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Pet Tips, Page 5 Central Valley Motorsports, Page 7 Clovis Night Out, Page 8 Dining Guide, Page 9

Let’s Talk Clovis, Page 10 Community Calendar, Page 15 Log of Shame, Page 16 Featured Recipe, Page 20

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LOCAL NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT

VOL. 4, NO. 12

october 10, 2013

“Clovis Night Out” Emphasizes Family and Safety + Fireworks By Carol Lawson-Swezey

The Clovis Police Department, for a third year, offered its own twist on the safety-oriented National Night Out with its “Clovis Night Out” event Friday, September 28th, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Sierra Meadows Park located at Sierra and Temperance Avenues. Clovis residents had an

opportunity to meet the officers and the professional staff who serve the community. Police offered information and sign-ups at a booth for the “Clovis Community Watch” neighborhood program. Let’s Talk Clovis, continued on page 10

Clovis Night Out, continued on page 8


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October 10, 2013

Clovis Roundup


Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

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Info provided by The City of Clovis & The Clovis Tourist Information and Visitors Center at Tarpey Depot. Revised and edited by Peg Bos of the Clovis Museum.


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October 10, 2013

Clovis Roundup

How to Protect Your Personal Finances from Identity Theft When someone uses your personal information – your name, Social Security number, credit card – without your permission, that’s identity theft. When they do it to commit fraud, that’s a crime. Identity theft is a growing threat, but if you prepare correctly and protect yourself in advance, it is possible to limit the damage. A free seminar at Fresno County Federal Credit Union can help you protect your identity. The Identity Theft Prevention seminar will be held Wednesday, October 23 from 6-7pm at the Cedar and Nees branch. You’ll learn how crooks get your personal information, how to minimize risk of identity theft, and what to do if you’re a victim and where to get help. To reserve free seating, visit www.FresnoCU. com. According to government sources, 9 million people have their identities stolen every year! Identity thieves can rent apartments, make purchases on credit cards, even establish telephone accounts in your name. Worse, you may not discover the theft for years – until you review your credit report or a credit card statement and find charges you didn’t make. Some victims of identity theft are forced to spend time and money repairing the damage. Some lose job opportunities, or are denied loans for education, housing or cars because of negative information on

credit reports. It’s relatively easy for someone to steal your identity – take action to keep your identity safe. While you’re out shopping, someone can lift your wallet, go through your unwatched belongings, or snoop over your shoulder. Scavengers go through your trash cans, or your mailbox. When businesses are hacked or hard drives are stolen, your records can be compromised. Online identity theft, as a matter of fact, is a fast-growing category. You’ve probably received unsolicited e-mail that promises payment if you provide bank account numbers. Remember, no legitimate retailer would ever ask you to submit personal data or passwords through e-mail. (If you receive e-mail from someone you don’t know, or if any e-mail or site makes you

feel uneasy, erase it.) From now on, keep all of your personal identification to yourself. Here are more ways to guard your identity and protect yourself from theft: • Never carry your Social Security card or number in your wallet or purse • Check your credit report yearly – to do so is completely free. Obtain your credit report from each credit bureau at www. AnnualCreditReport.com • Don’t turn the digits in your Social Security number into part of your PIN • Don’t tell anyone your PIN (and don’t carry it in your wallet or purse) • Always look for safe websites when shopping online (the URL will start with https://) • Read your emails and be aware of any

spamming, spoofing or phishing attempts • Use Verified by Visa and MasterCard codes when online shopping • If you think you are an identity theft victim, report it right away to your financial institution, the credit bureaus and call the ID Theft Hotline at 877-IDTHEFT. • Shred any papers with personal information in it, especially offers for credit you receive in the mail. A free shred day is being offered by Fresno County Federal Credit Union on Saturday, October 19th from 9 am to 1 pm at the Clovis branch, located on Clovis Ave and Palo Alto (maximum two file size boxes per person is permitted). Be sure to attend the free seminar at Fresno County Federal Credit Union on “Identity Theft Prevention.” It’s Wednesday, October 23 from 6-7pm at the Cedar and Nees Branch. Reserve free seating by visiting www.FresnoCU.com. At Fresno County Federal Credit Union, members have more confidence because they have easy access to a full range of services, including seminars, expert financial guidance, budget management, secure online and mobile banking, and online bill pay. Plus, free checking with no strings, savings without monthly fees, low rate auto loans and a low rate VISA. Visit Fresno County Federal Credit Union at www.FresnoCU.com or call (559) 252-5000 for more tips and tools.

Who Is Your Dentist? M a n y people know their dentist as the person that is fixes their teeth. All our lives we’re brain-washed about the dentist. They use the dentist as a tool to convince kids that if they don’t behave they will feel the wrath of the DENTIST. Have you ever heard, “ If you don’t behave, I’ll have the dentist pull out your teeth.” Probably more times than we ever want to remember. But really, how did this person get there, sitting in front of you checking out your teeth? This person, the dentist, is better known as a Doctor of Dental Surgery, ergo, D.D.S. This dental practitioner is a person who must undergo all the medical training a physician goes through, only their

emphasis is in the head and neck area. A dentist is expertly trained in regards to the teeth, but their emphasis far surpasses that. Their education involves all the tissues surrounding the mouth including the face, the head, and the neck. Tissues comprise the skin, the gums and the muscles. The supporting system or the bone involving the jaw, the face and the skull are their emphasis. We must not forget about the electrical system of the face, head and neck, which are the nerves that cause the muscles to move, including the muscles used for facial expression. It’s almost unimaginable all of the nerves, muscles, bones and teeth that are involved with the face. And guess what? They all do their thing automatically. Sometimes there is forethought involved with a smile, but a lot of our movements are natural reactions. Now you ask, who is the expert in this field? The dentist, of course. If you have problems with your teeth it is automatic to say, I’ll go see the dentist. But what if you’re having headaches, earaches, jaw pain, or even migraines. It’s not so easy to

figure out where you should go. But what if you knew who your dentist “was” and what they specialized in. Wouldn’t it be far easier to seek help? A toothache is something that involves many various aspects of these systems. Something as simple as sensitivity can be very frustrating to a person. You can’t just look at a tooth and say, “ Aha, there it is, sensitivity.” Sensitivity alone can be a very complex problem as it could involve various components of the facial system. So who gets to unravel the puzzle? Perhaps it’s your dentist. What if you are experiencing jaw pain? How do you know if it is from the joints? Is it a cartilage problem, a bony problem, is it a muscular problem? How would you know? Who has the expertise and the tools to figure it out? Perhaps, it’s your dentist. This is their area of expertise. Once the problem is identified, your dentist may be able to treat it. What about headaches? Is it being caused by stress, muscle abnormality, nervous (nerves) problems? Your dentist is your head and neck specialist. The

dentist is also your soft tissue specialist as it pertains to the oral cavity and all the surrounding structures. The shinbone is truly attached to the knee bone as the jawbone is connected to the skull bone. So you can start to get the picture that your dentist is far more involved in your well being than just teeth. And what about the artistic involvement? Well, that’s a whole other article by itself. Rest assured that your dentist is your head and neck specialist and “who” can treat you in the right direction. If you have any questions or wish to contact this writer you may do so at: Art of Design Implant, Cosmetic, and Family Dentistry Edward A. Treviño, DDS, FADIA 1040 E. Herndon Ave. #102 Fresno, California 93720 559-230-0809 559-230-0833 fax artofdesigndentistry@gmail.com www.fresnosdentist.com

Shaver Lake Fishing Report By Dick Nichols

Dick Nichols owner of Dicks Fishing Charters

Cold weather, some fog and mid morning gusty winds prevailed on Shaver Lake this past week, but the fishing was good for the most part for the heartiest of fishermen. According to guide Dick Nichols, of Dick’s Fishing Charters, his clients had anywhere from over a limit to over 3 limits on his 6 charter trips this past week. Most trips were 2 limits or more. Dennis Berry of Auberry and his brother in

law Bill Coleman of Southern California, connected with over 2 limits on their trip and 2 groups from Bakersfield picked up over 3 limits and 2 limits respectively. Other trips had near 2 to 2 limits. So, fishing in bad weather was not too bad, but according to Nichols he had to search each day for a school of spawning kokanee. The trout bite was fair with three 2 to 2.5 pounders caught this week including Cal Fire Captain Jared Krum’s 2.5 pounder. Captain Krum was out with Nichols celebrating his 33rd birthday. Another 2.5 pounder was caught with Nichols by Rudy Lauterio of Chico. The best locations were Stevenson and Tunnel Creek areas, Eagle Point and Dorabel Cove. The kokanee came up to 20 to 25 feet deep and were hitting on Apex, with corn, behind Mini Mountain Flashers and Trout Busters, tipped with corn and crawler, behind Mini Mountain Flashers on the other down rigger. The side poles were equipped with Trout Buster’s tipped with corn and crawler behind a weighted Mountain Flasher’s at 20 feet deep. Nichols said that fewer boats were on the water due to the inclement weather, but he did see a few anglers that were still fishing from anchored boats in the Tunnel Creek area. It was unknown what their success was.

Two couples from Bakersfield, Ray and Julie Etcheverry and Ray and Joan Rexford, picked up this nice stringer of mixed kokanee and trout this past week while fishing Shaver Lake.

Bank fishermen wrapped in warm clothing were seen in a few locations around road’s 1 and 2 and the dam. Reports were that a few yearling trout were caught from the bank this week, but short on the DFW normal size plants as Shaver has

not received a plant since the first week in August. Weather reports call for mid 70’s weather this week with some mid morning wind. The water temperature is down to 67-68 degrees and the lake capacity is at 62%


Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

Mixed breed dogs making a comeback Certain dog breeds, such as golden retrievers, American bulldogs and Siberian huskies, have long been popular companion animals. While purebred dogs will never go out of style, new breed combinations have spurred renewed interest in mixed breeds. According to the independent Costa Rican adoption agency Territorio de Zaguates, new breed names have helped increase the profile of mixed breeds. The group has begun the process of renaming its shelter pets with new, unique names. The monikers are based on physical characteristics of the animals as well as supposed breed makeup. Breeds such as the chubby-tailed German dobernauzer or the Alaskan collie fluffyterrier are just two of the organization’s newly dubbed dog breeds. According to Territorio de Zaguates, newfound interest in their mixed breeds has been staggering, with adoption rates jumping 1,400 percent since the campaign began a short time ago. The ASPCA says more than 75 percent of dogs in shelters are mixed breeds. Though the widespread interest in dog rescues continues to grow, the number of adoptions has waned in recent years. It could be because most of the dogs in shelters are mixed breeds, and there has long been a stereotype that such dogs are not as valuable as their purebred counterparts. But many dogs that are now registered with American and international kennel associations can trace their genetic origins to a handful of popular purebred dogs. For example, in the 1990s the mi-ki was developed and shares the bloodlines of the maltese, papillon and Japanese chin, while the kyi leo is a small companion dog breed that resulted from a cross between the maltese and the lhasa apso. New breeds are frequently created for miniaturization, breed enhancement or genetic mutation or to adapt to local climates and geography. Many of the popular mixed breeds of today have been crossed with poodles, long known for their intelligence and also their reduced

