Page 1





The

Rollamo 1927


Coplljrigh:ft ~

U927 l'-

c.l/lberif3arrzard edito-r

G.)[.Craw~rd Jju.sinesslfsr.

JJes{1ned & 611(jra ved by

CI;NTRAL i;NGRAVING Co.

S't./i:.u is p=::%::::1

Printed by

INLAND PRINTING Co. SprintJiield, Mo. ~

Photq:Jraphs by SID WHITING STUDIO St.{iuis ~

,J3ound by

BtCKTOLD PRTG.&BooKMrtJ.Co. St.fi!_uis


rt;he

ROLLAMO 1927 ~

T PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS 0F THE MISS0URI SCH00L 0F MINES ~fi!

ROLLA, MO.

til~


FOREWORD TO SET DOWN THE I JI ST ORY OF TILE ACTIV IT IES AND INC I DI ~NTS OF Tl IE MISSOURI

CHOO I.

OF

MINES DURING T lliS 1926 SCHOOL Y EA R + ~ • THAT SO \\'ELL RE PR E SENT

TI-lE i\11 rE R SPJRIT

• • TI li S VOLUME HAS BEEN WRITT EN. • •


C8NTENTS INTRODUCTORY CAl\ IPUS VTE\VS I

FACULTY

II

CLA SES

III ATHLETI C

TV ORGA IZATION

v

ADYERTISI G


DEDICATION TO STA L EY C. McCOLLUM TliiS VOLUME IS DEDICATED + AS FOOTBA LL COACH FOR T il E PAST FOUR Sf.:ASO:-.IS H E HAS LED T HE \\'A Y TO 110:-\0RS FOR ~l.S.~ l. A S I"'CERE BELIEF 1:-\ T HE SCHOOL, A~ U~FALTER J :--.'G CO~FIJ)f:.'lCE

IN THE PUREST ETHICS OF Ti l E GAME, BOTH 0 ' AND OFF TilE FIEI.O, A 0 A FERVENT F. E RGY I 1 FOSTER I ' (; SCHOOL SPIRIT l-IAS WO FOR HI M THE HI G H EST REGAJU) BOTH AT HOME A D AB ROA D. + + + + + +



In M emorian.l to

Frank Hiram Farris Born August 8 , 18G7 Died S e ptember 1, 1926 M e mber o f Board of Curators from Summe r ot 1925 until his death, 1926


Norwood I-Iall


Chemistr9 Building


Parke r Hall


MetallurgB Building


Mecha nical Hall


...

~1ine Experiment Station


G-gm nasiu rn


The Mine


FACULTY



STRATTON D LUTH BROOKS A. B., Michigan, 1896; A.M., ltarv:u-d, 190i; LL.D .• Colby, J<J J2; LL. l)., 1\.ingfiahtr, 1920

Pili Betti Kappa, Pili Beta Pili, Phi Dc/Ja Kappa, ,1/p/li Pi ?.eta,

. lct~citl

Principal of ll i~th School, Danvillc, l llinois, 1891-92; Adrain, \lichii(Oln, 1gq7-98; l..aSallc-Pcru, 111innil, 1R'1R-99; \'ic~·Prcsidcnt Ccntra11\:nrmal School, \lount Plusant, Michigan. 1892-93: Asainant Professor of 1' aychnlol!y and l•:ducation and High School l napcctnr, l 'nivcraity of llliooia. 1899-1902; Assistant Suj><rintcndcnt, Booton, 1902-06; Surcrintcndcnt, Clcvtland, Ohio, Januar>• to \larch 1906; Supcrintcndent, Boston, 1906-12; J>rcaidcnt, l:nivcraity of Oklahoma, 19 12-23; President, University or \liuouri, 1923-

Patt Ninttun


CHARLES H ER 1A~ FULTON E.M., &hool of ~Iince, ColumbiA U., 11197; D.Sc. (honorary), South Dakota, 1911

Th~la D~lta Clzi, Sigma Xi, T au B~ta Pi, P/zi 1\t~ppu l'lzi

M ember American l natitute of Mining and :\letallurgical En~rinecn; American E!~ctrochcrnic.al Socict); Auo t"nt in ,\ssayinl!, Columbia, 1898-99; lnatructor in l\lctallurgy, university of \\'yomin~r, l l!'.I'J 19UO; Profcstor or 1\fct,lllur!Q', South D.-akota Scbool of !\liMa, 19(X)..()S; President, South Oakot.-a School of ~fines, l<J05- I I ; J>rofc 10r of Mctallur.ocy, Case School or Applied Science, 19 11- 1920; D irector, ~liuouri School or '.linet an.J .'.lctallurgy, 1920..


l..cart fi<Mr Ul~

Wil\1olU\ ~ Tumn-

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L.c"" En15 Garren 1'roftlt>~r Of

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l'a(t Tu路tnly-oru



Pau rÂŤ:tnly-tltnt


'Walter 'Tluo6or't Sch•..-ak

A•toCK".at.: no~

of Ctwm11flry.

Patr Tu:tnty-fowr


T. G Hac; C&rlh!f

As,ocl•tt rr.tof Civil E•g111Urla.9

1111 .,.... J. Jen5011

l'hlllp Anton IUillb A:>)b1aat l>rotn)Or

A:r.~:hllt

louts tmu C.rrwr

Gror_gc Otlb rt.aaa A o:.~lr.t.nt 'Prefo~r o1 Ekdrial E•_.tllltrr-s

At~<u1c

of

Prok\~o~~r

.t "'P'!_y.slcs

oi Mrch... ~\ En.'tilltft'i'!J

Proks')or M•vrolo9.!f

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o1

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Sf•nigC.MAc Collun Allaltfic Dira1or

Cl.trcn« JollnMM!r« A:.•.lst .. nt 'Profrs.sor of i'hf'.ISI!:'I

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A~ba1

,

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of Civll E•slnreriD!J

Crltslinr l'irrrrC..tbUarc lhslst•nt Pro1c:.,.or

W..ltcr Ca.•rto Zc:all As\lst... nl 'Prafrssor of Mt'dtanir.. DNWla,.,

ol !Jp.ani!.h ,..,, Frrnch

:EII.!J«"De Let Joh:oon 'Prafr:;sar of Ea_glbh

A"w1cl~k

I.rust W1l511n C•rltoa Assls1.&111 'Profns;or af Mrdwlu~l Dr-1~ aa.! Dnniptivc Geo!Dd!:J


Noel Hut.bara

Assis1ant Re_gistrar

l.nlb1. t1510mug. Awsbld' to :Ei\th Ca.rri~ton Jones "Pro'hser fJf Millt~ Sdftla ~Tadie 1i J,rarian


.\II SIS. TPPI VALLEY EXPERI ~ IENT 'TATION United States Bureau of ~l ines H . M. L-\ WR E:-.:CE Mtlallurgi.st and //Cling Supn-intmdmt The laboratories of the ~ l ississippi Valier Experiement Station of the U.S. Bureau of ~ l u1es :Lrc maintained on the campus. The activities of this station arc of a general character, covering the lead and zinc fields of the Mississippi Valley and dea ling with probleml! of a mining, ore dressing, or metrtllur~ical nature which arise in the lead and zinc industries, the solution of which problems would tend to 111crease efficiency, encourage economic development and prevent waste in t he territory served h>• this station.

THE STA'l 'E

liNING EXPERil\1ENT STATIO

T

MA RT IN II. T HOR N BERRY B.S., Met.E. .1.s.s!Jciate Professor of i'vfetallurgicnl Researclr in Cllflrgt of Stt1/ion It i~ the ohject of the station to conduct such original researches or to verify such experiments as relate to the properties and usc:•s of mineral products; to investigate the en~inccring problems connected with the mineral industry, the economic methods of mining and the prepar:uicm of mineral product:., the methods of preventing wa:.te of the miner:-.1 resources and the methods of prcvenring accidents in mines, mills, and smelters; to ;tssist in improving the conditions surroumlin~ the labor in mines, mill~, and smelters; and such other researches or experiments as bear directly upon the application of mining and metallurgical engineering w the mineral industrr of the State of \ lissouri. T he new builtlin~-: which occupies a space of about I 10xl25 feet between Parker llall :tnd j ackling Gymnasium is the \l ississippi \'aile} Experiment Station of the United State>. Bureau of :'- lines. T he plan of the huildin!( is II shaped, making it essentially in two parts connected b} a passagcwa). The from win~ is occupied '" the offices and fine research laboratories of the Bureau of \ l ines on the ground floor, br the \1inin~ Department of The School of Mines on the top floor, :tnd the offices and laboratories of the State Experiment Station in the semi-basement. !\lost of the rear wing is occupied by a laboratory 28x80 feet on the ground floor and extending the full height of the rear wing. The equipment is complete with heav) machinen and apparatus for large scale experimental work. It includes a ten-ron ~ I ii waukee floor operated travcl;ng crane. In the north end of the rear wing Me the c:lenrolpic and the electrOthermic laboratories. In the semi-ba~ement is rhe rock dr ill testing laborator} . •\ t the south end is t he crusher room, and in the basement below that is the cement testing l:lboratory of the C. E. department.

M lSSOU Rl B UREAU OF GEOLOGY AND M INES STAT E GEOLOGIST H . A. BUEHLER The Missouri Bureau of Geologv and Mines-<>r T he M issouri Geolo~ical Surve), ns it is more common!) known has its head(tuartcrs at Rolla, and occupies the Rolla Building on the School campus. The Geological Sun·ey has at the present time a librarr of approximately five 1 housand volumes and pamphlets on geological and allied subjects, and a museum of seven thousand specimens of cl:•y, coal, barite, lead and zinc ore, iron ore, and other mine and quarry products of Missouri. T he Geological Survey is organited principally to aid in the development of the mineral resources of ;\I issouri. Information concerning these resources is g:tthered through observations in the field by members of the sralf. Geologic and topographic maps are prepared of different parts of the State and the various formations arc accurately described in accompan~ ing reporrs. The relation of geolog> to the ore deposits is also worked out ami detailed reports published concerning such investigations. The Bureau, in co-operation with the United States Geological S_urver, also maintains a water resource branch for the in~·estigation of water powers and flood preventton.



CLASSES



Seniors


SE IJOR

D oMINJC

L. ARRA East Orange, Mining Enxinur ing

t

•

J.

Bonanu Baaket Ball '24, '25 Captain '25

A LBERT EowARD B ARNARD

Sr. Louis, Mo.

Mining Enginuri11g Kappa Alpha Rollamo Board '24, '25, '26 Editor-in-Chic! '26 Senior Council Mo. Min. and Met.

CL\'DE FRANCIS BOISMENUE

E. St. Louis, Ill. Mining Er~gir~eeri11g

Bonanu Senior Council Sigma Gamma Epeilon Rollamo Board '26 Quo Vndia Mo. Mining and Metallurgy Prca. Athletic Anociation '26

'vVAI.'rER L YNN B RADFORI>

Rolla,

~ t o.

Cmeral Science Independe nt

j OH N D oNALD CAMERON Minir~g

Rolla, Mo.

Geology

Kappa Sigma Mo. Min. and Met. Square and Compan

BANNER L t 'rHER CHANEY

Civil

Crane, Kans.

Er~f{ineering

Independe nt Prea. Senior Council '21) Square and Compan Mo. Min. and Met.

Shangh;~i, China

CHIH L oN CHEN

i\1ining Enginur ing Independe nt

FREDERICK C LEARMAN

P ierce Cit)', Mo.

Melttllurgy Independe nt Tau Bela J>i Senior Council Quo Vadi1 Mo. Min. and Met. l'ac~

Tllirly-/owr


SENIORS

Crane, Mo.

FRANCIS H ARR\' CONI.£\'

Mining Enginuring Independent Mo. :\fin. and Met. Tau Beta Pi Sigma Gamma l::psilon

Rolla, Mo.

EowARO IIAROI.o CooK

Chemistry Grubstaker Treas. lr:t Remsen '26

East Orange, N. J . A1ining Enginuring

EoWAIW RA\' MOND C usH IN G

Rollamo Board '26 '2~. '25, '26

Bonanz.1 Theta Tau Miner Board Mo. Min. and ~let.

Wakefield, Mass. Mining Enginrrri11g

L LOYO AusTIN CuTTER

Kappa Sigma Vice-Prea. Athletic Association Treas. Theta Tau Mo. ;\fin. and ~let.

East Orange, Civil Engim:rring

l-I ERII£RT MARR US D IERS

Quo Vadis

Bonanua Satyr

1•

J.

A.S.C.I::.

R OBERT Sm:o.E\' DOL'Ct.Ass

Cape Girardeau, l\lo. ;\feclumictd Enginuring Kappa Sigma

F t.on> :ht.EN

GERARD

'\'cvada,

~Io.

Ciuil Enginuring Theta Kappa Nu Theta Tnu Scniur Council

Ro\

1\.S.C.£.

St. Louis, Mo.

GusHiER

Cioi/ Enginttring Mercier A.S.C.E.


SENI ORS

E. St. Louis, 111.

R AYMOND LE RO\" H ALLows M~tallurgy I..:~mbda

Chi Alpha

Tau Beta J>a

Ra ymond, Ill.

TH EODORE H ERMAN

Metallurgy Bonanza

Sec. Senior Council

Theta Tau

l{olla, Mo.

R ALPH EowARI> HILI'ERT

P~trokum

Senior Counci l

Mini11g

Grubstaker Theta T:au J>ree. Tau Bela Pi

Chicago, Ill.

P AtrL KIRK H OOVER

Mining Enginuring Sigma Nu Sec. Mo. Min. and Met.

Tau

B~ta

l'i

St. Louis, Mo. MtciJanical Engi11eering

R AY A1.vA j O BN SON'

Sigma Nu Football '25, '26 Satyr

H ERMAN I I ENRY MYELER

St. Charles, i\Io.

Chunistry l ndependcnt Tau Beta Pi Band

H ERMAN G~;O RG E KOI.WE Y

Sr. Chades, Mo. Mining Engineering Independent Square and Compau

NEO OVERTON' KRA FT

Belleville, Ill.

Clz~mistry

Kappa Sigma S~nior Council Tiaeta Tau T au Beta Pi Snytr

/'a~< Thirty-si.~


SEN IORS

Marshall, 1\Io.

j oHN Wi LLIAM L A\'THAM

Civil Enginuring l ndependtnt

Hobart, Okla.

j OHN R AY L EE

Cmrml Scimu Si~Cma:-<u

Footbo ll '2 1. '25, '26

CHARr.t s FtR DINANr>

Captnin '26

L ucK ru:w

Pacific, Mo.

Civil Enginuring Koppa Sigmo Miner Board '24, '25 , '26 Theta Tau

HoRER1'

R ALPH

L usK

Rolla, Mo.

Engin~tring Independent

Elutrical

W11.LIAM AI.ONZO M cCANLESS

R olla, Mo.

Mining Enginttring Independent Senior Counci l Mo. Min. and Met. Square and Com1>au Theta Tau

j OHN E ow1N

St. Louis, Mo. McCAULEY Civil Engintrring

K app3 Alpha \l iner Bo•rd '2-1, '25, '26 A.S.C.E. Quo Vadio Preo. Playero Football

Rolla, to. 1\lcCAw Elutrical Enginttring

RoBtRr F RANCIS

Sigma Nu Theta Tau

EowARO W1LSOII PARSONS Miniug Eugiml'ring Independent Mo. Min. and Met.

Moline, Ill.


SE IORS

r\1urtrtAY

.J ous

Rolla, l\ lu.

PA UL

Petroleum Nliuiug Independent ond Trrt. Senior Council Sec. Squore and Campau Prts. Closs of '27 Tou Beta Pi

s~c.

J oplin, l\lo.

FOWIN SMITII P ERK INS

Mining Enginerring Band

Independent Mo Min. and Met.

Sr. r.ouis, lo. Mining Enginuring

AMEDEE A R\IA'IO PE t:CNET

Kappa Alpha Quo Vndit Mo. Min . ancl Mel.

R OI.FE l\IOli>TCOMERY R AI'II..IN

Rolla, l\l o.

Ciuil Enginuring Faculty A.S.C.E. Band

L YMAN

Fremonr, Colo. Ciail EnginurinK

MoRt:Y R outSON

Beta Theta J>i A.S.C.E.

\ \'tLLJAM

LAWR~>NCE R usHMORF.

Golden City, Mo.

Electrical Engineering Sigmo Nu Bu•. Mgr. Athletic AtiOCiation


SEN IORS

RANDALL ATHONY ScHEER

Sr.

