Page 1

the clothworkers’ foundation annual review 2017

annual review 2017 the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

annual review 2017


the clothworkers’ company 2017 Master Dr Carolyn Boulter DL Wardens John Coombe-Tennant John Wake Daniel Jago Dr Lucy Rawson Court of Assistants Christopher Jonas CBE Neil Foster Richard Jonas John Stoddart-Scott DL Robin Booth Christopher McLean May Michael Howell Antony Jones Melville Haggard Michael Jarvis Oliver Howard Tim Bousfield Peter Langley Philip Portal Nicholas Horne Alexander Nelson Denis Clough Tom Ingham Clark Joanna Dodd Andrew Strang Andrew Yonge Colonel Alastair Mathewson OBE Sir Jonathan Portal Bt Honorary Assistant Andrew Blessley

introduction

Clerk to the Company Jocelyn Stuart-Grumbar

Textiles 2

The Clothworkers’ Company is a 500-year-old philanthropic membership organisation with roots in the textile trade. Established by Royal Charter in 1528 through the merger of the Fullers and the Shearmen, The Company was founded to promote the craft of clothworking in the City of London. It supervised the training of apprentices and protected standards of workmanship.

collections 10

Today

Trusteeship 18

Having accumulated considerable wealth over the centuries, largely through bequests from members and the prudent management of its assets, The Company’s overall objectives today are to administer its assets and affairs responsibly, play its part in the civic life of the City of London, support the textile industry in appropriate ways, and seek to increase its charitable giving.

Director of Finance, Property and Investments Hamesh Patel Chief Accountant Andy Boon Beadle and Hall Manager Michael Drummond Head of Grants Philip Howard senior Archivist Jessica Collins

contents

Affiliations Membership And Communications Manager Renée LaDue The Clothworkers’ Company Clothworkers’ Hall Dunster Court Mincing Lane London EC3R 7AH +44 (0)20 7623 7041 enquiries@clothworkers.co.uk www.clothworkers.co.uk Like us on Facebook! Twitter: @ClothworkersCo Instagram: Clothworkers_Co

20

The Clothworkers’ charitable activity is channelled through its grant-making charity, The Clothworkers’ Foundation,

established in 1977 with a significant endowment from The Company. The Company passes its income, having met the costs of running the Hall and its other activities, across to The Foundation each year. This, together with income from The Foundation’s own investments, is distributed to a broad range of charities. The following pages of this Review cover the key activities of The Company in textiles, its commitment to trusteeship, the continuing interest in its heritage and collections, and its support for the Armed Forces. The reverse side of this publication contains information on the activities undertaken by The Clothworkers’ Foundation. The Annual Review is directed both at the members of The Company as well as interested outside parties; we hope it will make interesting and informative reading on the modern role of an ancient City Livery Company.

Cover: New commission, a rosewater dish by Angela Cork to

Company photography by Kate Darkins and Richard Valencia.

commemorate our Supplemental

Printing by Park Lane Press. Design by Lydia Thornley.

Charter (granted in 2015). Read more on page 12. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

1


the clothworkers’ company 2017 Master Dr Carolyn Boulter DL Wardens John Coombe-Tennant John Wake Daniel Jago Dr Lucy Rawson Court of Assistants Christopher Jonas CBE Neil Foster Richard Jonas John Stoddart-Scott DL Robin Booth Christopher McLean May Michael Howell Antony Jones Melville Haggard Michael Jarvis Oliver Howard Tim Bousfield Peter Langley Philip Portal Nicholas Horne Alexander Nelson Denis Clough Tom Ingham Clark Joanna Dodd Andrew Strang Andrew Yonge Colonel Alastair Mathewson OBE Sir Jonathan Portal Bt Honorary Assistant Andrew Blessley

introduction

Clerk to the Company Jocelyn Stuart-Grumbar

Textiles 2

The Clothworkers’ Company is a 500-year-old philanthropic membership organisation with roots in the textile trade. Established by Royal Charter in 1528 through the merger of the Fullers and the Shearmen, The Company was founded to promote the craft of clothworking in the City of London. It supervised the training of apprentices and protected standards of workmanship.

collections 10

Today

Trusteeship 18

Having accumulated considerable wealth over the centuries, largely through bequests from members and the prudent management of its assets, The Company’s overall objectives today are to administer its assets and affairs responsibly, play its part in the civic life of the City of London, support the textile industry in appropriate ways, and seek to increase its charitable giving.

Director of Finance, Property and Investments Hamesh Patel Chief Accountant Andy Boon Beadle and Hall Manager Michael Drummond Head of Grants Philip Howard senior Archivist Jessica Collins

contents

Affiliations Membership And Communications Manager Renée LaDue The Clothworkers’ Company Clothworkers’ Hall Dunster Court Mincing Lane London EC3R 7AH +44 (0)20 7623 7041 enquiries@clothworkers.co.uk www.clothworkers.co.uk Like us on Facebook! Twitter: @ClothworkersCo Instagram: Clothworkers_Co

20

The Clothworkers’ charitable activity is channelled through its grant-making charity, The Clothworkers’ Foundation,

established in 1977 with a significant endowment from The Company. The Company passes its income, having met the costs of running the Hall and its other activities, across to The Foundation each year. This, together with income from The Foundation’s own investments, is distributed to a broad range of charities. The following pages of this Review cover the key activities of The Company in textiles, its commitment to trusteeship, the continuing interest in its heritage and collections, and its support for the Armed Forces. The reverse side of this publication contains information on the activities undertaken by The Clothworkers’ Foundation. The Annual Review is directed both at the members of The Company as well as interested outside parties; we hope it will make interesting and informative reading on the modern role of an ancient City Livery Company.

Cover: New commission, a rosewater dish by Angela Cork to

Company photography by Kate Darkins and Richard Valencia.

commemorate our Supplemental

Printing by Park Lane Press. Design by Lydia Thornley.