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About this Publication

Clovis Roundup is a publication that is published every other Wednesday and distributed weekly by Clovis Roundup Inc. throughout Clovis and surrounding areas. Donna Melchor - Publisher/Editor, editor@clovisroundup.com Ken Melchor - Vice President (559) 285-6687 kmelchor@clovisroundup.com Billy Xiong - Ad Design and Production (559) 289-8725 ads@clovisroundup.com Butler Web & Design - Online Coordinator www.ButlerWebAndDesign.com Joaquin Hernandez - Photo Journalist (559) 779-2409 joaquinh@aol.com Contributing Writers Carol Lawson-Sweezey - Featured Articles Peg Bos - Let’s Talk Clovis Don Curlee - Ag at Large April French - Police Log of Shame Paul Hinkle - Central Valley Motorsports Dick Nichols - Fishing Report Dr. Edward Trevino - Featured Articles

propensity to shed. Yorkipoos, schnoodles, cockerdoodles, and labradoodles are just a few of the newer breeds that have been paired with poodles. According to Animal Planet, many of these poodle hybrids are among the most popular of the mixed breeds. Additionally, cavachons, a cross between cavalier King Charles spaniels and the bichon frise breed, as well as chiweenies, a cross between chihuahuas and dachshunds, are growing in popularity. Many mixed breeds living in shelters were not intentionally crossed. Nonetheless, the resulting animals are still attractive to dog lovers, many of whom find mixed breeds more attractive than purebreds for a variety of reasons. * Mixed breeds tend to live longer,

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healthier lives because they may not be subjected to the inbreeding of some of the purebred varieties. * Mixed breeds may have a lower risk of some of the genetic diseases that plague certain pure breeds, including hip problems or eye diseases. * Very often mixed breeds are much less expensive than purebred animals. Mixed breeds are in abundance at area shelters and are frequently given away free to good homes. Mixed breed dogs have become increasingly popular thanks to clever marketing tactics and the public’s realization that mutts can make equally lovable pets as purebred pups.

Accounting Services Teresa Stevens - Certified Public Accountant (559) 326-2029 teresa@tmstevenscpa.com The Clovis Roundup is a custom publication. 2491 Alluvial Avenue Suite # 540 Clovis, CA 93611 | (559) 326-2040 www.clovisroundup.com To submit events for the CR Calender, email calendar@clovisroundup.com For Advertising, email kmelchor@clovisroundup.com Reproduction by any means of the entire contents or any portion of this publication without written permission is prohibited. The appearance of any advertisements in this publication does not constitute support or endorsement for any product, person, cause, business or organization named therein, unless specifically noted otherwise in the advertisement.


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Should You Leave the Leaves Alone? It looks like summer finally gave way to fall and the leaves are really dropping. Leaves end up everywhere including the roof, gutters, walks, flower beds, and the lawn. In some cases they can get pretty thick depending on the surrounding trees. The question is what is the proper thing to do with all those leaves? Are they beneficial or harmful? It depends. The leaves are a good source of carbon and can help enrich soils as they breakdown and feed all the little soil microbes. When the accumulated leaves reach a point where the lawn or flowers are completely buried and worse yet, wet and matted then you risk thinning and damaging the plants below. Extended periods of low or no light will result in yellow, thin and elongated leaves. You see they need light to do their photosynthesis and make that green chlorophyll. How should you manage the leaves then? I would suggest that leaves could be allowed to accumulate and decay in flower beds if you are okay with the look. It can help build healthier soils, reduce weeds, and retain more soil moisture. Green plant material should not remain covered for more than a week and perhaps shorter in the case of wet matted leaves. For coolseason lawns that do not go dormant I would recommend mulching the leaves into the lawn with a mulching mower when the lawn and leaves are dry enough to do. If the leaves are too thick they may need to be raked off. Another solution during leaf fall is to mow more frequently to allow the mulching mower to effectively mow the grass and leaves without leaving piles of debris. If clippings pile up during

the mowing process the accumulated clippings could be mowed again, raked, or blown to distribute the piles and keep the turf healthy. Dormant lawns should have the leaves mulched in or raked off during the winter prior to spring green up. While leaves can be good for soils, they must be managed. Do not let them form a dense mat on desirable plant material like flowers or lawns as they can cause thinning, yellow leaves in lawns and flowers. Removal or mulching are your two options and must be done regularly during heavy periods of leaf drop. Fall is also a great time to aerate and overseed lawns to rejuvenate them. Please check out our website at Fresno. WeedManUSA.com or call our office at 559-266-1624 for more information on lawns.


Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

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Central Valley Motorsports - SPONSORED BY HEDRICKS CHEVROLET -

By Paul Hinkle

Fall has entered with some great weather, except for the unexpected rain showers that took all of us by surprise. Take advantage of this perfect weather with a cruise around the valley. CLOVIS PARK IN THE PARK The last Clovis Park in the Park for this year was held on Saturday, September 21st. The overcast skies didn’t keep the car enthusiast away. Cars started arriving around 4:00 in the afternoon and by 5:30 the grass in front of the park was lined with cars. The BBQ’s were fired up and everyone was eating by 5:30. Kitahara Buick GMC sponsored this gathering and Glass King Inc. in Pinedale provided the food for everyone. Next year the first gathering at the park located on the corner of Clovis and Sierra will be held May 17, 2014 and each month thereafter through September 20, 2014. It is held on the third Saturday of the month. 11th ANNUAL CLOVIS BRITISH CAR ROUNDUP On the last weekend of September, British cars from all over California merged on the streets of Clovis. The British Car Roundup began on Saturday with a group cruise through the foothills and a catered lunch benefiting the Valley Nature & Education Center near Clovis. Saturday

was capped off with dinner at Yosemite Falls Restaurant on Shaw Avenue. Sunday morning British cars lined up on both sides of Pollasky Avenue south of Bullard. There were DeLoreans with their gull wing doors open and Jaguar XKE’s with the hoods up. Mini Coppers, Triumphs, Austin Healeys, Morris Minors and Bugeye Sprites were on display just to name a few. Sharyn &Terry Brown brought their beautiful Black 1956 Austin Healey. Most people when seeing it for the first time, mistake it for a Cobra. This event is the only place in the valley where you can view such a variety of British cars all parked in one place. EVENT WINNERS: Austin Healey AH 100/3000 – Jeff Boldt, Kingsburg, 1964 3000 Austin Healey Bugeye – John Wood, Oakhurst, 1960 Sprite DeLorean – Ken Wurscher, Hanford, 1981 DeLorean Jag Open - Don Hall, Fresno, 1952 Jaguar Mark VII Saloon Jaguar XKE - Mike McKinney, Fresno, 1967 Jaguar XKE MG Open – Larry Long, Santa Maria, 1933 MG J2 MGB – Bryce Cole, Squaw Valley, 1966 MG MGB MGT – Louis Levin, Modesto, 1952 MG MGTD Morris – Keith Smith, San Luis Obispo, 1959 Morris Traveller New Mini – Doug Bennett, Modesto, 2003 Mini Copper S

Old Mini – Jon Brothers, Clovis, 1970 Austin Mini Copper S MKII Open – Dave Wolin, Oakhurst, 1948 Anglia Fire Truck TR3 – James Reid, Fresno, 1960 Triumph TR3A TR4 – Russ Weber, Fresno, 1964 Triumph TR4 TR6 – Terry Starr, Fresno, 1973 Triumph TR6 Triumph Open – Robin Gunderson, Fresno, 1969 Triumph GT-6 Winners Circle – Barbara Newton, Golden Valley, 1967 Jaguar 420G Best of Show – Larry Long, Santa Maria, 1933 MG J2 UP COMING EVENTS: Oct. 12th Fall Finale Mopar Car Show Madera, 2nd Annual Autumn Car Show at Clovis Christian Church, Sports Cars in the Park Oakhurst, Oct 18th – 20th 22nd California Hot Rod Reunion, Oct. 19th Mariposa Yosemite Hot Rod & Custom Car Show, Nov. 2nd The Pontiacs of Central California Toys for Tots Car Show, 23rd Annual Cayucos Car Show, Nov. 3rd Turlock Swap, Nov. 9th –10th 24th Autumn Get-

Together Pleasanton, Nov. 15 – 17th Motor Trend 2014 Model Car Show Fresno, Nov, 22nd – 24th Goodguys 3rd Fall Del Mar Nationals, Dec 7th Mooneyes X-Mas Party Car Show & Drags, Dec 8th Pomona Swap Meet. If your club or organization is putting on a car show or motorsports event, please send your information to clovismotorsportsjamboree@gmail.com or call me at (559) 970-2274. I’m also looking for interesting cars and events to share with everyone.


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Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

Clovis Night Out

Continued from page 1

People may browse the more than 65 food, game and vendor booths. Those who attendied were able to see and sit in law enforcement vehicles, military vehicles and the city’s very large sanitation trucks and specialty vehicles. The Clovis Fire Department had engines on display and offered families an opportunity to operate a fire hose. A Clovis Police captain was sent into the dunk tank. Youngsters participated in SWAT team demonstrations, enjoyed “free” bounce houses, and face painting. This community event is designed to bring friends and families together for an enjoyable evening with safety in mind. Two live bands performed, and the evening drew to a close with a fireworks show.

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Clovis Roundup

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October 10, 2013

Ag at Large – Political clout: Cities penetrated by the farm vote By Don Curlee

If you blinked last November you might have missed one of California a g r i c u l t u r e ’s major political triumphs of the past decade. It defeated two unfriendly state legislators. Both Michael Allen and Betsy Butler had spent their terms in Sacramento opposing legislation that farmers supported. They repeatedly expressed support for issues and measures that farmers tried to defeat. When called on to vote for or against a measure farmers considered important neither of them was particularly cooperative. Neither legislator represented a farm community. Allen was sent to Sacramento by the citizens of a mostly residential Sonoma County district. Butler represented a district that kind of wrapped around LAX, mostly middle class and moderately Hispanic. Of course, both were Democrats,

making their pro-union alliances a matter of fact, and their allegiance to anti-business, anti-farm preferences a given. Both were committed to the passage of a measure that would have amended the state’s landmark farm labor election law, making it more difficult for farmers to stand their ground in opposition to unionization of their workers. Major farm organizations such as Western Growers, California Grape & Tree Fruit League, California Citrus Mutual and the Nisei Farmers League decided they could muster the clout and the dollars to run campaigns against the two protagonists in their own districts. Brochures were distributed pointing out how the legislators’ support for or opposition to certain measures were detrimental to their constituencies as well as agriculture. It worked. Both were defeated, and their replacements, both Democrats, were greeted by members of the agricultural contingent, hopeful of a more open and congenial relationship. The bond between the newly elected candidates and agriculture has grown even stronger as they complete their first year as their

districts’ choices in Sacramento. Beyond the effect of the hard-hitting campaigns in those two districts the concentrated and determined action by a united agricultural community sent a message to other legislators, warning what might happen if they were to be targeted. And it has brought an element of restraint to senators and assemblymen and women as they propose legislation, causing them to at least consider its effect on the state’s farmers. Sound down and dirty? Or does it indicate that a cooperative and conservative agricultural community has learned how to play a bit of political hardball when necessary? Representation in Sacramento for farmers has been an issue since the Supreme Court determined that the legislative process be based on one person having one vote. Prior to landmark Supreme Court decisions in 1962 and 1964 the state senate in California was composed of representatives whose district lines were drawn on a geographic basis, rather than on population. Senators from farming districts represented large land areas, and some

senators from heavily populated areas had districts only the size of postage stamps. The one-man-one-vote ruling changed all that, and denied the farm community of significant political strength.. Last year’s defeat of two urban legislators with platforms that were unfriendly to agriculture has brought a measure of new political confidence to the agricultural industry. Though it is costly to employ, the weaponry used has proven to be effective. With the state legislature composed predominantly of urban based, Democrat, union supporting representatives the position of the state’s farmers and agricultural interests can be overlooked in the day-to-day scramble of legislative give and take. But last year’s experience has shown that tunnel vision of that kind can be accompanied by peril. For incumbent legislators protection comes in the form of an awareness at least, if not an alliance with, the state’s agricultural community. Should a representative democracy work any other way?