Louis, \lo.

Cioil F.nginuring Kappa Alph• A.S.C.E.

l>lay~ro

Chicago, Ill. Mining F.nginuring Senior Council

Pross>« tor Quo Vadis Sigma Gamma Epsilon Satyr

EDwtN RAt.I'H SIEVERS

Sr.

Louis, i\lo.

Mining F.nginuring Bonan~n

Mo. Min. and Met.

Rolla, Mo.

) AMES FRANCIS SMt rH

Mttnllurgy Lambda Chi Alpha Theta Tau Satyr

Mayfield, Ky.

TERRY P ATILLO SMITH, ) R.

Civil Enginuring Sigma Nu

L Ewts

R EESE SrRINOER

Theta Tau

El

P aso, T exas

Mining Enginuring Playen

Sigma Nu Mo. Min. and Met.


SEN IOR

Washington, Ill. Mining Enginuring

H ALI'H DA:>If.l. SnLIVAI\

Bonan1.a Quo Va<.li1

Pres. Mo. Min. and !\let. Si~m• Gamma l~ptilon

TIIOMA),

H UOSON

THATCH F.R,

J II..

St. Louis, Mo. ,Wining Enginuring Kappa Sigma Mo. Min. and Met.. Football

II AROI.O DO!oll\AND THOMA <;

:\lexico, 1o.

Mining Gtolof{Y Lambda Chi Alpha Football '23, '2·1, '25, '26 \1o. Min. nnd Met.

PA U l. GOIWON WADDELL

Galloway, 1\ (o.

Chunistry Independent S.,nior Council

j o~1N R oBERT W At.'rHER

Cape Gir:mle:tu, Mo. Cioil Enginuring

I ndepcndrnt Senior Counci l Vice-f>rcl. J\.S.C.K

Tnu Bela J>i

CI.AR"NCE BI:R.NARU WEI SS

Cape Gir:mlcau, l\1o.

Chtmistry Senior Council

lndep<"ndent Tres. Cl~u or '27 Ira Rcmtcn

Quo \ od11


I-lERMAN BLTCK£NOEitFER Civil Engineering

Rolla, Mo.

Independent Tau Beta Pi

H ARRY FRANKLIN Ross£RT Civil Er1gineering

Rolla, Mo.

J ndependent

ERNEST ETARIDCE DECKER A;fining Engineeri11g

Rolla, Mo.

Square and Compass

j AMES WHED£R HARDY Columbia, l\llo. Mining Enginceri11g

Jo E AI,Bf.RT HOLMAN Marshall, Texas Medumicnl Engineering Kappa Alpha Quo Vadis

Kirkwood, Mo.

R oNALD MABREY

Geology Kappa Sigma Tres. Mo. Min. and Met. Tau Betn Pi

EowARI)

H annibal, Mo. Civil Engineering

BoHEN O' B RIEN

Knppa Sigma

Kansas City, Mo. Civil Engineering

R ICHARD H ENRY 0ST£R

Independent Senior Council

ALFRED

THOMAS S MITH Civil Engineering

Rolla, Mo.

Independent Pres. A.S. C. It

CLARENCE

L£E Wooos Mining Engineering Independent

Mo. Min. and Met,

Rolla, Mo.


THE ENGINEE R OF DREAMS By S. A. Granth:tm '28

The Engineer of Dreams Of brawny things he sings. The rushing roar of rivers brings Floods for him to choke and grapple, No petty butterfly, however pretty, Crosses the purpose

His singing voice thru canyons rings Vibrant, ecstatic as a dynamo. Against great mystic forces Are his si news, thews, and muscles Tightened, in silence : The implacable defiance of mountain si lence Moulding form, he is molded; Utilizing greatness, he is made great. Static thought changes state, Becomes dynamic. His dreams beat like hammers On the red hot plan that rests Upon the anvil of his mind .

His dreams presage what is to be, Down yonder, in the canyon.


Juniors

Part Forly-d.ru


IO RS

Unquestio nably, the .J unior year at J.S.l\1. is most doubtful pt.:riod of the four years grind. After lying around the previous year the student faces the delightful task of conquerin g Prof. Framt.:s' E. E. course and to accept without an argument the courses of the chosen profession . The idea that a J unior is but one )'ear away from R.O.s' Power Plants is enough to kill the joy of the year. The professional fraterniti es and scholastic societies begin to work on the third-rea r men and this onlr lends more hardships for the time being. Then last, but not least, is the putting on of St. P at's. With everything else taken into considera tion, this is the most importan t part of the daily work of a Ju nior. This celebratio n concerns the whole school and many outsiders. lf the event is put on in real style the J uniors have made their reputation and so it is a hard life after all The class of '28 had the surprcme honor of starting the wearingo fsuspenders by freshmen. Th is fact is not of much importan ce, except that they must have done a good job because the classes of the following years are still trying to out-do their predecess ors. The St. P at's celebratio n was great and shows that the class of '28 arc worthy of their name as Juniors. Credit must be given the committe es in charge of the decoratin g of the gymnasiu m and the music. The gymnasiu m was done up in a very clever fashion while the music was pmbably the best ever heard at this institutio n. We all hope the Class of '28 carry their good nhme thru the year and become diligent seniors in 1928.

Part Frmy-four

CLASS OFFlG.RS

COMMITT EE CH AIR ME'\

G. T. McCROREY , JlrCJidenr F. E. S£w£t.t., 1/iu-Prnid mt S. A. L'' NC'H, Surrl11ry P. A. I-I ALAs£v, Treasnrrr

I I. H. B.ut TtNOIIA '1, Duoratiom P. J. Bon Zt, Dana P..\.I I At.A!if.Y, Fi111mrr


JU

IORS


J UNIORS

K. A. AJlebach C. W. Ambler J. E. Antener R. P. Baumgartner A. P. Berry P.M. Berry P. J. Boyer M. P. Bradford J. H. Brickner H. H . Brittingham L. J. Burg R. W. Couch F. K. Crider D. H. Crumbaugh H. E. Cruz W. B. Davis P. H. Delano R. C. Dodge ]. G. Donaldson E. C. Faulkner C. A. Freeman J. F. Gage R. K. Grantham S. A. G rantham H. E. Gross J. A. Hahn P. A. Halasey ]. P. Harman J. R. H eckman C. F. Herbert A. L. Hill H. Histed S. D. Hodgdon H. R. Kilpatrick C. L. King

Pace Forty-six

N. L. Kozlinsky M. B. Layne M. C. Ledford J. 0. Lemon J. 0. Letts

J. J.

Li vingston S. A. Lynch G. T. McCrorey E. G. McLaughlan W. B. Machin L. T. Mariner W. L. M etcalf E. C. Miller H. B. Moreland T. D. Murphy H. H. Newcombe 0. D. Niedermeyer

]. F. Orr R. D. Palmer G. A. Roberts V. M. Roloff C. L. Salley W. K. Schweickhardt F. E. Sewell B. Y. Slates J. vV. Smith L. K. Snyder R. H. Sturgess 1. S. Sturgis M. E. Suhre W. S. Temples E. F. Thatcher ]. S. WiiAey E. Young


Sophomores


SOPHOMORES

CLASS OF '29 This old world has traveled all the way around Old Sol nearly twice since the class of '29 began making history at M .S.M. H aving survived the critical and gruesome days of a freshman with only a few casual ties; we took up the more pleasant duties of the conscientious sophomore. And, as every present freshman will tell you, we have pursued and executed ou r duty with unusual diligence. The annual class fracas was a huge success; thanks to the shanghai squad, whose excellent work made the victory possible. The evening following the fight we entertained the bewildered and mutilated feeshmen in the gym and found that quite a few of them were really human. I n the football game with the frosh, fate favored them with victory. But this hard fought battle only served to increase our vigilance for suspenderless freshmen . Aside from the foregoing diversions, ''precision of measurements" and t he "art of hand-shaking" completed ou r "college curriculum "; and we hope you will hear much more from us next year and the next.

OFFlCERS R. C. Mti.I.ER, President R. H. PARKER, !/ice-President A. H. KEMI', Secrett1ry and T1路eamrer

f>a&t Porty路dght



SOPHOM OR ES

A. C. Adolph H. M. Allshouse P. Belzung ~-F. Bohne H. C. B olon W. E. Broach R. A. Bryant R. W. Campbell l\1. C. Christine M. L. Clark W. L. Couch G. W Courtney E. A. Crawford G. E. Crays E. J. Crum B. N. D aniloff M. E. D ean S . R. D ittmer R. B. Donze W. L. Drake A. T. Gardner E. A. Godat E. J. Gregory J. G. Grohskopf C. E. Gutke S. S. Hansen H. L. H arrod E. T. Harvey F. W. H ocrtel W. B. LLollow J. B. H uebner C. G. H ueter J. R. J arboe C. R. J en nings C. vV. J ohnson H. G. J ones W. C. ] ones A. H. K emp W. C. Keniston R. G. Kern F. A. McCurdy

Pa,~

Fifty

A. L. M cRae M. H . 1anclel C. J. .:\ Jellies E. i\ lerckling 0. H . Mill er R. C. M iller H. D. l\1onsch \Y. T. l\1oore 0. \\'. M orris D. \\'. M ou lder A. 1ucllcr L. . l\ l ueller R. E. M yers A.C. awn M . G. Olmsted H. R. Osterwald H. C. Page C. R. Palstring R. H . Herman J. P cna J. Potter J. T. Powell J. S . Reger \V. H . R ollman T. Ru bottom H. W. Schaffner H . 0. Scheer L. H . Sch uette M.A. Sharp D. W. Smith R. T. Snider J . A. Spalding R. D. Stroll J. V. Sundstrom G. W. T aJiey M . F . Tamm M. V. Thompson F. E. Tucker L. F. Van Sciver W. S. Walter


Freshmen

Po(t Fijty路C11t


FRES II l\tiEN

CLASS OF '30 On the sixth of Septem ber Rolla began to show signs of life. Old studen ts returne d relucta ntly, but with a desire to conque r one more year. With them, came some hundre d odd so called freshmen. It did not take long for the Sophs and the unorga nized Freshm en class to come to blows on the first Monda y of school, after a two day sojourn in the Ozarks . After the fight and circus peace reigned about town. Footba ll began to be the discussed topic of the day. Several of the freshm an class distinguished themselves. Among these are "Sharli e" Ray and Lacy, who made their M's. Dover, DeFoe and Kirkpa trick made the squad, and if not for hard luck DeFoe would have probab ly made his letter. After football season the Freshm an-Sop homore game was held, and the Freshm an squad led by Dover conquered the Sophomores, l>y a score of 7 to 6, and as a result green caps were abolished. Toward the middle of the second semest er the class became socially inclined, and the F reshmen H op was given the 26th of Februa ry. f<rom the opinion of the school, a grand time was had by all. At the time of this writing track season is yet to come and nothing can be said definitely. F rom the looks of prospec ts the track team will be made up with quite a few Freshm en showing their ability.

OFFICE HS RA v, Presidml CHASE,

f/iu-Prts idmt

GRAFTON ,

Trcamrt r

Wotr, Surtlary


F RESil ME


FRESHMEN

V. Alexander 'vV. L. Andrews H. G. Bailey R. E. Ben nett W. J. Bercher D. J. Bisett A. E. Blaser 0. B. Board W. L. Brady C. R. Breckenridge J. L. Bremer A. Brent W. Brewer E . R. Brigham ] . C. Brown T . G. Callaway W. C. Cantrell R. W. Cavanaugh F. B. Chase E. F. Cirkal A. P. Cooper B. Davenport W. E . Davis J . C. DeFoe W. S. Depenbrink W. B. Dimond A. J. Doll F. T. Douglas G. W. Douglas T. J. Dover F. Edgin W. H. Ellis E. R. Epperson G. A. Ernst W. Farrar R. R. Gast 0. D. Gibbons A. C. Grabruck J. F. Grafton C. W. Grate G. R. Gregory

P"lt

Fijty-f~ur

C. J. Grimm W. T. Han back H. E. Hanlon W. R. Harkreader F. Harrington W. I. Har tnagel F. L. H awkins G. F. Heath A. P. Heiser J. H. Hell K. L. H enry W. A. Herbert C. M. Hess H. L. Hicks E . C. Hoeman A. W. Hoggard R. J. Hopp J. H. HuJtz P. C. Johnson C. C. J uhre R. F. Kirkpatrick R. L. Kirkpatrick J. E. Kitchen A. E. Koch E. J. Kt路oll L. R. Lacy R. M. J.acy R. E. Lee E. C. Long E. P. McCarthy C. W. McCaw J. E. McCumber L. D. McCusker K . H. McFann R. D. McNail M. J. McCaulay G. G. Maggi F . N . Mann R. S. Martin A. R. Maune E. Meeka

P. E. Moore T. R. Morgan P. B. Mudgett F. T. Murray F . F. Netzeband S.C. Osborn C. F. P age G. A. P age T. D. Palmer L. W. Pickles W. R. Powell E. M. Ray L. E. Reeve E. T. Regenhardt E. E. Ross B. H. Rucker R. R ydstrom W. J. Sabo P. G. Schuckmann F. B Schultz W. T. Sharp A. C. Shearer R. B. Sherrill J. A. Shibley C. Smith W. J. Stryker L. G. T ennies M. F. Thomas E. S. Towle R. E. Tucker E. H. Vierling R. C. Vierling L. M . Wallingford E. W. Watson J. H. Wesley G. C. White C. E. Wilhite S. Wolf R. V. Woods E. H. Woodman




ATHLETICS



Football

Patt Fifty-nine


CAPTAIN J. R. LEE-Fu/1/Jaclr. The !\liner '26 Caprain proved to be a true lender for his teammates. His line-smashing and tackling in the secondary defense have been a shining light in Miner victories for the past three years.

CAJ>TAJN-ELECT M. C . L EDFOR.t>-l!alfback. "Monty" was the fastest man carrying the pigskin for the Golden Wave last season. Abilit}' as a leader, aided br passing, punting, and open field running versntilcness speak for his worth as '27 Captain.

H. D. THOMAS- Halfbatlr. Tomm) completed four years of varsity gridironing laM f:~ll. This 160-pound h:~lfback was the most elusive ball c:~rrier on the \1cCollum eleven. In :~ddition, "Twidge" was a fighter every second till the final gun.

J. 0. LEMON-Haljbaclr. Toting the b:lll thru the line or off-tackle smashes, " J immr" gave Miner opponents lots of worrr. An eighty-five yard dash for :1 touchdown from scrimmage last fall is an example of his ynrclngc gaining for the past three seasons.

E I'IOCH YouNc-Cmter. Accurate passes nrc the main cog in the present day direct passing football machines. "Skipper" fulfilled this requirement very handily besides his fine work defensively. Young is a three year letterman.

0. D. NEJOERMEYER-Tack/e. Tall and well proportioned, Neidermeyer took advantage of his 195-pound physique in breaking thru opposing lines and opening paths for the McCollum backfield. " Red" will be present next yenr to bolster the '27 cleated warriors.


A. P. BERRY-~uart.-rback. After an absence of a year, Berry returned to fill the quarterback berth. "Art" was especiaJiy adept at tossing the pigskin into t he arms of Miner wingman. Berry qualified as a heady field tactician thruout the season to climax hjs proof in the final game.

H . C. BoLON-Tackl~. As a freshman, Bolon won a regular position and his playing last fall showed even greater improvernnr. T his left tackle used his 190-pounds to good advantage, being fast and shifty despite his weight.

G. C. ) OHNSON- Tacklt'. George had hard luck thruout the past season because of a shoulder injury but he played good football when he was in the game. J ohnson's stalwart p iny for three seasons has been n rampnrt in the l\l iner line.

M. A. SHAR I~ End. The lightest man on the varsit}', Shnrp's grit and alert pass receiving earned him a letter for the '26 season. He made his presence known to opponents regardless of physical handicap.

K. A. ALLEBACH- End. On numerous occasions when Berry's short passes went into a crowd, Allebach emerged with the pigskin tucked under his arm. Coupled with his adeptness at breaking up end runs, Karl was a real factor in the Golden Wave's forward wall.

C. 1~. HERBER~Guard. Undaunted by his two previous f::tilures, Herbert came to the fore as n guard to win the coveted " M ." "Chuck" assumed the role of an immovable obstacle on the defense and a shifty guard from the offensive position.


FOOTBALL

R. W. CAvANAUGH-Halfback. Speed formed the basis for Cavanaugh's success as a gridironer in the backfield. This lad has garnered a letter in his first year with considerable promise of being a yard consuming back in the future.

