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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019


THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY MASTER Sir Jonathan Portal Bt

CLERK TO THE COMPANY Jocelyn Stuart-Grumbar

WARDENS Alexander Nelson Philip Portal Dr Lucy Rawson John Wake

EA TO THE MASTER AND CLERK Emma Temple

COURT OF ASSISTANTS Dr Carolyn Boulter John Coombe-Tennant Denis Clough Joanna Dodd Melville Haggard Nicholas Horne Michael Howell Tom Ingham Clark Dan Jago Michael Jarvis Peter Jonas Antony Jones Colonel Alastair Mathewson Christopher McLean May Dr Cordelia Rogerson Andrew Strang Hanif Virji Andrew Wates Robert West Andrew Yonge

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE, PROPERTY AND INVESTMENTS Hamesh Patel CHIEF ACCOUNTANT Andrew Boon

ABOUT THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

CONTENTS PHILANTHROPY 2

BEADLE AND HALL MANAGER Michael Drummond

TEXTILES 4

HEAD OF GRANTS Philip Howard

50 FENCHURCH STREET

14

HEAD OF COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES Jessica Collins

ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

16

AFFILIATES

24

TRUSTEESHIP 12

MEMBERSHIP AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER Renée LaDue Cover: Architectural rendering of the proposed commercial tower at 50

HONORARY ASSISTANT Andrew Blessley

Fenchurch Street, with innovative vertical greening. Courtesy of Eric Parry Architects. Read more on page 14.

The Clothworkers’ Company Clothworkers’ Hall Dunster Court, Mincing Lane London EC3R 7AH +44 (0)20 7623 7041

enquiries@clothworkers.co.uk www.clothworkers.co.uk Like us on Facebook! Twitter: @ClothworkersCo Instagram: Clothworkers_Co

Facing page and thumbnail above: Pen-and-ink drawings by Emma Bashforth. Read more on page 18.

The Clothworkers’ Company is a 500-year-old philanthropic membership organisation with roots in the textile trade. Established by Royal Charter in 1528 through the merger of The Fullers’ Company and The Shearmen’s Company, we were founded to promote the craft of clothworking in the City of London. We supervised the training of apprentices and protected standards of workmanship. Nowadays, our mission is to play our part in the civic life of the City of London, support the textile industry through education and skills development, foster Fellowship and promote Trusteeship among our members and more widely, and use our position and wealth for charitable causes and social good. The Clothworkers’ charitable giving is principally channelled through our grant-making charity, The Clothworkers’ Foundation, established in 1977 with a significant endowment from The Company. The Company passes our income, having met the costs of running the livery hall and our other activities, across to The Foundation each year. In 2019, The Company transferred

more than £2.1 million to The Clothworkers’ Foundation. Together with income from The Foundation’s own investments, this is distributed to a broad range of charities each year. The Foundation awarded grants in excess of £7.5 million in 2019; please refer to The Foundation’s independent Annual Review for details. The Clothworkers’ Company itself directly makes grants in support of textiles and trusteeship across the UK each year, to our military affiliates and to other miscellaneous charitable causes. The following pages of this publication cover our key areas of grant-making for 2019, which amounted to more than £1 million. Our Annual Review is directed both at the members of The Clothworkers’ Company as well as external audiences; we hope it will make interesting and informative reading on the modern role of a livery company with a long history – and philanthropic legacy – in the City of London today. Members may refer to the Members’ Supplement for more detailed financial information. ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

1


THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY MASTER Sir Jonathan Portal Bt

CLERK TO THE COMPANY Jocelyn Stuart-Grumbar

WARDENS Alexander Nelson Philip Portal Dr Lucy Rawson John Wake

EA TO THE MASTER AND CLERK Emma Temple

COURT OF ASSISTANTS Dr Carolyn Boulter John Coombe-Tennant Denis Clough Joanna Dodd Melville Haggard Nicholas Horne Michael Howell Tom Ingham Clark Dan Jago Michael Jarvis Peter Jonas Antony Jones Colonel Alastair Mathewson Christopher McLean May Dr Cordelia Rogerson Andrew Strang Hanif Virji Andrew Wates Robert West Andrew Yonge

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE, PROPERTY AND INVESTMENTS Hamesh Patel CHIEF ACCOUNTANT Andrew Boon

ABOUT THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

CONTENTS PHILANTHROPY 2

BEADLE AND HALL MANAGER Michael Drummond

TEXTILES 4

HEAD OF GRANTS Philip Howard

50 FENCHURCH STREET

14

HEAD OF COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES Jessica Collins

ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

16

AFFILIATES

24

TRUSTEESHIP 12

MEMBERSHIP AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER Renée LaDue Cover: Architectural rendering of the proposed commercial tower at 50

HONORARY ASSISTANT Andrew Blessley

Fenchurch Street, with innovative vertical greening. Courtesy of Eric Parry Architects. Read more on page 14.

The Clothworkers’ Company Clothworkers’ Hall Dunster Court, Mincing Lane London EC3R 7AH +44 (0)20 7623 7041

enquiries@clothworkers.co.uk www.clothworkers.co.uk Like us on Facebook! Twitter: @ClothworkersCo Instagram: Clothworkers_Co

Facing page and thumbnail above: Pen-and-ink drawings by Emma Bashforth. Read more on page 18.

The Clothworkers’ Company is a 500-year-old philanthropic membership organisation with roots in the textile trade. Established by Royal Charter in 1528 through the merger of The Fullers’ Company and The Shearmen’s Company, we were founded to promote the craft of clothworking in the City of London. We supervised the training of apprentices and protected standards of workmanship. Nowadays, our mission is to play our part in the civic life of the City of London, support the textile industry through education and skills development, foster Fellowship and promote Trusteeship among our members and more widely, and use our position and wealth for charitable causes and social good. The Clothworkers’ charitable giving is principally channelled through our grant-making charity, The Clothworkers’ Foundation, established in 1977 with a significant endowment from The Company. The Company passes our income, having met the costs of running the livery hall and our other activities, across to The Foundation each year. In 2019, The Company transferred

more than £2.1 million to The Clothworkers’ Foundation. Together with income from The Foundation’s own investments, this is distributed to a broad range of charities each year. The Foundation awarded grants in excess of £7.5 million in 2019; please refer to The Foundation’s independent Annual Review for details. The Clothworkers’ Company itself directly makes grants in support of textiles and trusteeship across the UK each year, to our military affiliates and to other miscellaneous charitable causes. The following pages of this publication cover our key areas of grant-making for 2019, which amounted to more than £1 million. Our Annual Review is directed both at the members of The Clothworkers’ Company as well as external audiences; we hope it will make interesting and informative reading on the modern role of a livery company with a long history – and philanthropic legacy – in the City of London today. Members may refer to the Members’ Supplement for more detailed financial information. ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

1


PHILANTHROPY 2019 > £3 MILLION TEXTILE GRANTS

OTHER CHARITABLE GIVING

Academic Research and Innovation

Trusteeship

University of Leeds, CCTMIH (equipment) ................................................................................................................ £42,500

Charity Governance Awards (eight cash prizes) ........................................................................................................ £40,000

University of Leeds, CCTMIH (PhD bursary) ............................................................................................................ £26,000

Cause4, Trustee Leadership Programme (payments for our 2018 and 2019 commitments

University of Leeds, Colour Summer Internship ....................................................................................................... £20,000

were made in this financial year) ................................................................................................................................. £40,000

University of Leeds, CCTMIH (PhD bursary) ................................................................................................................ £9,000

Association of Chairs (core funding) ............................................................................................................................... £26,000

Prince’s Foundation, Future Textiles ............................................................................................................................... £30,000

Reach Volunteering, TrusteeWorks (recruitment services) ................................................................................... £26,000

University of Huddersfield (MSc bursaries) ................................................................................................................. £20,000

Reach Volunteering (board diversity and inclusivity research and resource project) ...................................... £9,550 New Philanthropy Capital (NPC) (charity sector seminars) .................................................................................... £19,325