Charter (granted in 2015). Read more on page 12. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

1


textiles Over time, our funding for textiles initiatives has come to straddle both The Company and Foundation. Recently, as part of our effort to foster continuous improvement in our own governance, we have sought to delineate the distinct, but compatible, purposes of The Clothworkers’ Company and The Clothworkers’ Foundation, respectively. The Foundation has nine Main and Small Grants programme areas, a number of major ongoing Proactive Grants initiatives, and another impending commitment towards Care Leavers. We felt it important to allow The Foundation’s grants team and trustees to dedicate their full attention to these matters, and to consolidate all matters to do with textiles within The Company.

Photograph by Chris Bethell

This decision provides clear guidance for The Company’s modern purpose, which places textiles and trusteeship at the heart of its activities. There are encouraging signs of groundbreaking innovation in textiles

2

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

Facing page: Weavers at Cockpit Arts, a creative business incubator supported by The Foundation.

(not least at the University of Leeds), and also of investment in the mills that bring this innovation to market. As a result, we felt it was the right time to reaffirm The Company’s roots in clothworking, clarify what direction our enduring interest in textiles should take, and discover how we might have the most meaningful impact on the industry. Therefore, in 2017, we interrogated our Textiles Strategy, an exercise last undertaken in 2012. Previously, our objectives were to: support textile technology and manufacturing in the UK; maintain our support of academic excellence and innovation in technical textiles, traditional textiles, and colour science in the UK; encourage young adults to pursue studies and a career in these fields; selectively support and reward excellence in textile design; contribute to the preservation and accessibility of textile collections of national importance. Over the past decade or more, The Foundation (principally) and Company, between them, have committed more than £11m in textiles-related support, with the

categories of Academic Research and Innovation (42%) and Heritage and Conservation (34%) accounting for the lion’s share (with exceptional grants to the Victoria and Albert Museum and British Museum explaining the latter). In evolving our strategy, we have now committed ourselves to applying our resources to meet the following objectives: prioritising British textiles; focusing on cloth, rather than costume, and on the manufacture of cloth; directing our involvement in textile design towards talented students at higher-rated institutions, with an interest in people who are studying or possess the ability to convert ideas into a product capable of being manufactured as well as an understanding of textile technologies; rigorously exploring prospective usage of equipment that we fund; directing our support in heritage towards cataloguing, indexing, storing, conserving, displaying and improving access to important textile collections and archives. The above objectives also reflect our recognition that fashion and retail industries are too broad and

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

3


textiles Over time, our funding for textiles initiatives has come to straddle both The Company and Foundation. Recently, as part of our effort to foster continuous improvement in our own governance, we have sought to delineate the distinct, but compatible, purposes of The Clothworkers’ Company and The Clothworkers’ Foundation, respectively. The Foundation has nine Main and Small Grants programme areas, a number of major ongoing Proactive Grants initiatives, and another impending commitment towards Care Leavers. We felt it important to allow The Foundation’s grants team and trustees to dedicate their full attention to these matters, and to consolidate all matters to do with textiles within The Company.

Photograph by Chris Bethell

This decision provides clear guidance for The Company’s modern purpose, which places textiles and trusteeship at the heart of its activities. There are encouraging signs of groundbreaking innovation in textiles

2

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

Facing page: Weavers at Cockpit Arts, a creative business incubator supported by The Foundation.

(not least at the University of Leeds), and also of investment in the mills that bring this innovation to market. As a result, we felt it was the right time to reaffirm The Company’s roots in clothworking, clarify what direction our enduring interest in textiles should take, and discover how we might have the most meaningful impact on the industry. Therefore, in 2017, we interrogated our Textiles Strategy, an exercise last undertaken in 2012. Previously, our objectives were to: support textile technology and manufacturing in the UK; maintain our support of academic excellence and innovation in technical textiles, traditional textiles, and colour science in the UK; encourage young adults to pursue studies and a career in these fields; selectively support and reward excellence in textile design; contribute to the preservation and accessibility of textile collections of national importance. Over the past decade or more, The Foundation (principally) and Company, between them, have committed more than £11m in textiles-related support, with the

categories of Academic Research and Innovation (42%) and Heritage and Conservation (34%) accounting for the lion’s share (with exceptional grants to the Victoria and Albert Museum and British Museum explaining the latter). In evolving our strategy, we have now committed ourselves to applying our resources to meet the following objectives: prioritising British textiles; focusing on cloth, rather than costume, and on the manufacture of cloth; directing our involvement in textile design towards talented students at higher-rated institutions, with an interest in people who are studying or possess the ability to convert ideas into a product capable of being manufactured as well as an understanding of textile technologies; rigorously exploring prospective usage of equipment that we fund; directing our support in heritage towards cataloguing, indexing, storing, conserving, displaying and improving access to important textile collections and archives. The above objectives also reflect our recognition that fashion and retail industries are too broad and

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

3


textiles

Right: Textiles production at Pennine Weavers, a mill in West Yorkshire.

well-supported commercially for us to make a meaningful difference. In essence, our principal interest in textiles as a craft guild will be to work with others to support innovation, technical skills, and links with the industry. We will also move away from funding art textiles and exhibitions in favour of funding initiatives directed at safeguarding the textiles heritage that informs our objectives in innovation and technical skills. EDUCATION and Innovation In British Textiles In 2012, we helped to establish the Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare (CCTMIH) at the University of Leeds, with a £1.75m anchor donation. The Centre works to develop enabling technologies based on advances in textile science and engineering. It creates prototype products used in healthcare for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease, illness, infection, or injury. We have been a major supporter of both the Textiles and Colour Science Departments at Leeds University since they were established and, over the past 20 years, have made grants to these departments in excess of £10m.

4

We currently provide bursaries for a number of postgraduate (MA and PhD) students across the two departments. In addition, we make the occasional capital grants to assist with the purchase of cuttingedge specialist equipment.

“Make Your Future”. This handson programme is designed to bring together traditional textilemaking with digital technologies, to stimulate the creativity of young people, and inspire future careers in textiles.

the Centre when it was at the University of Southampton, and now in its relatively new home in Glasgow. In addition, we have funded internships in tapestry conservation through Historic Royal Palaces, at Hampton Court.

