-

ased advice to owners in all phases of project delivery from design through commissioning and occupancy. • Engaging professional CM services for capital projects are more likely to result in on-time, on-budget delivery with project intent intact. • Engaging CM services on capital education projects in West Virginia serves to assure taxpayers and bond holders that public funds are stewarded effectively. Throughout, CMAA reinforced its belief that the best course of action for assuring the citizens of West Virginia of the efficient and effective use of funds allocated or appropriated for capital education projects is to engage professional CM services on all such projects.


CM A A NEWS CM SALARY SURVEY COMING SOON

SECURE YOUR EXHIBIT BOOTH AND SPONSORSHIP FOR THE 2018 CMAA NATIONAL CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

CMAA will be conducting a confidential CM salary survey to determine the median or average compensation paid to construction managers using various job titles. This a brief survey that should not take more than 10 minutes to complete and the results will be used to tabulate salary trends in the CM industry.  Participants will receive a complimentary summary of the results.  Please be on the lookout for the survey from our partner, Readex Research. 

Are you looking to strengthen your brand image, increase your visibility, and demonstrate your commitment to senior level decision makers in the construction industry? If so, visit our website at www.cmaanet. org for exhibit and sponsorship opportunities.

Stephen Ayers, Architect of the Capitol, presents Antoinette Turnquist, PhD, Omaha Public Schools, with the 2017 Person of the Year award.

OUT WITH THE OLD: CMAA UNVEILS A NEW DIGITAL EXPERIENCE CMAA has recently launched a new website guaranteed to offer members and nonmembers alike quick and easy access to essential offerings and information. The new website is rich with a clean modern design, improved functionality and search options, and enhanced content focused on the industry and Association news. Designed with you in mind, visit www.cmaanet.org to explore our new website.

NOMINATIONS WANTED FOR OUR INDUSTRY’S BEST AND BRIGHTEST CMAA’s Individual Recognition Awards program is designed to recognize and honor the contributions of CM professionals and those who have made a significant impact - truly our best - on behalf of the industry. This is your opportunity to ensure deserving colleagues, clients, and professionals are recognized by submitting your nominations today.

• Person of the Year • Distinguished Owner Award • Distinguished Service Award • The Bruce D’Agostino Award for Owner Outreach

• Leader in Sustainability • The Power of Community

• Educator of the Year • Distinguished Young Professional Award

• Chair’s Award for Safety • Chair’s Award for Innovation • Chair’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion

Nominations are due no later than June 15, 2018. Visit www.cmaanet.org/ awards for more information.


7926 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 800 McLean, VA 22102-3303 USA

INSIDE:

Manhattan’s West Side Story Following—and Forecasting—the Money Seven Secrets to Employee Retention Legal Corner

Profile for CMAA

Summer 2018 Advisor  

Summer 2018 Advisor  

Profile for cmaa1
Advertisement