Technical Education and Vocational Support UKFT Export (industry and trade shows) .................................................................................................................. £150,000 UKFT, Young Textiles Technician Training Fund (with The Drapers’ and Weavers’ Companies) .......... £10,000 Textile Centre of Excellence, Edu4Tex .......................................................................................................................... £50,000

Directory of Social Change (app research and development supporting the Charity Governance Code) .............................................................................................................................................. £15,000 Military Affiliations

Textile Centre of Excellence, Apprenticeship Champion Programme ............................................................... £22,000

No. 47 Squadron RAF, Family Welfare Programme ................................................................................................... £22,000

Cockpit Arts, Clothworkers’ Award for Weavers (£66k committed over three years) .................................. £22,000

Scots Guards, Soldiers and Family Welfare Programme .......................................................................................... £20,000

The Weavers’ Company Entry to Work Scheme .......................................................................................................... £34,625

FANY (Princess Royal’s Volunteer Corps) (core funding for operations officer salary) ............................... £15,000

Fashion Enter Ltd, Tailoring Academy ........................................................................................................................... £25,400 UAL, Central Saint Martins Materials Fund (materials for 10 final-year students) ........................................ £10,000 UAL, Central Saint Martins (sponsoring a third-year printed textile bursary) ................................................... £5,000 Making It in Textiles (student conference co-funded by The Drapers’ and Weavers’ Companies) ............. £8,600 Heritage and Conservation Manchester Art Gallery (improving access and relocation of textile collections) ........................................... £70,000 Worthing Museum and Art Gallery (costume research) .......................................................................................... £45,000

Other Charitable Grants Livery Advocates Pilot (with The Goldsmiths’, Haberdashers’ & Skinners’ Companies) ............................. £15,000 The Creative Dimension (creative skills workshops) ................................................................................................ £10,000 The Lord Mayor’s Appeal .................................................................................................................................................... £10,000 Bishopsland Educational Trust (bursaries for materials, tools and educational visits) ................................... £6,000 Designer Bookbinders, Transferring Design (bespoke introductory bookbinding training in art colleges and universities) ........................................................................................................................................ £3,000

Centre for Textile Conservation (MPhil Textile Conservation bursary) ............................................................. £35,500 Historic Royal Palaces (textile conservation internships) ....................................................................................... £36,000 Textile Design

The Clothworkers’ Foundation Surplus Funds donated to The Foundation (including match-funding for members’ contributions to our Clothworkers’ Charity Fund) .......................................................................................... £2,100,000

University of Huddersfield (BA/BSc Textiles Practice bursaries) ........................................................................ £20,000

2

Royal College of Art (MA bursaries) ................................................................................................................................. £19,000

Please note that this grants report is intended to illustrate the breadth and diversity of our charitable giving in 2019,

Bradford Textile Society Design Competition (sponsorship of four prizes) ........................................................ £5,650

particularly within our key areas of interest. It is not a comprehensive list of our grant-making or charitable giving,

New Designers, Clothworkers’ Company Associate Prize in Printed Textile Design ...................................... £2,800

which may also include commitments made in previous years or smaller donations to a variety of organisations.

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

3


PHILANTHROPY 2019 > £3 MILLION TEXTILE GRANTS

OTHER CHARITABLE GIVING

Academic Research and Innovation

Trusteeship

University of Leeds, CCTMIH (equipment) ................................................................................................................ £42,500

Charity Governance Awards (eight cash prizes) ........................................................................................................ £40,000

University of Leeds, CCTMIH (PhD bursary) ............................................................................................................ £26,000

Cause4, Trustee Leadership Programme (payments for our 2018 and 2019 commitments

University of Leeds, Colour Summer Internship ....................................................................................................... £20,000

were made in this financial year) ................................................................................................................................. £40,000

University of Leeds, CCTMIH (PhD bursary) ................................................................................................................ £9,000

Association of Chairs (core funding) ............................................................................................................................... £26,000

Prince’s Foundation, Future Textiles ............................................................................................................................... £30,000

Reach Volunteering, TrusteeWorks (recruitment services) ................................................................................... £26,000

University of Huddersfield (MSc bursaries) ................................................................................................................. £20,000

Reach Volunteering (board diversity and inclusivity research and resource project) ...................................... £9,550 New Philanthropy Capital (NPC) (charity sector seminars) .................................................................................... £19,325

Technical Education and Vocational Support UKFT Export (industry and trade shows) .................................................................................................................. £150,000 UKFT, Young Textiles Technician Training Fund (with The Drapers’ and Weavers’ Companies) .......... £10,000 Textile Centre of Excellence, Edu4Tex .......................................................................................................................... £50,000

Directory of Social Change (app research and development supporting the Charity Governance Code) .............................................................................................................................................. £15,000 Military Affiliations

Textile Centre of Excellence, Apprenticeship Champion Programme ............................................................... £22,000

No. 47 Squadron RAF, Family Welfare Programme ................................................................................................... £22,000

Cockpit Arts, Clothworkers’ Award for Weavers (£66k committed over three years) .................................. £22,000

Scots Guards, Soldiers and Family Welfare Programme .......................................................................................... £20,000

The Weavers’ Company Entry to Work Scheme .......................................................................................................... £34,625

FANY (Princess Royal’s Volunteer Corps) (core funding for operations officer salary) ............................... £15,000

Fashion Enter Ltd, Tailoring Academy ........................................................................................................................... £25,400 UAL, Central Saint Martins Materials Fund (materials for 10 final-year students) ........................................ £10,000 UAL, Central Saint Martins (sponsoring a third-year printed textile bursary) ................................................... £5,000 Making It in Textiles (student conference co-funded by The Drapers’ and Weavers’ Companies) ............. £8,600 Heritage and Conservation Manchester Art Gallery (improving access and relocation of textile collections) ........................................... £70,000 Worthing Museum and Art Gallery (costume research) .......................................................................................... £45,000

Other Charitable Grants Livery Advocates Pilot (with The Goldsmiths’, Haberdashers’ & Skinners’ Companies) ............................. £15,000 The Creative Dimension (creative skills workshops) ................................................................................................ £10,000 The Lord Mayor’s Appeal .................................................................................................................................................... £10,000 Bishopsland Educational Trust (bursaries for materials, tools and educational visits) ................................... £6,000 Designer Bookbinders, Transferring Design (bespoke introductory bookbinding training in art colleges and universities) ........................................................................................................................................ £3,000

Centre for Textile Conservation (MPhil Textile Conservation bursary) ............................................................. £35,500 Historic Royal Palaces (textile conservation internships) ....................................................................................... £36,000 Textile Design

The Clothworkers’ Foundation Surplus Funds donated to The Foundation (including match-funding for members’ contributions to our Clothworkers’ Charity Fund) .......................................................................................... £2,100,000

University of Huddersfield (BA/BSc Textiles Practice bursaries) ........................................................................ £20,000

2

Royal College of Art (MA bursaries) ................................................................................................................................. £19,000

Please note that this grants report is intended to illustrate the breadth and diversity of our charitable giving in 2019,

Bradford Textile Society Design Competition (sponsorship of four prizes) ........................................................ £5,650

particularly within our key areas of interest. It is not a comprehensive list of our grant-making or charitable giving,

New Designers, Clothworkers’ Company Associate Prize in Printed Textile Design ...................................... £2,800

which may also include commitments made in previous years or smaller donations to a variety of organisations.

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

3


TEXTILES Over the past decade or more, The Clothworkers’ Foundation and The Clothworkers’ Company have committed close to £12 million in textiles-related support, with the categories of Academic Research and Innovation as well as Heritage and Conservation accounting for the lion’s share. From 2017, in order to allow the grants team and trustees of The Foundation to dedicate their full attention to improving the lives of people and communities facing disadvantage, we have consolidated all textiles grant-making within The Clothworkers’ Company. This decision places textiles alongside trusteeship at the heart of The Company’s mission. Groundbreaking innovation is happening in textiles, and investment in the skills that help bring this innovation to market is required. As a result, we felt it was the right time to reaffirm The Company’s roots in cloth, clarify what direction our enduring interest in textiles should take, and discover

how we might achieve the most meaningful impact on the industry. TEXTILES STRATEGY The Company aims to: • •

prioritise British textiles; focus on cloth, rather than costume, and on the manufacture of cloth; direct our involvement in textile design towards talented students at higher-rated institutions, with an interest in people who are studying or possess the ability to convert ideas into a product capable of being manufactured, as well as an understanding of textile technologies; rigorously explore the prospective usage of equipment that we fund; direct our support in heritage towards cataloguing, indexing, storing, conserving, displaying and improving access to important textile collections and archives.