F . E. TucKER-Guard. After holding down an end position for a while, Tucker was shifted to guard where he won a varsity berth. "Tuck" fought his way off the injured list and held his own against invading ball toters.

R M. LAcv-Guard. Lacy was one of freshman that earned a regular place last fall. Aggressive, fast, and alert, the newcomer made his weight count. His faculty for diagnosing enemy tactics was more than helpful.

E. M. RAY-End. "Charly" broke into a first team position at a wing in the middle of the season, only to be cut down by an injury that kept him out of the last two games. Ray is a very likely satellite for McCollum's future elevens.

S. D. H oDGDON- End. For three long fall seasons "Sammy" toiled with the scrubs but the '26 season saw him in a varsity place. Grabbing passes was his long suit netting lengthly gains time and again. Persistence is the epitome of Hodgdon's football play.

Patt Sixty-two


THE 1926 FOOTBALL SEASON The results on record for the Miners 1926 football season show five victories and three defeats. Washington U., St. Louis U., and Arkansas T ech. turned in the only defeats chalked against the McCoJlum clan during the past season and only the two point margin of a safety gave St. Louis a victory. This points to the fact that the 1926 season of the fall sport ranks with the best performances of M.S.M. elevens in a number of years. The Miners '26 eleven opened the season on slippery, muddy gridiron at JackJing Field opposing the McKendree College warriors from Lebanon, lllinois. Despite the uneven footing the Golden Wave rolled up six touchdowns and Captain Lee added five extra points to triumph 41 to 13. Lemon scored three touchdowns, one on a forty yard sprint across the striped field across the visitors goal lin e. T he McKendreeites were held to a mere twentytwo yards total yardage gained in scrimmage. A pass and a recovered fumble gave the losers their on ly points of the sixty minutes of play. Offtackle plays and straight football were the Miners tactics that gave the successful results. The M.S.M. eleven met the Washington University Bears in their annual fracas at Francis field in the second game of the year. The St. Louisans showed unexpected strength and succeeded in gaining a 25 to 2 victory. Ledford got loose for a twenty-five yard sprint in the third quarter placing the ball on the Bears twenty yard line and Thomas' thirty yard gain again put the Miners in striking distance of the goal but the final drive was lacking. The ability of the Washington U. linemen to outcharge the Miner linemen providing openings for their fl eet backfield was the deciding factor in the Bears triumph. The golden-jerseyed McCollum eleven started the Homecoming game with Arkansas Tech. by carrying the pigskin sixty yards down the field to the visitors three yard line. The Tech's heavy line proved equal to the task however and held on their goal line. The Miners held the Arkansas eleven to nine points for the first three quarters but Nemecek and Conley, the visitors' backs, ran wild in the final quarter to score three touchdowns and clinch the set-to 30 to 0. A fast, heavy set of backs supported by an equally heavy line worked well in scoring a voctory for the Tech. gridders.


FOOTBALL

T he Golden Wave came from behind in an uphill battle against a strong Kirksville Osteopath team in the next game to win 14 to 6. Lemon entered the line-up with the McCollum cohorts six points behind and proceeded to break away on an eighty-five yard brilliant dash for a touchdown . From this point on the Miners held off the plunging Docs and a short pass, Ledford to L emon, scored the second Miner touchdown. Captain Lee halted t he visitors thruout the second half after being on the sidelines for the first thirty minutes. R ay gave a fine exhibition of receiving passes on the Miners left wing with L acy putting up his usual valuable defense work at guard . T he visitors ran thru the M iner defense time and again in midfield but when they approached the twenty yard line they faced a stone wall defense. Ledford gained considerable yardage from a spread formation which caught the visitors napping more than once. The St. Louis U. game was a hard contest to lose with the Billikens holding a 9 to 7 verdict when the final gun shot. Thruout the game the Miners revamped line held the onrushing Billikcns but a 22 yard pass in the opening minutes of play gave the St. Louisans their lone touchdown and subsequently, victory . The St. Louis eleven's success at passing all during the game was the only thing that kept them in the running. W here the Miners aerial attack had previously done so much damage it failed to gain a yard against the Billikens. Thomas smashed his way from midfield for t he Miners touchdown in the last quarter when he ripped thru the St. Louis line in short off-tackle thrusts. A blocked kick gave the Billikens a safety in the third quarter which proved to be the winning points. Evansville College of I ndiana received the brunt of a smashing Miner offense in the next game and were forced to acknowledge defeat 32 to 9. Captain Lee led his teammates in the attack by boring thru the enemy line for large and numerous gains. Berry and Lemon also took a major part in totalling up the Miners score. T homas received a wrenched ankle in the first quarter that kept him on the injured list with Ledford and Ray who were injured in the St. Louis game. T he McCollum eleven's battering attack met li ttlc resistance from Evansville while an intercepted pass was the means of the losers' only score.


FOOTBALL

The Drury Panthers invaded J ackling F ield for the Miners annual contest in the next game. The P anthers did the unexpected and held the Miners to a 6-6 tie in the first half after pre-game dope had given the Golden \\'ave the benefit of a much stronger team. Coach McCollum, however, held out the regular backfield in the first two quarters. When Captain Lee, Lemon, Thomas and Berry started on a rampage in the second half the P anthers soon found themselves unequal to the task of holding the Miners in c heck. The final score stood Miners 26, Drury 6, when the final gun went off. Berry's passes to Sharp and Allebach proved very effective thruout the game after the visitors got the first score. Captain Lee broke thru for two touchdowns whil e Th om as and Lemon toted the pigskin very dexterously in the last two quarters. This was the twenty-second meeting of the Miners and the Panthers since 1893 and gave the Golden Wa ve 13 victories to 9 for Drury. The elated warriors of M.S.M. put the finishing touch on the season's eight game schedule by turning in a brill iant triumph over the Springfield Bears at Springfield in the annual Thanksgi ving Day fracas. After being on the defensive for practically the whole first half the Golden \\'ave began to roll and scored twenty-ane points in only a minute over one quarter. Ledford ran wild from a triple pass formation, stepping thirty-five yards for one touchdown and two twenty-five yard gains in succession put the ball on the two yard lin e to result in another touchdown. Captain Lee plunged over for six points, kicked three perfect placements with a mudcovered ball and played a stalwart game to lend the finishing touch to his career in f iner moleskins. Thomas finished up his four rears of varsity play by scoring the third touchdown with line-breaking plunges. Berry's forty yard pass to Sharp also featu red the Miner scoring rally. Bolon, Neidermeyer, and Allebach also performed well in the line and only darkness prevented Lemon from scoring a fourth touchdown. The Miners come-back qualities in the second half resulted in victories over Kirksvi lle, Drury, and Springfield in the last three games of the season and thruout the schedule in practically every game the golden jerseys outscored their rivals in the last half. This alone gives plenty of evidence of the fighting qualities of the 1926 M.S.M. football eleven.


FOOTBALL


Basket Ball


FRANK E. DENN IE "SPIKE"

Director of Athletics CoaciJ of Basketball and Y.rack


BASKET

THE SQUAD

T he basket ball season proved to be an unsuccessful one hut we put the blame on no one. "Spike" started out with a few lettermen but these men soon dropped out of the running and the task of reorganizing the team confronted him. Captain Orchard was lost to the team after the mid-semester and his loss was keenly felt. Niedermeyer and Thomas returned to the squad and it was through the work of these two men that kept up the team's scoring punch. The development of several new candidates proved successful and we are looking forward to the next season when these men will form the nucleus of the team. Considering the games won the season was quite unsuccessful but of the games lost several were unfortunate. T wo of them were lost by a single point and in both cases they were lost because Dame Fortune refused to look kindly upon the golden-jcrscycd men. All the lettermen will return to school next fall well grounded in the art of basket throwing and "Spike" should produce a winning team.


BASKET BALL

LETTERMEN H. D . T

HOMAS

(Captain), FO?-ward

W. B. H ot.LOw, Forward

F. E. 0. D.

T ucKER,

F orward

NIEDERME YER,

D. H. N.

Center

Mtt.L ER, Guard

V. T AMM, Gum路d

E. M . RAY, Guard

BASKET BALL R EVIEW MINERS 17 -

J AMES MILLIKEN 38

Miners failed to get going in t heir first game.

MI NERS 23-

W ASHINGTON

u.

52

The Bears kept t he upper hand all the way.

MINERs 24-McKENDREE 32

Miners led in second half but were unable to keep in front.

MIN ERS 47-

SHU RTLE FF 3 1

Brilliant shooting by Thomas and

iedermeyer left t he visitors behind.

MINERS 35-ST.

The golclen-jerseyed

P agL Srotnly

Louis U. 23

Jive

led all the way.


BASKE T

MINERS 16-

CoNCORD IA

-!9

Undefeated Concordians proved too much for Miners.

MINERS 26-CENT RAL WESLEYA N 32

Wesleyans sravcd off Miner rallies in second half to win close game.

MINERS 34-CENT RAL WESLEYA N 35

Miners :~head three points with onlr a minute and

:1

MINERS 21-CENT RAt. CoLLEGE

half left to pht)

29

Poor refereeing prevented any real basket ball playing.

MINERS 49-CENT RAL CoLLEGE 50

With five point lead all the way Miners were p:lSsed in final seconds.

MINERS 23-SPRlN GFIELD TEACHERS

49

The Bears effective offense turned in a victorr.

MINERS 27-DRUR Y 30

Poor shooting cost the game when Miners outplayed Panthers on floor.

MINERS 31-DRU RY 27 1iederrneyer

went on nineteen point rampage clinching a hard frncas.

MINERS 24-SJ>RJN GFIELD TEACHERS 46

The Bears again proved too versatile for the ~liners.


GYMNASIUM


Other Sporl路s


W RESTLI G

LETTERMEN

D. W. Moulder (Captain)

C. B. Weiss

E. H. Cook

H. W. Schaffner

J. J . Livingston

H. C. Bolon

A. L. Hill

C. H. J ennings

Coach McCanless's wrestling squad had only a three meet schedule, but all of these were within a space of two weeks keeping the Miner grapplers on their toes. The Miner matmen lost a close meet to Kemper Military Academy of Boonville in the first contest of the season. Cook won his featherweight bout by a fall. Captain Moulder in the bantam weight division and Schaffner in the heavy took decisions. The cadets, however, took one more fall than the Miners winning the meet 16 to 11. Oklahoma University's experienced grapplers won every bout in the Miners second meet of the season. The visitors took three bouts by falls and four by the decision route. Against the Missouri Tigers, Livingston was the victor in an overtime bout in the middleweight class and Walker garnered another decision in the featherweight division. M.U. forfeited the unlimited bout to Schaffner when they had t he meet won 16 to 11.


W REST LI G

SUMM ARIES MINER S

11,

KEMPE R

16

5 seconds 115 Pound Class- Capt. Mould er (Miner s) won by 2 minute s, time advant age agains t McCon nell (Kemp er) . 4 minutes. 125 Pound Class- Cook (Miners) threw Goldm an ( Kempe r) in minute , 58 135 Pound Class- H ill (Miner s) lost to Long (Kemp er) by 1 second s time advant age. (Kemp er) 145 Pound Class- Living ston (Miner s) lost to Capt. Thomp son by 8 minute s time advant age. er) m 158 Pound Class- Wiess (Miner s) was thrown by Sutphe n (Kemp 4 minute s, 10 seconds. er) m 175 Pound Class -Bolan (Miner s) was thrown by Winbe rg (Kemp 4 minute s, 35 seconds. s time Heavy weight Class- Schaft ner (Miner s) won by 3 minute s, 18 second advan tage agains t McCal eb (Kemp er). R eferee -W. D . Semple , Washi ngton U.


MINERS

)1,

MISSOU RI

16

115 Pound Class- Godwin (Missouri) defeated Capt. Moulder (Miners) By 6 minu tes 37 seconds time advanta ge. 125 Pound Class-W alker (Miners ) defeated Tiffin (Missou ri) by 1 minute 49 seconds time advanta ge. 135 Pound Class-C ardwell (Missouri) threw H ill (Miners ) 36 seconds.

tn 5 minutes

145 Pound Class- Livingston (Miners) defeated Young (Missouri) by 48 seconds advanta ge in extra periods.

155 Pound Class- Miller (Missouri) threw Weiss (Miners ) tn 6 minutes 40 seconds.

175 Pound Class- Paul (Missouri) defeated Bolan (Miners) by 4 minutes -18 seconds advanta ge. Unlimit ed- Missouri forfeited to Schaffner (Miners). Referee- Bauman , Oklahom a A.&M.

MINERS

0,

OKLAHO MA UNIVER SITY

27

115 Pound Class- Lewis (O.U.) won by 3 minutes 40 seconds time advanta ge against Capt. Moulde r (Miners ). 125 Pound Class- H uddle (0. U .) won by a fall against Cook (Miners).

tn

8 minutes 17 seconds

135 Pound Class- Danfort h (O.U.) won by 7 minutes 33 seconds time advanta ge against H ill (Miners ). 145 Pound Class- Englis (O.U.) won by 8 minutes 55 seconds time advanta ge against Jenning s (Miners ). 158 Pound Class- Cook (0. 0.) won by fall in 2 minutes 22 seconds against Weiss (Mi ners). 175 Pound Class- Fullerto n (O.U.) won by 8 minutes 56 seconds time advanta ge against Bolon (Miners ). Heavy Weight Class- Will (O.U.) won by fall against Schaffne r (Miners ). Referee -Cook


LETTE RMEN B. F. Thompson (Captain )

M. C. Ledford C. A. J ohnson J. L. Lee \\'. D. Moulder R. Snider

G. C. J ohnson N. F. Tamm E. C. Smith H. B. M oreland

SUMMA RIES MI NERS

43,

SPRINGF IELD T EACHERS

99

Mile Run- D ooley (S) first, Hagerty (S) second, Osterwo ld (M) third. Time, 4 minutes , 47.5 seconds. HO-yard Dash- Fisher (S) first, R iley (S) second, Burg (M) third. Time 53.9 seconds. 100-yard Dash- H amilton (S) first, Thompson ( I) second, Morris (S) third. T ime, 10.4 seconds. 120-yard High Hurdle s-R eynaud (S) first, Burg (M) second, Austin (S) third.

T ime, 16.1 seconds.

880-yard Ru n- Lindholm (S) first, Wise (S) second, Osterwold (l\1) third. Time, 2 minutes, 10 seconds. 220 yard Dash- H amilton (S) first, E. C. Smith (M) second, G. C. J ohnson (M) third. Time, 23 seconds. 220-yard Hu rdles-R eynaud (S) first, E. C. Smith (l\1) second, G. C. J ohnson (M) third. Time, 26.4 seconds. t ile Relay- Wo n by Springfield. Time, 3 minutes, 4:4.5 seconds. Two-mil e Run- Dooley (S) first, Stout (S) second, Sievers (M) third. Time, 10 minutes, -10 seconds. Half-mile Relay- v\'on by Springfie ld. Ti me, 1 minute, 36 seconds. Pole Vault- Reynaud (S) first, Moulder (M) second, Austin (S) third . Height, 11 feet 6 inches. Shot Put- C. W. J ohnson (M) first, Bolen (M ) second, Austin (S) third. D istance, 37 feet, 8 inches. 1-Iigh J ump-Rill (S) first, D. W. Smith (M) and Cherry (S) tied for second. Height, 5 feet, 10 inches. Discus- Rill (S) first, Lee (M) second, C. \V. .1 ohnson (M ) third. Distance , 125 feet, 11 inches. Broad Jump- Davis (S) first, Ward (S) second, C. W. J ohnson (M) third. Distance, 2 1 feet, 5 inches. Javel in - C. Davis (S) first, Austin (S) second, Shar (M) third. Distance , 161 feet.