The Company and the University have been co-funders of an Innovation Fund to foster commercial ideas in textiles and colour science. Since 2005, the Fund has disbursed more than £1.2m to allow the development of early-stage innovations.

Our successful partnership with creative business incubator, Cockpit Arts, continues to flourish. The arrangement provides studio space and access to equipment for graduate weavers, enabling them to set up in business. Our support has allowed the studio to purchase the cutting-edge desktop looms currently in use by its resident weavers.

Five years ago, the Clothworkers’ Centre for the Study and Conservation of Textiles and Fashion opened at Blythe House. The Foundation’s £1m grant to the V&A, towards the £3m overall cost of the Centre, was to allow students, designers, and researchers greater access to the Museum’s extensive collection. The Centre was in the news this year for the vital role it played in helping director Paul Thomas Anderson and actor Daniel DayLewis in researching the movie Phantom Thread; two of the Centre’s volunteers, Sue Clark and Joan Brown, even landed supporting roles in the film.

For a number of years, we have also funded student bursaries through the Royal College of Art, Central Saint Martins and the University of Huddersfield, as well as making capital grants for the purchase of specialist equipment. Skills Development We encourage young people to go into the UK textile industry through subsidised work placements, organising the annual “Making It in Textiles” conference in Bradford to highlight opportunities in the industry, and fostering apprenticeships in Yorkshire. We committed £90,000 over three years to the Crafts Council, funding its flagship education programme,

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

Designs for the Future We are longstanding supporters of TexSelect (formerly “TexPrint”), New Designers, and the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition. CONSERVING THE PAST We are a major supporter of textile conservation in the UK. Since the 1980s, we have made capital grants, funded research, and provided bursaries for students at the Centre for Textile Conservation to the tune of £1.75m – supporting

In 2014, the British Museum opened its World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre. Our £0.75m grant to the Museum went towards the creation of The Clothworkers’ Organics Conservation Studio, housed within the Centre, to bring conservation and scientific research together under one roof with specially designed studios and laboratories. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

5


textiles

Right: Textiles production at Pennine Weavers, a mill in West Yorkshire.

well-supported commercially for us to make a meaningful difference. In essence, our principal interest in textiles as a craft guild will be to work with others to support innovation, technical skills, and links with the industry. We will also move away from funding art textiles and exhibitions in favour of funding initiatives directed at safeguarding the textiles heritage that informs our objectives in innovation and technical skills. EDUCATION and Innovation In British Textiles In 2012, we helped to establish the Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare (CCTMIH) at the University of Leeds, with a £1.75m anchor donation. The Centre works to develop enabling technologies based on advances in textile science and engineering. It creates prototype products used in healthcare for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease, illness, infection, or injury. We have been a major supporter of both the Textiles and Colour Science Departments at Leeds University since they were established and, over the past 20 years, have made grants to these departments in excess of £10m.

4

We currently provide bursaries for a number of postgraduate (MA and PhD) students across the two departments. In addition, we make the occasional capital grants to assist with the purchase of cuttingedge specialist equipment.

“Make Your Future”. This handson programme is designed to bring together traditional textilemaking with digital technologies, to stimulate the creativity of young people, and inspire future careers in textiles.

the Centre when it was at the University of Southampton, and now in its relatively new home in Glasgow. In addition, we have funded internships in tapestry conservation through Historic Royal Palaces, at Hampton Court.

The Company and the University have been co-funders of an Innovation Fund to foster commercial ideas in textiles and colour science. Since 2005, the Fund has disbursed more than £1.2m to allow the development of early-stage innovations.

Our successful partnership with creative business incubator, Cockpit Arts, continues to flourish. The arrangement provides studio space and access to equipment for graduate weavers, enabling them to set up in business. Our support has allowed the studio to purchase the cutting-edge desktop looms currently in use by its resident weavers.

Five years ago, the Clothworkers’ Centre for the Study and Conservation of Textiles and Fashion opened at Blythe House. The Foundation’s £1m grant to the V&A, towards the £3m overall cost of the Centre, was to allow students, designers, and researchers greater access to the Museum’s extensive collection. The Centre was in the news this year for the vital role it played in helping director Paul Thomas Anderson and actor Daniel DayLewis in researching the movie Phantom Thread; two of the Centre’s volunteers, Sue Clark and Joan Brown, even landed supporting roles in the film.

For a number of years, we have also funded student bursaries through the Royal College of Art, Central Saint Martins and the University of Huddersfield, as well as making capital grants for the purchase of specialist equipment. Skills Development We encourage young people to go into the UK textile industry through subsidised work placements, organising the annual “Making It in Textiles” conference in Bradford to highlight opportunities in the industry, and fostering apprenticeships in Yorkshire. We committed £90,000 over three years to the Crafts Council, funding its flagship education programme,

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

Designs for the Future We are longstanding supporters of TexSelect (formerly “TexPrint”), New Designers, and the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition. CONSERVING THE PAST We are a major supporter of textile conservation in the UK. Since the 1980s, we have made capital grants, funded research, and provided bursaries for students at the Centre for Textile Conservation to the tune of £1.75m – supporting

In 2014, the British Museum opened its World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre. Our £0.75m grant to the Museum went towards the creation of The Clothworkers’ Organics Conservation Studio, housed within the Centre, to bring conservation and scientific research together under one roof with specially designed studios and laboratories. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

5


textiles: TexSelect in Focus “Her winning design (using muted tones and earthy colours) took inspiration from raw qualities present in the natural environment, which she interpreted into printed designs expressive in mark and rich in texture.”

The TexSelect (formerly “TexPrint”) programme is focused on giving emerging designers greater experience of exhibiting and selling their work; speaking with buyers, press and others in the industry; additional training and marketing experiences; and opportunities to develop an understanding of commercial requirements. The programme invites 24 designers to participate annually, awarding additional prizes to exceptional designers in special categories. The Company is an annual sponsor of those special awards, supporting the prize for the best textile design for interiors.