Facing page: University of Leeds, where we support the Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation in Healthcare as well as Textiles and Colour Science activities.

4

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

5


TEXTILES Over the past decade or more, The Clothworkers’ Foundation and The Clothworkers’ Company have committed close to £12 million in textiles-related support, with the categories of Academic Research and Innovation as well as Heritage and Conservation accounting for the lion’s share. From 2017, in order to allow the grants team and trustees of The Foundation to dedicate their full attention to improving the lives of people and communities facing disadvantage, we have consolidated all textiles grant-making within The Clothworkers’ Company. This decision places textiles alongside trusteeship at the heart of The Company’s mission. Groundbreaking innovation is happening in textiles, and investment in the skills that help bring this innovation to market is required. As a result, we felt it was the right time to reaffirm The Company’s roots in cloth, clarify what direction our enduring interest in textiles should take, and discover

how we might achieve the most meaningful impact on the industry. TEXTILES STRATEGY The Company aims to: • •

prioritise British textiles; focus on cloth, rather than costume, and on the manufacture of cloth; direct our involvement in textile design towards talented students at higher-rated institutions, with an interest in people who are studying or possess the ability to convert ideas into a product capable of being manufactured, as well as an understanding of textile technologies; rigorously explore the prospective usage of equipment that we fund; direct our support in heritage towards cataloguing, indexing, storing, conserving, displaying and improving access to important textile collections and archives.

Facing page: University of Leeds, where we support the Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation in Healthcare as well as Textiles and Colour Science activities.

4

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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TEXTILES

ACADEMIC RESEARCH & INNOVATION In 2012, we helped to establish the Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare (CCTMIH) at the University of Leeds, with a £1.75 million anchor donation. The Centre works to develop enabling technologies based on advances in textile science and engineering. From bioactive wound dressings capable of speeding up healing rates in the management of diabetic ulcers, to implantable devices capable of promoting the regeneration of bone or skin – the application of textiles in healthcare is a rapidly developing field. Working with nurses, orthopaedic, dental and cardiovascular surgeons to identify unmet needs in current

clinical procedures, the CCTMIH team is developing physical prototypes that overcome the performance limitations of existing products. The Company has also been a principal supporter of the Textiles and Colour Science activities at Leeds University since it was established. We currently provide bursaries for a number of postgraduate students. In addition, subject to access and utilisation criteria, we make capital grants to assist with the purchase of cuttingedge specialist equipment. In 2019 alone, we funded new equipment at the University of Leeds CCTMIH with a grant of £42,500, and other grants towards the Leeds Colour Summer

Internship and PhD projects – as well as a master’s programme at the University of Huddersfield.

satisfy the demands of sustainability and, where possible, bring a societal benefit for future generations.

Finally, we made a grant of £30,000 to The Prince’s Foundation, supporting Future Textiles at Trinity Buoy Wharf London. The project brings together industry and education in two unique settings, training the next generation with skills for the textile industry and providing a range of no-cost workshops suitable for secondary school teachers, pupils and those seeking employability skills.

For exciting innovation to make the journey from concept to commercial success, laboratory to the marketplace, it is important to nurture the technical skills that enable apprentices, students and trainees to succeed.

TECHNICAL EDUCATION & VOCATIONAL SUPPORT Breakthrough ideas in textiles – and materials more widely – must

In 2019, major new grant commitments included £150,000 to UK Fashion & Textiles to support trade shows and help build the international reputation of the UK textiles industry. In addition, we cofunded the UKFT Young Technician Training Fund with The Drapers’ and Weavers’ Companies as partners. A grant of more than £34,000 went to The Weavers’ Company ‘Entry to Work’ programme to help place 12 young people in the field of textile manufacturing. The Textile Centre for Excellence received funding again for the Apprenticeship Champion Programme (£22,000 for the final year of our support for the scheme),

Facing page: Future Textiles at Trinity Buoy Wharf. © 2019, The Prince’s Foundation. Right: UKFT exhibition at Première Vision in Shanghai (2019).

6

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

7


TEXTILES

ACADEMIC RESEARCH & INNOVATION In 2012, we helped to establish the Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare (CCTMIH) at the University of Leeds, with a £1.75 million anchor donation. The Centre works to develop enabling technologies based on advances in textile science and engineering. From bioactive wound dressings capable of speeding up healing rates in the management of diabetic ulcers, to implantable devices capable of promoting the regeneration of bone or skin – the application of textiles in healthcare is a rapidly developing field. Working with nurses, orthopaedic, dental and cardiovascular surgeons to identify unmet needs in current

clinical procedures, the CCTMIH team is developing physical prototypes that overcome the performance limitations of existing products. The Company has also been a principal supporter of the Textiles and Colour Science activities at Leeds University since it was established. We currently provide bursaries for a number of postgraduate students. In addition, subject to access and utilisation criteria, we make capital grants to assist with the purchase of cuttingedge specialist equipment. In 2019 alone, we funded new equipment at the University of Leeds CCTMIH with a grant of £42,500, and other grants towards the Leeds Colour Summer

Internship and PhD projects – as well as a master’s programme at the University of Huddersfield.

satisfy the demands of sustainability and, where possible, bring a societal benefit for future generations.

Finally, we made a grant of £30,000 to The Prince’s Foundation, supporting Future Textiles at Trinity Buoy Wharf London. The project brings together industry and education in two unique settings, training the next generation with skills for the textile industry and providing a range of no-cost workshops suitable for secondary school teachers, pupils and those seeking employability skills.

For exciting innovation to make the journey from concept to commercial success, laboratory to the marketplace, it is important to nurture the technical skills that enable apprentices, students and trainees to succeed.

TECHNICAL EDUCATION & VOCATIONAL SUPPORT Breakthrough ideas in textiles – and materials more widely – must

In 2019, major new grant commitments included £150,000 to UK Fashion & Textiles to support trade shows and help build the international reputation of the UK textiles industry. In addition, we cofunded the UKFT Young Technician Training Fund with The Drapers’ and Weavers’ Companies as partners. A grant of more than £34,000 went to The Weavers’ Company ‘Entry to Work’ programme to help place 12 young people in the field of textile manufacturing. The Textile Centre for Excellence received funding again for the Apprenticeship Champion Programme (£22,000 for the final year of our support for the scheme),

Facing page: Future Textiles at Trinity Buoy Wharf. © 2019, The Prince’s Foundation. Right: UKFT exhibition at Première Vision in Shanghai (2019).

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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TEXTILES

and another grant of £50,000 for the new Edu4Tex programme, which is designed to bring together schools and sector bodies for the purpose of developing a new approach to the promotion of the textile sector to teachers and young people. Our successful partnership with creative business incubator Cockpit Arts continues to flourish. Cockpit provides studio space and access to equipment for graduate weavers, enabling them to set up in business. Our support – repeated again in 2019 with a grant of £66,000 (over

three years) – will allow a fresh round of applicants to benefit from the facilities and business mentoring programme Cockpit offers. An extraordinary grant of £26,400 to Fashion-Enter Ltd enabled the social enterprise to purchase equipment and open up its Tailoring Academy in London, which also received support from the Mayor of London’s Good Growth Fund as well as Haringey Council. Meanwhile, we continued funding the Materials Fund and other bursaries at UAL, Central Saint Martins.