TRAC K

SUMMA RJES M I NERS

70,

DR URY

65

100-yard Dash-Th ompson (M) first, Gross ( D) second, Ledford (M) third, Time, 10.7 seconds. r-. Jile Run- Davidson (D) first, Evans (D) sec,ond, Osterwal d (M) third. Time, 4 minutes, 49.1 seconds. 440-yard Dash-G . Johnson (M) first, Phillips (0 ) second, De Ia Porte (D) third. Time, 5-t-.5 seconds. 120-yard High Hurdle-T amm (M) first, E. Smith ( D) second, Krider (D) third. Time 17.5 seconds. 880-yard Run- Silesby (D) first, Davidson (D) second, Schneider (M) third. Tim e, 2 minutes, 8 seconds. 220-yard Dash- C. S. Smith (M) first, Gross (D) second, Thompso n (M) third. T ime, 23.8 seconds. Twa-mile Run- B. McKinely (D) first, E. McKinley (D) second, Ambler (M) third. Time, 10 minutes, 25.5 seconds. 220-yard Low Hurdles- C. S. Smith (M) first, Tamm (M) second, F.. Smith (D) third. Time, 27.7 seconds. Half-mile Relay-W on by Miners (T hompson, Ledford, Smith, J ohnson )路 Time, I minute, 36 seconds. Mile Relay-W on by Drury (Evans, Gardner, McCrosky, Davidson) . Tim e, 3 minutes, 42.5 seconds. Pole Vault- Moulder (M) first, E. Smith (D) second. Height lO feet, 6 inches. Shot Put C. J ohnson, (M) and Wheatley ( D) tied for first, Bolon (M) third. Distance, 38 feet, 8 inches. High J ump-E. Smith (D) first, T amm ( M) and D. Smith (M) tied for second. Height, 5 feet, 8 inches. Discus Throw-Lee (M) first, C. Johnson (M) second, Wheatley (D) third. Distance, 115 feet, 11 Y2 inches. Broad Jump-Sc hneider ( 1) first, E. Smith (D) second, C. J ohnson (M) third. Distance, 19 feet, 2 inches. J avelin Throw- Wheatley (D) first, Shay (M) second, C. J ohnson (M) third. Distance, 148 feet, 10 inches. STATE MEET

C. Smith of the Miners placed second in the dash and the Miners halfmile relay team took third place in the state meet at Cameron , Missouri.


BASEB ALL

I NTRAM URAL BASEB ALL, 1926 Since there is no varsity baseball team an I ntramural Baseball Series is held every spring. The winner of this series receives a cup for that year. After winning the cup three times it becomes the property of that team. There is keen competiti on in these games and holds the interest of the student body for the spring semester. The Faculty are well represente d ever}' year since they are allowed to play the employee s of the various organizati ons located at the school, such as the Bureau of Mines. However, with all their star players they have failed to win the coveted prize. It seems as though the good pitching of" Doc" Schrenk is for nought since the other members of the team are constantly thinking about school work and how they can flunk some poor freshman and make it look as though it were not his fault. May the Faculty win when they have the best team. At the end of the regular playing schedule in the intramura l baseball series the Kappa Sigmas and the I ndepende nts stood tied at nine victories apiece and one defeat. With Smith on the mound and Young catching the Kappa Sigmas won their second successive baseball pennant by a 10 to 6 score. FINAL LEAGUE STANDING

w. Kappa Sigma I ndepende nts, Prospecto rs, Merciers, Faculty, Sigma Nu, Lambda Chi Alpha, Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Alpha, Bonanza, Grubstake rs,

10 9

L. 1 2

6 6 6 6

4 4 4

4 4

6 6 7 9 9

3 1

1

4

%

909 818 600 600 600 600

400 400 300 100 100



A.TIIO-GRAVU RE


"For when the one great scorer comes To count against your name; He counts not whetl1er you have won or loS!, But how you pla)'ed the game."


ORGAN IZATION S



Clubs and

Fraten~ilies


.

SIGM A N U

GAi\1MA X I CI-HPTER lnstnlltd Januar_v 3, !903

FRArRE:. IN FACVI.. rAlE

j oseph \\'. Barley

H enry II. Armsh~路

Charles

.J . l\1 illar

FRATRES I N UNIVER:.tTATE

StniorJ

P. K. H oover

W. L. R ushmore

R. F. McCaw

1.. R. Springer R . A.

T. P. Smith

J. R. Lee

J ohn~on

JunifJrJ

C. \\'. Ambler P. J. Boyer

F. K. Crider C. Ledford

~1.

J. 0.

.J.

Lemon

F. Orr

SophfJm&res

J.

H . Brickner

A. 1.. Mdbc

J. A.

Spalding

FrniJmw

T. D. Palmer 'IN. Brewer L. K. S nyder

R. C. Dodge

D . .I. Bissett W. 1.. 11racly B. M. Davenport G. F. I Ieat h

C. C. Juhre

C. \\'. McCaw R. W. Cavanaugh

J. A. Shihlcy


SIGM A N U


K APP A ALP IIA

BETA ALPH A CHA PTER lmtnlle d .fp,·i/2 7, / 903 F RATRt::S IN URn£

FRATRE S II> F ACl!I.TA TR

Charles L. Woods

Charle s Y. Clayto n FRATRE S IN UNtV F.RSITA TE

Srniors

J. A. llolm an A. A. Peugnc t S. D. llodgdon

J.

J. E. 1\lcCau ley

A. E. Barnar d R. A. Scheer

7unior s

\\'. B.

F. (;age

~lachin

J . T. Sturgis Sophomorrs

R. E. M)•crs D. \\'.Smi th

\\'. S. W alter H. L. H arrod

W. E. Rroal·h E. II. \'ierlin g

II. L. H icks R. R. Cast

\\'. B. Dimon d M. F. Thoma s R. R ydstrom

R. Vierling F. M cCarth y


KAPPA ALPHA


SI GM A

BET: \ CHI CH:\P T ER hwallc d

Ducmbe~路

JO, !903

F RA'IRI-.\ IN UNIVER~ITA'I~

J.

Smior.s D. Cnmcro n

C. F. Luckfi dJ

L A. Currer

R . l\ l ahrc\'

R. S. Dougla ss

:\. 0.

E. B. O'Brien T. II. T hatche r

~\: raft

'Juniors \V. B. Davis E. C. F aulkner J. R . Heckm an

J. S.

J. W. H. R. Kilp:trr ick

Smith

E. F. Thatch er E. Young

So pl10morn Reger

:--=. S. \\' illi:tms 1'rnl11nm

C. L. King R. B. Sherrill

B. Strrke r F. R. l lar ringron A. P. Heiser

l'att Nintl}'

R. 1.. Kirkpa rrirk

E. C. Long L D. McCus ker B. H . Rucker L. Cl. Tennie s



PI KAP PA ALP HA

ALPHA K:\PPA CH APTER lnstall~d

Dunnbrr Z, 1905

FRATRES IN F'ACUt.rA TE

Wa lter C. Zeuch

I\I au rice D. Orten FRATRES IN UNIVERS ITATE

A. P. Berry C. A. Freeman

M. H. Layne \\'. H. Schweick hardt J. S. \Vi lAcy

H. Histed

Spuial

c;. F. \\'anenm achcr C. E. Gutkc S. S. Hansen

Sophomores

0. \\'. ;\1orris

J. \'. Sundstro m 'J. F. Tamm

Frulzmen

H. F. Kirkpatr :ck S. C. Osborne P. B. Mudgett T. G. Calloway

E. S. T owle C. E. Wilhite K. L. llenry A. R. Maune


PI K APPA ALPHA


CIII ALPIIA

:\LPHA DrJLTA ZETA CHAPTER lnstal!t•d .1prilli, !917 FRATRE:~ IN FA Ct I. lA I"E:

Dr. \\'. D. Turner

FRA'I'RE S IN UNI\'I::RSI l'Al'f.

E. C. H unze Smi(JrJ

R. L. Hallows J. H. Reid

llugh Thomas

j. F. Smith H. D. Thomas

Julli(Jrs

K. A. Allebach

1..

J.

Hurl(

H . H. ~ ewcombe

Sophom(Jrn

B. E. Orchard

Frnlmun

J.

C. Brown A. P. Cooper J. H. Lofton M.

F. E. Tucker

J. Macauley

R. E. Tucker W. E. \Varson C. M. I l e~s E. J. Gregory


L AlVI BD A CHI ALPH A


GRUBST AKE RS

l路oundrd Srpumlm 15, /90!

Crnduulu A. H. Keuchler

R. E. H ilpert

R. (;. O'J\Icara A. \\'. \>\'alk~:r

E. II . Cook

E. ( ;ammeter

L. T.

larincr

7uniors

R. P. Baumgartner P. H. Delano

j . 0. Lcm

H. H. Brittingham: \\'. C. Keniston

SopllomfJru

\\'. L. Couch R. C. ~tiller

L. \V. Pickles L. H. King l路ruhmtn

P. G. Schuchman II. I. H artnagel

Pact Nintly-Jix

F. F. l\'etnband E.

J.

Kroll


Pa:t Nincty-INMn


BONA Z A CLU B

FRATRE~ t:.. F~cl LtAn;

Dr. C. E. Banblcy

Smiors

D. L. Ar r:t C. F. Boismcnue E. R. Cushing

T. IIerman II. l\!. D iers

E. R. Sievers R. D. Sullivan

]u11iors

R. K. Grantham

E. C. l\Jiller E. F. Sewell

H . B. i\toreland SopllfmJIJrrs

II. D. Adkisson J. L. Bremmer L. B. Bowman H. L. Campbell

~ 1. L. Clark R. S. Dittmer

G. \\'. Sack H. \\'. SchatTner

Fr(slmu11 \\'.H. Ellis 0. D. Gibbons F. L. H awkins C. L. M arrin

Poet Nintl)l-<'igltt

G. \\'. 1'\elson

R. F. P artridge E. l\1. Ray Wallingionl

1..



PROSPECTO R CLUB

Seniors II. F. Bossert

F. "-.. Scydler

7uniors

J. G.

Donaldson H. E. Gross J.P. Harmon C. F. Herbert G. C. J ohnson

1• L. Ko:tlinsky G. T. McCrorey W. 1.. Metcalf M. E. Suhre R. H. Sturgess

So pl1omores M. C. Christine A. Mueller

L. U. Mueller K. R. ~cal

Frtslmun M. Olmstead A. Brent

E. H. flrigham j. W esley


PROSPECTO R CLU B

I'act O•t

n..nJwi o,,


CL UB

Smiors

H. Gunther

Juniors

J. E.

P. A. 1-hlasey

Weber

SopiJomorn

C. G. H uetcr J. R.J arboe R. G. Kern \ 1. \'.Thompson J. H . \\'iltlgen

0. G. Brewer R. B. Donze ÂŁ.A. Godat \\'. B. Hollow J. B. Heubncr Frrsltmm

A. J. Doll F. T. Douglas G. A. Ernst

~ 1.

\'. J. Grafton

F. \ l urphey F. T. Murray A. E. Koch


MERCIER CLUB


ARGONAUTS

ERNEST

A. CRAWFORD

R At.PH \ \' . CAMrBEt.L

Th~ta

Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Wal>hingron University

Washington Universit}

OSCAR

D.

Xi

NIEDERMEYER

SHIRl.ÂŁ \ '

A.

L YNCH

Sigma Clti

Kappa Delta Chi

Illinois Wesleyan College

J:1mes Millikan College

SAMIJEL

A. G~tA~"fHA\1

FLOYD

GERARD

Tlula Kappa Xu

Etta Tluta Pi

Westminster College

\\'cstminsrer College

D OROIIIY

Al.tcr. Sir.vr.RS

PM ,\1u, Universil)' of '\ew Mexico

Pagt Ont II udud Four

A.


Honorarg and Professional


T AU B ETA Pr

BETA OF MISSOURI f'RATRES IS tJRUI'

1-1. A. Buehler I I. C. Brckmnn V. L. Austen fo:. S. Wheelt•r

Vv. A. Werner

/nsla/led Decemb(r, /906

L. E. Garrett, Mo. 13. R. 0. J~:~ck80n, Mo. B.

K. K.

Kcrshn~r.

M11. 13.

C. V. Mann, Colli. B. Cl. A. Muilcnberg, Mo. 13. D. ~·. Walsh. l\lo. B. R. M. Rankin, Mo. B.

f'RATIU!S IS J'ACVLTA1"H

C. G. C. C.

Y. Clayton, Mo. B. R. Dean, Mo. B. R . .Forbes, Mich. B. H. Fulton, N. Y. A.

Pa1,t One Hundrtd Six

)1k.\1"1\ES IN lTNIYHOITI\H

Lt:. G:.mmct•r E. C.llun>.e

f.M. Wilron H. B!icken&Nf..r 1', Cl<·arrnnn R. E. llilpm P. K. lloover N. 0. 1\.mfl f'. II. <.''lnl•r R. r.. llallow' II. II. Kavt'lrr R. i\ lnbrey

M.

.J.

J>nul

J. E. Antener P. G.

Wadd~!l

J. R. \Vnlrlll'r Pl.ti)CF•

11. I I. Brittimcham R. \\'. Couch P. II. lklnno 1·:. C. Miller F. 1•:. s,.wdl W, S Tctnl"kt


TH ETA T AU

IOTA CHAPTER I IONORAJlY ME>tBBII.S I I. A. Buchler C. V. Mnnn FRATRES IN UROE

LI.L.lM!nard

E. K. Schuman E. S. Wheeler fRATRes IN UNJVP.RSITATE

R. 1'. .Baumgattntr t>. J. Boyer E.~- Cu•hin~

H . M. Diers W. B. Davis F. A. Gernrd T. Herman R. J:o;. Hilpert H , l!isted H. R. Kilpatrick C. F. Luckfield

W. A. McCanless R. F. McCaw

]. II. Reid

J.• f. Smith

r. P. Smith

I nsta//(d December, 1915 II ugh Thomas

N. 0. Kraft I . H. Brickner 'R. W. Couch L.j. Burg

M. B. U)'OC G. T. McCrorey

\\ . B. M;~chin

F. E. Sewell

E. F. Thntcher

PLti>CI'.S

0. \V. Morrio A. H. Kemp E. j. Gregory E. C. Faulkn<r W. S.Tcmpleo D. W.Smith R. C. Miller R. K. Grantham J. V: Sundstrom L. K. Snyder Dr. W. D. Turner Dr. C. H. Fulton

l'att On1 Hundred SNIOI


K APPA PHI

M. S. M. CHAP TER

FACUI.T Y

H . H. Armsbr

C. H. Fulton

J. \V.

E. G. llarris

B:1rle)'

ÂŁ. \\'. Carlton

R. 0. J nckson

C. Y. Cla)' ton

K. K. Kershner

C. L. Dake

C. V. Mann

G. R. Dean

G. A. Muilcnbe r -1

C. R. Forbes

L. T. Schrenk

T. H . Frame

\\'. D. Turner

GRAOU ATE STUDEN TS

E. C. Hume

M. K. Underwood


On the Campus

Patt Ont IIN111im/ Ni111


Q UO VADI

ANO I JUNGLE Colors:

Black and Blue

Bor ()s f' \Cn:rv ·• Bontt" Cl•yton

non "\\ olr' All(bach ''Robo'' Roitmenue

" IAX>cr, I" Hurg

"lk<y 'ClearmAn "llcrb" J)i(n

.. Gam" Garnmct~r

"Sam" llods<fon

\lotto:

"Cho~lkr"

llnlman .. 1\.t"nny" 1\.rniaton "Biattty" \ltCaulcy ":\1•c" \I<Cmr•~ "Willy" \!•chin "l..tx,.;> II " \lrtcall "l'r:tnuta" PtuRntt

" I· rrnlclr" Srydlrr "Rip'' Sullivan "Clank" \V till "llughic" 'J'homu

Please 1\1 urn

Flflwtr:

"Sammy" \\ uthtman

Boo.s Es ROt Tt; "T\\irrs" Camphcll "TufTy" l>illmtr "Soak u

( •rt~'Ot)

"Joe" Jorbn< ..Ancient'" ~1aunH r ' Rob" \1ycra " Loocy Ill " \lucllrr "Shony" Smith

Dog Fennel

Km• "1~-r.

1\ "\\"ohtro "f•ror • Kc,..hncr "Cornllakc•" \tiller "(ina ld" Rol>cru ·(;(nr" \'I<rliniC "Shurty '' Krrnp "John it" ll ucbncr u(~)()sco·· ~!orris

"Hnld ly" Templet


L. A. Ao"mnn R. L. Camphcll i\f. C. Chris1inc E. J, Crum E. T. Grogory l.. M. llaynrr

A. L . .l\kRa.

<.:. S. l\!arviJJ

R. C. Miller 0. W. Morris

J. S. R•~tcr

J\1. A. Sharp :---1. F. Tamm

N. S. V.ll!iams W. B. Hollow

). R. Jarboe

PL&l>CP.S

R. S. l1i11mor 1.. II. Sebum \\'. lhcwer

Pa,t Ont 1/unrlrtd f:.'lttJtn


MI SSOU R I MIN ER

STAFF

J.