Above: TexSelect winner, Lucy Day. Facing page: Hand-dyed and printed Harris Tweed, embellished

The 2017 recipient of the prize was Lucy Day, who was also shortlisted for two other special TexSelect awards and offered the opportunity to undertake an AVA CAD/CAM software training course. Her winning design (using muted tones and earthy colours) took inspiration from raw qualities present in the natural environment, which she interpreted into printed designs expressive in mark and rich in texture.

Lucy completed a Bachelor of Arts in Fashion and Textiles at Colchester School of Art, and continued her studies with a Master of Arts from the Royal College of Art. Today, she is freelancing for a unique print design studio called Circleline. There, she is experimenting with techniques to produce artistic and forward-thinking prints for a broad range of clients. Her work was featured in the Textile View magazine. The magazine’s creative director said, “Lucy created some beautiful designs, which we printed and made up into costumes to be shot by our collaborating photographer, James Champion. Lucy was there to style the shoot for her part of the story and to offer general support after a very early morning start.” Lucy has written to The Company to say: “The funding from The Clothworkers’ Company has allowed me to get started and rent a space at a screen print studio, where I continue to produce my own textiles, maintaining the hand-printed techniques I know and love.”

with fringe to depict undulating mountains. Page 9: Lucy’s layered and screenprinted silk design.

6

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

7


textiles: TexSelect in Focus “Her winning design (using muted tones and earthy colours) took inspiration from raw qualities present in the natural environment, which she interpreted into printed designs expressive in mark and rich in texture.”

The TexSelect (formerly “TexPrint”) programme is focused on giving emerging designers greater experience of exhibiting and selling their work; speaking with buyers, press and others in the industry; additional training and marketing experiences; and opportunities to develop an understanding of commercial requirements. The programme invites 24 designers to participate annually, awarding additional prizes to exceptional designers in special categories. The Company is an annual sponsor of those special awards, supporting the prize for the best textile design for interiors.

Above: TexSelect winner, Lucy Day. Facing page: Hand-dyed and printed Harris Tweed, embellished

The 2017 recipient of the prize was Lucy Day, who was also shortlisted for two other special TexSelect awards and offered the opportunity to undertake an AVA CAD/CAM software training course. Her winning design (using muted tones and earthy colours) took inspiration from raw qualities present in the natural environment, which she interpreted into printed designs expressive in mark and rich in texture.

Lucy completed a Bachelor of Arts in Fashion and Textiles at Colchester School of Art, and continued her studies with a Master of Arts from the Royal College of Art. Today, she is freelancing for a unique print design studio called Circleline. There, she is experimenting with techniques to produce artistic and forward-thinking prints for a broad range of clients. Her work was featured in the Textile View magazine. The magazine’s creative director said, “Lucy created some beautiful designs, which we printed and made up into costumes to be shot by our collaborating photographer, James Champion. Lucy was there to style the shoot for her part of the story and to offer general support after a very early morning start.” Lucy has written to The Company to say: “The funding from The Clothworkers’ Company has allowed me to get started and rent a space at a screen print studio, where I continue to produce my own textiles, maintaining the hand-printed techniques I know and love.”

with fringe to depict undulating mountains. Page 9: Lucy’s layered and screenprinted silk design.

6

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

7


textiles: grants Grants From the Company and Foundation

£

University of Leeds, School of Design

PhD bursary in green systems for sustainable colouration of polyester

70,000

University of Leeds, School of Design

BA Fashion Technology course bursaries

60,000

University of Huddersfield, Textiles Centre of Excellence

Funding for the Apprenticeship Champion

44,000

The Weavers’ Company Textile Education Fund

Industry placement scheme

30,000

Centre for Textile Conservation

MPhil bursary

27,400

University of Huddersfield, Textiles Centre of Excellence

Trailblazer Apprenticeships (funded in partnership with The Drapers’ Company, The Dyers’ Company and The Weavers’ Company)

26,000

University of Leeds, Department of Colour Science

Summer research internships

25,000

University of Leeds, Department of Colour Science

MSc bursary

20,000

University of Leeds, School of Design

Two MSc bursaries in Advanced Textiles

20,000

Cockpit Arts

Desktop looms

16,250

Central Saint Martins

Materials fund and student bursary

15,000

University of Huddersfield

BA/BSc bursaries

15,000

“Making It in Textiles”

Conference for third-year textile students (funded in partnership with Campaign for Wool, The Drapers’ Company and The Weavers’ Company)

15,000

Royal College of Art

MA bursaries

13,000

Hopetoun House Preservation Trust

Specialist cleaning for two tapestries

10,000

Bradford Textile Society

Textile design competition

4,650

New Designers

Sponsorship and Printed Textile Design Prize

4,000

Total

8

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

415,300

“The funding from The Clothworkers’ Company has allowed me to get started and rent a space at a screen print studio where I continue to produce my own textiles, maintaining the handprinted techniques I know and love.” Lucy Day

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

9


textiles: grants Grants From the Company and Foundation

£

University of Leeds, School of Design

PhD bursary in green systems for sustainable colouration of polyester

70,000

University of Leeds, School of Design

BA Fashion Technology course bursaries

60,000

University of Huddersfield, Textiles Centre of Excellence

Funding for the Apprenticeship Champion

44,000

The Weavers’ Company Textile Education Fund

Industry placement scheme

30,000

Centre for Textile Conservation

MPhil bursary

27,400

University of Huddersfield, Textiles Centre of Excellence

Trailblazer Apprenticeships (funded in partnership with The Drapers’ Company, The Dyers’ Company and The Weavers’ Company)

26,000

University of Leeds, Department of Colour Science

Summer research internships

25,000

University of Leeds, Department of Colour Science

MSc bursary

20,000

University of Leeds, School of Design

Two MSc bursaries in Advanced Textiles

20,000

Cockpit Arts

Desktop looms

16,250

Central Saint Martins

Materials fund and student bursary

15,000

University of Huddersfield

BA/BSc bursaries

15,000

“Making It in Textiles”

Conference for third-year textile students (funded in partnership with Campaign for Wool, The Drapers’ Company and The Weavers’ Company)

15,000

Royal College of Art

MA bursaries

13,000

Hopetoun House Preservation Trust

Specialist cleaning for two tapestries

10,000

Bradford Textile Society

Textile design competition

4,650

New Designers

Sponsorship and Printed Textile Design Prize

4,000

Total

8

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

415,300

“The funding from The Clothworkers’ Company has allowed me to get started and rent a space at a screen print studio where I continue to produce my own textiles, maintaining the handprinted techniques I know and love.” Lucy Day

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

9


collections “We have recently agreed to include images of our important early 17th-century Treswell Plan Book in the Layers of London Project. Supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, this is a ground-breaking, interactive online mapping tool for the history of London.”