CONSERVING THE PAST We have been one of the foremost supporters of textile conservation in the UK. Since the 1980s, we have made capital grants, funded research, and provided bursaries for students at the Centre for Textile Conservation, supporting the Centre to the tune of £1.75 million when it was at the University of Southampton, and now in Glasgow. The Clothworkers’ Centre for the Study and Conservation of Textiles and Fashion at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), Blythe

Facing page: The Tailoring Academy by Future-Fashion Ltd. This page: Cockpit Arts weaver Jacob Monk with a sample of his work.

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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TEXTILES

and another grant of £50,000 for the new Edu4Tex programme, which is designed to bring together schools and sector bodies for the purpose of developing a new approach to the promotion of the textile sector to teachers and young people. Our successful partnership with creative business incubator Cockpit Arts continues to flourish. Cockpit provides studio space and access to equipment for graduate weavers, enabling them to set up in business. Our support – repeated again in 2019 with a grant of £66,000 (over

three years) – will allow a fresh round of applicants to benefit from the facilities and business mentoring programme Cockpit offers. An extraordinary grant of £26,400 to Fashion-Enter Ltd enabled the social enterprise to purchase equipment and open up its Tailoring Academy in London, which also received support from the Mayor of London’s Good Growth Fund as well as Haringey Council. Meanwhile, we continued funding the Materials Fund and other bursaries at UAL, Central Saint Martins.

CONSERVING THE PAST We have been one of the foremost supporters of textile conservation in the UK. Since the 1980s, we have made capital grants, funded research, and provided bursaries for students at the Centre for Textile Conservation, supporting the Centre to the tune of £1.75 million when it was at the University of Southampton, and now in Glasgow. The Clothworkers’ Centre for the Study and Conservation of Textiles and Fashion at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), Blythe

Facing page: The Tailoring Academy by Future-Fashion Ltd. This page: Cockpit Arts weaver Jacob Monk with a sample of his work.

8

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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TEXTILES

House, was made possible by our £1 million grant towards the £3 million overall cost of the Centre. The Centre allows students, designers, and researchers greater access to the V&A’s extensive collection. The Centre will move to the new V&A East site, in Stratford, in the early 2020s. In 2014, the British Museum opened its World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre. Our £0.75 million grant to the museum went towards the creation of The Clothworkers’ Organics Conservation Studio, housed within the Centre, to bring conservation and scientific research together under one roof, with specially designed studios and laboratories. In 2019, we provided a grant of

£70,000 to support the Manchester Art Gallery’s exciting plans to relocate its clothing, textiles and fashion accessories from Platt Hall to its new city centre gallery. We also awarded £45,000 to the Worthing Museum and Art Gallery, which plans to create a costume research centre covering an important collection of textiles and costume. The Company continues to support textiles conservation internships with Historic Royal Palaces and sponsors an MPhil at the Centre for Textile Conservation. DESIGNS FOR THE FUTURE The Clothworkers’ Company funds additional BA/BSc bursaries at the University of Huddersfield in Textiles Practice. For many years, we have also funded MA bursaries at the Royal College of Art

(although 2019 is the final year of this latter commitment). We are long-standing supporters of TexSelect, New Designers, and the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition. Amber Sorayapour won our TexSelect Interiors Prize at Première Vision in Paris this past autumn (marking the final year of our sponsorship commitment to the programme). Clara Leitaõ won the New Designers Printed Textile Design Clothworkers’ Associate Prize. Our four prizes at the Bradford Textile Society Designer Competition were presented to Jessica Dryden (Printed Textile), Evie Brownlee (Knitted Design), Eleanor Newton (Woven Fabric Design), and Katie Dyson (Fabric Designed for Fashion or Interior Products).

Left: Pair of leather gauntlet gloves, circa 1650. © Worthing Museum & Art Gallery. Facing page: Design by Jessica Dryden (Leeds Arts University), first prize winner for a Printed Textile at the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition 2019.

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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TEXTILES

House, was made possible by our £1 million grant towards the £3 million overall cost of the Centre. The Centre allows students, designers, and researchers greater access to the V&A’s extensive collection. The Centre will move to the new V&A East site, in Stratford, in the early 2020s. In 2014, the British Museum opened its World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre. Our £0.75 million grant to the museum went towards the creation of The Clothworkers’ Organics Conservation Studio, housed within the Centre, to bring conservation and scientific research together under one roof, with specially designed studios and laboratories. In 2019, we provided a grant of

£70,000 to support the Manchester Art Gallery’s exciting plans to relocate its clothing, textiles and fashion accessories from Platt Hall to its new city centre gallery. We also awarded £45,000 to the Worthing Museum and Art Gallery, which plans to create a costume research centre covering an important collection of textiles and costume. The Company continues to support textiles conservation internships with Historic Royal Palaces and sponsors an MPhil at the Centre for Textile Conservation. DESIGNS FOR THE FUTURE The Clothworkers’ Company funds additional BA/BSc bursaries at the University of Huddersfield in Textiles Practice. For many years, we have also funded MA bursaries at the Royal College of Art

(although 2019 is the final year of this latter commitment). We are long-standing supporters of TexSelect, New Designers, and the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition. Amber Sorayapour won our TexSelect Interiors Prize at Première Vision in Paris this past autumn (marking the final year of our sponsorship commitment to the programme). Clara Leitaõ won the New Designers Printed Textile Design Clothworkers’ Associate Prize. Our four prizes at the Bradford Textile Society Designer Competition were presented to Jessica Dryden (Printed Textile), Evie Brownlee (Knitted Design), Eleanor Newton (Woven Fabric Design), and Katie Dyson (Fabric Designed for Fashion or Interior Products).

Left: Pair of leather gauntlet gloves, circa 1650. © Worthing Museum & Art Gallery. Facing page: Design by Jessica Dryden (Leeds Arts University), first prize winner for a Printed Textile at the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition 2019.

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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TRUSTEESHIP The nature of The Company’s commitment to Trusteeship is twofold. First, we have established The Clothworkers’ Company as a grant-maker and a champion for change and improvement to charity sector governance in the UK. Second, we encourage and support our members in serving as trustees or school governors. We are proud to sponsor and host the annual Charity Governance Awards to celebrate the best practice and innovation of trustee boards throughout the UK. The awards are made possible through the partnerships we have forged with New Philanthropy Capital (NPC), Prospectus and Reach Volunteering. Members actively participate as well by undertaking the first-round evaluation of entries submitted to the Charity Governance Awards. However, we know that it is not enough to shine a spotlight on good governance, and we must find a way to help create the changes we seek across the sector. Working with our partners, we support efforts to increase participation of would-be trustees, to improve diversity and inclusivity on boards, and to enhance the capability of those already serving. The 2017 ‘Taken on Trust’ report from the Charity Commission

12

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

“Trusteeship is increasingly part of the ethos of The Company’s membership, and 35% of Clothworkers reported that they were serving as a school governor, trustee or volunteer in 2019.” found that the c. 700,000 trustees then serving in the UK were mostly white, male and over the age of 55 – and many were serving on multiple boards. While those serving are making a meaningful contribution to the charity sector, most charity boards are not reflective of the communities they serve, and there are still an estimated 100,000 trustee vacancies that boards are struggling to fill. A charity’s service users are dependent on its trustees for the leadership required to keep the organisation capable, nimble and sustainable. This means having the right breadth of talent, lived experience and range of skills at the table. Being a trustee is hard work and challenging, but 93% of trustees say it is immensely fulfilling. And yet, recruitment remains a problem.