How to ask others to donate to a good cause Financial donations are essential to nonprofit organizations’ survival, helping such organizations meet their operating costs and carry out their missions. However, asking for donations is not always easy. The following are some tips for individuals looking to raise funds for good causes. * Establish your target. The amount of money you hope to raise should be a realistic goal. For example, if you are participating in a fun run or walk to benefit a local charity, a goal of raising $1,000 is more realistic than a goal of $1,000,000. * Work as a team. Enlist the help of

volunteers who are truly passionate about the cause. Such team members are likely to work harder to raise funds. * Clearly identify the organization you’re supporting. Some groups are easily recognizable, while smaller organizations may not be as readily known. Take steps to ensure donors are fully aware of the organization you’re supporting. * Know where the money will be going. Prospective donors will want a clear picture of how their donations will be used. Have such information readily available when seeking donations. * Ask for donations in person. Friends

and family are far more likely to support a loved one’s attempt to raise money for a good cause when such solicitations are made by the individual and not sent out as a mass email from the charity itself. A personal appeal also gives fundraisers the chance to explain why the cause means so much to them. * Let donors know that no donation is too small. Individuals who keep their fundraising goals realistic should recognize that no donation is too small and that some prospective donors may only be able to afford smaller contributions.


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October 10, 2013

Clovis Roundup

‘Let’s Talk Clovis”, 120 Years of Ministry, 1893-2013, Clovis Memorial United Methodist Church and their families. By Peg Bos, Clovis Museum

Methodists from the Academy Church and those who worshiped at Mississippi School united to build the first church in Clovis in 1893. It is believed that the church was the first building erected west of Fulton (Clovis Ave). A circuit rider from the Visalia District Millerton Circuit served Methodists at Dry Creek (Academy) and those at the 1869 Mississippi School (quarter mile north of Little Dry Creek between Behymer and Perrin). Community gatherings and church services were often held in schools and that practice continues today. Circuit riders were not always ordained ministers but were required to deliver sermons, obey the rules of the Church and have a horse for transportation. Church families would provide them lodging and food during their visit. The Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church South was formed at Academy in 1865. Rev Joel Hedgpeth was appointed pastor the same year. He was described as a good pastor and a good friend. Rev. Hedgpeth was cross-eyed and young worshipers were always attentive as it was difficult to know who he was looking at. He became the first pastor of the Clovis church and served from 1893-1897. He was a gentle man. At one time, he was admonished for not preaching “fire and brimstone”. He responded that he believed preaching love was the true message. Poems were often part of his sermons. John Greenup Simpson and family arrived in the Dry Creek area in 1852 and eventually owned over 7,000 acres of range land. He and his wife Sarah donated land for the Academy Church (168/Tollhouse Rd. and N. Madsen Ave), a parsonage and cemetery (Mendocino Ave). A simple one room wooden church was erected in 1868. The church continues to celebrate liturgical services and community gatherings under the jurisdiction of the Clovis United

Methodist Church. In 1893 John W. Potter and James Cate purchased four lots ($10 each) at southwest corner of Fifth and Woodworth. That building was destroyed by fire 1900 (?). It was quickly replaced and expanded in 1908. A larger church and Sunday school annex was built in 1920. The congregation moved to its present location (1726 Pollasky) in 1963. The Valley Community Church of God now worships at the former location. The Clovis Presbyterian Church (built 1912 at North West corner of DeWitt & Fifth) sold their building to the Clovis Masonic Lodge in 1930. The Presbyterian Church had ceased services there many years prior to the sale. Many Presbyterians joined the Methodists during that time. A service of dedication was held on June 13, 1948. Dedication of the church organ and carillon (bells) were in memory two Clovis Gold Star Heroes of WW II,

Warren Arbuckle and Sidney Smith. The organ continues to serve the congregation at their Social Hall. In 1951 the Jane Cole Circle presented “Pageant of the Brides”. Jane Cole was the wife of Academy sheep baron William T. Cole. She bore him 10 daughters (each married 10 local cowboys). Third and fourth generations of those families continue to support the Academy Church. The pageant included gowns worn by Mrs. Lina Briscoe (1901); Mrs. J. Wise Browne, (1909); Mrs. Carl Merriman, (1912); Mrs. Carl Polson, (1913) and Mrs. Thomas Howison (1913), who were married at the church. In 1993 Diane Slocum-Zastovnik (author and member of the church) published “100 years in Ministry”. Twenty-two names and the years of their membership were listed. Six of the 22 survive: Norma Nelson Meek (82 years), Marilyn Smith Weyant (76 years), Peg Rogers Bos (72 years), Duane Wamsley, Helen Nelson

McGaughy and Harry Rogers (71 years). All are from early day Clovis families. Roberta Simpson Coon (great granddaughter of John and Sarah Simpson) and Ray Hedgpeth (1920-2010, great grandson of Rev. Joel Hedgpeth) founded the Academy Church Circle to preserve the church and continue worship services. The non profit Academy Community Foundation was formed this year to continue financial support of the church that is the oldest continuing Protestant church in Fresno County. A celebration of the 120 years of Methodist ministry will be held on October 19th at the Academy Church. Greetings from former Ministers, music, games and a boutique will begin at 10:00 am. A BBQ will be served at noon (reservations available, Mary Tolle, 299-6484). The United Methodist Church is a part of our rich heritage.


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October 10, 2013

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Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

Mayor Ashbeck at the helm By Carol Lawson-Swezey

Clovis Mayor Lynne Ashbeck believes making our community better lies within the power of each individual. “If everyone could do one thing- big or small- to make the community a better place, we would all be well served,” Ashbeck said. It is that philosophy, an idea which emerged from a Clovis Chamber of Commerce breakfast, which is at the core of the city’s Care for Clovis campaign. That campaign will roll out later in the fall. “We certainly cannot control what happens in Sacramento or Washington D.C.,” Ashbeck said, “but we absolutely are in charge of the kind of place we want to live in.” The new campaign is one of many that Ashbeck has been a part of in her 12 years of service on the Clovis City Council. Add to that her service since 1987 on the Personnel Committee and Planning Commission and you have a lot of noble work to be tallied. But for Ashbeck, it’s all for the good of the community she loves. “Clovis is the best community in the Valley. Period. We have a strong sense of our history, shared values among our

residents, tremendous public safety services, and consistent leadership in our City government over the last 100 years,” she said. “As an example, we have had nine City Managers in our 101 year history. In contrast, a recent Fresno Bee article noted that the City of Fresno has had seven City Managers since 1997. There is something to be said for steady, consistent leadership and consistent, competent local government services across generations. We share many of these traits with Clovis Unified School District, a relationship that over the last 50 plus years has been a big part of making Clovis the place it is today.” Ashbeck was voted in as the mayor of Clovis this March by fellow council members- the second term she has served in that office. She was first elected to the City Council in 2001, served as mayor from 2003–2005, and has been re-elected to subsequent council terms in 2005, 2009, and 2013. In that time, she founded the Clovis Citizen’s Academy, a five-week training program to help Clovis residents learn more about local government and is active with the League of California Cities Institute for Local Government initiatives around civic engagement and public participation. When asked about the difference between the city’s needs during her last term as mayor and now, Ashbeck said the city is larger, more populated and requires more public service needs for police, fire, parks and public utilities. “We are ‘older,’ having celebrated our centennial in 2012 and now beginning our second century. We are also a stronger city having weathered the economic storms of the last several years so our fiscal policies have been tested and reinforced. But the fundamental needs of our citizens… a competent local government…are the same,” she said. The city’s priorities remain essentially the same. “Our entire Council shares the same goals regardless of who is wearing the Mayor ‘hat’…sound fiscal ‘health’ of our city, engaged employees and citizens, smart land use planning, jobs for our residents, investing in our civic infrastructure for our future needs, maintaining our position as the safest city in the Valley, and regional leadership,” she said. “We don’t waiver very far from those core competencies of local government.”

Personally, Ashbeck said she is committed to ensuring that citizens have as many opportunities to engage with local government as possible. “The chance for everyone who wants to be ‘heard’ to do that is really a core value for me in local government. I also am keenly aware of the need to never lose sight of the core competencies of local government…while responding to our growing community and changing environment. We want to be the best example of local government around…and keeping our eye on that is important.” Ashbeck said the highlights of her career thus far are too numerous to count but a few stand out. “We weathered the economic ‘storm’ and are financially sound. Over the last 12 years, we have invested in our civic infrastructure to ensure our ability to ‘grow well’…a wastewater treatment plant, a surface water treatment plant, new parks, two new fire stations, and more. Our General Plan process is almost complete, with clear visions for our southeast, northwest and northeast growth areas. But mostly, it’s the people. I established the Clovis Citizens’ Academy for our residents to learn more about local government and the annual Mayor’s Legacy Luncheon where we invite our former elected officials to reflect on our history and our future,” she said. But it’s the touches of humanity which have moved her most. “It’s the folks whose homes are touched by the World Changers events…the family whose loved one was saved by our firefighters…the senior citizen who calls to thank you for the public utilities staff who helped them with their garbage cans…the sixth graders who interviewed our Clovis ‘founding leaders’ and came to the Council to share what they had learned….the home builder who helped relocate a neighbor because their child could not live near fields being plowed during construction. The ‘human element’ of this work is incredibly amazing and rewarding. It’s really what makes Clovis…Clovis.” As if she didn’t have enough to do as council member and mayor, Ashbeck has another day job as well. In her professional life, Ashbeck is the regional vice president for the Hospital Council of Northern and Central California based out of the Fresno office. The Hospital Council is a nonprofit hospital

Clovis Streets to close for Color Run-October 13th Elm

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The Color Run will be held on Sunday, October 13, 2013 starting at 8:00am. The Color Run is a fun, family 5K (3.1 mile) run/walk event where participants are pelted with colored cornstarch at 4 color stations on the course. The Clovis Color Run course is on Clovis Avenue from Santa Ana to 3rd Street. Road closures for the event will start at 7:45am and will remain closed until approximately noon. (See road closure map for times.) East/ West travel through Clovis will need to use Herndon or Ashlan. The pre-race and post-race party are being held in the south parking lot of the Sierra Vista Mall. The mall has been great helping us with promotion, parking, and space. People can register Saturday at packet pick up which will be inside the Sierra Vista Mall (between Sears and Kohl’s). Packet pick up is 10:00 am to 6:00pm. The cost is $45. They can also register the day of the event or by visiting www. TheColorRun.com. If running or walking isn’t your thing, we need lots of volunteers too. Volunteers can register at the same website. Some of the proceeds from this event will go to Clovis Area Recreation to help purchase youth sports equipment. There is also a Flea Market at the Rodeo Grounds that weekend on both Saturday and Sunday. On Sunday, flea market attendees should access the flea market by entering on 5th Street from Sunnyside until the roads reopen.

