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Norway is currently receiving the most advanced version of BAE Systems’ CV90. This vehicle of Swedish origin is in service in seven nations. (BAE Systems)

furbishing the chassis and upgrading the vehicle’s survivability and turrets, as well as enhancing combat system performance. A key element of the upgrade is the adoption of the new Battlefield Management System in place of the existing Tactical Command and Control System (TCCS), which will bring those vehicles into the digital era. The IFVs fire control system will receive updated software, while the coaxial machine gun, currently an M1919A4 (Ksp m/39 in the Swedish Army) will be replaced by an FN MAG (Ksp m/59). Deliveries will run between 2018 and 2020. In January 2016 Estonia announced the acquisition of 35 CV90 used hulls from Norway, following that of 44 CV9035NL in December 2014. The hull acquisition aims at completing the 1st Infantry Brigade equipment with combat support variants, the type and number of specialist versions remaining unknown, although some of them will be certainly turned out in command post vehicles. Norway sold part of its older CV90s to Estonia as it acquired 103 new such tracked vehicles at the new standard, which include most of the recent upgrade proposals. Among these we find semi-active suspensions, rubber tracks, a new and more powerful engine providing 600 kW, which copes with the considerable weight increase the currently build CV90s being around 35 tonnes, new ballistic and mine/IED protections, and finally full digitisation. Hybrid diesel-elec-

tric propulsion is also proposed. The new CV9030N, N standing for Norway, also include Orbital-ATKs M52 chain gun in 7.62 mm calibre as coaxial weapons. On 24 June 2015 the first Puma infantry fighting vehicle was handed over to the Bundeswehr. The new German Army IFV is being assembled in Unterluess by Rheinmetall Waffe Munition and in Munich by Krauss-Maffei Wegmann, the two companies having formed a 50-50 JV, Projeckt System & Management GmbH (PSM), for the Puma programme. Production is in the ramp-up phase, each facility having produced since 25 vehicles each, the total number contracted by the Bundeswehr being 350, eight of which driving training vehicles. Those IFVs are delivered to the Ausbildungszentrum Panzertruppen, the German Army Armoured Corps Training Centre in Munster where one Panzergrenadier company gets hold of its vehicles and carries out a three months training, before moving to its barrack together with the vehicles. The Puma is fitted with an unmanned turret armed with the fully stabilized 30 mm MK30-2/ABM automatic cannon, a twin Spike missile launcher being installed on the left of the turret. A key feature of the Puma is the decoupled running gear, with hydropneumatic suspensions, integrated fuel tanks and lightweight tracks, which together with the 800 kW engine providing a power-toweight ratio of 19 kW/tonne ensures optimal mobility. Its modular armour allows the Puma to protect it against kinetic energy and shaped charges, its reactive armour being effective against standard RPGs as well as against tandem charges, the rubber bomblet carpet on upper surfaces being a quite peculiar solution. The IR jammer, laser warning receiver and trainable grenade launchers add a further degree of protection, together with the C4I system and networked capacities of the vehicle. A series of upgrades are already on the table. One is the TSWA (Turret-independent Secondary Weapon Station, a short range protection system with a 10-400 metres range with full stabilized day/night The German Army has received around 50 Puma IFVs. These vehicles feature innovative solutions such as the decoupled running gear. (P. Valpolini)

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Eurosatory 2016 Supplement  

In this special Eurosatory 2016 supplement, Paolo Valpolini discusses both wheeled and tracked armoured vehicles.

Eurosatory 2016 Supplement  

In this special Eurosatory 2016 supplement, Paolo Valpolini discusses both wheeled and tracked armoured vehicles.

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