This is partly due to the naturallylimited pool in which ‘word of mouth’ recruitment (still making up more than 90% of recruitment strategies) operates. Rich pools of talent are inexcusably overlooked. It is important to reach out to those who have not previously considered becoming a trustee. Recognising these challenges, we continue to invest in and support the Cause4 Trustee Leadership Programme (a five-week training course in London that ends in a trustee-matching event) and its related regional one-day seminars, the Reach Volunteering TrusteeWorks recruitment service (which matched 882 trustees and another 1,045 volunteer placements in 2019), and trustee training seminars from NPC, among others.

were interviewed, and expert content producers researched, prepared, crafted and delivered content appropriate to target audiences. Reach defined a set of design principles and guidelines, and these informed content development. In all that we do, The Clothworkers’ Company welcomes expressions of interest from members. The flourishing partnership with Reach Volunteering provides

Clothworkers with access to fascinating trustee roles, published directly to the Members’ Area and highlighted in the monthly e-newsletter. The Trustee Leadership Programme, co-funded with Close Brothers Asset Management, is offered free of charge to members. For those already on trustee boards, a number of NPC’s seminars are offered at Clothworkers’ Hall. Finally, The Company also hosts an annual trusteeship dinner to allow members to get together to

discuss and debate relevant issues. The volunteer activities of individual Clothworkers are many and varied. Realistically, it is difficult to quantify existing commitments to trustee or volunteer roles, or the extent to which this might be expanding. However, trusteeship is increasingly part of the ethos of The Company’s membership, and 35% of Clothworkers reported that they were serving as a school governor, trustee or volunteer in 2019.

Below: Representatives of SignHealth accept their Board Diversity and Inclusivity award at the 2019 Charity Governance Awards.

In 2019, we awarded an additional grant of more than £9,500 to Reach Volunteering, supporting an in-depth research project on diversity and inclusion and drawing on instructive case studies from the Charity Governance Awards finalists in this category. Reach selected finalists across a range of criteria – type of diversity (eg disability, youth), location and charity size. Board Diversity and Inclusivity category winners ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

13


TRUSTEESHIP The nature of The Company’s commitment to Trusteeship is twofold. First, we have established The Clothworkers’ Company as a grant-maker and a champion for change and improvement to charity sector governance in the UK. Second, we encourage and support our members in serving as trustees or school governors. We are proud to sponsor and host the annual Charity Governance Awards to celebrate the best practice and innovation of trustee boards throughout the UK. The awards are made possible through the partnerships we have forged with New Philanthropy Capital (NPC), Prospectus and Reach Volunteering. Members actively participate as well by undertaking the first-round evaluation of entries submitted to the Charity Governance Awards. However, we know that it is not enough to shine a spotlight on good governance, and we must find a way to help create the changes we seek across the sector. Working with our partners, we support efforts to increase participation of would-be trustees, to improve diversity and inclusivity on boards, and to enhance the capability of those already serving. The 2017 ‘Taken on Trust’ report from the Charity Commission

12

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

“Trusteeship is increasingly part of the ethos of The Company’s membership, and 35% of Clothworkers reported that they were serving as a school governor, trustee or volunteer in 2019.” found that the c. 700,000 trustees then serving in the UK were mostly white, male and over the age of 55 – and many were serving on multiple boards. While those serving are making a meaningful contribution to the charity sector, most charity boards are not reflective of the communities they serve, and there are still an estimated 100,000 trustee vacancies that boards are struggling to fill. A charity’s service users are dependent on its trustees for the leadership required to keep the organisation capable, nimble and sustainable. This means having the right breadth of talent, lived experience and range of skills at the table. Being a trustee is hard work and challenging, but 93% of trustees say it is immensely fulfilling. And yet, recruitment remains a problem.

This is partly due to the naturallylimited pool in which ‘word of mouth’ recruitment (still making up more than 90% of recruitment strategies) operates. Rich pools of talent are inexcusably overlooked. It is important to reach out to those who have not previously considered becoming a trustee. Recognising these challenges, we continue to invest in and support the Cause4 Trustee Leadership Programme (a five-week training course in London that ends in a trustee-matching event) and its related regional one-day seminars, the Reach Volunteering TrusteeWorks recruitment service (which matched 882 trustees and another 1,045 volunteer placements in 2019), and trustee training seminars from NPC, among others.

were interviewed, and expert content producers researched, prepared, crafted and delivered content appropriate to target audiences. Reach defined a set of design principles and guidelines, and these informed content development. In all that we do, The Clothworkers’ Company welcomes expressions of interest from members. The flourishing partnership with Reach Volunteering provides

Clothworkers with access to fascinating trustee roles, published directly to the Members’ Area and highlighted in the monthly e-newsletter. The Trustee Leadership Programme, co-funded with Close Brothers Asset Management, is offered free of charge to members. For those already on trustee boards, a number of NPC’s seminars are offered at Clothworkers’ Hall. Finally, The Company also hosts an annual trusteeship dinner to allow members to get together to

discuss and debate relevant issues. The volunteer activities of individual Clothworkers are many and varied. Realistically, it is difficult to quantify existing commitments to trustee or volunteer roles, or the extent to which this might be expanding. However, trusteeship is increasingly part of the ethos of The Company’s membership, and 35% of Clothworkers reported that they were serving as a school governor, trustee or volunteer in 2019.

Below: Representatives of SignHealth accept their Board Diversity and Inclusivity award at the 2019 Charity Governance Awards.

In 2019, we awarded an additional grant of more than £9,500 to Reach Volunteering, supporting an in-depth research project on diversity and inclusion and drawing on instructive case studies from the Charity Governance Awards finalists in this category. Reach selected finalists across a range of criteria – type of diversity (eg disability, youth), location and charity size. Board Diversity and Inclusivity category winners ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

13


50 FENCHURCH STREET For nearly 500 years, generous bequests from members and other benefactors, coupled with wise investments by the Court, have enabled The Clothworkers’ Company to thrive and grow not only our assets, but also our impact through grant-making. The Company has been on the existing site since our founding in 1528, when The Fullers’ and The Shearmen’s Companies united and decided to remain at Shearmen’s Hall on Mincing Lane. Over the centuries, Clothworkers’ Hall has changed out of opportunity or necessity – such as the destruction of the third hall by The Great Fire of London (1666) and that of the fifth hall by The Blitz (1941). The hall we are all familiar with today is the sixth on this historic site, opened in 1958. It is our home and the scene of fellowship among members. But it is also our place of work, where we fulfil our civic duties to the City of London, manage our extensive assets and strive to meet our commitments to our textiles partners, our military affiliates, our partners in championing good charity governance, and – in particular – to The Clothworkers’

Foundation. Our modern purpose, and legacy for future generations, is dependent on our ability to capitalise on our assets in order to increase our philanthropic impact. In 2019, we announced our plans for the evolution of Clothworkers’ Hall, securing its future here in the City of London and maximising our assets to increase our charitable giving. We submitted our bold proposal for the development of a new Livery Hall, commercial building and public realm for planning permission at the end of the year, receiving planning consent in May 2020 (during the City of London’s first virtual Planning and Transportation Committee Meeting). The project aims to redevelop the island site that includes Clothworkers’ Hall. The new commercial development (‘50 Fenchurch Street’), will be at the forefront of the City of London’s strategy for a greener, more environmentally sustainable Square Mile, offer the City modern office and retail space, create a new public realm and improve access to the historic church tower and crypt. We are looking forward to the future of 50 Fenchurch Street, and Clothworkers’ Hall.

Left: Architectural rendering of the proposed development, illustrating the new and expanded public space at ground level. Courtesy of Eric Parry Architects.

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

15


50 FENCHURCH STREET For nearly 500 years, generous bequests from members and other benefactors, coupled with wise investments by the Court, have enabled The Clothworkers’ Company to thrive and grow not only our assets, but also our impact through grant-making. The Company has been on the existing site since our founding in 1528, when The Fullers’ and The Shearmen’s Companies united and decided to remain at Shearmen’s Hall on Mincing Lane. Over the centuries, Clothworkers’ Hall has changed out of opportunity or necessity – such as the destruction of the third hall by The Great Fire of London (1666) and that of the fifth hall by The Blitz (1941). The hall we are all familiar with today is the sixth on this historic site, opened in 1958. It is our home and the scene of fellowship among members. But it is also our place of work, where we fulfil our civic duties to the City of London, manage our extensive assets and strive to meet our commitments to our textiles partners, our military affiliates, our partners in championing good charity governance, and – in particular – to The Clothworkers’

Foundation. Our modern purpose, and legacy for future generations, is dependent on our ability to capitalise on our assets in order to increase our philanthropic impact. In 2019, we announced our plans for the evolution of Clothworkers’ Hall, securing its future here in the City of London and maximising our assets to increase our charitable giving. We submitted our bold proposal for the development of a new Livery Hall, commercial building and public realm for planning permission at the end of the year, receiving planning consent in May 2020 (during the City of London’s first virtual Planning and Transportation Committee Meeting). The project aims to redevelop the island site that includes Clothworkers’ Hall. The new commercial development (‘50 Fenchurch Street’), will be at the forefront of the City of London’s strategy for a greener, more environmentally sustainable Square Mile, offer the City modern office and retail space, create a new public realm and improve access to the historic church tower and crypt. We are looking forward to the future of 50 Fenchurch Street, and Clothworkers’ Hall.