We continue to preserve, make accessible, and develop our archives and collections, whilst supporting talented artists and craftsmen in a number of fields. Archives It was a busy year for the archivists, with a substantial increase in the number of enquiries received and a higher volume of visitors to the Hall. Whilst many of our activities are of a curatorial nature, we are keen to ensure we continue to make significant strides towards professionalising the care of our archives. Accordingly, we have recently developed an Archives Strategy for The Company, a forward plan to guide our activities over the coming years with the ultimate aim of reaching Archive Accreditation Standard. An important facet of this Strategy is to explore ways in which we can make our collections more accessible online. As an example, we have recently agreed to include images of our important early 17th-century Treswell Plan Book in the Layers of London Project. Supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, this is a ground-breaking, interactive online mapping tool for the history of London.

10

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

Tapestry Designed by the Turner Prizewinning artist Chris Ofili CBE, and hand-woven by the internationally renowned Dovecot Tapestry Studio in Edinburgh, The Caged Bird’s Song is a bold and vibrant triptych that draws on Ofili’s ongoing interests in classical mythology and contemporary demigods. It is inspired by the stories, magic, and colour of the Trinidadian landscape the artist inhabits.

Above: The Caged Bird’s Song (tapestry), 2014-2017. © Chris Ofili.

The commission and, in particular, the choice of such a prominent artist to design the work, make a powerful statement about our commitment to our root craft and our desire to support endangered skills and nurture talent. The tapestry was installed in Clothworkers’ Hall in September 2017, following the critically acclaimed exhibition at the National Gallery, Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic (April to August 2017), in which the tapestry featured. Since then, we have welcomed more than 130 visitors to the Hall for a series of bimonthly tapestry viewings, in order to meet continued public demand in this magnificent work of art and craftsmanship.

Wool, cotton, and viscose. Courtesy of the artist, Victoria Miro London, The Clothworkers’ Company, and Dovecot Tapestry Studio, Edinburgh. Left: Detail of the Islington area from the Treswell Plan Book, c1612.

Dovecot is one of only two surviving tapestry studios in the UK, and it took a team of five master weavers more than two and a half years to translate Ofili’s watercolour design to the loom – interpreting, replicating, and magnifying each and every colour

and nuance with great skill and artistry. In order to showcase this extraordinary piece further, we will be opening Clothworkers’ Hall for London Craft Week (May 2018). This will involve a series of tapestry master classes, run by Dovecot’s master weavers,

in addition to a lunchtime talk discussing the making of the tapestry. We will also be opening the principal ceremonial rooms of the Hall for Open House London on Saturday, 22nd September 2018.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

11


collections “We have recently agreed to include images of our important early 17th-century Treswell Plan Book in the Layers of London Project. Supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, this is a ground-breaking, interactive online mapping tool for the history of London.”

We continue to preserve, make accessible, and develop our archives and collections, whilst supporting talented artists and craftsmen in a number of fields. Archives It was a busy year for the archivists, with a substantial increase in the number of enquiries received and a higher volume of visitors to the Hall. Whilst many of our activities are of a curatorial nature, we are keen to ensure we continue to make significant strides towards professionalising the care of our archives. Accordingly, we have recently developed an Archives Strategy for The Company, a forward plan to guide our activities over the coming years with the ultimate aim of reaching Archive Accreditation Standard. An important facet of this Strategy is to explore ways in which we can make our collections more accessible online. As an example, we have recently agreed to include images of our important early 17th-century Treswell Plan Book in the Layers of London Project. Supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, this is a ground-breaking, interactive online mapping tool for the history of London.

10

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

Tapestry Designed by the Turner Prizewinning artist Chris Ofili CBE, and hand-woven by the internationally renowned Dovecot Tapestry Studio in Edinburgh, The Caged Bird’s Song is a bold and vibrant triptych that draws on Ofili’s ongoing interests in classical mythology and contemporary demigods. It is inspired by the stories, magic, and colour of the Trinidadian landscape the artist inhabits.

Above: The Caged Bird’s Song (tapestry), 2014-2017. © Chris Ofili.

The commission and, in particular, the choice of such a prominent artist to design the work, make a powerful statement about our commitment to our root craft and our desire to support endangered skills and nurture talent. The tapestry was installed in Clothworkers’ Hall in September 2017, following the critically acclaimed exhibition at the National Gallery, Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic (April to August 2017), in which the tapestry featured. Since then, we have welcomed more than 130 visitors to the Hall for a series of bimonthly tapestry viewings, in order to meet continued public demand in this magnificent work of art and craftsmanship.

Wool, cotton, and viscose. Courtesy of the artist, Victoria Miro London, The Clothworkers’ Company, and Dovecot Tapestry Studio, Edinburgh. Left: Detail of the Islington area from the Treswell Plan Book, c1612.

Dovecot is one of only two surviving tapestry studios in the UK, and it took a team of five master weavers more than two and a half years to translate Ofili’s watercolour design to the loom – interpreting, replicating, and magnifying each and every colour

and nuance with great skill and artistry. In order to showcase this extraordinary piece further, we will be opening Clothworkers’ Hall for London Craft Week (May 2018). This will involve a series of tapestry master classes, run by Dovecot’s master weavers,

in addition to a lunchtime talk discussing the making of the tapestry. We will also be opening the principal ceremonial rooms of the Hall for Open House London on Saturday, 22nd September 2018.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

11


collections “Our collection exists in large part due to the generosity of past Masters and members; however, we actively seek to build a representative collection of the best of contemporary British silver.”