E. McCauley ........... ............ C. F. Luckfield.__ .• ..... .... .......

Editor .. .....Busines s Manager

NEWS D EPARTM ENT

C. A. Freeman ....... .. ......... ............. ......... ............ .. ........... Associat e Editor Prof. C. Y. Clayton ......... ...·-· -·-. .... ........ ....... ... ..... Alumni E. R. Cushing........ ......... --··· ....... . ..... . . . ... . . ....... ... ....... Sports H. Histed... ......................................................................................... Assistan t C. Gutke.... . .. ............... . ... ..... ... ... .................... ...... Assistant F. H arringto n............ . ············- ........................ . Assisltml R. B. Donze ........... ........... ........... ........... ..... .............. ............... Assistan t

F EAT U RE DEPART MENT

J. E.

McCauley Editor C. A. Freeman ..... _.......................... .................................................... .. Assistant

B uS I NESS MANAGE MENT

R. P. Baumga rtner ... ..... • .. .. .• .. .. . .. •• ..• . .. . .Asst. Business Mgr. P. H. Delano ...... · - .........--·· .. . ....... ..... .... ... .Adoertising Mgr. H. B. Moreland ........ .......... ............ ..•. ............. ........... ... ... .. Circulat ion Mgr. C. W. Ambler ..• .......... .. -·-· .. ... Asst. Circulation Mgr. M. B. Layne ........... ......... ......... ......... .... ..............Aut. Circulal ion Mgr. C. C. J uhre .......... ............ . . ..... ................................... Ass/. Circulat ion Mgr. R. C. Miller ... ...... . . .......... . .... . . ..... . . .. Assl. //doer/ising Mgr. G. E. Grays ..... -·· ..... . ............. ....... . ....... Asst. AdoertiJ i11g Mgr.

Dr. J. W. Barley. .......... ............. ........... ............... . H. Reid .. .. .. . .. _ . .......... ...... . ............ ...... E. C. Miller. .. ................................................. E. Gam meter -· .... ....... .. .. . ....... ....... .

J.

. ... Faculty Advisor Contribming Editor . Contributir~g Editor Cartoonist


TIJE MI SOURI

The Missouri Miner i~ publi~hcd once a week. Through this periodical the student body is kept informed as to all the scandal and gore of rhe town ami of rhc school. The smff is to he congratulated on the excellent publications of rhe year. The llomecoming Number, Football ~ umber and St. Par"s ~umher wcr~ vcr) well received.

PtJr~ O•t llu•drrJ Thort~"'


AlVIERICA

SOCI ETY OF CIVIL E N GINEER S

The iVIissouri School of Mines Student Chapter was organized in the spring of 1924 by C. W. B. Sittler. Soon after its beginning it promoted the first inspection trip for Civil Engineers. At the suggestion of the Student Chapter this C. E. Senior Inspcction Trip" as made a requirement for graduation becoming effecrive in 1926. T he purpo!>e of rhe Student Chapter is to further the study of Civil Engineering in the school. T he Society has a 100% enrollment of all J unior and Senior C. F.. students. It is not unusual for the members ro make talks before the organization. T his G:ives the men a chance to become accustomed to speaking before an audience and to keep well informed on engineering subjects. Prominent engineers have been persuaded to speak before the local organization but this year they only succeeded in procuring one outside speaker, Mr. \\'. G. Heltzel, who is promient in the oil game. Mr. H eltzel also spoke before the student bod} and the A. L ~ l. E. Association.

HONORARY r-.1EMBE RS

E. G. Harris C. V. Mann

J. B. Butler H. C. Beckman

T. G. McCarthy OFFI CERS

A. T. SM ITII

00

0

••

j OHI'l \ VAt. l"HERS...

j . E.McCAuL£V

-

Pt·esidmt f/iu-l'residm l Secretary-Treamrer

0

• • -· •• ·····-···· •

--·

• ----·-·.

M EMB E I~ S

H. Blickensderfer II. F. Bossert E. \V. Carlton 13. L. Chancy II. 1\ I. Diers F. A. Gerard R. Gunther J. R. Walther J. W. l.aytham C. F. Luckfield .J . E. McCauley L. T . Mari ner 11 . Tl. Newcombe R. I I. Oster R. M. Rankin L. M. R obison

A. T. Smith

J. H . Brickner ).. J. Burg R. C. Dodge F.. C. Faulkner J. F. Gage

J.

R. I !eckman A. L. ll ill j . 0. !.em W. B. 1\lachin H. B. 1oreland R. P. Palmer V. M. Roloff" Dorothy A. Sievers J. W. Smith L. K. Snyder R. A. Scheer

In consequence of the existence of the Student Chapter of American Society of Civil Engineers at this school the St. Louis and Kansas City sections of A.S.C. E. have offered 11 J unior Membership in the .'\.S.C.E. with entries and first year's dues paid to a senior from this school submitting the best article on a Civil Engineering subject.


SOCIETY OF CIVTL E JG I I EI~RS

I'ott Ont 1/undm/ Fiftttn


THE ROLLAMO BOARD

A. E. Bnrnnrd, Editor-in-CI:icf E. A. Crnwford, Businns Mamlgtr D. W. Smith, Circumtion ,'.fgr. R. R. Gnst, Ass/. Cimdation \ fgr. II. L. H icks, Ass/. Adttrtising /ifgr. V. S. Christine, Aut. Advertising Mgr.

C. F. Eoismenue, dsst. Organization Mgr.

R. S. Dittmer, , /ut. Org~tniuztion iHgr. C. L. King, /sst. Orgmuuztion Mgr. E. R. Cushing, ..lthlrtir Editor J. P. H nrmon, P/10/ogmplltr Joe Schneider, Artist


Mi r ÂŁN G A D M E TALLURG IC AL A S OC JAT IO

W. A. M cCANI,ES:.

c. L. D AKE

P. K. l loovER It M.

MAIIREY

Prnidm1 IIice-Pri!Jidml Secrtlllr" Trrtlmrcr

The officers of rhe A. I.M.F:., with the aid of rhe local members obtain men to speak before the Association at this school. There have but a few speakers this year, but these few were first rare speakers and stand high in their particular line oi engineering. The meetinl(s are usuall) in the form of smokers. Th1s type seems to appeal to members of the local organization. t\frer the speaking has been completed a hot lunch is usuall) served. The attendance of the meetings has al"ays been near 100c,. The membership consists of all J unior and Senior ;\liner" and ~l erallur!l:i\rs. The Speaker:. of the year were as follows: \1 r. A. S. E. Corbett l\l r. ] . H. Steinmensh

l\l r. R. G. Knickerbocker l\l r. \\'. (j, Heltzel

/ 13(f

Oor 1/umfmJ Sr.-rnlrm


Pr·esident Vice-Presidmt Secretar.r Treamrtr

PA UL WEBER •..•

W. K. ScHWEICKHARIYr C. B. W EISS . E. H. CooK .

The membership consists of all Chemical Enl(inccrin(o( students.

C. B. Weiss H. H . Kaveler R. W. Cavanaugh Fred Lane D. Walsh \V. K. Schweickhanlt H. L. Dunlap

PtJ(t OM flunJmJ Eit/rlmt

W. T. Schrenk

J.

t\lonroc •·.. C. ll unzc P. (;. Waddell \\'. D. Turner J. A. Spalding C.

F.. II. Cook

J. t\1. Wilson J. E. Antener K. K. Kershner P. Weber N. L. Ko:.dinsky


B. L. CuANEY .. -··· ............... ·····-····~·········-···-·················~·.. N. 0. KRAt~r.........................·-···-....... ..........................

f/iu.Prtsidtml

M. ].

and Trtamrcr

PAUL............ - .........-

M. C. Ledford A. E. Barnard S. S. Hansen N. 0. Kraft ]. H. Reid F. K. Scydler R. E. Hilpert C. F. Boismenue

.............................. ... - •.•..• .. Secretary

Prnident

R. Gunther B. L. Chane) F. Clearman S. A. Lynch \\'. A. ~lcCanlcss

M.J. Paul

J. R. Walther C. B. Weiss

Patt Ont llunJud

Nittt1U1t


ATHL ETIC A S OCIAT IO

C. F.

B oJSMENll'

Prnidmt

L. A. Cv路rrER

Viu-l'rnid mt

W. L. Rus HMORE

. ... ..

,\{anagrr

] l NIORS ANI) SOJ>HOMOIU' ~

C. W. Ambler \\'. L. \letcalf

II. L. Harrod \\'. B. H ollow

H. B. Moreland M. C. Christine R. S. Ditmer

J. J arboe

PatrOn~ llut~dud

Trttnly

R. V. Ma r tin P. T . Moulder


SQ UAR E AND CO M P ASS

Ml SSOURI SCHOOL OF MINES SQLJAHE OF SQUA R E A D COMPASS J>rnidmt

II. G. Kot.w.,;v

flirr-Prrsidml

R. G. O'~ I EARA ­ ;\1.

Strrtlllr.''

J. P At'l• ••••

\'. R. Hinsch o\. I I. Keuchler C. R. Forhcs

J.

R. l.ee R. 1'.. I hlpcrt R. G. 0' \ lcara

J. B. Butler

~l uilenberg

H. L. Dunlap

G. A.

J. ~1. Paul C. E. Bardsley \\'. D. Turner J. \1. \\'ilson \\". T . Schrenk

J. D. C1mcron H. G. 1\.nlwa~ B. L. Ch:tney F. h. Decker \\ . :\. ~ l cCanles~


We all will remember " Bill's" orchestra as having been the producers of some mean and fancy music during the year. They displayed rare and clever work on all the latest numbers. It will also he remembered that the members willingly offered their services to the M.S.M. Players and to the J unior class in the promotion of Sr. Pat's. T he members of the Orchestra are: " Bill" Schweickhard t, Drums and Director " Ken" Gray, Saxaphone and Violin

"Fat" Potter, Bass

"Peewee" Gutke, Trumpet

"Charlie" H ueter, Piano

" Red" Hoover, Banjo

" H appy" Zell, Saxophone


TH E CO LL EG IANS

their line playing all year. Under rhe T he "Coll egian s" will be long remembered nftcr did some renl syncopating nnd helped the year capahle direction of Frank Seydler the orchestra as offering their service~ to the Junio r class and a real socinl success. T hey arc to remembered } work. to any other organi7ation that deserved chnrit The orche stra consisted of the following: "Fran kie" ScydJer, Piano and Direc tor " Bob" Sherrill, Trum pet

"L. R." Reeves, Trum pet "Jim" Smith , Banjo

"Van " Van Scivers, Saxophone :tnd Trom bone "Bird ie" Partridge, Saxophone "r\cal " Faulk ner, Saxophone

"llola nd" Tucke r, Drums


..

M. S. M. PLAYE RS

T he M.S.M. are the dramat ic guild of the school. T his worth) organiz ation nor only furnishes the school and townspeople with good amusem ent bur manas;(e to help the juniors put on a bigger and better St. P at's and to suppor t themse lves. D ue ro fact that no girls volunte ered to take the female parts in the plays, these purrs \\ere very well taken by some of the " Weake r" membe rs of the "Strong er ex." Since the membership is compet itive a strong organization has been perfect ed. All the membe rs are constnn tly working to further the: succ<.s~ of the organiz ation. The membership of the P layers for 1926-1 9li is:

J. E. McCauley

PrnideJ.I

Ruth Camero n

f/ice-Prnident

S. D. llodgdon

Busines s

,\ /anag~r

1.. R . Springer

Stage

1\1/am~ger

R. A. Scheer

Properl_y Manager

Prof. L. \V. Currier

Director FACULT Y

11. H . Armsby STUDEN TS

J. W. Bnrley NoN-ST UDENT S

R . L. Campb ell

Miss R uth Camero n

R. S. D itt mer

M iss Doroth y C ul ber tso n

S. D . H odgdon

.l\Jiss Queenie Bottom

J. E. McCau ley J. H. lleid

Miss j osephin e E llis M iss Nell Kitchen

L. R. Springe r

Miss Lorraine Love

W. K. Schweickhard t

M iss Helen Underw ood

R. A. Scheer

Pott O.u H undrtd Twtnty-fowr


THE M.S. M.

student The two plays " In the 7-one" and "The Glittering Gate" were presented tO the the under were plays Both year. the of attempt body by t he M.S.M. Players as their initial These ces. pcrform:m excellent direction of Prof. L. \\'. Currier who is to be complimen ted on the in that plays were of a little different type than the usual run of plnys presented b)路 the Pl:t)'ers there was little or no humor in either of them. realist ic, " In the Zone" was t)路pical of all the rest of Eugene G. 0':-.leil's plays, in that it W:tl> he drew his and dealt with man's relation to his fellowmen and with strife among men. As at various working while s experience and hardships plays almost entirely from his own numerous and drama of t)'pe strongest occupation s all over t he world, it is no wonder that they are the that they are realistic and sordid. T he setting for " In the Zone" is the forecastle of the British tramp steamer, Glenc;tirn, suspected of about midnight in the fall of 191 5. On account of his shady actions, Smitty is point that being a Ger man SP)' and this suspicion grows upon the members of the crew to the , explosives expected the containing of instead finally t hey tie him and open his strong box which, life. his of story the told contained only some of Smitty's private correspond ence which , L. \\'. The cast included R. S. Di ttmer, A. C. Adolph, R . L. Campbell, J. \ '. Sundstrom ynch. L A. S. and Morris, W. Currier, T. D. Murphy, 0. 's T he second play given was "The Glittering Gate," written b>路 Lord Dunsany. Dunsan) . He plays arc all highl y imaginativ e, full of strong effective unfamiliar lands and characters exception no was play This fatalistic. works much for atmospher e and his plays are somewhat to the rule. J im nnd The play takes place in a lonely spot with none present except two dead burglars, ahead goel> him, :; Rill. Bill finds the gate of Heaven close at hand and while Jim discourage find that is and forces it ope n with a "jimmy." Both men quickly drag open t he doors only to that they nothing on the other side. Their limited intelligence does not allow them to realize that decide final!} thcr and world this in s can never find Heaven on account of their wickednes there is no Heaven. J. A. Spalding, as " J im" and L. \\', Currier, as " Bill," made up the cast. to be T he St. Par's play " \Vappin' Wharf," was excellently presented b)' the Players only drawn and long was play he received in the most dishearten ing manner b) all those present. T acting. out and for this reason most of the audience fniled to appreciate the fineness of the Pirates The action takes place on rhe windswep t coast of Devon. The wind howls, the D nrlin' cuss with broad masterful cuss words, and the grog goes round and round the circle. to, love is makes grog like Anheuser- Busch used to make, the Captain drinks like Fnlstaff used stories. olmes' H Sherlock of one with compares made like Valentino used to; and the mystery

H. L. The cast included; 0. W. Morris, R. S. D ittmer, S. A. Lynch, W. H. Schweickh ardt, Harrod, A. L. ~feRae, D. W. Smith, and J. \'. Sundstrom .


CO-EDS

I rene Wood Blickensderfer Blanche L. Bradford 1\l::u-r P hariss Bradford Dorris R yan J ones Edith C. J ones Irene V. Leonard

F rances 't. l\Iann Leola f.audrce M illar Agnes C. Nawn Mary E. Powell Edna Fun ke Rolnff

Ruth E. Schumor\

' adine M . Sease D orothy Alice Sievers Mabel \\'. Swenson Katherine E. White Mabel W. Zcuch


Militar~


MILITA RY

KE~>NF.rH M. :\1oORE,

Capt11in Corps oi Engineers, U.S.A. Professor of Military Science and Tactics L Ewts L. l\l cKIMMEY, MaJirr Signal R!rrtrician, Retired, U.S.A . Assistant to Professor of ~lilit:tr}路 Science and T actics.

f-~OWARI>

II.

t:irstU. Corps of Engineers, U.S.A. Assistant Professor of ~ l ilitary Science and T actics. WALn:R,

ARTH\.R Scorr, Tcclmiwl Sn-grant, U.S.A. Instructor in ~1ilitar)' Science and T nclir,.