Left: Architectural rendering of the proposed development, illustrating the new and expanded public space at ground level. Courtesy of Eric Parry Architects.

14

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

15


ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

Portal, a pupil of de Lamerie.

We continue to preserve, make accessible and develop our archives and collections, whilst supporting talent and nurturing skills in a number of endangered crafts.

Facing page:

ARCHIVES

This page: Sir Jonathan Portal Bt donated this 18th-century cup by Abraham

A Freedom Ceremony, with the 500 Masters exhibition banners.

With more than 250 research enquiries answered and an increase in the number of research visits made by academics, 2019 was another busy year in the Archive. Subjects of interest included The Company’s role as lobbyist for the cloth trade, 1600 to 1640; reforms in schools influenced by livery companies in the late 17th century, for example at Sutton Valence Grammar School, Kent; 19th-century grants to University College Bristol; historical links between textile and fashion education and the textile and fashion industry in England, 1850 to 2000; and the Yorkshire College of Science (now the University of Leeds) and its relationship to industry and trade bodies.

the 18th Century, which ran along the breadth of Cheapside in the autumn and featured a number of prominent Clothworker businesswomen: www.citywomen.hist.ac.uk. A major project this year was an exhibition celebrating our 500th Master (Sir Jonathan Portal Bt, in the chair for 2019-20), which was intermittently displayed at the Hall for our members and guests. Much research behind the scenes went into the writing and production of a series of exhibition panels to communicate, illustrate and celebrate the lives and notable achievements of some of the 499 Past Masters be they merchants, cheesemongers, politicians, geographers, scientists, or bankrupts. The project uncovered a

great deal of new information about previous Masters, rescuing them from obscurity, and will be of longterm benefit to us both internally and in the assistance we provide to researchers. A digital slideshow of the banners will be available on The Company’s new website (expected to launch in July 2020). The Company is keen to ensure the furtherance of knowledge and skills transfer. Accordingly, we welcomed two volunteers during the course of the year. Anne Courtney, a UCL student on the MA programme for Archives Administration, spent two weeks cataloguing papers relating to the Royal Commission on Livery Companies in the 1880s. Freya Barrett, a history undergraduate and aspiring museum professional, was given a week’s work experience

assisting with research, displays and data entry using CALM, our collections management software. We plan for Freya to augment her hands-on experience in 2020. BOOKBINDING Bookbinding is an endangered craft that we have supported for more than 12 years. We are slowly building up a collection of designer bookbindings, and in 2019 took delivery of five newly completed bindings by Jo Bird, Pamela Richmond, Sue Doggett, Ann Tout – all seen in previous Clothworker membership magazines – and, most recently, Rachel Ward-Sale. Rachel’s startling binding is of The Revelations of St John the Divine, a

The breadth of interests demonstrates the research potential of our archives, and we are committed to widening access to our collections by enhancing our online catalogue, making preparations to provide access to digitised material online and participating in outreach activities to showcase our unique holdings. We contributed to the successful outdoor exhibition City Women in

16

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

17


ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

Portal, a pupil of de Lamerie.

We continue to preserve, make accessible and develop our archives and collections, whilst supporting talent and nurturing skills in a number of endangered crafts.

Facing page:

ARCHIVES

This page: Sir Jonathan Portal Bt donated this 18th-century cup by Abraham

A Freedom Ceremony, with the 500 Masters exhibition banners.

With more than 250 research enquiries answered and an increase in the number of research visits made by academics, 2019 was another busy year in the Archive. Subjects of interest included The Company’s role as lobbyist for the cloth trade, 1600 to 1640; reforms in schools influenced by livery companies in the late 17th century, for example at Sutton Valence Grammar School, Kent; 19th-century grants to University College Bristol; historical links between textile and fashion education and the textile and fashion industry in England, 1850 to 2000; and the Yorkshire College of Science (now the University of Leeds) and its relationship to industry and trade bodies.

the 18th Century, which ran along the breadth of Cheapside in the autumn and featured a number of prominent Clothworker businesswomen: www.citywomen.hist.ac.uk. A major project this year was an exhibition celebrating our 500th Master (Sir Jonathan Portal Bt, in the chair for 2019-20), which was intermittently displayed at the Hall for our members and guests. Much research behind the scenes went into the writing and production of a series of exhibition panels to communicate, illustrate and celebrate the lives and notable achievements of some of the 499 Past Masters be they merchants, cheesemongers, politicians, geographers, scientists, or bankrupts. The project uncovered a

great deal of new information about previous Masters, rescuing them from obscurity, and will be of longterm benefit to us both internally and in the assistance we provide to researchers. A digital slideshow of the banners will be available on The Company’s new website (expected to launch in July 2020). The Company is keen to ensure the furtherance of knowledge and skills transfer. Accordingly, we welcomed two volunteers during the course of the year. Anne Courtney, a UCL student on the MA programme for Archives Administration, spent two weeks cataloguing papers relating to the Royal Commission on Livery Companies in the 1880s. Freya Barrett, a history undergraduate and aspiring museum professional, was given a week’s work experience

assisting with research, displays and data entry using CALM, our collections management software. We plan for Freya to augment her hands-on experience in 2020. BOOKBINDING Bookbinding is an endangered craft that we have supported for more than 12 years. We are slowly building up a collection of designer bookbindings, and in 2019 took delivery of five newly completed bindings by Jo Bird, Pamela Richmond, Sue Doggett, Ann Tout – all seen in previous Clothworker membership magazines – and, most recently, Rachel Ward-Sale. Rachel’s startling binding is of The Revelations of St John the Divine, a

The breadth of interests demonstrates the research potential of our archives, and we are committed to widening access to our collections by enhancing our online catalogue, making preparations to provide access to digitised material online and participating in outreach activities to showcase our unique holdings. We contributed to the successful outdoor exhibition City Women in

16

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

17


ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

limited edition work by the Old Stile Press with illustrations by Natalie d’Arbeloff. A particularly challenging commission, as the book’s pages open in a concertina fashion, Rachel conceived a triptych box-binding structure to safely encase the text block. The design is inspired by the imagery of Christ crucified – with grey onlays in the form of crosses adhered to the hand-dyed leathers – surrounded by ash and flames in sprinkled, impressed and pared back gold leaf. This is a reference to her home town, Lewes, and its famous annual bonfire. All our bindings are displayed in a prominent position in the Entrance Hall, attracting the attention of members and guests alike. We currently have three books out on commission with eminent bookbinders, with another three commissions soon to be initiated.

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

VISITORS’ BOOK On occasion, our core collections are supplemented with acquisitions of unique works of art. In 2019, we initiated a commission to create a second Great Twelve Visitors’ Book, which was the gift of John Coombe-Tennant (Master 2018-19). The completed binding was featured in the Clothworker (no. 21), but the project began with a series of intricate pen-and-ink drawings of architectural details in Clothworkers’ Hall by the artist Emma Bashforth; Emma’s drawings are now featured throughout the Visitors’ Book. Emma said: ‘I had the privilege of producing a series of pen-and-ink illustrations for the Visitors’ Book. They depict some of the wonderful architectural details at the Hall. ‘I toured the Hall with Jessica

Collins, and together we carefully selected 11 architectural features to focus on – including Cedric, the carved golden ram, and other striking decorative plasterwork, gilding and carvings adorning the ceremonial rooms. Each drawing took 12 to 15 hours to complete.

