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The Afghan Hound - What model is nearer to the standard?

Padenghe, May 2014


The Afghan Hound - what is typical and why? A personal viewpoint Espen Engh & Ă…ge Gjetnes May 2014


What is typical and why ? Sources of information: Afghanistan – the natural habitat Breed function Breed history The breed standards


Welcome to Afghanistan


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Welcome to Afghanistan!

Photo courtesy Betty Stites


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


Afghanistan – the natural habitat


The Afghan Hound in the breed’s natural habitat - consequences  A dog answering to ”survival of the fittest” –

suitable to stringent demands of the environment.  Sturdy, healthy and sound in body and mind  ”One leg in each corner”  Energy efficient – dry, bony, angular, houndy  Strong character  Coat suitable for the adverse conditions


On the top of the mountain! Unique - beautiful


The functional Afghan Hound

1. A versatile hunter 2. A herding dog 3. A guard dog


The functional Afghan Hound

1. A versatile hunter 2. A herding dog 3. A guard dog


The versatile hunting Afghan


The versatile hunting Afghan


The versatile hunting Afghan


The versatile hunting Afghan


The versatile hunting Afghan


The versatile hunting Afghan


The versatile hunting Afghan


The Afghan Hound as a hunting sighthound  Long limbs and tail.  Long and muscular neck  Strong jaws  Long and flat, but well developed muscles  Moderate, but solid bone  Deep chest, only moderately wide  Suppleness

∑ = a hunting dog with aerodynamic construction


The Afghan Hound as a hunting sighthound  Combining speed and power  Extreme athletic ability  Head carried proudly – reconnaissence gait.  Jumping ability – reflected in springy

movement  Square proportions suited for the game and the terrain.  Big feet  Unique coat pattern


The functional Afghan Hound

1. A versatile hunter 2. A herding dog 3. A guard dog


The functional Afghan Hound A versatile herder: - Goats - Sheep - Even horses

requires plenty of stamina and endurance, sound construction

impression of strength and dignity


The functional Afghan Hound

1. A versatile hunter 2. A herding dog 3. A guard dog


The functional Afghan Hound 3. A guard dog – temperament - Looks at and through one - Dignified and aloof - A certain keen fierceness


Morphological structure is it better judged in the show ring or on the field?  As a jumper and broken field

courser, he is without peer, being built for the rigours of actual prolonged field combat under difficult ground conditions.

Miller & Gilbert, 1975


Morphological structure is it better judged in the show ring or on the field?  Both the show ring and the field can potentially yield

useful information  But comparing lure coursing/racing to hunting:  Different terrain  Different types of game  Different climatic conditions  Not truly testing ability to cope with distance and endurance  Not testing other working aspects (herder, guard)

Good show judges should be able to assess functional structure!


Morphological structure is it better judged in the show ring or on the field?  Would it be

appropriate to consider the licence of coursing cumpulsory to the confirmation of a champion title?  No!


What is typical and why ? Sources of information: Afghanistan – the natural habitat Breed function Breed history The breed standards


Breed history Zardin, born 1902


Breed history 1920s – the Bell Murrays


Breed history 1920s – the Ghaznis


Breed history Ch.Asman of Ghazni (1929)


Breed history Ch.Westmill Tamasar (1932)


Breed history Ch.Aruna of Enriallic (1937)


Breed history Ch.Amanullah of Kandahar (1933)


Breed history Ch.Xenos v.d. Oranje Manege (1949)


Breed history Ch. Shirkhan of Grandeur (1954)


Breed history Ch. Haboob von Katwiga (1968)


Breed history Ch.Meccas Falstaff (1968)


Breed history Ch.Coastwind Abraxas (1970)


Breed history Ch.Amudarya Shalar (1973)


Breed history Ch.Elmos Tutankhamun (1982)


Breed history Ch.Pahlavi Puttin on the Ritz (1982)


Breed history – summary What do these dogs have in common?  Strength and dignity  Elegance with power  Upstanding, houndy, ”dry”  Straight hard topline, square  Prominent hipbones, low-set tail  Attitude  Head held proudly  Typical coat pattern, not overly coated  ∑ = THE ESSENCE OF THE BREED


What is typical and why ? Sources of information: Afghanistan – the natural habitat Breed function Breed history The breed standard(s)


The Afghan Hound standard  Group10, FCI breed number 228.  Date: 12.12.2011 GB.  Country of origin: Afghanistan  Country of patronage: Great Britain  The American standard is more

descriptive and detailed – and artistic!


Overall impression versus details

1.Overall Impression 2. Overall impression 3.Details


The Afghan Hound  Focus on quality and positive traits  Lack of quality is the worst of all faults!  Movement an ingredient of breed type


Overall impression Gives the impression of strength and dignity, combining speed and power. Head held proudly.


Overall impression Gives the impression of strength and dignity, combining speed and power. Head held proudly.


Afghan Hounds – important ingredients to the overall impression  Upstanding, long limbs  Square in a ”large square”  Long neck  Angular (not smooth)  Combination of power and

   

strengh with elegance and refinement Athletic and ”ready for takeoff”. Proud bearing Attitude Movement


Overall impression – proportions

 Upstanding  Good length of leg

is essential


Overall impression – proportions  Square

”Small square”  Compact  Cobby  Untypical for

an Afghan Hound


Overall impression – proportions  Square  FCI: back of moderate length, loin rather short.

Typical large square:  Even more important

with good length of leg than a short body.


Neck Long, strong with proud carriage of the head.  Important for the

function  Important for type and balance  Contributes to a marked degree to the elegance


Overall impression – proportions  Angular

 Level back,

straight loin  Hard and ”dry” silhouette  Prominent hipbones  Defined, bony croup Never soft, smooth or curvy lines as opposed to many other Sighthound breeds.