R. 0. T. C.

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps comprises the units established in school~> and colleges throughout our countr)' as feeders for the corps of reserve officers needed by our national defense policy. The training course as offered by the government through the schools is not onlr helpful to the government as a source of supply o f future officers, but is an education in itself to the student. The United States is divided up into corps areas and the R.O.T.C. unit :u the t .S.l\1. is in the Seventh Coa路ps Area. At the present time there are about two hundred and fifty R. 0. T.C. units in the leading colleges and universities of the country. These units have produced about thirty t housand reserve officers and expect to produce about five thousand more each year. The unit at M.S.i\1. consists of one hundred and sixty men. Of this number, thirty-nine are advanced course students consisting of J uniors and Seniors, while the remainder of the unn is made up of basic course students consisting of Freshmen and Sophomores. The malitar} course offered at this school is strictly engineering and when the full four years have been completed the student receives a commission as Second Lieutenant, E ngineer Section, Officers' Reserve Corps. There are nineteen seniors in the advanced corps and all of them will probabl} receave a commission. The highest honor that can be received in the advanced course is to be appointed Cadet Major. Through the Director and with the consent of the Board of Curator~ the student receiving the rank of Major is exempt from all fees and deposits required during the Senior )'Car. This scholarship was won hy ed 0. Kraft who is Cadet ~1ajor of the Battalion. The unit is organized into a bnttalion of four companies with :1 bartalion staff nnd company All Seniors arc cadet officers; Jun iors are non-commissioned officers; Sophomores, corporals an d first class privates. In this manner the men receive a higher rank every year as

offi cers.

they advance in the work and is the ideal way of organizing the students. This system was started last year. At eight o'clock ever) Saturday morning the entire battalion is formed for drill. At this hour the cadet officers tnke full charge of the drilling with the aid of the regular officers of the army. The work for the morning has been previously outlined for each commander and this schedule is followed for that period. By allowing the students to do the drilling, they receive well directed instr uction in leadership and the ability to appear before others in well poised manner.

It is the general impression among outsiders th:tt the course offered consists entirel) of drilling. As a matter of fact the drilling is the smallest part of the traming. Three hours a week are spent in the class room where the technical subjects concerning militarr arc taught. This training is of much economical ,路aluc to the student as well us instrunion in n militar) course.


R. 0. T . C.

TH E AOVA JCF. D CORP

OFFICERS

Cadet Major, N. 0 .

K RAfT

Cadet Captain, A. T .

SMITH

Cadet Captain, It A.

j OHNSON

Cadet Caplnin, 1.. R.

S i•RtNGER

Cadet Ctlptain, R. F.

~ lcCAw

Cadet C11pt11in, A.

E.

B ARNARD


R. 0 . rf. C.

..


Captain, KENNETH M. MooRE, Corps of Engineers Professor of Militnr} Science and Tactics.

First Lieutenant, EDWARD H . \ YALTER, Corps of Engineers Assistant P rofessor of M ilirnry Science and Tactics.

Technical Sergeant, ARTHUR ScoTT Instructor

Master Sergeant, LEWIS L.

M cKIMMEY, R etired L ist

Assistant to rhe Professor of Military Science and Tactics.

Cadet Maior,

ED

0.

K RAFT

Commanding R.0.T.C. Battalion

Cadet Captain, ALFRED T. SMITH

COMP A

Y A

Cadet Captain, A. E. B ARNARD Cadet First Lieutenant, S. D. H oDGDON Cadet Second Lieutenant, J. W. SMITH Cadet Second Lieutenant, W. L. R IJSHMORE Cadet First Sergeant, J. R. H ECKMAN Cadet Sltif/ Sergeants

P.

J.

Boyer

E. C. Miller Cad(! SergMnts \V. K. Schweickhardt

J. 0. Letts Cad(! Corporals C. E. Gutke ]. H. Hahn C. \V. Johnson D. W. Smith M. E. Suhre F. E. Tucker

Cadtt Priuatts, Firs/ ClaJS G. W . Courtney J. B. H uebner 0. W. Morris E. B. O'Brien

Cndtt Priuatu

W. L. Andrews W. J. Bercher C. B. Breckenridge J. L. Bremmer A. Brenr E. R. Brigham F. B. Chase F. T. Douglass F. Edgin W. H. Ellis 1.. R. Lacy R. M. Lac} E. C. Long K. II. McFann A. R. ~launc E. M. Ra> E. T. Regcnhanlt C. E. Ross W. J. Saba L. G. Tennies E . S. T owle R. E. Tucker


R. 0. T . C.

COMP ANY B

Cadet Captain, R. A. J oHNSON Cadet Fh·st Lieutenant, C. F. BoiSMENU E Cadet Second Lieutenant, C. F. L ucKrrELD Cadet Second Lieutenant, H. D. Cadet Fit·st Set-geant,

Cadet Striff Sergeants J. G. D onaldson S. A. Grantham Cadel Sergeanls S. S. Hansen R W. Couch Cadet Corporals H. C. Bolon R. A. Bryant W. B. H ollow H. G. J ones C. R. Palstring M.A. Sharp Cadet Privates, First Class G. F.. Crays \V. L. D ake W. C. J ones H. R. Osterwald L. W. Pickles J. II. Wildgen

.J. S.

T HOMAS

WrLFLEY

Cadet Prioatu \V. L . Bradr W. B. Dimond W. Farrar H. E. H anlon J. F. Grafron A. P. H eiser H. L. H icks H. Kirkpatrick R. Kirkpatrick F. McCarthy C. L. l\l:min ~ 1. ]. Macauley D. H. Miller P. E. M oore G. A. Page R. P. Palmer L. E. Reeve R. \'ierling G. C. White

I'a •t

Q,., f1 tHtdrtJ Tltirtyo~Art~


COM P ANY C

Cadet Captain, L. R. SPRIN GER Cadet First Lieutenant, C. L. WooD s Cadet Second Lieutenant, L. A. Cadet Second Lieutenant, T. H Cadf't Fit路st Sergeant, C. \\'.

Cad~/

Staff Sergeants R. P . Baumg nrtner

j. F. Orr Cadet Sergeants

L. J. Burg J. F. Gage Cadet Corporals

R. S. Dittme r II. C. Page R. H. P:trkcr G. W. Talley W. S. T en p ies \V. S. W alter

Cadet PriVfltrs, l.'i rsl Class F.. .J. Crum J. R. J arboe C. TI. J enning s [c. A. M cCurdy A. l\luellc r

PoKt Ont l!undm l Tlt.iny-four

CuTT ER ERMA:-:'

AMBI. ER

Cadet Pricau s W.

E.

Bro:tch

W. C. Cantre ll M. 1.. Clark D. II. Crumb augh J. C. D efoe E. H. E pperso n

G. A. Ernst R. H . Gast

G. E. Heath C. \1. H ess I I. ll ultz C. C. Ju hrc E. J. Kro ll C. \\'. ~lcCaw R. D. M cNail W. R. Powell F. B. Schult-t. L. l\1. Wallin gford

J.


R. 0 . T . C.

COMPANY D Cadet CtJptain, R. F.

M cCA '"

Cadet First Lieutenant, R. A.

ScHEER

Cadet Second Lieutenant, F. H. CoN LH

J. E. McCAULEY Cadet Second Lieutenant, J. 0. L EMON

Cadet Second Lieutenant,

Cadet First Sergeant, C. L.

Cadet Staff Sergeants

]. J. Li vingston B. Y. Slates Cttdet Srrf(l!fiiiiJ A. T . Rcrr)'

11. A. Moreland Cadet Corpomls

II. M. Alis house ~1. C. Christine A. T. Gardner A. ll. Kn1p \\'. B. '\lachin J. T. t>owcll

Cadtt Pricnlts, First Class

R. B. Oon7e A. 1.. ~lcRae \1. \ '. Thompson 1.. F. \ 'an Scivt•r P. T. ~l oulder

SALLEY

Cadet Privates

W. R. Brewer T. G. C:tlloway W. S. Depcnbrink G. W. Douglas T. J. Dover C. W. Grate C. J. Grimm F. ll. H :mington R . J. Hopp A. E. Koch J. L. M cCumher G. G. Maggi

E. ~ lceka T. R. ~ ! organ F. T. ).Jurray T. \\'. Rubortom C. Smith ]. \\ esler R. E. \\'ood E. H. \\'ooJm:tn

/'Qtt O•t 1/o.,tJml Tltir v-fiot


R.O. T. C. CAMP, 19 26

On June I I the inhabitants of the Swedish settlements of St. Pau l and Min neapolis were astonished, startled, bewildered and surprised by the invasion of their peaceful Scandinavian communities h> a horde of collegiates from the middle west, some arriving b>• train, riding either the cushions or blinds, while others came in more elegant style of piloting slightly extinct yet tastefully decorated flivvers. Among this mob of embr)'O soldiers on rhe way to Fort Snelling were nineteen students of the Missouri School of Mines, who, having performed various feats for the medicnl deparrmenr, were then properly clothed and domiciled in Colonel Welsh's Camp for Collegiate Cadets. \>\'hereupon began rhc search for know ledge of soldiering. Major Lt!ntt. began this training in infantry drill by the introduction of his famous leather-lunged cadence system, altho one of the majors present objected to "so damn much noise." Another jo)' spot of camp was Colonel Mumma's rifle range and it is said that such hills as there are in ;\1innesota are still reverhcrating to his vocal booming, "\\'ith Ball Cartridges Load!" Demolitions, trenches, entanglements, reconnaisance, sketching, and bridges filled the program for the engineer platoon, D-3, which consisted of Engineer students from Iowa U., Ames, Kansas U., and M.S.M ., under the excellent leadership of Lieut. II. J . Casey. I n connection with the construction of a pontoon bridge across the Minnesota River, a boat race using the awkward pontocns was held. T his race was won by the Miner's stalwart crew, consisting of Wightman, Cammack, Slates, :0.1ariner, Livingston, Hodgdon and ~lcCaule). Athlerich plared a prominent part in the Camp activities. The ~ l iners showed up well in wrestling, baseball, track and swimming. T he Miners achieved most instant fame by virtue of their exceptional vocal accomplishments, and the chorus composed of'' selected cast of tenors, baritones, monotones, and under tones, with Dingus ~1cReynolds on the banjo, received immediate acclaim. Calltain Moore and Lieutenant Walter accompanied the ;\l iner aggregation and were apparently well pleased with the ~howing of these nineteen members of the class of '69, particular!) the perfect 100 per cent record in discipline wh ich t he Miners rated.

..


0

St. Pat's

l'act O.u 1/wntiml T4irty-u~•


...

Pace 0 ru 11 unJrcJ T.'. nrrty-citht


ST. P AT'S O UEE ~

~1iss

Loraine Love !JlUEEN

of SdJNT PATRICK 1927


ST. P AT'S

ST . P AT'S, 1927 It is customary that men of a certain profession should celebrate and pay homage to the greatest man of that profession. It is more than that. It is fitting and a ltogether proper that they should do this. That is why the biggest day in the M.S.M. Engineers¡ calendar is M arch 17th. \\'hen that day came this year all dail> toil was stopped and all true and loyal engineers paid homage to the one and only St. Pat., who as every one knows, visits this school annually on the da)' when with the greatest of engineering ingenuity he drove the snakes from Ireland. In this way he acquired the title of saint and became the patron of all engineers for never before nor since has such an engineering feat been attempted. Jt deserves the utmost of anention and his visit to Rolla is an honor which the most distingJished of men strive to secure. The venerable old bard, accompanied as usual by a retinue of his faithful followers garbed in fitting costumes, arrived at the Grand Central Station, where many of his loyal enthusiasts wept with joy at seeing their far famed lender. After a stirring welcome St. Pat. mounted his chariot and :ICcompanied with guards and pages, lead the parade through the streets of fair Rolla and finally to Parker H all where he gave greetings to the school and its guests. Once more great credit is due co the ignoble Quo\' ad is "Kids" for the safe-guarding all year of that ancient and far famed ninth wonder of the world the Blarney Stone. Several times in years gone by, the Blarney Stone has been stolen bur each time, after a great expenditure of mind and money it has been recovered. Once it was taken just before the date set for St. Pat's visit, and on arriving here and hearing of the great catastrophe he was very nngry and exceedingly harsh with the M.S.M. students. l t is snid that he threatened never to come bock if it was lost again and so every one is more than glad to see it safely guarded. Then in due form Sr. Pat knighted, presented with a pin and sheepskin, and reprimanded in a fatherly way all of his senior sons. After the last one had kissed the Blarney Stone, the ceremony in due reverence ended. That afternoon the corned)•, "\\'appin \Vharf" was presented at Parker H all by the 1Vl.S.M. Players. Its presentation of pirate life in the days gone by was portrayed with no little ability and it won the applause of the pleased house. The crowning feature of rhe St. Pat's festivities was the St. Pat's Ball that night, which rivaled in beauty and splendor any of those of his previous visits. T he Gymnasium was turned into a joy-hunter's paradise, decorated in the most ingenious way with a pleasant arrangement of color combinations. The lighting effects could in no way have been better, and it could be easily seen that St. Pat was pleased with the efforts of his J uniors. R ed and green and gold cloth was suspended around the walls, and the ceiling, dome shaped, was studded with the vnricolored lights, that kept up a constant change and produced a very ple:1sing effect. And such pretty guests! Fair damsels from the world over came to make this a bigger and better celebration and it is due these joy-makers that the dance was the astounding success it was. Beauties of every description were there. Blonds, (gentlemen prefer them, they say) brunettes -dark ladies, light ladies-every type was represented. Lovers, perhaps since childhood, were seen in an evident state of bliss. Other couples less fortunate, (t)r is it more?) while not in the same sort of bliss were enjoying a thrill of a lifetime. Just before mid-night St. Pat was announced and the crowd gave way as he approached his throne. The dancers were then commanded to Kow-Tow, and the three hundred joy imbibers fell to their knees and made re:uh for the grand entr)' of the past queens, maids of honor and the Queen and her atrendants. The procession then started and in a stately manner moved down the aisle. Miss Helen Underwood, St. Pat's Queen 1925, entered first. ext came Miss Dorothy Keisler, St. Pat's Queen 1926, followed by the two maids of honor, Miss llelen Bowen nnd Miss Lucia Keisler. At this moment a great hush fell on the expectant crowd as the 1927 Queen made ready to make her appearan~e. Preceded by the crown bearer and the little Aower girls, M iss Loraine Love, this year's Queen, accompanied by her train bearers, entered, and to the strains of Sr. Patrick's favorite ballad, "The Wearing of the Green," moved in a most pleasing and winning manner down the aislewoy.

P111t Onr Hut~tlrttl Ftirly


ST. P AT 'S

expression of :twe :tnd enrhusi:tSm. The\' The dancer s could not be restrai ned longer from their s n spectac le ns thnr of Miss Love in :1it refused to remain Kow-T owed at the sight of so gloriou moved gracef ullr ro the foot of the be:tring y her lovely benuty , ns she slowly and with queenl Patrick ns the 1927 Queen of l.ove Sr. b)• d crowne wns she se, throne where, amidst grent npplau Sr. Par's festivities, a former Queen 's si~ter and Beauty . For the first time in the history of the Love received this highest compli ment of sat on t he thro ne nnd ruled suprem e. Miss rancy followed her ns holder :'lnd ruler of 1he has sister r younge her the J unior Class in 1920, and now the throne the Ro) nl Party, led by St. hea r~s of t he M.S.M . studen ts. After a short stay on an nisleway formed by their admiri ng h Pat:•ck nnd Queen Lorain e, left the ball room throug evenin g and rhe costum ed merr)the of event subjec ts. T his m arked the most impor tant costum es: There were all descripof ng Speaki g. dancin their resume makers seeme d conten t ro what-n ots, mingling wirh fair one:. disguised tions; D espera dos, high wayme n, preach ers, kids, and did the guests hegin to weuken and o'clock four as bewitc hing nymph s of all kinds. Not until happy merry- makers wended their but tired the and strain then the orches tra played a final weary way home. looked dead. The celebra tors did But the following mornin g- Ugh! Everyb ody sure it not been for the strenuo us nt~ht had have, not seem ro apprec iate it as much as they might expressions of regret chat the m:•ny and heard w:ts ere., feet, before. Much compla ining of sore afterno on creme along the dead faces began wonderful time of last night was gone. But as the . There were two, and from all reports d:tnces to liven up with :tnticip arion of the oncom ing tea tr:t spilled the music at the K. A. orches Varsity 1. M.S.i\ they were res good as a million. The syncop ation on the now fully recovered House nil afterno on and the Varsity Club fairly rained easily noticed, as the )ells and l:tughs, ere. joy hunter s at the Sigma Nu H ouse. I t could be on :tnothe r comple te day of plensure. J n started indicn ted, that the celebr ators were again more quiet :md dignified than the d:tnces anothe r part of our fair cit)' of Rolla, while it was much held. M rs. Emily D iehl W:lS hostess in a then in progress, a deligh tful recepti on was being M iss Loraine Love, the 192~ St. Patrick 's of prettily decora ted home at a reception in honor celebration a complete success. And Par's Sr. the m:tke help to Queen . J ust one more event everyo ne wns :til set for :tnothe r glorious b)• the time the dances and the recepti on were over ceased and no one had a though t except since nigh t. All t he compl aining of sore feet had long the tea dances dep:trt ed around 5:30 at guests he T for dinner nnd then :t big formal dance. dinner :tnd the big J unior P rom. to clothe t hemse lves in their fi nest for the last formal open and the revelers began to fill the At nine-th irty the doors of the Gym were thrown of the night before. Gone were the dance ball-ro om once more. Bur what :1 contra st to the y of the night before turned , as cow-bo cked red-ne the reck less costum es of t he mask ball and ion in the formal black and white. On his if by magic, into a stately figure clothe d to perfect l .ou, was n fair damsel arr:tyed in a beautif ul arm, instead of the lady who last night was known as dignified benut) that history might deand ic majest gown fringed with pearls -a rivnl ro an) is almost unbelievable. I t was indeed as scribe to us. T he contr:t st betwee n the t wo nights before was in irs recklessnes~. The fairy beautif ul and interes ting in its dignity as the night or in the arms of the trnnsfo rmed M.S.M . on, figures fi itted here and there across the ha ll room, inspiri ng :lS that produc ed for the fun or g thrillin !iO been studen ts. l\lusic h:tS never before during the whole of the time lose his henrt m:tkers t hat night. I t is a funny M iner who did nor, from casting a cupid inRected ere in the n to love. And nn ;llmost impossible fear to restrai The crowd danced ns they never danced . visitors ul directi on of one (or more) of these beautif I lowever, there is an end to nil good things before and eve!') thing seeme d roo good to be true. to vanish with their princes and the old and ns the bell struck three rimes the Cinclerellns began ing of the guel'ts, chis year's chapte r dep:trt the With gym took on its silent cloak once more. a glorious celebra tion of the coming of in "Grea t Celebr ations '' came to a close and rhus ended that great old b:trJ St. Patrick .

p.,,., One If11ruimJ Fort}'-011<


ST.