This page: Portrait of Emma, and her illustration of ‘Apollo’ for the Great Twelve Visitors’ Book. Facing page: Rachel Ward-Sale’s designer binding of The Revelations of St John the Divine.

‘Although I often work on other pen-and-ink commissions, I spend most of my working life as a freelance archivist. I began working for The Company in 2008, on ROLLCO (Records of London’s Livery Companies Online). Since then, I have worked intermittently in the archives on various freelance cataloguing and indexing projects.

© 2019, Leigh Simpson.

‘I was delighted to be selected by the Collections and Archives Committee to undertake these drawings, and it was a pleasure to renew my connection with The Company through this commission.’ ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

19


ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

limited edition work by the Old Stile Press with illustrations by Natalie d’Arbeloff. A particularly challenging commission, as the book’s pages open in a concertina fashion, Rachel conceived a triptych box-binding structure to safely encase the text block. The design is inspired by the imagery of Christ crucified – with grey onlays in the form of crosses adhered to the hand-dyed leathers – surrounded by ash and flames in sprinkled, impressed and pared back gold leaf. This is a reference to her home town, Lewes, and its famous annual bonfire. All our bindings are displayed in a prominent position in the Entrance Hall, attracting the attention of members and guests alike. We currently have three books out on commission with eminent bookbinders, with another three commissions soon to be initiated.

18

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

VISITORS’ BOOK On occasion, our core collections are supplemented with acquisitions of unique works of art. In 2019, we initiated a commission to create a second Great Twelve Visitors’ Book, which was the gift of John Coombe-Tennant (Master 2018-19). The completed binding was featured in the Clothworker (no. 21), but the project began with a series of intricate pen-and-ink drawings of architectural details in Clothworkers’ Hall by the artist Emma Bashforth; Emma’s drawings are now featured throughout the Visitors’ Book. Emma said: ‘I had the privilege of producing a series of pen-and-ink illustrations for the Visitors’ Book. They depict some of the wonderful architectural details at the Hall. ‘I toured the Hall with Jessica

Collins, and together we carefully selected 11 architectural features to focus on – including Cedric, the carved golden ram, and other striking decorative plasterwork, gilding and carvings adorning the ceremonial rooms. Each drawing took 12 to 15 hours to complete.

This page: Portrait of Emma, and her illustration of ‘Apollo’ for the Great Twelve Visitors’ Book. Facing page: Rachel Ward-Sale’s designer binding of The Revelations of St John the Divine.

‘Although I often work on other pen-and-ink commissions, I spend most of my working life as a freelance archivist. I began working for The Company in 2008, on ROLLCO (Records of London’s Livery Companies Online). Since then, I have worked intermittently in the archives on various freelance cataloguing and indexing projects.

© 2019, Leigh Simpson.

‘I was delighted to be selected by the Collections and Archives Committee to undertake these drawings, and it was a pleasure to renew my connection with The Company through this commission.’ ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

19


This page: Miriam Hanid’s Loving Cup under construction,

ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

commissioned to celebrate the first Lady Master, Dr Carolyn Boulter (2017-18).

SILVER We had an exceptionally busy year in relation to curatorial activities, dominated by commissions and outreach related projects. In the spring, Yusuke Yamamoto and Miriam Hanid began work on their loving cup commissions for The Company. They were able to present their designs and early progress during our London Craft Week event at Clothworkers’ Hall last May. Yusuke is a Japanese silversmith based in Wales, who has previously worked with Hiroshi Suzuki, maker of our wonderful set of three hammered vases (the gift of Paul Wates, Master 2003-04). His teasel-inspired loving cup was selected for the commission to celebrate our 500th Master. The elegant bowl of his loving cup was hand raised from a single sheet of silver, hammered inside and out to give a textured effect, with small areas of added gold leaf ‘nunome’ onlay enlivening the surface further. The cup was completed in excellent time for Goldsmiths’ Fair last September and made its first appearance at Clothworkers’ Hall at the Court and Livery Dinner in October.

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

Miriam Hanid is an award-winning young designer silversmith based in Suffolk, whose work already features in many public and private collections including that of HM Queen Elizabeth II. Her ‘cascade’ loving cup takes its inspiration from textiles – the design is based on a cascade of draping and flowing cloth, which swirls around the form of the cup. Miriam relished the opportunity to push her chasing skills to the limit during the commission and collaborated with the silversmith Jenny Edge to design and fabricate elegant but robust hand-chased handles that spiral around the cup and stem. The piece is currently awaiting hallmarking and a final polishing before its first appearance at the Hall. It was chosen to celebrate the second recent milestone for The Clothworkers’ Company – the election of our first Lady Master (2017-18). Our plate collection has also swelled further this year with the acquisition of a fine silver gilt 18th-century two-handled cup and cover made by Abraham Portal, a pupil of de Lamerie. It has been gifted by the present Master, Sir Jonathan Portal Bt, who is a distant descendant of the maker, as his Master’s gift to The Clothworkers’ Company.

SUPPORTING TALENT We have acted as a patron of the arts for many centuries and continue to foster talent and nurture skills in selected areas today. In addition to commissioning contemporary silver, we make an annual grant to Bishopsland Educational Trust to enable students to purchase raw materials and essential tools, which will assist them in their careers long beyond the end of their formal studies. Bishopsland is a unique oneyear residential workshop for emerging silversmiths, providing masterclasses in craft techniques coupled with essential training in marketing and business skills. Prominent alumni include Rod Kelly, Jane Short, Hiroshi Suzuki, Theresa Nguyen, Angela Cork and Miriam Hanid, all of whom feature (or are soon to feature) in our growing plate collection. We recently supplemented our funding to Bishopsland to provide further financial support to those students remaining on site during the coronavirus pandemic, in order to help them complete their studies. In bookbinding, we fund prizes in the Open Choice category of the Designer Bookbinders competition, which consistently ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

21


This page: Miriam Hanid’s Loving Cup under construction,

ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

commissioned to celebrate the first Lady Master, Dr Carolyn Boulter (2017-18).

SILVER We had an exceptionally busy year in relation to curatorial activities, dominated by commissions and outreach related projects. In the spring, Yusuke Yamamoto and Miriam Hanid began work on their loving cup commissions for The Company. They were able to present their designs and early progress during our London Craft Week event at Clothworkers’ Hall last May. Yusuke is a Japanese silversmith based in Wales, who has previously worked with Hiroshi Suzuki, maker of our wonderful set of three hammered vases (the gift of Paul Wates, Master 2003-04). His teasel-inspired loving cup was selected for the commission to celebrate our 500th Master. The elegant bowl of his loving cup was hand raised from a single sheet of silver, hammered inside and out to give a textured effect, with small areas of added gold leaf ‘nunome’ onlay enlivening the surface further. The cup was completed in excellent time for Goldsmiths’ Fair last September and made its first appearance at Clothworkers’ Hall at the Court and Livery Dinner in October.

20

THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

Miriam Hanid is an award-winning young designer silversmith based in Suffolk, whose work already features in many public and private collections including that of HM Queen Elizabeth II. Her ‘cascade’ loving cup takes its inspiration from textiles – the design is based on a cascade of draping and flowing cloth, which swirls around the form of the cup. Miriam relished the opportunity to push her chasing skills to the limit during the commission and collaborated with the silversmith Jenny Edge to design and fabricate elegant but robust hand-chased handles that spiral around the cup and stem. The piece is currently awaiting hallmarking and a final polishing before its first appearance at the Hall. It was chosen to celebrate the second recent milestone for The Clothworkers’ Company – the election of our first Lady Master (2017-18). Our plate collection has also swelled further this year with the acquisition of a fine silver gilt 18th-century two-handled cup and cover made by Abraham Portal, a pupil of de Lamerie. It has been gifted by the present Master, Sir Jonathan Portal Bt, who is a distant descendant of the maker, as his Master’s gift to The Clothworkers’ Company.