San Gabriel

The Color Run - October 13, 2013 Race Route

7/1/2013

Intersection Closures (7:45am - 10:15am)

Road Closure (7:45am - 12:00pm) Road Closure (5:00am - 2:00pm)

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and health system trade association established in 1961, representing 190 hospitals in 50 of California’s 58 counties—from Kern County to the Oregon border. “My role is serving the common interests of hospitals…leading projects and issues ranging from nursing education to community health to mental health, homeless patients, and disaster preparedness… and everything in-between,” Ashbeck said. “Hospitals are essential to every community’s ‘safety net’ and it is a privilege to do work on their behalf.” Ashbeck is also involved in many community and regional organizations, including the Board of Trustees of Fresno Pacific University; the Board of the California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley, and co-founder of the United Way Women’s Initiative with Supervisor Susan Anderson, focusing on prescription drug use prevention in our communities. Ashbeck grew up in a military family and moved from San Diego to attend Fresno State, where she graduated in 1977 with a BA in home economics and later a MS in Nutrition. She earned a second Masters in 2012 from Fresno Pacific in Peacekeeping and Conflict Resolution. “That was a powerful life-changing experience,” she said. Balancing a high powered career and a political career takes organization, support and dedication. Ashbeck credits her success to her family support of husband Jeff, five grown children and three grandchildren, an amazing boss, a great colleague who works as her assistant at the Hospital Council, and city manager Rob Woolley and his staff. “I often tell our city employees that the only reason I can do the City Council work is because they make it easy for me…they deserve all the credit for doing such a good job at the ‘daily’ work of our city,” she said. And Ashbeck plans to just keep steering the city helm. “My community service philosophy is likely best reflected in a quote I often use…”plant a tree under which you will never sit,” she said. “We are all enjoying the fruits of our parents’ generation…and we have a responsibility to leave something better for our kids…and their kids. If we don’t do it, who will?”

Wake Up Clovis Join the Clovis Chamber of Commerce at Wake Up Clovis on Friday, October 18th to hear from Steve Ward, Associate Superintendent Administrative Services of Clovis Unified School District. Steve will be talking about the impact of the governor’s realignment plan that takes money from successful school districts to fund others that are struggling. Locally, CUSD is losing millions of dollars while Fresno Unified is gaining millions. The difference in the per pupil expenditures between the two districts will jump to over $3,900. CUSD has historically received less funds per student yet it runs an award winning budget and scores high on the academic scale. Come at 7:30 am to order breakfast from the menu. Steve will start his discussion at 8 am. Seven Café & Grill is located on the north east corner of Shaw and Minnewawa behind the Wells Fargo Bank. Fran Blackney Communications Director
Business Advocate Clovis Chamber of Commerce
325 Pollasky Ave
Clovis, CA 93612 559 299-7363


Clovis Roundup

Clovis Blood Drives The holidays are almost here which means more folks will be traveling the freeways for extended periods and unfortunately more accidents happen. The Central California Blood Center needs to be prepared by making sure we have an adequate blood supply for our Valley hospitals The Great Pumpkin Blood Drive, though it is in Fresno, will be the big event of October and Clovis through October 27. Residents are encouraged to participate. Donors at the blood centers will receive a voucher for a pumpkin throughout the month. Sunday donors at the Pumpkin Patch at Shaw and Blackstone will receive a pumpkin plus treats such as hot dogs and shaved ice, plus fun for children. Fresno donor centers are at 1196 E. Shaw Avenue, #102, 1010 E. Perrin Avenue, 4343 W. Herndon and the Visalia center is at 1515 S. Mooney Blvd. The centers operate from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, except that Visalia closes at 1 p.m. on Saturday. One pint of blood can help save up to three lives. Volunteers can also join the National Marrow Donor Program Registry. For additional information, please call (559) 389-LIFE (5433) or visit www.donateblood.org . Blockbuster Video – October 12, 4:00 – 7:00 p.m., 1610 Herndon Ave., Clovis. All donors will receive a variety of discounts from Valley businesses for dining, recreation, entertainment, and services. Vons – Fowler and Ashlan – October 12, 12noon – 4:00 p.m., 3100 Fowler Ave., Clovis. All donors will receive a free vintage T-shirt. Schneider Electric – October 15, noon – 4:00 p.m., 3500 Pelco Way, at three locations – Pelco Buildings #2, #3 and #7. All donors receive a voucher for a discount to the Big Fresno Fair plus a voucher for a free pint of Baskin Robbins ice cream. First Baptist Church – October 27, 9:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., 2080 Tollhouse Road, Clovis. All donors will receive a variety of discounts from Valley businesses for

2013

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October 10, 2013

Upcoming Events PINK PANCAKE BREAKFAST AT HEDRICK’S CHEVROLET Help Hedrick’s make strides in the fight against cancer, October 19th, 8am to 11am. Hedrick’s Chevrolet – 961 W. Shaw, Clovis. Guardians of the Ribbon Pink Heals Fire Truck, Fresno State Women’s Basketball Team…and more! $5.00 Donation –(559) 291-7711 ROCKTOBERFEST: RocktoberFest (Wednesday, October 9th from 10:00am-1:00pm) is the largest event that Willow International puts on each year. There are three aspects to it: 1.) Transfer/four year Universities will attend to speak with and recruit our students looking to transfer 2.) We will be holding a JOB FAIR open to the public! So far, both Jem Management and Target will be looking to hire (we will have plenty more by the event). Veteran’s Employment Services will be out as well. 3.) We also use that day to market our Student Educational Plans (SEP’s), which assist our students with completing their educational goals in a timely manner. A car show (I will send you the flyer tomorrow-please do the best you can to advertise it), commercial vendors, live music, food and college programs and services will play a prominent part in the event as well. Join “The Color Run” in Clovis and Help Improve the Rec Center Are you ready for some family fun? Join this year’s first “Color Run” in Clovis on October 13th at 8 a.m. The course begins at Sierra Vista Mall, continues north on Clovis Avenue to Fourth Street www.bing.com/search?q=the+color+ru n&form=MSNH14&pq=the+color+run &sc=8-13&sp=-1&qs=n&sk=&ghc=1 # where runners turn around and head back to the Mall. By the end of the run, you will be covered in color, courtesy of high school teams set up along the route. In addition, by signing up to run or to volunteer, you raise money for sports equipment for Clovis Area Recreation’s

dining, recreation, entertainment, and services. SIERRA HIGH SCHOOL BLOOD DRIVE All donors receive a mug and FREE special event T-shirt! October 14, 2013, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Sierra High School, 33326 N. Lodge Road, Tollhouse The administration, faculty, staff and students of Sierra High School invite you, your family and friends to join them in helping save lives by participating in a blood drive on October 14. A bloodmobile will be on site between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. All donors receive a mug and special event T-shirt! “The holidays are almost here which means more folks will be traveling the freeways for extended periods and unfortunately more accidents happen. The Central California Blood Center needs your help to be prepared by making sure we have an adequate blood supply for our Valley hospitals,” states Chris Sorensen, Director of Community Relations and Development. “We appreciate our faithful donors and also encourage first time donors to please consider giving the gift of life.” Blood donation takes less than one hour to complete. Donors must be in good general health, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be at least 17 years old (16 years old with written parental consent). Senior citizens are encouraged to donate, as there is no upper age limit. Donors should eat a good meal and drink plenty of water within 4 hours prior to their donation. Donors can give blood every eight weeks. Photo ID and Social Security Number are required at donor registration. The Central California Blood Center is the sole provider of blood and blood products for the 31 hospitals in Fresno, Tulare, Madera, Kings and Mariposa Counties and must collect between 5,000 to 6,000 pints of blood a month to meet the needs of our Valley community.

CLOVIS

CALENDAR

-OCTOBERClovis High 40 year class-reunion Saturday, Oct 12th 6 to 11pm The Clovis High School Class of 1973 will celebrate its 40 year class reunion at The Belmont Country Club, 8253 East Belmont Ave There will be a no-host bar starting at 6 p.m. with buffet dinner at 7 p.m. and dancing to follow. The cost is $30 per person. Deadline for making reservations is Oct. 4th. For more details contact Rhonda at rdickins@hotmail.com for tickets. Escape to Brazil with Rio Grill Saturday, October 12th Shows start at 6:30pm Rio Grill Brazilian Steakhouse 1240 Shaw Ave.- Sierra Vista Mall Join us for an authentic Brazilian Steakhouse Dinner & Live performances from Brazilian Samba Dancers 559-322-6300 $30 per person Color Run Sunday, October 13th starting at 8 am The Color Run is a fun, family 5K (3.1 mile) run/walk event where participants are pelted with colored cornstarch at 4 color stations on the course. The Clovis Color Run course is on Clovis Avenue from Santa Ana to 3rd Street. Road closures for the event will start at 7:45am and will remain closed until approximately noon. (See attached road closure map for times.) East/West travel through Clovis will need to use Herndon or Ashlan. Visit www.TheColorRun.com

expanded facility. More information: type in http://thecolorrun.com/fresno-clovis/ or call: (559) 324-2767. FRESNO COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY CONTRIBUTES TO AFFORDABLE CARE EFFORTS Fresno County Public Library is partnering with the Fresno County Department of Social Services to provide help for those seeking to register for health care under the terms of the new Affordable Care Act. Beginning October 1st, the Library will provide assistance in the following ways. 1. An information table, hosted by Covered California representatives, at the Central Library on October 1st. 2. Information sessions at seven Fresno County Public Library branches throughout October and November, provided by Covered California. 3. Forty-three enrollment fairs throughout the month of November at 14 different Library branches. Trained volunteers or agents will be on hand at every event to answer questions; laptops will be provided for the purposes of enrollment. Spanish speakers will offer additional assistance at 28 sessions and a Hmong speaker will be available at four events. These enrollment fairs are provided courtesy of the Fresno County Department of Social Services. There will be an enrollment fair at one or more Fresno County Library branch every day throughout the month of November, with the exception of Sundays and holidays. December dates will be announced in early November. 4. A dedicated website that provides: the phone number and website for Covered California; a short video introduction on navigating one’s options; dates, times and locations for informational sessions; dates, times and locations for enrollment sessions; and a link to background information on the Affordable Care Act. The website’s address is www.fresnolibrary. org/aca.html. 5. Bookmarks and posters to direct residents toward additional assistance.

