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helped incoming professionals get a sense of key issues and roles and relationships with other colleagues that they hadn’t been aware of.” The MacEwan University study aims to build on what Reeves and others have learned, says the MacEwan University study’s principal investigator Dr. Irene Coulson, with the goal of developing “a robust, sound, rigorous, evidence-based framework for interprofessional collaborative education, with curriculum to match.” The team will ground its research in the real world of nursing homes, first learning how staff and residents interrelate and then providing an educational program that incorporates simulation with the hope of increasing interprofessional collaboration and person-centred care. Over time, they’ll examine whether the education results in improved resident satisfaction, safety and health – and whether this way of learning can be transferred to other settings, providing a template for collaborative education.

Her own Harvard simulation experience provides a case in point. “We went from preconfigured assumptions about each other’s roles and place in the hierarchy to really flattening that – from being in somewhat adversarial roles to being equal partners who all had something valued to contribute to patient safety and effective care. We really coalesced as a team,” she says. “It impacted me so much that I realized I would devote the rest of my career to formalizing a way for nurses to know the value of other healthcare providers and to interact in meaningful ways – one little step at a time.”

Simulation has power to change behaviour because it combines immersive hands-on learning with emotional involvement and deep reflection... When you have that emotional experience, it creates a connection your brain just never forgets.

Simulation has power to change behaviour because it combines immersive hands-on learning with emotional involvement and deep reflection, says Colette Foisy-Doll of MacEwan University’s Clinical Simulation Centre, who recently became one of the world’s first Certified Healthcare Simulation Educators. “When you have that emotional experience, it creates a connection your brain just never forgets. Impactful simulation learning occurs in a psychologically safe environment, where you’re encouraged to make mistakes. It grounds people in common goals. Then when that team is out in the real world doing their thing, they can together remind each other what they want to achieve.”

Even the best interprofessional simulations function like “little droplets in the ocean” when training as a whole remains disjointed, Reeves cautions. Yet he has reason to hope the MacEwan University research will bear fruit. “They’ve started off well in terms of thoughtfully framing and underpinning their approach with theory. I am also pleased that the plans for the interventions they deliver and evaluate will be done in a rigorous fashion. It’s great to see really good academic work. Because we all want patient care and well-being to improve.” The MacEwan University team understands the need to offer a range of educational programs that involve multiple professions in collaborative learning. Research, work experience, classes and labs all could become opportunities for professions to learn together rather than in isolation as they do now, Coulson notes. “One of the challenges is redesigning education across all healthcare fields so we’re not teaching in silos and then expecting these professionals to go out and collaborate. We need to pull the thread of interprofessional collaboration through the entire curricu>

care | fall 2014

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CARE – Fall 2014 | College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Alberta  

In this issue: A unique home visit model of care is making life easier for palliative and geriatric patients in the Edmonton area. Does poor...

CARE – Fall 2014 | College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Alberta  

In this issue: A unique home visit model of care is making life easier for palliative and geriatric patients in the Edmonton area. Does poor...