Overall impression

 Combining speed

with power


Overall impression

 Pads well down on

ground  Standing solidly on his feet.  �ready for take-off�


Overall impression

From Barb Bornstein: The Architecture of the Afghan Hound


Overall impression A most athletic dog And should convey that impression both standing and moving


The athletic Afghan Hound!


Overall impression  Proud carriage of

head  A style of high order  A king of dogs, that has held true to tradition throughout the ages (US)


Overall impression Attitude

 �Dignified and

aloof�  Arrogant


Overall impression - movement �Smooth and springy with a style of high order.�  Movement extremely important in the breed  Athletic  Hard frame with firm and defined topline on the move  Head and tail always held high in movement


Overall impression - movement ”Smooth and springy with a style of high order.”  Smooth: unstrained, even, synchronized and effortless.  Springy: floating, , supple, ”hanging in the air”  Breathtaking: ”a style of high order”  Balance and coordination, going forward


Important Afghan Hound details  Expression  Head details  Feet  Topline  Hips, croups and

hindlegs  Tail  Coat


Behaviour and temperament expression  Eastern or

Oriental expression is typical of the breed.  looks through

one  Certain keen fierceness  an element of extoic aggresiveness


Head  Quite a lot of

emphasis is put on the Afghan Hound head, but less important that overall impression, proportions and movement  The head as an indicator of quality.


Skull and stop  Long skull, prominent

occiput.  Skull not too narrow, but neither too broad.  Long top-knot characteristic  ”Slight stop” – not much, but not completely without, to be evaluated from the side.


Skull and stop  Long muzzle with

punishing jaws – a long, strong enough, well chisseled and dry muzzle is important for head quality.  Scissor bite, level bite

tolerated


Eyes  Nearly triangular  Slanting slightly

upwards from inner corner to outer corner.  Dark for preference  Not large or round.  Expression is most important


Forequarters The forequarters of the Afghan Hound are not very different from other sighthound breeds, except for:  Long and springy pasterns  Strong and very large feet both in length

and breadth


Body and outline Breed typical features:  Straight, horizontal topline (level back, straight loin)  (Very) prominent hipbones, wide apart  Long and defined, moderately sloping croup (falling slighty away to stern) with low set tail


Tail  long (= not too short)  low set • ring at the end  straight shaft  sparesly feathered  must be raised when in action, but not over the back.


Hindquarters  Great length

between hip and hock.  Slightly bowed from hock to crotch (US)


Coat  Long and very fine texture

     

on ribs, fore and hindquarters and flanks. Natural saddle Distinct, silky topknot Ears and legs well coated Pasterns can be bare – nice! Coat must develope naturally. A moderate amount of coat enhances the elegance and the look of a sighthound!


Size Ideal height at withers: Males: 68-74 cm. Btiches: 63-69 cm.

 Definite sex

characteristics  Few dogs under standard size  Beware of masculine bitches  Elegance must be retained!


Summary:  Functional  Historical  Correct

according to the standard  ∑ =beautiful!


The King of dogs (in coats by Ă…ge Gjetnes)


Questions – coat and patterning  Is the coat of

today’s Afghans typical?  Despite what the standard says: stripping is widespread and tolerated.  Can we breed without using scissors?


Coat pattern  One of the breeds unique traits.  Natural patterning seldom seen today.  Is it treasured? It should!  Do Afghan people know what it looks like,

and what to look for?  Even breed specialists can question patterned Afghans.


Typical coat pattern


Typical coats?  Are the coats of todays Afghan Hounds

typical?  To win seems to be the only thing that matters.  Lots of different opinions regarding what is correct.  Coat has always been highly treasured among breed people, now more than ever.


Ideal Afghan Hound coat


Typical coats, FCI standard  Standard: 

  

Long and very fine texture on ribs, fore and hindquarters and flanks. Only asking for silky hair on topknot Pasterns can be bare. Any evidence of clipping or scissoring should be penalized


Typical coats, AKC standards  Standard:  



Thick silky hair, very fine in texture Should be shown in it’s natural state, the coat is not clipped or trimmed Fault – lack of shorthaired saddle in mature dogs.


Ideal Afghan Hound coat


Typical coats?  More focus on correct coat texture.  If correct coat quality less maintenance and

often less amount.  Natural life, the guarding of the coat is hysterical. Wrapping, no free exercise, all to grow more coat.


Typical coats?  Newcomers? Some are shocked to see how

Afghans are kept, just to grow coat.  We need newcomers, both inside and outside the showring.  A good Afghan coat should only acquire a weekly bath/brushing as an adult.


Trimming, scissoring?


Typical coats?  A brush and a comb is no longer what is needed to

groom an Afghan Hound, unfortunately.  When did it start, and why?  How did Afghan people suddenly find out that we need to cut, clip and scissor our dogs?  Almost never penalized, even if the standard ask for a natural developed coat with no traces of clipping or scissoring. What if the eyes are too light, the bite is incorrect, poor angels? Penalized!


Typical coats?  Little knowledge among judges.  BIG responsibility among breeders.  Too few stands up for their believes  Too few have respect for the standard.  Only we can make a stop to what has

happened.  Afghan Hounds should not be shaped, they should have a natural look to them.


Can I be shown?


Trimming, scissoring?  If trimming needs to be done, use your

fingers or tools that will leave a natural look.  Natural saddles can be achieved if people are patient.  Clipping machines should not be a part of the householdâ˜ş


Trimming, scissoring?  Breed without scissoring?  Definitely possible  Who is willing to change?  Knowledge and respect.  Correct coats do not need to be

scissored!!!!!!!!!!

Afghan Hound: what is typical and why by Espen Engh, AHWC 2014  

Afghan Hound what is typical and why by Espen Engh Afghan Hound World Congress 2014

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