Academy Church. 10667 N. Madsen (North on Madsen from 168/Tollhouse Rd Call Mary Tolle, 299-6484 for lunch reservations

to register. If running or walking isn’t your thing, we need lots of volunteers too. Volunteers can register at the same website. Some of the proceeds from this event will go to Clovis Area Recreation to help purchase youth sports equipment. “EAST MEETS WEST ARMENIAN MUSIC & JAZZ CONCERT” Sunday, October 13, 2013 7:00 PM LOCATION: Paul Shaghoian Concert Hall 2770 East International Avenue (At Willow) TICKETS: Adults $20.00; Students & Children $10.00 RESERVATIONS: Les Nunes (559) 289-0622 lesnunes@concert.net John Chookasian (559) 213-1909; chook3@ qnis.net ww Old Town Clovis Flea Market Saturday-Sunday, Oct 12th & 13th Clovis Rodeo Grounds Sunday, flea market attendees should access the flea market by entering on 5th

Street from Sunnyside Clovis Advantage Business Trade Show Wednesday, October 16th Veterans Memorial Building www.clovischamber.com DENIM & DIAMONDS DINNERDANCE-AUCTION Saturday, October 19, 6 PM Clovis Rodeo Grounds Hall Tickets: $30 and can be purchased at: A Book Barn (640 Clovis Ave) Bear Creek Cabin & Decor (on 4th between Pollasky/Clovis) San Joaquin College of Law (Joan Lassley) For more information phone: 324-8745. Academy Church Services and Events Boutique 10:am & Deep Pit Bar-B-Que 12: noon with live music games, and ministry. Saturday, October 19th Celebrating 120 years of Methodist Ministry at the historic 1868 Methodist

PINK PANCAKE BREAKFAST AT HEDRICK’S CHEVROLET Help Hedrick’s make strides in the fight against cancer Saturday, October 19th, 8am to 11am Hedrick’s Chevrolet – 961 W. Shaw, Clovis Guardians of the Ribbon Pink Heals Fire Truck, Fresno State Women’s Basketball Team… and more! $5.00 Donation –(559) 291-7711 American Legion Auxiliary October Luncheon Saturday, Oct 19th at 11:00-2:30 Clovis Memorial Building located at 453 Hughes Ave The memu will be ham, turkey and roast beef, salads, and wonderful baked goods. There will also be a fashion show sponsored by Barbra’s Fashion. Tickets available at the door for $10.00 Shred Day Thursday, October 19th from 9 am to 1 pm Fresno County Federal Credit Union’s Clovis branch (located at 175 N. Clovis Ave, one block south of Herndon) Up to two (2) file size boxes per person allowed; information is available at www. FresnoCU.com.


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Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

Log of Shame by April French-Naten

September 18, 2013 A local country western store that sells boots over on West Shaw Avenue was vandalized when someone decided to steal their security camera. Hey cowboy, you do know that up until the time you stole the camera it recorded you taking it right? Smile, you’re on Candid Camera buddy, and you can’t hide!

September 21, 2013 Ya know, stereotypes are usually in place for a reason. When I hear the words “band kids” I typically think of well-mannered, hard working students. But today, the band kids broke the mold when officers were called to Clovis and Santa Ana for a report of an injured person. Turns out, there was quite the fistfight between the tuba player and the drummer! The tuba player was booked into custody, and the drummer was whisked off to the ER for minor cuts and bruises. Dude, don’t mess with the tuba player yo! September 22, 2013 A non-injury traffic accident occurred near Peach and Swift when a car swerved to avoid a six-foot snake in the road! Animal control was called, and it did not take long to figure out that a neighbor in this area had an escaped pet snake wondering the streets! The snake was returned to its owner. The bumpers of the two cars that collided, well, they have a tad more damage to repair than the snake! September 23, 2013 A local party supply company had someone break into their facility and steal a 10ft x 10ft party tent during the night. REALLY? First of all, that was well thought out, because it’s not like you could fit that thing in the back of your Honda Coupe! Second of all, if you find yourself at a party with a 10x10 tent, do us all a favor and check for a receipt like a ninja detective! Stealing from a locally owned business is low and slimy!

CROSSWORD

September 20, 2013 An officer noticed a well-known transient gentleman stumbling down Fifth St., so he stopped to see how he was. The man was extremely intoxicated as he explained to the officer that he had found a $50 bill in the gutter earlier that day. Apparently, he hit the liquor lotto and drank it all away! He was arrested for being drunk in public. Looks like his luck just ran out!

LAST ISSUE’S ANSWERS

September 19, 2013 As far as I am concerned, if you are over 21, you are a competent adult and are responsible for your own destiny. So when this young buck had a run in with the law, he should have known that the authorities were not joking about those fun little probation searches they warned him about. When officers arrived to search the young man’s home, they found him in possession of narcotics. So, back to the slammer you go! Perhaps now you will take it a tad more seriously, eh?

September 24, 2013 A young woman began to get threatening calls from another young woman, and was very concerned about the content, so she called police. Turns out, her new boyfriend had a secret admirer that did not approve of him dating anyone but her. The kicker, the suspect was his 10-year-old neighbor girl that apparently has a crush on him despite the fact that he is 8 years older than her. He had no idea! September 25, 2013 Over on Pierce, a resident was given four animal citations because his pooch had three puppies and decided to relocate the pack. Apparently, mamma preferred the neighbor’s porch, and every time they would move her home she would bring all her pups back. Time to get them their own kennel! September 26, 2013 A local mobile home resident reported the crime of the century when someone broke into an elderly woman’s trailer and stole her brand new microwave. She suspects one of her jealous neighbors (all elderly men) but has no proof. Perhaps when she gets her new one she won’t brag about it nearly as much! September 27, 2013 A local gas station put a collection jar next to the cash register in order to do their part to help a local charity. Some young heathen ran in and stole the collection jar right off the counter, and bolted out the front door. I sincerely hope he tripped and hit his head on the run home! September 28, 2013 A woman in the 1800 block of Herndon Avenue reported a petty theft when someone stole her wallet while she was shopping. Luckily, she had very little cash, and only a few cards that she was able to cancel before they were used for a Sequoia National Parks pass. Joke’s on the thief… the government is shut down, so your pass is no good! September 29, 2013 A man was booked into custody for outstanding warrants when a citizen called police to report the man attempting to break into a car in a shopping center parking lot. Turns out, the owner of the car noticed the man, and sat watching as he called police. The thief was unsuccessful in accessing the car, but he was successful in drawing attention to himself and getting arrested! September 30, 2013 A van parked on the street became the target of a theft when someone decided to siphon out all the gas. Turns out, the van belonged to the church that it was parked in front of, and was the youth department’s transportation. The joke is on the thief, because instead of getting angry, this amazing group of kids decided they were going to pray over him! Talk about the sweet wrath/grace of God! *The above Police Logs are loosely based on actual events. The names have been changed to protect the innocent. The circumstances have been created and embellished for your entertainment.

ACROSS 1. Most favorables 7. 23rd Greek letter 10. Rated higher 12. Immature herring 13. Malignant skin neoplasm 14. Orange-red spinel 15. Hunted beings 16. Be obedient to 17. Excavate with a shovel 18. = to 100 cauris 19. Lose hold of 21. Highest card 22. Western Union message 27. The “Show Me” state 28. Early photo process 33. A public promotion 34. A group of statues 36. A single thing 37. Ireland 38. A raised speaking platform 39. Leavened bread 40. Farm animal shelter 41. Oral polio vaccine 44. Chinese fine silk silver

45. Chocolate-colored acidic pulp pod 48. ____ off 49. Hagiographa 50. Manuscripts, abbr. 51. Over the sea DOWN 1. Stare impertinently 2. Address a deity 3. Converts hide into leather 4. Matrimonial response 5. 13th Hebrew letter 6. Dentist’s organization 7. Fleshy fungus caps 8. Kill violently 9. License & passport 10. Refereed 11. Arbor framework 12. Luxuriant dark brown fur 14. Group purchasing protest 17. Insecticide 18. An island group of the S Pacific

20. A wooden hole plug 23. A purine base found in DNA and RNA 24. Spanish park 25. Atomic #18 26. Married woman 29. And, Latin 30. Cantonese dialect 31. Causing physical hurt 32. Short trips or tasks 35. Small craving 36. Paddled 38. Leuciscus leuciscus’ 40. Parting phrases: good____ 41. Figure skater Yuka 42. Opera song 43. Create social or emotional ties 44. Opposite of LTM 45. Icahn’s airline 46. Air Reserve base (abbr.) 47. Russian manned space station *See our next issue for Crossword Answers*


Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

9th Annual Hubbard-Baro Memorial Golf Tournament Scheduled

Page 17

Improperly disposed chemicals generate HazMat Response

The ninth annual Hubbard-Baro Memorial Golf Tournament at Fort Washington Golf and Country Club on November 11th not only serves to remember the two young men who gave their lives for our country, but also other soldiers in our valley who lost their lives or returned with severe physical injuries from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The money raised will go directly to the Fresno Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The donation is $175.00 per person. Check-in begins at 9:30 a.m. To sign-up or become a sponsor: www.hubbardbarogolf.com

Shoulder Tap Operation to Stem Alcohol Sales to Minors at Stores A California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) grant is allowing the Clovis Police Department to curb alcohol-related crimes in the city and stop the sales of wine, beer and liquor to teenagers in Clovis. Clovis Police conducted a “Shoulder Tap” operation to catch those buying alcohol for minors. So far, the $35,500.00 ABC grant as part of a yearlong agency partnership has produced 4 operations and education for licensed businesses. The results include: • 1 Informed Merchants Preventing Alcohol-Related Crimes and Tendencies (I.M.P.A.C.T.) Operation on Aug. 21: check with convenience/liquor stores to make sure they are in compliance with Business and Professions Code laws and have a copy of their license available. They also must pick up litter and clean up graffiti outside their stores. 20 locations checked; most in compliance. Next check will result in citations, if not in compliance. 1 Trap Door Operation on Aug. • 29: attempt by minors to gain entry into a bar by using an altered ID or someone else’s ID (borrowed ID, which is a felony). Officers in plain clothes worked with door security and bar owners to cite/ arrest minors trying to pass a false/altered ID. Several IDs were checked. Officers actually saw minors leaving bar lines, so the operation effectively acted as a deterrent. 3 businesses; 1 arrest. • 1 Party Patrol on Sept. 7: to stem alcohol issues among minors through preventive/proactive enforcement to

determine where and how juveniles get alcohol, address problem areas in Clovis and contact parents. 2 arrests; 3 citations; 69 contacts. • 1 Minor Sales Decoy Operation on Sept. 20: Police, in unmarked vehicles, dropped off underage decoys (age 17 to 20) at local stores that sell alcohol. The decoy attempted to purchase beer from store clerks. 30 of 31 businesses asked the 17-year-old for ID; 1 sold alcohol to the 17-year-old; 3 sold alcohol to the 20-year-old. The clerks were cited and released. The fine is $1,000.00 or more.