Pa,• Ont llundmJ Forty

lr<'O

PAT '


!'a

t

On 1/wnJuJ Fort)•-tlrrtt


ST. PAT 'S MASQUE /1 pirate grim with whisk n路ed chin

Stt路ode boldly cross I he floor Thumbed his nose at a princess Took a nun to the doorCause the fit路st was (at The second was thin. Pointed to the sky, Said aloud on high: "Yo! Ho-ho! and a bottle of Gin." And after awhileThey went back in. Ho-lw m! /lnother bottle of Gin!

Pagt Ont fJundrtd f"ony-four


Odds and

Ends

Pall Ont 1/urufmJ Forly-fict


HOME-C OM I

G

And did they all come back? 1or all of them carne back but rhose that did enjoyed one ol rhc best home-com ing celebrations ever held at M.S.M. The Home-coming held on October 14, IS, 16 saw an ingathering ol a total of 103 of the former students of the School of Mine~, and from reports on all sides was in ever}· way a decided ~uccess. Rolla, as was to be expected, had the largest representation, but St. Louis and vicinity was a close second with 20 alumni in attendance. The Lead Belt, Joplin, Chicago, T ulsa, and Kansas City, were all well represented. Registration was t he 14th. On the 15th, the fi rst general meeting was at mass meeting hour. A. D. Terrill '98, announced the Tau Beta Pi pledges. Following this was a general pep meeting getting ready ior the Ark:lnsas Aggie battle. Thorn} called on various alumni present for a short talk and they all responded nobly. T hat night the alumni, 75 in number, gathered at the Baltimore Hotel for a luncheon. Following this they went to gymnasium ior a snwkcr, wrestling nnd boxing de monstration by t he students. Saturday afternoon was too bad for t he M iners who could not stop the strong Aggie team and lost 30 to 0. That night proved to a glorious night for all Seniors and Alumni when a dnnce was held for their benefit :1t the gymnasium. Rather wet, yes, but then no different from any other Home-Coming dances. The following alumni were present: G. R. Dean, '90; E. Long, ex-'90; J. H. Smith, ex-'97; A. D. Terrill, '98 ; \\'. M. Weigel, '00; D. F. Donn hoe, ex-'01; E. A. Mortland, '02; 1.. E. Ga rerr, '0 1; H. R. Tlanlcy, '0 1; R. E. llcller, cx-'02; J. W. Scott, ex-'02; T . L. Gibson, cx-'03; W. II. Powell, '03; C. Myers, ex-'05; F. B. Powell, '06; J. B. Scott, '07; F. X. ~nchtm:111n, '09; V. H. Hinsch, '09; J. J. Bowles, '10; B. F. Murphy, ' 10; 0. \\'. Holmes; A. F. Karte, 'I I ; ~1. H. T hornberry, '12; C. Y. Clayton '13; D .~. Blaylock, 'IS; J as. L. Head, '16; V. X. Smith, ex-'16; G. E. J ohnson; '16; C. \V. Bower '16; J. l\1. Schuman, '16; S. \V. l.esnink, '07; W. \ '. Bayha, ex-' 17; J. C. Bnrton, ' 17; P. S. Elfcrd, ' 17; J. S. Brown, ' 17; Homer Houston, ex-' 17; T. L. Dawson, cx-' 18; \V. C. Zc uch, ' 18; E. E. Decker, ex-' 19; E. N . Murp hy '20 ; 0 . E. Stoner, '20; W. W. \\'cigel, '20; W. 1\1. Taggert, J r., '20; R. C. Sch:1ppler, '20; M . P. Brazill, '20; K. 1\.. Kershner, '20; E. K. Schuman, '20; R. L. Johnson, '2 1; Wm. Knhlbaum, '21; :\.C. Laun, '21; A. L. Cairns, '21; H . C. Kerr, '21; S. H. l.o)•d '21; C. J . Millnr, '21; H . \\'. 1\l undr, '21; \\'.C. Powell, '21; B. S. Cornwell, '22; W. B. Bolt '22; E. J. Torrence, '22; P. D. Windsor, '22; J . B. Butler, '22; E. S. Wheeler, '22 ; E. R. Tragi tt, '23 ; W. P. Gatts, '23 ; D. G. Gibson, J r., '23 ; K T. Camphcll, '23 ; H. C. Buser, '23; H. r.. Leonard, '23; D. li. Wnlsh, '23; W. A. Warner, '23; T . R . T homas, '24; D . L. Moodie, '24; \'1'. E . I I. Knight, cx-'24; C. \\'. Sitzlcr, '24; I. H. Lovett, '24; 0 . H. Baker, '25; F. P. ~l atlack, '25; L. A. Fisher, '25; II. E. ~ l c B ride, '26; \\'. J. Mmtldcr, '26; \\'.A. Burg, '26; E. !\loran, '26; H. A. Herder, ex-'26; D. !>.. Griffin, '26; C. T. J ones, '16; l\1. E. McLcnn, '26; J. D. Behnke, '26; E. Gammeter, '26; E. C. Hu n.,e, '26; E. W. Carleton, '26; H. <T. O'Meara, '26 ; J. M. Wilson, '26; M. K. Underwood, '26; Ra lph Butts, ex-'27; G. N. Morg:111, ex-'28; S. E. Gl nddc n, ex-'28 ; A. T. Couch, ex-'28.


STAT I ON MS.t\1

STATIO N MSM BROADCASTING they The Rollamo Board wishes to announce that the following students have proven that l'amc. nrc in class by themselve s and arc hereby recommended to Rolla's Hall of C. F. "Bobo" Boismenu e, the only one man in the wide world who would ever undertake "Bobo" the task of dating so man y large women and expecting to handle them. Of course in confidence some h:lVe is of superior srock to the general run of M.S.M. students and should his work.

1'. H . "Satch" Con ley, student and politician. Thcreis no doubt that "Satch" has put more

in those men into office than any other five men put together. He has that come hither appeal all force~ painlessly he ce countenan shining his Irish blue eyes that no one can resist and with question. a is graduation after to his will. J ust what "Pinky" Conley will do to the world looking forUnquestio nably, the Republica ns and Democrat s arc too weak for him and we are ward to a new political pnrry. rocks. Prof. L. W. Currier, dramatist of no mean ability and an instructor who knows his hair of crops neatest Besides being one of the proud members of the faculty, he hns one of the dain P helps County- yes! Both of them are worn like all artists wear them. Our only recommen tion is to use some of Fred Lane's famous swamp-ro ot. dancing路 H. H. 1-hrrod, the only student who we nt to a Miner dance sober with the idea of goes with 'ow there is no sin against going to dances sober, but to think that this young man that the re:tlizc not does he that suppose We the sole idea of hot-footin g it around is absurd. ll ugo's while. great a in gentlemen present would care to dance with their own dates once day is coming but we do not know when. course W. A. "Mac" McC:mless, the greatest hand-shak er the school has ever acquired. Of the sec so bear not c:tn just he "!\l ac" docs not do this ro get a grade in any of his subjects, like nothing is wonderful results of his various jobs go unseen or talked about. They s:ty there knowing your Prof. and "Mac" is following it extremely well. nt Captain K. M. Moore, our bright soldier boy who has a t last converted the governme lis I . profession other over to the idea that officers pants should be college as well as in any the latest garment shows the full bag heginning at the top and getting bagger as you approach style. this g knee. We give fu ll credit to "Cap" for establishin helped Jack Weber, the man who is still a cross-word puzzle to his profs. If questions ever he forgets a man to success, J ack has passed the successful stage at least a year ago. Perhaps will he a t 1 him. not Md prof. the to listen to came who there are several others in the course questions. of plenty great day when J ack becomes the prof. and can ask himself Zane's C. 1.. "Zane Grey," the last of his line. We admire ch:n dashing young look in to the days e)路e as he imagines he is after the J ndian again. One more pistol and he will be back make a and west go should Zane's of rope of '49. A man who can raise a mustache like that circus. some in horse white name for himself. May we sec the dny when Zane will he riding a


CALEND AR

SEPTEMBE R 11 School Opens- lots of bull throwing, etc. but Kahlbaum gets all the money. Many new faces that are hard to look at and Sophomores looking for some little fellow to clean up on. J 7 Miner Board throws their first brawl. Everybody has a good time because there is nothing else to do. Some new Co-eds but not so hot. 18 Kappa Sigma Pledge dance. 24 Lambda Chi Alpha dance. Some drunks. 25 P i K. A. Pledge dance. There were a few pledges present. Class Officers elected- more honor to Conley. 30 K. A. Dance. Very quiet. OCTOBER Miners 41, McKendree 13. The team started the season off right by running ci rcles around the team from across the big river. Sigma Nu's break into society by throwing big Pledge dance. 2 Prospectors hold first shin-dig of the year. 6 Bonanzas give the girls a treat with a dance. 7 Merciers try their luck at brawling to music. 9 Washington U. 25, Miners 2, just the same ole story. We take it good naturally by now. 1-4- H ome-coming. Old grads back for a glimpse of the Alma Matre. 15 Kappa Sig. dance. Alumni banquet for those who returned for Home-comi ng. Smoker at gymnasium for Alumni. Some pretty good wrestling and boxing displayed. 16 Miners are treated pretty rough by Arkansas Aggies and lose 30 to 0. The Alumni cou ld not cheer quite hard enough. Home-com ing Dance for Seniors and Alumni. Rather wet but nice. Everybody has a big time. 22 M iners 14, Kriksville 6. Gave the Osteopaths a little of their own medicine. Rollamo Dance thrills the entire student body. 29 Miner Board decorates gym and gives a real Halloween Dance. 30 St. Louis U. 9, Miners 7. Not such a hot time this time. The Irish have lots of luck and turn the trick. Kappa Sigma's score with another dance. Lots of hard cider on deck but no kick to it.


CALENDAR

NOVEMBE R 6 Evansville College fails to see the speedy Minet路s and get the short end of a 32 to 9 score. T he Indiana boys have their minds on other things- ask Lemon and Hodgdon. 12 Miners hit their stride and make Drury like it to the tune of 27 to 6. Our old rivals could not see the boys- the sun was in their eyes. Miner D ance at the gym . Sigma Nu's make it a chapter dance. Sigma Nu's did not have enough from the night before and throw a Hick Dance. Quo Vadis I nitiation. Some K. A.'s get home without telling Doc Fulton about it. 23 Thanksgiving Day. Miners beat Springfield Teachers 21 to 0. They did not get any turkey until after the game. 30 M.S.M. wants ~1,227,250 for an appropriation. Wait and see how much of this they will not receive. 13

DECEMBE R 1 Tau Beta P i initiation.

More students led astray.

7 I ntramural Basket Ball starts. 9 J uniors start St. Pat's drive by raffling off a few turkeys. From the looks of the turkeys they made some money. 10 Juniors on real drive. Give dance at the gym. Music donated by Varsity Orchestra. Some money made- for the officers. 11 Sophomores lose the annual Soph-Freshmen football game 7 to 6. The time keepers refused to cheat the Frosh and consequently the Class of '29 received a beating. 13 Football Banquet. Monty Ledford chosen to lead the football next fall. 17 men receive letters. Harold Thomas is given gold fopt. ball for being a letterman for four years. 15 M.S.M. Band blossoms forth and put on interesting concert at Parker Hall. The piccolo players shine. 16 The Basket Ball team makes a bad start and is trounced by Millikan 38 to 17. 18 Miners bite the dust as Washington Bears clean up 55 to 25. 23 Christmas H olidays begin. The holiday Assayers get initial instruction on firing a furnace- it may come in handy some day. 26 Conyers-Culbertso n marriage. And he could have helped it.


CA LE DA R

JANUARY Big

ew Year ceebration over. in Rolla.

Some have hangover but not those

8

Athletic Association try to make some pin money for B oismenue by giving dance. Big time had by all.

12

Miners 24, McKendree 32. School broadcasts program from Station WOS at .Jefferson City. Doc Armsby gets to do his stuff.

15

Miners 47, Shurtleff 31. The team scores their first victory. T homas and Niedermeyer doing the heavy shooting.

17

The K. E., Grubstakers, and Independents tie in the Intramural basket ball series.

22

The Satyrs give dance at Mercier Club. Most of the girls got home all right. Niedermeyer celebrates again.

27

The M.S.M. Players present " Jn the Zone" and "The Glittering Gate" before a crowded audience at Parker H all. The plays were well received.

29

Concordia added another to their long list and Miners are beaten 49 to 16. FEBRUARY Central Wesleyan 32, Miners 26. J ust another case of too bad.

2

T he Wesleyans win a close game 35 to 34. very well .

Dame F ortune did not so

]1

Central College take the first game of the series 29 to 21.

12

The Miners lose another heart breaker the Central 50 to 49.

17

Oklahoma U. wins the wrestling meet. boys down.

18

J uniors still after money. Put on big dance at the gym and a few turn out.

19

Miners 27, Drury 30. Our enemy makes up for the football game. H ard to take butJ unior Shotgun R affle. The men are still winning a free hat at the Shaver H at Shop. They say that the J uniors did pretty well. T hank goodness they have final ly found a way to make some cash. Miners take the Drury P anthers for a ride and win 31 to 27. Missouri U. 16, M.S.M. 11. T he wrestling team j ust can't get star ted.