Commissioning Silver We are fortunate to possess an extensive collection of silver, dating from the early 17th century, with a particular highlight being the magnificent suite of plate presented by Samuel Pepys (Master, 1677-78). This includes the extremely rare, pierced and chased silver gilt cagework cup made by Gerard Cooques (the royal goldsmith), which has this year been the subject of new research by experts at the Victoria and Albert Museum and Ashmolean Museum. Our collection exists in large part due to the generosity of past Masters and members; however, we actively seek to build a representative collection of the best of contemporary British silver. Towards that goal, we place commissions with eminent modern designers every two years. In the past year, we have taken delivery of two important, but contrasting, pieces. A new badge for the Clerk was designed by Ginnie de Vroomen and made by her husband, Leo de Vroomen. In partly oxidized silver, it features an artistic representation of fleece curls and a gold-plated ram’s

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the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

horn against a background of chequered cloth. The badge was generously presented to The Company by Immediate Past Master Michael Jarvis. Additionally, Angela Cork was commissioned to create a rosewater dish commemorating our Supplemental Charter, granted in 2015. Her “Charter” dish incorporates an abstracted, three-dimensional teasel plant pattern around the outer rim. The design was hand-chased by setting the silver onto pitch and using hammers to compress and shape the metal into voluminous teasel shapes. The effect is to make the rim almost cloth-like in appearance. A satin finish and highly polished centre provide an elegant contrast within the dish. We will shortly invite designs from five silversmiths for two new loving cups as our 2018 commissions. This is so that we may gracefully retire our 18th-century cups from active use during Livery Dinners.

Facing page clockwise from top left: The Clerk’s badge, given by Immediate Past Master Michael Jarvis. Detail of our Pepys cup. Angela Cork’s rosewater dish. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

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collections “Our collection exists in large part due to the generosity of past Masters and members; however, we actively seek to build a representative collection of the best of contemporary British silver.”

Commissioning Silver We are fortunate to possess an extensive collection of silver, dating from the early 17th century, with a particular highlight being the magnificent suite of plate presented by Samuel Pepys (Master, 1677-78). This includes the extremely rare, pierced and chased silver gilt cagework cup made by Gerard Cooques (the royal goldsmith), which has this year been the subject of new research by experts at the Victoria and Albert Museum and Ashmolean Museum. Our collection exists in large part due to the generosity of past Masters and members; however, we actively seek to build a representative collection of the best of contemporary British silver. Towards that goal, we place commissions with eminent modern designers every two years. In the past year, we have taken delivery of two important, but contrasting, pieces. A new badge for the Clerk was designed by Ginnie de Vroomen and made by her husband, Leo de Vroomen. In partly oxidized silver, it features an artistic representation of fleece curls and a gold-plated ram’s

12

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

horn against a background of chequered cloth. The badge was generously presented to The Company by Immediate Past Master Michael Jarvis. Additionally, Angela Cork was commissioned to create a rosewater dish commemorating our Supplemental Charter, granted in 2015. Her “Charter” dish incorporates an abstracted, three-dimensional teasel plant pattern around the outer rim. The design was hand-chased by setting the silver onto pitch and using hammers to compress and shape the metal into voluminous teasel shapes. The effect is to make the rim almost cloth-like in appearance. A satin finish and highly polished centre provide an elegant contrast within the dish. We will shortly invite designs from five silversmiths for two new loving cups as our 2018 commissions. This is so that we may gracefully retire our 18th-century cups from active use during Livery Dinners.

Facing page clockwise from top left: The Clerk’s badge, given by Immediate Past Master Michael Jarvis. Detail of our Pepys cup. Angela Cork’s rosewater dish. the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

13


collections

This year, we have been fortunate to receive from the present Master, Dr Carolyn Boulter, a full-length portrait of her ancestor, Sir Robert Beachcroft (Master, 1700-01, and Lord Mayor of London, 1711-12), by Richard van Bleeck. The portrait has been hung – for the current Master’s year – at the head of the Court Room, adjacent to that of Carolyn’s grandfather, Major Maurice Beachcroft. For the time being, the Master may feel the benevolent eyes of her forebears upon her when the Court convenes.

Commissioning Contemporary Bookbindings

Photograph by Anthony Belfield

Bookbinding is an endangered craft that we decided to support 10 years ago.

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the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

We are slowly building up a collection of designer bookbindings, and currently have five books out on commission with eminent bookbinders. We recently took delivery of a suitably macabre binding of The Great Plague: A People’s History by Evelyn Lord (2014), with a binding by Julian Thomas MBE, former Head of Conservation at the National Library of Wales. In early 2017,

we also received our second commission from Jenni Grey. All our bindings are displayed in a prominent position in the Entrance Hall, drawing the attention of members, guests, and general visitors. These are displayed alongside a striking selection of bindings generously lent to us by a member of the Court. Other Heritage Collections Facing page: Detail of bookbinding

Our commissioning activity is usually focused upon plate and bookbindings. However, on occasion, our core collections are supplemented with other acquisitions of works of art.

by Jenni Grey. Above left: Bookbinding by Julian Thomas MBE. Above: Our full-length portrait of Sir Robert Beachcroft, given by current Master Carolyn Boulter.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

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collections

This year, we have been fortunate to receive from the present Master, Dr Carolyn Boulter, a full-length portrait of her ancestor, Sir Robert Beachcroft (Master, 1700-01, and Lord Mayor of London, 1711-12), by Richard van Bleeck. The portrait has been hung – for the current Master’s year – at the head of the Court Room, adjacent to that of Carolyn’s grandfather, Major Maurice Beachcroft. For the time being, the Master may feel the benevolent eyes of her forebears upon her when the Court convenes.

Commissioning Contemporary Bookbindings

Photograph by Anthony Belfield

Bookbinding is an endangered craft that we decided to support 10 years ago.