Clovis Fatal Traffic Accident Update The intersection of Clovis and Fifth shut down while the traffic team reconstructed the accident that occurred early morning on Wednesday, October 2nd. The road closures were on Clovis from 4th Street to 8th Street and on Fifth Street from Pollasky to Hughes Street to 8th Street and on Fifth Street from Pollasky to Hughes. A Clovis Police Officer was trying to conduct a traffic stop on a pick-up in the area of Clovis and Eighth when the driver accelerated away from the officer going northbound on Clovis. The victim was working on a piece of construction equipment in the northbound lanes of Clovis Avenue when the driver hit the victim and then hit another construction rig that was parked on Clovis Avenue. The driver, 31 year-old, Justin Desatoff was charged with a Felony DUI, causing bodily injury and was booked into Fresno County Jail. The charges regarding the

fatal accident will be forwarded to the Fresno County District Attorney’s office for the additional charge of vehiclular manslaughter.

Tip of the Day Regardless of how much red curb is painted in front of a fire hydrant, you must park at least 15 ft away from them.

On October 2, 2013 at 10:40am the Clovis Fire Department responded to the area of Helm and West Holland for a report of abandoned hazardous waste containers. First arriving units discovered approximately 25 containers holding an unknown substance. In order to minimize exposure to the public, the area was sealed off and additional assistance from the Department’s Hazardous Materials Team responded to evaluate each container. Resources were also provided by American Ambulance and Fresno County Department of Environmental Health. Hazardous Materials Specialists determined several containers held a type of pesticide. The remaining containers continue to be evaluated. Following the evaluation, the scene will receive a thorough clean-up using a certified hazardous waste hauler

coordinated through the Fresno County Department of Environmental Health. Fortunately, there were no injuries and the hazards were isolated so as to not require any evacuations in the area affected. Citizens are reminded that household chemicals should never be disposed of as part of the Community Clean-up. Improper disposal could lead to fines and possible criminal prosecution. Should you have chemicals that require disposal, the County of Fresno holds one hazardous waste “dropoff event” each year for county residents for disposal of paint, pesticides, used oil, batteries, electronic waste and other products that are considered hazardous waste. There is no charge for residential waste, but there are limits on the types and quantities of items accepted. Reservations are required. For more information, please call Fresno County Resources Division at (559) 600-4259.


Page 18

By Carol Lawson-Swezey

October 10, 2013

Clovis Roundup

Forever Plaid continues to be forever wonderful

A late summer storm, four angels blown in from Heaven and a night at the theater. It doesn’t get much better than this. CenterStage Clovis Community Theater (CCC Theater) ended their 2013 season, not with a whimper but a heavenly bang, with its production of Forever Plaid on September 19. 20 and 21 at the Rex Phebus Veteran’s Memorial building in Old Town Clovis. The small intimate production showcased the local and very significant talents of four singers and a pianist in the story of an early “boy band” who were given one more chance to take the stage after an untimely end to their career following a deadly car crash. The band, comprised of veteran performers Peter Allwine, Kyle Dodson, Eric Estep and Darren Tharp were complemented on the piano by Scott Hancock, who barely had any lines but held his own with his on spot accompaniment. The play was a perfect medium to highlight each individual characters personality and talent where no one stole the show but instead all balanced the production in general. The play, Forever Plaid, is an offBroadway musical revue written by Stuart Ross in New York in 1990 and now performed internationally. The show is a revue of the close-harmony “guy groups” (e.g. The Four Aces, The Four Freshmen) that reached the height of their popularity during the 1950s. Personifying the cleancut genre are the Plaids. This quartet of high-school chums’ dreams of recording an album ended in death in a collision with a bus filled with Catholic schoolgirls on their way to see the Beatles’ American debut on The Ed Sullivan Show. The play begins with the Plaids returning from the afterlife for one final chance at musical glory. To the mostly mature audience at the CenterStage production, many of the songs sung by the Plaids brought back a flood of good memories of slower and

simpler times and sentimental refrains. The songs included: “Three Coins in the Fountain”; “Undecided”; “Gotta Be This or That”; “Moments to Remember”; “Crazy ‘Bout Ya, Baby”; “No, Not Much”; “Sixteen Tons”; “Chain Gang”; “Perfidia”; “Cry”; “Heart and Soul”; “Lady of Spain”; “Scotland the Brave”; “Shangri-La”; “Rags to Riches”; and “Love is a ManySplendored Thing”. There were moments of gut splitting laughter interspersed with the jingles. A three minute salute to the Ed Sullivan Show provided a dizzying cascade of the four actors spinning in and out with variety acts ranging from plate twirling to Jose Jimenez and Popo Geo ( apologies to those readers under the age of 50). A tribute to Perry Como was a standout but this writer’s favorite was a combo delight of Tennessee Ernie Ford’s Sixteen Tons and Chain Gang. The “boy band” also incorporated audience members in its musical foray, taking photos and dragging an unsuspecting audience member on stage to try her hand at the piano for Chopsticks. The CCCT is currently discussing its venue for next season. Usually it is one large production and a smaller one. Earlier this year, CenterStage put on Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Coat. “We have always promoted family oriented productions,” said Teri-Ann Spraetz, president of CenterStage. “When our Artistic Director Chris Lang suggested a 1960’s themed show, a musical as a second play for us, we were delighted to present a show which could bring back so many fond memories of music from the ‘50s and ‘60s. We achieved a record number of attendees for a CS second show.” But this last production of Forever Plaid with a stellar cast of five held its own. From one show stopping production after another and a heart wrenching farewell medley, where the group knew this was finally the end of the road, Forever Plaid

propelled us to its loftier heights. As Eric Estep in his role as Frankie said, “All I want is that one perfect moment; that’s all we can hope for.”

He needn’t have worried. This production of Forever Plaid was a series of perfect moments again and again.


Clovis Roundup

By Carol Lawson-Swezey

After falling in love with the ambiance, culture and food of Brazil, Britney Pratt decided to open a restaurant reflecting all the passion and character of Brazil and other South American countries. Her love of exotic destinations was fueled by living in places like Ecuador and frequent visits to Cancun. Her dad and business partner, David Hatch, met, wooed and married a woman from Brazil. “My stepmom lived in Cancun and we would travel there quite a bit to visit her. Her best friend, who was also Brazilian, owned a small churrascaria (Brazilian steakhouse) and my father and I fell in love with the restaurant,” Britney said. “I was just finishing college and did not have anything lined up, and my dad had some money he wanted to invest. My grandparents had previously owned restaurants so we both thought it was a good idea for our family to get back in the business and what better genre of restaurant to open than a Brazilian steakhouse! We thought the Valley would

October 10, 2013

Page 19

Escape to Brazil at Rio Grill fall in love with it just like we did.” They opened the first Rio Grill Brazilian Steak House in Visalia on 12/19/2007. In October of the following year, they opened the Clovis location at the Sierra Vista Mall. With a business management background, the then 22 year old rolled up her sleeves and took that fateful plunge. “I didn’t have a restaurant background, but I like to think it’s just in my blood,” she said. The two restaurants follow the Brazilian steakhouse all-you-can-eat format (rodizio style) with a limited but hearty menu. “Customers can come in and create their own kind of meal that they want,” she said. ”We have Brazilian side dishes and appetizers, and a huge salad and garden bar. Then we have gauchos (Brazilian cowboys) who bring twelve to thirteen different cuts of beef, pork, chicken and pineapple from our open flame grill on skewers, and carve those meats table side. As much as you want! Our lunch prices start at $7.95 and $11.95 and dinner is $15.95 and $24.95.” Rio Grill is the Valley’s only Brazilian Steakhouse, and offers live Samba performances once a month. Samba is a type of Brazilian music and dance which is performed and celebrated during carnival in Brazil with elaborate costumes and performances. The trained dancers travel to each restaurant monthly to perform for guests. Brazilian Churrasco (BBQ) consists of side dishes such as Brazilian white rice, black beans, and stroganoff, fried bananas, and pastas. Some authentic Brazilian salads featured are salada de batata (potato salad) salada de frutos do mar (seafood salad) and salpicao (Brazilian chicken salad). Their grilled meats are hand cut in-house and include chicken drumsticks, spicy chicken, chicken hearts, chicken wrapped in bacon, garlic steak, peppered steak, tri tip, top sirloin, picanha (a Brazilian cut of beef), pork ribs, parmesan crusted pork tenderloin, and pork linguica sausage.

Appetizers offered in the bar include pao de queijo--Brazilian cheese bread, made from gluten free cassava (tapioca) flour. Customers can also purchase jars of delicious treats like Rio Pastel (a tasty Brazilian pastry filled with creamy cheese or meat) and a Gauchos platter (an assortment of grilled meats). Britney wanted her restaurants to reflect the exotic, carefree and joyful atmosphere of Brazil. “What is not to love about that!,” she said. “Their people, music, food and dance all emulate those characteristics, and I think that is why people keep coming back.” Britney said that the local Brazilian community has opened their arms to her businesses. “I deeply love and appreciate Brazilian culture,” she said. “Customers love Rio Grill. We make sure that our guests leave having had a great experience. We want our guests to feel like they were able to escape to Brazil with Rio Grill.”

Although it’s definitely been a challenge managing two busy restaurants, Britney said she is blessed with an amazing staff who believe in her, the restaurant and in each other. “We keep open lines of communication,” she said. “I am available to all of them, from my manager to my dishwashers, whenever they need me. We respect each other, and we love what we do.” Although the restaurants opened in the midst of a business weary recession, they have managed to not only survive, but thrive. “We are still trying to educate Valley residents about what Brazilian cuisine is all about. It has been a journey, but definitely a great one. Our success comes from the fact that we are all young adults. I am only 30 and started this whole process when I was just turning 22,” Britney said. “We all work hard, and respect each other. We opened right before the recession hit and have managed to keep our doors open six years later! To me that’s a success.”