21

24 26

l'aKt One fl undrcd Fif:y

Can not keep the Oklahoma


CALENDAR

MAR C H T he town full of 4-5 High School Baske t Ball Tourn amen t at the gym . cup after strang e wome n and s trange r bors. Podu nk gains the much hard work. a dance at the Boism enu e shows his business ability and the A.A. give car. new a gym . Big profit for "Spik e'' and proba bly The calm before the storm . a millon dollars. 17 Big day for t he frish. Conle y can't be bough t for Not had, at all! town. St. P ar's D ay. Girls begin to pour into Frate rnity house partie s commence. e) The filled with 18 St. P at. arrive s. Big P arade . (and this is no pictur ony at beauti ful girls and dressed up Miners. Knigh ting cerem ue Ball P arker Hall. " Wapp in' \\'har f" in the aftern oon. Masq that night. Some dance ! the celebraA. T. Smith and Miss P aulsell get marrie d- fin e way to ruin tion. . T he crowd still 19 T ea dance s at K. A. H ouse and Sigma i\'u !louse night. Every body that Prom going strong and full of pep. Ju nior 'err wet dressed fit to kill and some killings were made. Dance but that was d ue to the excess rain. a tomb after 8 :1 7 20 The dates leave and so does the pep. Rolla like P. M. I\t iners worn out but happy. put on. They 21 The Class of '28 credit ed with the best St. Pat's ever deserv e all the credit given . Classe s starte d again but t hat is all. 23 School back to work in earne st. St. Pat's forgot ten. T HE FLAPPER'S PRAY ER I crave the lights that hrightl y shine, Also the men and the sparkli ng wine. A crave for fun withou t paying the price, I want robe naught y and yet be nice: I crave for the thrills of a long, close kiss, I want the things that good girls miss; I crave the heart and :1rms of a man And yet stay single, if I can. I 'vc come to you now for advice l n how to be naught \ and still be nice, I crave to do what other girls do; T ease 'em, cuddle up, l>ill and coo, Blacken OJ}' eyes and powtkr my nose, Rouge my cheeks to look like a rose; Tango a little and shimm y a lot, Park m' corset when the weathe r IS hot; R ide :llld swim, and golf and ~kate, T ake the fence instead o f tht g;ttc; Break all record s-yes bur one, And be good and tn.•c when the gam!.' is done. I don't like the pepper hut I do like the spice. Oh, I want to be naul(ht ) and still be nice,

:\>Jl) T ilE A~SWE R

This advice, clear girl, is good and true, You can't ear vour cake and have it, too. If you" ant the man and )·ou w:tnt the wme, \Vhy someone must pay when you wine ;llld dine, The next must be bur a lon~er kiss, I f you want the things that good girls miss. You've got to be wi~r than most girls, Sis. So watch your step is my advice, If you want to be naught y and still be nice. Go to it kid, wnh powder and paint To make you look like what you ain't; Shimm ) and dance to your heart's conrcnr , Be hugged and kissed till your ribs are l~ent; Park your corsets on o hickory limb, But never, mr dear, t.to into swim, Bathe if you will on the dew) green, Bur you can't use mud and come out clean. The game you'd play i<> man's long suit Since F- ve tir~r nibbled on forbidden fruit. Whatev er you get you must pay the price; You can't be naughtY and still be nice.

· Phi Chr

r.,, o.., 11"~""" F'•fty-onr


J OKES

Clubman: My wife doesn't like the portrait you did of me at allsays it isn't naturaL Artist: I knew it! Didn't [ tell you repeatedly, at each sitting, that you were not drinking enough?

" o you want a position as stenographer, young lady? What are your qualifications?" "\\'ell my father is a bad shot."

Mother (entering room unexpectedly): Why, Mabel, get right down from that young man's knee. Mabel: No, I got here first.

T he vaudeville performer was giving her interpretation of the hula-hula at the church festival. The scandalized minister hurriedly sought the chairman of the entertainment committee. " I think," he said severely,"that dancer is out of place." " It does look like it, sir, but that's just the way she's dancing," returned the young man.

- Pitt Pather. Grandmother: When I was young we didn't do the things in a horse and buggy that you young do in an automobile. Flapper Granddaughter: \\'ell, you couldn't- in a horse and buggy.

-Minn. Ski-U-Mah. STEEL YOURSELF FOR THI S Curfew shall not ring tonight, I'm afraid they'll have to scrap her; For P op had to have his ironSo he went and et the clapper.

- f/irginia Reel.

TS IT COl\11 G TO THIS? " Did you hear about the raid at Van Cupp's house party last night?" "No. Was any whisky found?" "Not a drop-the officers forgot to bring a stomach pump."

- Princeton Tiger.

- Crimson Colt. A deaf old lady came into church rect:ntly in Glasgow, Sweden. As the minister started his sermon she placed her ear trumpet to her An usher approached her ear. swiftly and said: "One toot and out you go."

- Pi PM Bullet. TID ! GS FROM THE BEACH " \Vho is this fellow Tide I hear about so much?" " I never heard of him." "vVhy, I've heard everyone saying, ' Hi, Tide,' and ' Lo, Tide'."

l'att

o,., 1/untlrtd Fijt;•-tu¡o

"She asks me how many lumps I'll have in my tea " "Yeah?" "So I tells her, 1'11 take mtne smooth, please."

- Colgate Banter.

The inebriated young man rocked into the lobby of a great hotel far from his native land. He looked into a tall mirror and smiled with pleasure. " Look!" he cried. "They've got n. picture of me here!" Dartmoui!J ]ack 0' Lanter11.


-

_j

路路----

AD VER TIS ING



· -------------------------------- ---------------- ----·

School of Mines and Metallurgy of the

University of Missouri Rolla, Missouri O ffers four-yea r collegia te curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in

~ I

I

~

Metal Mine En gineering Coal Mine En gineering Mining Geology Petroleum Engineering Civil Engineerin g Metallurgy General Science Mechanical Engineerin g E lectrical Engineering Chemical Engineerin g P etroleum Refining Ceramic E ngineering

Grad uate courses leading to the degree of Master of Science a re a lso offered in t hese curricula. For catalog and other information, address,

T H E R EGI S TR A R School of Mines and Metallurgy Rolla, Missouri

---------------- ---------------- ---------------- ----· PatL Oru

fl ~t•drtl Frft\'

fitt


MERCHANTS AND FARMERS BANK

CAPITAL A ND SURPLUS $ 116,000.00

Big

-

-

-

-

-

Strong

SCHUMANS

-

-

-

Serviceable

L. C. SMITH & SON

Rolla's Biggest and Best S tore

CASH ONLY Our size enables us to serve more efficiently in satisfying you r wants than others.

Hardware and Electrical Supplies +--------------------------------------·

Our prices are always reasonable for the quality received. You can't buy cheaper or better.

•·------------------------------ -----------·

A warm true spot for the student

R epairing, Cleaning and Pressing

We carry all tudenl Goods, Dry Goods, Shoes, etc.

Phone 188

E. E. SEASE

·-----------------------------------· · --------------------------------------¥


mi stin cti ve ideas in dnnuals ol'e

II.Ua pl"ime factol" in a successful

boo k-- - In all Oill ' ann ual s thel"e is found dis tinc tion plu s the fin est qualitq ofwol'kmanship-~-

CENTRAL ENGUAVING COMPANY SAI NT

LOU IS


AS ALWAYS

AND W ILL BE

HAS BEEN

The Students' Headquarters

H. & S. DRUG STORE Across From the P ost Office STUDENTS' SUPPLI ES OF EVERY KIND

C. HARVEY

FRED W. SMITH

Compliments of

C. D. VIA FURNITURE AND VARIETY GOODS THE HOUSE OF A THOUSA ND VA LVES ~------------------------- -------------路

PRIDE

OF ROLLA

Ice Cream

Butter and

Pure Ice

ROLLA CREAMERY AND ICE CO.

路------

路----------------------------------------~ 路------------------~

BUNCH'S BARBER SHOP

Home of

H art Schaffner & Marx Clothes

HARRY S. W I TT The Shop Next to the M erch ants and Farmers Bank

Cleaning and P ressing


Our Portraits and Groups Were All Snapped by

SID WHITING (himself) Who Operates the Most Modern and Fully Equipped Studios Known to the Science of Photography AT

4322 OLIVE ST. and GRAND AT WASHI NGTON ST. LOUIS. MO. BURREL ROGERS

Operators

SID WHI T ING

We have had excellent service and perfect satisfaction. ROLLAMO BOARD

Patt O..t llundrtd Fijt-y-nint


JOHN W. SCOTT DRUGGIST AND BOOK SELLER

"THE MINERS' CO-OP." E IGHT H AND PI NE

·------------ ------------- ------------- ------------- --------· .------------ ------------- ------------ ------------- --------· Andrews Allen, C. E.

J ohn .'\. Garcia, E. M.

Allen & G arcia Co. Consulting and Constructin g Engineers Designing, Superintend ence, Constructio n Everything for a coal mine, inc~uding Structures, Mechanical and Electrical Installations, Shaft Sinking, Development and Operation

EXAMINATIO NS- REPORTS- APPRAISALS Isabella Bldg., 2 1 F. Van Buren St.,

CHI CAGO

+------------ ------------- ------------- ------------- --------· +----------- ------------ ----· Horace H. Clark G eorge A . Easley Consulting Engineer Industrial Fuels and Their Application

Mining Engineer a nd

Specialist in Industrial Gas Sales for Public Utility Companies Office 122 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, 111.

Re~idenee

1501 S ilencer Ave. Willmette, 111.

Operator 120 Broadway

La Paz

New York

Bolivia, S. A.


The INLAND SPRINGF IE LD. MO.

HIGH GRADE

COLLEGE CATALOGUES BULLETINS A ND ANNUALS

LI THOGRAPHI NG. STEEL PLATE AND LETTERPRESS PRINT ING

Office and Factory 4 I 5-2 1 E. Olive St.

Office Supply and F umiture Dept. 219 S. Jeffe1son St.


THE STANDARD STORE Men's Shoes and Furnishings THE BARGAIN SPOT OF ROLLA We Sell for Cash

We Buy for Cash

H. BRANNOCK, Manager · ---------------------------------------------------~

B. H. RUCKER Insurance

Bonded Abstracter

Real Estate

Leading Fire Insurance Compan ies in the World Most Complete Set of Abstracts o{ Title Real Estate Bought and . ·old Office Southeast Cor11er Se'VeJLtlz a11d Pi11e Streets, Rolla, Missouri D. F. DONAHOE, Manager

MARI E J O H NS, Stenographer

·--------------------------------------------------~

Complitnents of

Rolla Wholesale Grocery Co. Rolla, Missouri

-----------------------· Always Go to

HANRAHAN'S for the highest grade of

Pure Foods, Groceries, Meats, Fruits, Vegetables

I 4----------------------__. Pa, t Ont II unJrtd Sixty-two

·----------------------~

CRUMPLER'S Dry Goods Clothing and Shoes 7th Street


路--- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---路

"KR UZ ITE " - "MI ZZO U"

HIG H ALU MIN A FIRE BRIC K Made from Diaspore, Missou ri's Great Gift to the Refractories Field

Whe n you are "out on the job" and find a fire brick prob lem, write us, and we will be glad to help you solve it. "WE ARE ROLLA MEN"

A. P. GRE EN FIRE BRICK CO. MEXICO, MISSOURI, U. S. A. NEW YORK : Cl IICAGO : ST. LOUIS : LONDON


·------------------------~

H arry R .

McCaw

--+1

c •-Clocks,

Adjusted

0

(/)

Jewelry,

FURNITURE, RUGS PINE STREET

Watches

Phones: Store 276; Residence 171

~----------------------·

~

Sold

.

Wrist

Licensed Embalmer

Undertaking

• .-4 .....-

~

.

~

Repaired

~-------------------------·

L. T. HUDSON MOTOR CO. Authorized

Ford

Dealer

"THE STORY IS THE SAME THE WORLD OVER..

----------------·

New Era Printing Co.

Compliments of

KEN GRAY

Dance Programmes Hand Bills Novelties

·------------------------· The Peacock Food Shop ~IRs.

\ V. D .

~1ct\tCOL

Picnic and Party Lunches a pecialty Table . ·ervice PHONE 150

If you want to sec a complete line of

1\IE.K'.' , LADIE -, AN D CHILDREN' READY-TO-\ VEAR

Delicatessen

Call and Pay Us a Visit

ROLLA, MO.

The Sterling M. Smith Co.

.------------------------· Pa(l 01111 II undrtd Sixty.four


TO BE STRONG TO SERVE IT

TO BE LIBERAL T O BE P ROMPT DEPO 路rTORS WELL AND TRULY IS THE POLICY OF T HE

NATIONAL BANK OF ROLLA

Capital Surplus -

........ ........

$50,000.00 $60,000.00

A

SERVICE based on the facilities and experience gained du ring a half of a centu ry is extended by this bank. We feel that because of this experience we a r e in a position to extend every aid and assistance to our fr iends and customer s consistent with good, sound

business methods.

Enw1N L oNG, Presidenl

P. H. F. A.

Cashier As..'/1 Cashier

McGREGOR, CAMERON,

OFFICERS S. L.

Vice President FLOY W . \ VEBB, Ass't Cashier GEORGE BARNITZ, Bookkeeper l\1rTCrTELL,

Pa~t Ont llrmtfrtd Sixty 路/i~


--路 TRENKEL'S Bakery and Confectionery Fancy P astry Work

.-- - - - - - - - - - - .

Ozark Hotel European

Candies

701 PINE STREET Rolla, Missouri

Modern Througho ut

FAUL.KNER'S DRUG STORE a-----------------------------------~

- - - - - - - - -路 Missouri General Utilities Compan y

Let our service do your househo ld work Sunshine Market Groceries and Meats

Phone 71 FREE DELIVERY

A LOVELY

ALL-SILK HOSE (ALLEN A)

Specially m ade for dancing, but worn fo1 a ll occasions

Ask for No. 3 78S at

Asher Mercantile Co.

--路


~ ----------------------------------------------

ROLLA STATE BANK ROLLA, MISSOURI

Large Enough to Serve You Strong Enough to Protect You Small Enough to Know You

C a pita l and Surplus

$ 1oo, ooo.o路o

DEPOSITORY Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Your Banking Business solicited and every courtesy consistent with safe and sound banking will be extended


BARNITZ AND VIA Coal

'-""'

Wood

'-""'

Ice

Bottlers of

Qual ity Beverages

·- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -0 ~---------------------------·

Heller's Clothing House Know n as the Best

The Best Know n ~---------------------------·

·--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --·

F arn1ers' Pro duc e Exc han ge Quality

Eggs

·Pou ltry

Flou r

Daily Delivery ·------------~

~------------·

F. B. POWELL LUMBER CO. Every thing in

BUILDING MATERIAL

---- ---- ---- --·

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There are thirty-seven alumni of the Missouri School of Mines who are residents of Tulsa. This city is designa ted the Oil Capital of the World

Happy is the Man Whose Work lS• His Hobby And happy are his customers. Edison's only recreation is his job. Ford would really rather make Fords than finance peace ships. M organ wor ks at golf and yachting, but when he wants a real good time he floa ts a bond issue. Dr. Eliot wou ld rather teach than fill five-foot book shelves. Mary Carden likes acting so much s he acts a ll the time. When Walter l lagen needs a holiday he plays in a golf tournamen t. Douglas Fa irba nks goes to the movies when he isn't making them.

When things get dull on the Ladies Saturday Home journa l and Evening Post. Cyrus C urtis starts a newspaper. The man who does the best work is the ma n who likes his work so well he cannot help doing it when he is not working outside office hours When we. in our store, a re not actually executing plans we have alre3dy made. we a re formulating plans to be executed some time in the future. Merchandising is our hobby. It is also our job.

BROWN-DUNKIN TULSA, OKLA. For the information of those who don't know us. we will eay tha t we a re a department store in Tulsa, O kla .. supplying the world's finest merchandise to a discriminating clientele.

Pat' Ont II undud Sixt)•-niiiL


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The American Gas Associat ion What it is-- What it is doing for American Industry-The object of the American Gas Association is to promote mort' and better ways of utilizing gas; - to assist the industries of America (and the i)ublic as a whole) in deriving to the fullest the numerous ad vantages inherent in gas; -to advance to the highest efficiency, methods of gas manufacture, distribution and utilization; -to collect and disseminate information on these subjects. The Ame rican Gas Association was organized in 1918-and consolidated with the American Gas Institute, and the National Commercial Gas Association. The m e mbe rs hip includes 551 Gas Compani es, 21 H o lding Companies, 428 Manufac turers of gas burning appliances, and 3,444 Indi,•idual memberships. Its activities and interests exte nd to every s tate in the Union. The sales o f gas for the year 1926, officially reported to the Association, Gas American amounted t o 38 billi o n cubic fee t more than the am ount sold

in 1925. This is twice the inc rease in 1925 ove r 1924-makinl-( a to tal inc r ea se o f 40% in the last fiv e years. This phe no menal in crease in the usc of gas is largely due to the growi ng demands from in ~lu s­ trial c ustomers. The Amencan Ga.; Association has recentlv appropriated half a million do"ars for research wo rk and dcvc.opmcnt of the industrial gas heating busi ness. Write to soc mtwn what ga s your I in e

the American Gas Asfo r info rmatio n Oil is doing fo r o thers in of busi ness.

A m eri can Gas Association 342 Madison Avenue, NEW YORK CITY

YOU CAN D O IT BETT ER W I'r H G AS