14

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

We are slowly building up a collection of designer bookbindings, and currently have five books out on commission with eminent bookbinders. We recently took delivery of a suitably macabre binding of The Great Plague: A People’s History by Evelyn Lord (2014), with a binding by Julian Thomas MBE, former Head of Conservation at the National Library of Wales. In early 2017,

we also received our second commission from Jenni Grey. All our bindings are displayed in a prominent position in the Entrance Hall, drawing the attention of members, guests, and general visitors. These are displayed alongside a striking selection of bindings generously lent to us by a member of the Court. Other Heritage Collections Facing page: Detail of bookbinding

Our commissioning activity is usually focused upon plate and bookbindings. However, on occasion, our core collections are supplemented with other acquisitions of works of art.

by Jenni Grey. Above left: Bookbinding by Julian Thomas MBE. Above: Our full-length portrait of Sir Robert Beachcroft, given by current Master Carolyn Boulter.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

15


collections

“We have a long track record as a patron of the arts, and we continue to support up-and-coming talent in selected areas.”

We are also delighted to announce the safe return to Clothworkers’ Hall of a fine ormolu mantel clock by Vulliamy, stolen from the Hall in 1970. The story of its adventures and how we were able to secure its restitution may be found in the Members’ Supplement (2018), as well as on our website. Supporting Talent

Above left: Vase by Hiroshi Suzuki, a Bishopsland alumnus.

We have a long track record as a patron of the arts, and we continue to support up-and-coming talent in selected areas.

Above right: Apprentice El Lanham. Image used with permission from the Royal Collection Trust. © Russel Sach TES.

16

In silversmithing, we make an annual grant to Bishopsland Educational Trust. The grant

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

enables students to purchase raw materials in addition to essential tools, which will assist them in their careers long beyond the end of their formal studies. Bishopsland is a unique oneyear residential workshop for emerging silversmiths, providing master classes in craft techniques coupled with essential training in marketing and business skills. Prominent alumni include Rod Kelly, Jane Short, Hiroshi Suzuki, Theresa Nguyen, and Angela Cork – all of whom feature in our growing plate collection.

the Designer Bookbinders annual competition, which consistently attracts high-quality bindings from talented crafts people. This year, we again organised a temporary loan of the Clothworker prize-winners’ bindings, which were displayed for guests at the December Court and Livery Dinner. We also fund bursaries to enable talented binders to attend master classes jointly organised by Designer Bookbinders and the Society of Bookbinders, as a means of enabling skills transfer from one generation to the next.

Queen’s Bindery Apprenticeship Scheme (QBAS), the first bindery apprenticeship to be established since the 1970s. Over a seven-year pilot period, up to six apprentices will be trained at the Royal Bindery at Windsor and attend external workshops. They will acquire a diverse range of bookbinding skills including fine leather binding, edge-gilding, and gold finishing – skills that may otherwise be lost forever. The Scheme is now in its second year and two new apprentices, Emily Macmillan and Laura Hollingworth, were recently recruited.

satisfactory completion of their terms. Apprentice Bookbinder Standards have been submitted to the Institute of Apprenticeship for assessment, and Journeyman Bookbinder Standards will be submitted in due course. We have recently agreed to increase funding for QBAS to help offset the costs of the full-time administration the Scheme requires, ensuring its continued success in future years. 

Above: Apprentices Emily Macmillan and Matthew Stockl. Images used with permission from

In bookbinding, we fund prizes in the Open Choice category of

Additionally, The Company is a founding partner of the

All apprentices will receive City and Guilds qualifications upon

the Royal Collection Trust. © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

17


collections

“We have a long track record as a patron of the arts, and we continue to support up-and-coming talent in selected areas.”

We are also delighted to announce the safe return to Clothworkers’ Hall of a fine ormolu mantel clock by Vulliamy, stolen from the Hall in 1970. The story of its adventures and how we were able to secure its restitution may be found in the Members’ Supplement (2018), as well as on our website. Supporting Talent

Above left: Vase by Hiroshi Suzuki, a Bishopsland alumnus.

We have a long track record as a patron of the arts, and we continue to support up-and-coming talent in selected areas.

Above right: Apprentice El Lanham. Image used with permission from the Royal Collection Trust. © Russel Sach TES.

16

In silversmithing, we make an annual grant to Bishopsland Educational Trust. The grant

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

enables students to purchase raw materials in addition to essential tools, which will assist them in their careers long beyond the end of their formal studies. Bishopsland is a unique oneyear residential workshop for emerging silversmiths, providing master classes in craft techniques coupled with essential training in marketing and business skills. Prominent alumni include Rod Kelly, Jane Short, Hiroshi Suzuki, Theresa Nguyen, and Angela Cork – all of whom feature in our growing plate collection.

the Designer Bookbinders annual competition, which consistently attracts high-quality bindings from talented crafts people. This year, we again organised a temporary loan of the Clothworker prize-winners’ bindings, which were displayed for guests at the December Court and Livery Dinner. We also fund bursaries to enable talented binders to attend master classes jointly organised by Designer Bookbinders and the Society of Bookbinders, as a means of enabling skills transfer from one generation to the next.

Queen’s Bindery Apprenticeship Scheme (QBAS), the first bindery apprenticeship to be established since the 1970s. Over a seven-year pilot period, up to six apprentices will be trained at the Royal Bindery at Windsor and attend external workshops. They will acquire a diverse range of bookbinding skills including fine leather binding, edge-gilding, and gold finishing – skills that may otherwise be lost forever. The Scheme is now in its second year and two new apprentices, Emily Macmillan and Laura Hollingworth, were recently recruited.

satisfactory completion of their terms. Apprentice Bookbinder Standards have been submitted to the Institute of Apprenticeship for assessment, and Journeyman Bookbinder Standards will be submitted in due course. We have recently agreed to increase funding for QBAS to help offset the costs of the full-time administration the Scheme requires, ensuring its continued success in future years. 