Page 20

October 10, 2013

Family Features

A

utumn brings colorful foliage and perfect weather for entertaining indoors and out. As you plan your fall gatherings, consider stopping by your local farmers market to pick up all the ingre­ dients neces­sary for preparing a savory home cooked feast that’s sure to please any crowd. See how local inspira­tion and fresh ingredi­ents led celebrity Chef Tim Love to create his most recent recipes. Every fall, Chef Love takes inspiration from the end of summer harvest to create unique dishes, like his latest recipe for Balsamic Turkey Meatloaf with Balsamic Mayonnaise. Ripe fall vegetables are the inspiration for his Grilled Chicken Thighs with Sweet Potato-Balsamic Salad and his Grilled Brussels Sprouts with Balsamic Mayon­naise. All three recipes include Hellmann’s® Creamy Balsamic Mayonnaise Dressing, which combines the rich, great taste of Hellmann’s® that you love with a touch of sweet, aged balsamic vinegar. Whether you’re hosting a casual evening with friends or having the whole family over for a relaxing Sunday after­noon, these simple recipes are perfect for any occasion. Pair the dishes with clean table decor and your favorite refreshing beverages for an easy evening of entertaining. Carry a tradi­tional theme throughout the tablescape by using mismatched plates, cutlery and glasses. Tie napkins and cutlery together with twine, and then tuck in a little bouquet of fresh herbs from the garden to add a dash of color and homegrown goodness. For a daytime gathering, take the dining table outside to enjoy the beautiful fall weather and final weeks of grilling season. Lay out a blanket for the kids to picnic, and add a few games to keep them entertained. Savor the season by enjoying delicious meals and lasting memories in the company of your loved ones. For more recipes, visit www.Hellmanns.com.

Clovis Roundup

Grilled Chicken Thighs with Sweet Potato-Balsamic Salad A Chef Tim Love recipe Serves 4 Grilled chicken thighs: 4 chicken thighs, skin removed Peanut oil 2 tablespoons Tim Love Poultry Rub (or your favorite poultry rub) Sweet potato-balsamic salad: 2 cups large dice sweet potatoes 3 strips cooked bacon, diced 1/2 cup julienned onion 1/2 cup minced red pepper 1/2 cup Hellmann’s® or Best Foods® Creamy Balsamic Mayonnaise Dressing Salt and pepper Preheat grill to 400°F. Rub thighs with peanut oil and poultry rub. Place thighs on grill and close lid for 5 minutes. Open grill lid and flip chicken. Close lid and let cook for five more minutes until chicken is done (168°F). Mean­while, poach sweet potato in salted water for 5 minutes. Com­bine all ingredients and mix well. Season with salt and pepper.

Grilled Brussels Sprouts with Balsamic Mayonnaise A Chef Tim Love recipe Serves 4 20 Brussels sprouts 1/4 cup vegetable oil Salt and pepper 1 red chile, minced 1/4 cup Hellmann’s® or Best Foods® Creamy Balsamic Mayonnaise Dressing Preheat grill to medium high. Fill large saucepan half full of water and bring to a boil. Add Brussels sprouts and simmer for 4 minutes. Make water bath of half ice and water. Place sprouts in bath to cool quickly. Cut in half lengthwise. Oil sprout halves. Season with salt and pepper. Grill for 1 minute each side. Top with minced chile. Serve with mayonnaise.

Balsamic Turkey Meatloaf A Chef Tim Love recipe Serves 6 1 1/2 pounds ground turkey 1 cup bread crumbs 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 white onion, diced 1/2 cup Hellmann’s® or Best Foods® Creamy Balsamic Mayonnaise Dressing 1 (8-ounce) can tomato juice 3 tablespoons brown sugar 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce Salt and pepper Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix all ingredients, place in loaf pan and bake for 1 hour.

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Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

Page 21

University mourns passing of proud alumnus Peter Mehas

Dr. Peter G. Mehas, a Fresno State alumnus, student-athlete and servantleader who was an unfailing advocate for his alma mater and a fervent Bulldog athletics promoter, will be greatly missed by the university community. Dr. Mehas died Friday, Sept. 27, in a Fresno hospital. Dr. Mehas was well-known and liked throughout the Fresno State campus. He frequently attended a variety of academic and athletic events, always with a big smile and kind words for students, faculty, staff members, administrators and other alumni. As chairman of the university’s Centennial Celebration in 2010-11, he reveled in promoting the history of Fresno

State and in touting its bright future. In a Centennial interview he said: “I am so very, very proud to be a graduate. ... Thank goodness that I graduated from this university, did graduate work here. My children and my wife have all attended this university. Not only does this community owe a great deal to Fresno State – California State University Fresno – but I personally do as well.” A native of Fresno, Dr. Mehas received his bachelor’s degree from California State University, Fresno in 1962, his master’s degree from UCLA in 1967, and his doctorate in education from the University of Southern California in 1979. He was an All American, All Conference center at Fresno City College and played on Fresno State’s undefeated 1961 Mercy Bowl football team. He started his career as a teacher in Fresno and worked in educational positions on the local, county, state and national levels. Since 2007 he had served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the California State University system, which governs Fresno State and 22 other CSU campuses. Dr. Mehas and his wife, Demi, have two daughters, Alethea and Andreanna. Here are some comments from the Fresno State community: Joseph I. Castro, Fresno State President: “Mary and I are deeply saddened by the news that Dr. Mehas has passed away. He was an incredibly talented man who used

Boice Funeral Home celebrated its 100th anniversary

his gifts to serve others every day of his life. I was fortunate to get to know and work closely with him as the head of my search committee and a member of my transition team. I will miss his wisdom, warmth and unwavering Bulldog spirit. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Mehas family.” John D. Welty, President Emeritus, Fresno State: “I worked closely with Pete Mehas for 22 years and never met an individual more loyal to his alma mater and his community. Pete always put the needs of others first in his life and served with great passion and enthusiasm. He often remarked that he owed so much to Fresno State, but it is we who love the university and the community who owe so much to him.” Jacqui Glasener, executive director of the Fresno State Alumni Association: “Pete Mehas was a proud Bulldog like no other. From being a member of the Mercy Bowl Football team as a student, to returning to his alma mater to chair the Centennial Celebration and most recently heading the committee that brought Dr. Joseph Castro to Fresno State as our new president, he was always involved. We were pleased to present him with the Distinguished Alumnus Award for his tireless support of Fresno State and the community in 2002.” Thomas Boeh, director of Athletics: “On behalf of all that are associated with Fresno State Athletics, we are

deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Pete Mehas. As a former outstanding Bulldog student-athlete and member of the historical 1961 Mercy Bowl team, Pete embodied the concept of utilizing sport as a foundation for the development of dynamic passion and life-long leadership skills. Pete’s boundless service on behalf of the advancement of education as well as his extraordinary accomplishments as a leader, advocate and mentor, will remain as a continual source of great pride for those serving in the Department of Athletics and for Bulldogs everywhere. Pete will greatly missed and our deepest condolences go out to Demi and the entire Mehas family.” Moses Menchaca, president, Associated Students, Inc. (ASI) “Dr. Mehas was truly an inspiration and a mentor and was the voice of reason even when others disagreed. The CSU and Fresno State will truly miss him, but his work will last for generations.” Russel Statham, former ASI vice president of finance and current Fresno State administrator: “I served with Dr. Mehas on the CSU Board of Trustees when I was Fresno State student, and in fact sat next to him at meetings. He was one of my biggest mentors, providing me good advice on leadership and how to manage through difficult times. He was a humble servantleader who set a tremendous example for all of us.”

Alumni House launches new Wedding Education Program

September 27th. It opened in September of 1913, when it began serving families from a building located near Fourth Street and Pollasky Avenue. It has been with the Clovis Chamber of Commerce since 1918, the chamber’s second oldest member.The funeral home is now part of the nationwide Dignity Memorial® network of funeral, cremation and cemetery service providers which has more than 1,600 facilities nationwide and is North America’s largest provider of funeral services. The Smittcamp Alumni House at Fresno State will offer brides and grooms a Wedding Education Program with monthly planning seminars designed to help them navigate the wedding industry in a new partnership with Genesis Master of Events of Fresno, 2012 Wedding Coordinator of the Year. The new campaign, which will be announced today at a special event from 9-10 a.m., will also promote the university’s Smittcamp Alumni House as a wedding venue for Valley couples. A handful of weddings are held each year at the 10,000-square-foot facility that features an outdoor garden, banquet room and accommodates 400 guests. “We want to inform the community that the Smittcamp Alumni House is a beautiful setting to host your wedding,” said Hank Charles, assistant director of Business Development for the alumni house. “The Wedding Education Program also provides a valuable educational opportunity for brides and grooms to learn how to plan a successful and costs-savings affair.” The seminars will be taught by Victoria Lewis, who with her husband Kevin founded Genesis Master of Events. Topics will include: Wedding Planning 101, How to Save Thousands on your Wedding and Top Ten Things to Avoid When Planning a Wedding. The first wedding seminar of the semester will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25. (Details: https://www.facebook. com/SmittcampAlumniHouse).

Victoria has worked in the wedding industry for over 27 years and 2,000 events. Genesis was the WeddingWire. com 2012 Bride’s Choice Award for Wedding Planner. At today’s event, she will discuss the wedding seminars and present the Wedding Quick Tip Program, welcome guests, cut a “new partnership” cake and provide tours of facility and garden with Jennifer Burgess, Alumni House manager. Models will showcase bridal gowns and tuxedo wear, and Fresno State’s live mascot, Victor E. II will be decked out in formal wear to pose for photos with guests. Wedding packages begin at $4,000 and include Genesis’ services such as full service event planning, partial planning, day of wedding coordination, flowers and décor, invitations, bridal accessories, wedding part gift planning and the seminars. Built mostly with donations from a gift from Earl and Muriel Smittcamp, the Alumni House opened its doors on March 21, 2000. It was the first stand-alone alumni headquarters building on any of the 23 California State University campuses, and also serves as headquarters for the Fresno State Alumni Association. It is available for use by the public, not just alumni and current students, said Burgess, who books events. “The Smittcamp Alumni House provides picturesque and memorable settings with a dramatic entrance with custom leaded and stained glass windows and classis architectural details like Corinthian capitals with majestic columns,” she said. For more information, contact Charles at 559.278.8520.


Clovis Roundup

Page 22

October 10, 2013

‘Dogs Go To 5-0 with 61-14 Win at Idaho No. 23/21 Fresno State racks up 734 yards of offense and forces five turnovers in 47-point win By Jason Clay jaclay@csufresno.edu | GoBulldogs.com

MOSCOW, Idaho - Derek Carr threw five touchdown passes, three to Davante Adams, as the duo led No. 23/21 Fresno State in a 61-14 win over Idaho on Saturday at the Kibbie Dome. Fresno State is now off to a 5-0 start to the season, its best start since 2001 when the Bulldogs opened the year with sixstraight wins and reached as high as No. 8 in the Associated Press Top 25 Poll. “I thought our guys came out with a lot of intensity. We sustained it for the most part, got a little sloppy there in the third quarter, but I like our team. We got better this week,” head coach Tim DeRuyter said. “Our guys have fun playing and that’s why it is fun to coach them.” The Bulldogs have now won 10-straight regular season games and have scored 40 or more points in every single one of those games. Fresno State went for 734 yards of offense, which was 23 yards shy of tying the school record of 757 for the most yards in a game that was set back in 1991 against New Mexico. One week after he saw his 11-game streak of consecutive games with a touchdown reception come to an end, Adams went off on Saturday at Idaho. He tied the school record with 16 receptions, which went for 185 yards and a careerhigh three touchdowns. “We owed it to ourselves to finish a game the way we did today, because last week we obviously didn’t do as well in the second half,” Adams said. “I think we definitely needed this one.” Adams caught touchdowns on the first two possessions of the game, which included an acrobatic one-handed 17-yard TD on a back shoulder throw from Carr.