SUPPORTING TALENT We have acted as a patron of the arts for many centuries and continue to foster talent and nurture skills in selected areas today. In addition to commissioning contemporary silver, we make an annual grant to Bishopsland Educational Trust to enable students to purchase raw materials and essential tools, which will assist them in their careers long beyond the end of their formal studies. Bishopsland is a unique oneyear residential workshop for emerging silversmiths, providing masterclasses in craft techniques coupled with essential training in marketing and business skills. Prominent alumni include Rod Kelly, Jane Short, Hiroshi Suzuki, Theresa Nguyen, Angela Cork and Miriam Hanid, all of whom feature (or are soon to feature) in our growing plate collection. We recently supplemented our funding to Bishopsland to provide further financial support to those students remaining on site during the coronavirus pandemic, in order to help them complete their studies. In bookbinding, we fund prizes in the Open Choice category of the Designer Bookbinders competition, which consistently ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

21


This page:

ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

Yusuke Yamamoto’s Loving Cup, commissioned to celebrate the 500th Master, Sir Jonathan Portal Bt (2019-20).

attracts high quality bindings from talented makers. We are the sole funder of bursaries to enable deserving binders to attend training masterclasses jointly organised by Designer Bookbinders (DB) and the Society of Bookbinders; we have now made two grants towards the Transferring Design initiative, a scheme devised by DB to deliver introductory and bespoke bookbinding training to students on allied courses at UK art colleges and universities, both as a means of skills transfer and to encourage new talent to consider entering the craft. We are also a founding partner of the Royal Collection Trust’s

Queen’s Bindery Apprenticeship Scheme (QBAS). The scheme is now in its fourth year, with six apprentices gaining unparalleled experience in a wide range of binding skills in the Royal Bindery at Windsor and on placements around the UK. All now possess or will shortly complete their initial City and Guilds qualifications (levels 1-3) in bookbinding, and the most experienced apprentice is now considered to be highly employable, such is the quality of the training received. PUBLIC EVENTS We were delighted Miriam Hanid and Yusuke Yamamoto could participate in our London Craft Week event, in a follow-up to

2018’s successful series of weaving masterclasses with weavers from Dovecot Tapestry Studio.

Facing page: QBAS apprentice sewing book sections. © 2019, Royal Collection Trust.

The Making of a Silver Commission was curated in collaboration with Contemporary British Silversmiths (CBS), and comprised of a series of silver demonstrations by both Miriam and Yusuke, a behindthe-scenes tour of the plate vault for leading collectors and curators in the world of silver, and a lunchtime discussion on the commissioning process with insightful commentary from both silversmiths, led by Angela Cork, chair of CBS. We had 117 visitors on the day, and we were delighted to learn that both silversmiths received new commissions as a result of this exposure. Our plans to host a bookbindingthemed London Craft Week event in May 2020 in collaboration with the Queen’s Bindery Apprenticeship Scheme were sadly cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic; however we hope to be able to participate in the event again in May 2021. In addition to the London Craft Week event, we also welcomed 1,252 members of the public to Clothworkers’ Hall on a single day in mid-September, when we threw open our doors for another successful London Open House weekend.

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

23


This page:

ARCHIVES & COLLECTIONS

Yusuke Yamamoto’s Loving Cup, commissioned to celebrate the 500th Master, Sir Jonathan Portal Bt (2019-20).

attracts high quality bindings from talented makers. We are the sole funder of bursaries to enable deserving binders to attend training masterclasses jointly organised by Designer Bookbinders (DB) and the Society of Bookbinders; we have now made two grants towards the Transferring Design initiative, a scheme devised by DB to deliver introductory and bespoke bookbinding training to students on allied courses at UK art colleges and universities, both as a means of skills transfer and to encourage new talent to consider entering the craft. We are also a founding partner of the Royal Collection Trust’s

Queen’s Bindery Apprenticeship Scheme (QBAS). The scheme is now in its fourth year, with six apprentices gaining unparalleled experience in a wide range of binding skills in the Royal Bindery at Windsor and on placements around the UK. All now possess or will shortly complete their initial City and Guilds qualifications (levels 1-3) in bookbinding, and the most experienced apprentice is now considered to be highly employable, such is the quality of the training received. PUBLIC EVENTS We were delighted Miriam Hanid and Yusuke Yamamoto could participate in our London Craft Week event, in a follow-up to

2018’s successful series of weaving masterclasses with weavers from Dovecot Tapestry Studio.

Facing page: QBAS apprentice sewing book sections. © 2019, Royal Collection Trust.

The Making of a Silver Commission was curated in collaboration with Contemporary British Silversmiths (CBS), and comprised of a series of silver demonstrations by both Miriam and Yusuke, a behindthe-scenes tour of the plate vault for leading collectors and curators in the world of silver, and a lunchtime discussion on the commissioning process with insightful commentary from both silversmiths, led by Angela Cork, chair of CBS. We had 117 visitors on the day, and we were delighted to learn that both silversmiths received new commissions as a result of this exposure. Our plans to host a bookbindingthemed London Craft Week event in May 2020 in collaboration with the Queen’s Bindery Apprenticeship Scheme were sadly cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic; however we hope to be able to participate in the event again in May 2021. In addition to the London Craft Week event, we also welcomed 1,252 members of the public to Clothworkers’ Hall on a single day in mid-September, when we threw open our doors for another successful London Open House weekend.

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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AFFILIATES We are proud to support affiliations with HMS Dauntless, No. 47 Squadron RAF, the Scots Guards and the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (Princess Royal’s Volunteer Corps) – also known as the ‘FANY’. Our financial support primarily assists with a range of welfare activities for the service men and women, and their families, as well as grants for special projects. In October 2019, the FANY delivered a handson first aid demonstration at Clothworkers’ Hall for our Young Freedom Reception. The event was a great opportunity for Clothworkers to witness a small part of the services that the FANY are able to provide – while developing life-saving skills throughout the evening. A month later, FANY volunteers were deployed immediately to staff the Casualty Bureau on behalf of the City of London Police in the wake of the terrorist attack near London Bridge (29 November). In addition, members of the Corps who were trained in Trauma Risk Management (TRiM) provided support to Fishmongers’ staff at their first regrouping since the incident. City of London Police later recognised their efforts with a plaque and presentation ceremony. Clothworkers’ contributed £15,000 to the FANY towards salary costs in 2019. A grant of £20,000 went to the Scots Guards for the Soldiers and Family Welfare programme. Additionally, we sponsored the inaugural Clothworkers’ Scots Guards Community Awards at an event at Clothworkers’ Hall in June. Finally, we awarded £22,000 to No. 47 Squadron RAF for its Family Welfare programme. Right: FANY volunteers taking part in the Lord Mayor’s Show (9 November 2019).

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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AFFILIATES We are proud to support affiliations with HMS Dauntless, No. 47 Squadron RAF, the Scots Guards and the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (Princess Royal’s Volunteer Corps) – also known as the ‘FANY’. Our financial support primarily assists with a range of welfare activities for the service men and women, and their families, as well as grants for special projects. In October 2019, the FANY delivered a handson first aid demonstration at Clothworkers’ Hall for our Young Freedom Reception. The event was a great opportunity for Clothworkers to witness a small part of the services that the FANY are able to provide – while developing life-saving skills throughout the evening. A month later, FANY volunteers were deployed immediately to staff the Casualty Bureau on behalf of the City of London Police in the wake of the terrorist attack near London Bridge (29 November). In addition, members of the Corps who were trained in Trauma Risk Management (TRiM) provided support to Fishmongers’ staff at their first regrouping since the incident. City of London Police later recognised their efforts with a plaque and presentation ceremony. Clothworkers’ contributed £15,000 to the FANY towards salary costs in 2019. A grant of £20,000 went to the Scots Guards for the Soldiers and Family Welfare programme. Additionally, we sponsored the inaugural Clothworkers’ Scots Guards Community Awards at an event at Clothworkers’ Hall in June. Finally, we awarded £22,000 to No. 47 Squadron RAF for its Family Welfare programme. Right: FANY volunteers taking part in the Lord Mayor’s Show (9 November 2019).

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

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THE CLOTHWORKERS’ COMPANY ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

Profile for The Clothworkers' Company

The Clothworkers' Company Annual Review 2019  

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