Above: Apprentices Emily Macmillan and Matthew Stockl. Images used with permission from

In bookbinding, we fund prizes in the Open Choice category of

Additionally, The Company is a founding partner of the

All apprentices will receive City and Guilds qualifications upon

the Royal Collection Trust. © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

17


Trusteeship We are committed to sustaining our root trade in cloth by supporting both innovation and conservation in textiles. However, most Clothworkers today do not participate in our historic craft, and we have sought to develop Trusteeship as an additional core purpose for The Company in the present day. We encourage members to use their professional skills as trustees for third sector organisations. Nearly half of the c170,000 charities in the UK have vacancies on their boards, and we have a passionate and talented membership capable of providing advice and leadership. We support our members in exploring these opportunities by promoting trustee vacancies and connecting Clothworkers to charitable organisations. We also sponsor opportunities for training and skills development. Furthermore, we work with partners to support good governance across the industry. There are an estimated 820,000 charity trustees in the UK. They are responsible for ensuring that their charities are well run and fulfilling their charitable objectives.

Facing page: Photos from our Charity Governance Awards reception in 2017, including keynote speaker Vince Cable.

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the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

Much has been done in the past decade to educate trustees on the importance of good governance, but there are still challenges to overcome, with many charities finding it difficult to recruit new trustees, offer proper induction or training, and effectively evaluate performance. We have begun a number of initiatives to solve these problems and become a champion of good governance across the charity sector. We partnered with NPC (New Philanthropy Capital) to fund “Board Matters”, an investigation into challenges facing the third sector. The outcome was the discovery and articulation of the key areas the sector needs to address: increasing the pool of trustees, creating an effective matching service to bring individuals and charities together, coordinating access to appropriate information on trusteeship, funding research into best practices, and improving trustee boards’ performance. We co-fund, with Close Brothers Asset Management, the Cause4 Trustee Leadership Programme in London. More than 500 would-be trustees have participated, many going on to serve as a trustee. In 2017, we extended the programme to include one-day seminars in

“We encourage members to use their professional skills as trustees.” Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester, and Glasgow. The programme has received accreditation from the Institute of Leadership Management. We also have an evolving partnership with Reach Volunteering, supporting its TrusteeWorks service, which placed a record 473 trustees in 2017 (including 33 chairs). Newer collaborations, in related areas, include our support for the development, consultation, and publication of the new Charity Governance Code. We are also in discussion with the highlyrespected Association of Chairs, with a view to assisting them to expand their reach, impact, and sustainability. Finally, we have partnered with NPC, Prospectus, and Reach Volunteering to celebrate and reward good governance in the sector with our third annual Charity Governance Awards; the next awards ceremony will be held on 24th May 2018.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

19


Trusteeship We are committed to sustaining our root trade in cloth by supporting both innovation and conservation in textiles. However, most Clothworkers today do not participate in our historic craft, and we have sought to develop Trusteeship as an additional core purpose for The Company in the present day. We encourage members to use their professional skills as trustees for third sector organisations. Nearly half of the c170,000 charities in the UK have vacancies on their boards, and we have a passionate and talented membership capable of providing advice and leadership. We support our members in exploring these opportunities by promoting trustee vacancies and connecting Clothworkers to charitable organisations. We also sponsor opportunities for training and skills development. Furthermore, we work with partners to support good governance across the industry. There are an estimated 820,000 charity trustees in the UK. They are responsible for ensuring that their charities are well run and fulfilling their charitable objectives.

Facing page: Photos from our Charity Governance Awards reception in 2017, including keynote speaker Vince Cable.

18

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

Much has been done in the past decade to educate trustees on the importance of good governance, but there are still challenges to overcome, with many charities finding it difficult to recruit new trustees, offer proper induction or training, and effectively evaluate performance. We have begun a number of initiatives to solve these problems and become a champion of good governance across the charity sector. We partnered with NPC (New Philanthropy Capital) to fund “Board Matters”, an investigation into challenges facing the third sector. The outcome was the discovery and articulation of the key areas the sector needs to address: increasing the pool of trustees, creating an effective matching service to bring individuals and charities together, coordinating access to appropriate information on trusteeship, funding research into best practices, and improving trustee boards’ performance. We co-fund, with Close Brothers Asset Management, the Cause4 Trustee Leadership Programme in London. More than 500 would-be trustees have participated, many going on to serve as a trustee. In 2017, we extended the programme to include one-day seminars in

“We encourage members to use their professional skills as trustees.” Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester, and Glasgow. The programme has received accreditation from the Institute of Leadership Management. We also have an evolving partnership with Reach Volunteering, supporting its TrusteeWorks service, which placed a record 473 trustees in 2017 (including 33 chairs). Newer collaborations, in related areas, include our support for the development, consultation, and publication of the new Charity Governance Code. We are also in discussion with the highlyrespected Association of Chairs, with a view to assisting them to expand their reach, impact, and sustainability. Finally, we have partnered with NPC, Prospectus, and Reach Volunteering to celebrate and reward good governance in the sector with our third annual Charity Governance Awards; the next awards ceremony will be held on 24th May 2018.

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

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affiliations The Company continues to nurture its relationships with the Scots Guards, HMS Dauntless, 47 Squadron and the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY). Over the last 12 months, we have enjoyed several reciprocal events and are currently working on a number of interesting initiatives among these affiliations. Our financial support assists, primarily, with a range of welfare activities for the servicemen and servicewomen, and their families. We also assist with certain salary expenses for the FANY.

Top and facing page: The Company hosts the crew of HMS Dauntless. Bottom left and right: The Scots Guards attend a lunch at Clothworkers’ Hall.

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the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

21


affiliations The Company continues to nurture its relationships with the Scots Guards, HMS Dauntless, 47 Squadron and the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY). Over the last 12 months, we have enjoyed several reciprocal events and are currently working on a number of interesting initiatives among these affiliations. Our financial support assists, primarily, with a range of welfare activities for the servicemen and servicewomen, and their families. We also assist with certain salary expenses for the FANY.

Top and facing page: The Company hosts the crew of HMS Dauntless. Bottom left and right: The Scots Guards attend a lunch at Clothworkers’ Hall.

20

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

the clothworkers’ company annual review 2017

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The Clothworkers' Company Annual Review 2017  
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