“Derek threw a great ball back shoulder because the guy was over the top, so it was just right there and I just threw the hand up,” Adams said. “It was right there, it couldn’t have been any easier.” Carr registered his third 400-yard passing game of the season and in the process set a new school record for most 300-yard passing games in a career with 14. Carr was 37-of-48 passing for 419 yards and five touchdowns with one interception. With 82 career touchdown passes, he now only need two more TDs to tie Paul Pinegar’s school record of 84. In the first half alone, Carr had 390 yards passing and his five touchdown passes was only one less than the number of incompletions (six) he had on 37 firsthalf attempts. Defensively, the Bulldogs forced five turnovers in the game - recovering one fumble and picking off four passes. The four picks tied for the most in a game in the DeRuyter era, matching the four the Bulldogs had against Colorado last season in a 69-14 victory. “The coaches were talking to us all week saying that the scoreboard is a liar, don’t look at it, it is going to lie to you,” safety Derron Smith said. “We tried to go out there (in the second half) with the same mentality as when we first went out there and I think we did a good job of doing that. Smith had the first interception in the game, his third of the season and 10th of his career. Joining him with picks was Charles Washington, Nikko Motta and Curtis Riley. Washington’s, Motta’s and Riley’s picks were all the first of their careers. “That’s mojo for the whole team, we feed off that energy,” Washington said of

Photo credit: www.zimbio.com

the Bulldogs ability to get take-aways. “Everybody was hyped today, we came out strong and forced a lot of turnovers and were able to capitalize on it.” Fresno State had six sacks in the game and now has 13 sacks in the last two weeks. Idaho finished with 275 yards of offense. Motta added two sacks to go along with his interception, which came on a blitz where Smith hit Vandal quarterback Chad Chalich when he was throwing the ball, causing it to pop up in the air and into Motta’s hands. Sophomore Dillon Root added two sacks of his own on the last two plays of the game to put the stamp on the

win. For the second week in a row, the Bulldogs also ran the ball well. Fresno State gained 312 yards on the ground and had three rushing touchdowns. Sophomore Marteze Waller registered the first 100-yard rushing game of the season by a Bulldog and the first of his career, as he ran 19 times for 157 yards and two touchdowns. Josh Quezada added 64 yards on 11 carries and Darryl Cash had the third touchdown run in the fourth quarter to cap off the scoring for Fresno State.

Bulldog Volleyball Fall to Broncos in See-Saw Five-Set Contest The Fresno State volleyball team (7-7, 1-1) wrapped up its conference-opening weekend with one of its top efforts of the season statistically in a tight five-set battle with Boise State (7-6, 2-2). The `Dogs cruised to advantages in the first and fourth sets by 25-16 and 2517 margins, but came up just short in the second, third and fifth sets by 26-24, 2624 and 15-13 counts, and wrapped up the weekend with a 1-1 mark. With its third +.300 mark of the year, Fresno State posted a team-season high in hitting (.301) and near bests in kills (70), assists (67), blocks (11) and digs (84). “Today was frustrating,” Fresno State head coach Lauren Netherby-Sewell said. “We out-hit them, out-dug them, basically tied them in blocks, and had more aces. Basically, we just had bad timing. We should have closed them out in set three but didn’t do it. In set five we didn’t side out as well as they did, so this is a painful loss. Coming in, we wanted to shut down their pins b/c of they have a complex offense, but weren’t able to stop them at key times.” Boise State entered the weekend ranked second in the league in hitting with a .258

mark, but was held to .214, and its other team totals trailed Fresno State in kills (68), assists (63), aces (2) and digs (63), while the Broncos held a slight advantage in blocks (12-11). Senior outside hitter Korrin Wild led Fresno State in kills (20) for the seventh time in 2013, and missed tying the team season high by one, while her 15 digs marked for her fifth double-double of the season and 33rd as a Bulldog. Another senior outside hitter, Marissa Brand (.471, 17 kills), logged her first +.400 mark of 2013 and topped the team in hitting for the second time this year. Her kills tally was her second-highest of the campaign, and her 15 digs marked her fourth straight double-double and 32nd of her career. “Tonight was a missed opportunity for us,” Brand said. “Our fans got to see a lot of our strengths tonight. When we’re clicking offensively and get teams out of system with our serving, we’re a fun team to watch. However, we let them off at the end of the second and third sets - something that has gotten us in other matches this year. I was really proud of how our team battled back in the fifth set after getting

down, and our players really showed the Bulldog spirit.” One shy of the team’s season blocks high, senior middle blocker Maci Murdock logged her season high (8) and topped the team for the fifth time in ‘13. The Turlock, Calif., native also added her fifth +.400 mark (.429, 11 kills) of the year and her sixth double-digit kill tally. Redshirt senior right side hitter Holly Franks added 18 kills - two off her season high - and her .283 hitting mark was her fourth-best of 2013. The Tollhouse, Calif., native added a team high in aces (3) for the fourth time on the campaign. Junior setter Christina Lee topped the team in digs (19) and assists (57) to post her third straight double-double and sixth of the season. Her assists total tied her career high that ranked fourth-best in the MW earlier this week. Freshman libero Maggie Eppright added 17 digs and added an ace, as did Brand. For the Broncos, three players notched +10 kills - Alysa Gammel (16 kills, .182), Sarah Horton (11 kills, .140) and Brittany Reardon (10 kills, .222). Other category leaders included Hannah

Hubbard (21 digs), Reardon (4 blocks), Aly Duffin (4 blocks), Casey Rose (29 assists, 1 ace) and Sarah Baugh (1 ace). Two nights before, Fresno State opened its second year of Mountain West action with a 3-1 victory over Utah State who had beaten Boise State twice last week by 3-0 and 3-1 scores. A month ago, the Aggies were tabbed third in the preseason MW coaches poll, followed by the ‘Dogs (sixth) and Broncos (seventh). Looking ahead, Fresno State makes one of its most challenging road trips of the year when it plays at San Diego State and UNLV next Thursday and Saturday, October 3-5. Those squads were tabbed first and third, respectively, in the MW preseason coaches poll. “This conference is always tough,” Netherby-Sewell said, “and Boise is one of those teams that is either hot or cold. Tonight they were hot when it mattered, and part of it might have been our serving at those points. This match is only the second of the conference season - we will build off it and move forward.”

‘Dogs Grab First Conference Win By: Andrew Rich arich1221@mail.fresnostate.edu | GoBulldogs.com

Morgan Castainscored two goals to add to her team lead and the Fresno State women’s soccer team erased an early 1-0 deficit to earn their first Mountain West Conference victory of the season 3-1 over Nevada (3-6-3, 1-2 MW) on Friday night at Bulldog Stadium.

The win was also the `Dogs (4-7-1, 1-2 MW) first home win in three tries this season. “I believe in the team and I feel like they needed to have a performance like this so that it solidifies the things that we’ve been working on,” head coach Brian Zwaschkasaid. Castain’s first goal came in the 23rd minute when she scored on a ball that deflected off of Wolfpack goalkeeper Kelsey Quintos to even the score 1-1. The senior also played a part in the goal that gave the `Dogs the lead in the 30th minute. Castain’s shot went off of Quintos right

to the feet of Jaycee Bingham who found Shonice Myersopen in front of the goal and she put it away to give Fresno State a 2-1 advantage. It was a lead the Bulldogs wouldn’t relinquish and Castain made sure of it in the 56th minute when she added some insurance. She took a pass from Bingham at the top of the goal box and drilled it into the far corner for her second goal of the game and a 3-1 lead. Castain now has a team-high seven goals on the season. Bingham added two assists, which were her first on the year. The stingy Fresno State defense allowed

just four shots on goal and goalkeeper Katie DeVaultfinished with three saves. The junior now has 282 career saves which puts her just eight off the mark of 290 for 2nd all-time in Fresno State history. “Nevada is a good team so they threw challenges at us just like any other team,” Zwaschka said. “We had the combination of executing well but also grinding out a win and those are two things that we have been talking about.” The `Dogs are back in action on Sunday when they take on UNLV at 1:00 p.m. inside Bulldog Stadium.


Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

Page 23

Clovis True Value adding more life to revitalized center By Carol Lawson-Swezey

Among the brushes, nuts and bolts, ladders and tools at the new Clovis True Value, there is a wealth of experience. Three generations and over 150 total accumulated years of hardware knowledge are being brought to the new store, located at 1890 Shaw Avenue, east of Fowler. Family members Steve and Vicki Bassett, her sister Lynda Rosetta-Hall and another sister Donna Rosetta-Hansen and her husband, Brad, have combined resources, skill and decades of experience to open up the new store and help revitalize a neglected shopping center. The hardware store, at the site of the former Walgreens, has a 10,000 SF sales floor and offers more than 22,000 items for sale. It is in the same shopping center as the newly opened Walmart Neighborhood Market and a soon to be opened tire store at the old Boston Market location.

“The new stores will help revitalize this neighborhood,” said co-owner Steve Bassett. “It’s a big change for Clovis. We are excited about being in this area that I have such a passion for. I lived in this area and my kids went to Jefferson Elementary. All of us are home-grown.” Hardware has been a family business for generations of the Bassett/Rosetta clan. Patriarch James Rosetta, who is now retired, was co-owner of a large hardware store for years and now comes to the new store to share his wisdom and expertise. All three daughters and some grandchildren worked in hardware since they had to use step stools to reach the shelves. Vicki’s son, Adam Klusener is the new Clovis True Value store manager. The process from planning to opening took about a year and much of the newly hired staff are experts in their fields. “There

is so much that goes into starting a store like this- sometimes we wondered whether it would ever happen,” Bassett said. “But we’re ready, it’s really not overwhelming because of all of the experience that we ha ve.” The store has been open for business since mid September but will celebrate a Grand Opening with a bang on Friday through Sunday, October 18, 19 and 20th. A variety of events from kid’s activities to raffle drawings are planned. Prizes will include a BBQ, lawn mower and patio furniture. In store specials will include a bucket sale, where any regular priced item stuffed into a five gallon bucket will be sold at a 20 percent discount. Hot dogs will be sold on Saturday and Sunday between 11am to 3pm with proceeds going to charity. Bassett said they are hoping to draw a large crowd. They sent out 13,000 flyers to the surrounding neighborhood.

Although he realizes there are other large competitors around, he’s hoping that the neighborhood he loved will welcome the store and relish what it can offer in personal attention and specialty items. “If we don’t have it, we will get it for them with a special order whenever possible,” Bassett said. “One of our big draws is our personal attention. Customers are able to get in and out quickly with help from staff so they can get to their projects.” Bassett is hoping that what is good for the neighborhood will be good for business as well. “We’ve been in the hardware business for so many years and we had the opportunity to do this,” Bassett said. “After research and due diligence, we found it to be a good location. Customers are very happy we’re here and surprised and pleased at the number and variety of items we carry.”


Clovis Roundup

October 10, 2013

Page 24

CR 10.10.13  

CR 10.10.13

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