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The

Clothworkers’ Annual Review

2011-2012


Contents

Introduction Textiles Trusteeship Our History Celebrating the Jubilee Support for the Armed Forces Court and Trustees

3 4 7 8 11 12 13

The Clothworkers’ Company The Clothworkers’ Foundation Clothworkers’ Hall | Dunster Court | Mincing Lane | London EC3R 7AH Telephone 020 7623 7041 | Fax 020 7397 0107 enquiries@clothworkers.co.uk www.clothworkers.co.uk

Cover London: The Thames on Lord Mayor’s Day, looking towards the City and St Paul’s Cathedral by Canaletto. © Bridgeman Art Library.

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Hiring Our Hall

Design and Print: www.tridentprinting.co.uk

Clothworkers’ Hall is available for hire for corporate functions, meetings and wedding receptions. Over 5,500 guests attended events at the Hall during 2011. We also welcomed the film crew of the BBC2 hit ‘Episodes’. To find out about our competitive hire rates and exquisite catering please contact the agency that manages external functions on 020 7871 0577 or email sales@itstheagency.co.uk

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Introduction

Introduction Founded almost five hundred years ago to promote the craft of clothworking in the City of London, the Clothworkers is today a membership organisation involved in the affairs of the City, and which aims to invest its surplus resources in philanthropic endeavour. This Review covers the 2011-12 activities of the Livery Company, The Clothworkers’ Company, and its associated grant-making charity, The Clothworkers’ Foundation. Established by Royal Charter in 1528, the Company was founded to regulate the craft of clothworking in the City of London. It supervised the training of apprentices and protected standards of workmanship. Its members were all actively involved in the craft. Livery Companies have always had close connections with the City Corporation and their members elect the Sheriffs and Lord Mayor to this day. The Clothworkers’ Company accumulated considerable wealth over the centuries, largely through bequests of money and property from members, and by prudent management of its assets. The Company’s overall objectives are to administer its assets and affairs responsibly, play its part in the civic life of the City of London, support the textile industry in appropriate ways and seek to increase its charitable giving. Charity has always been at the heart of the Company’s activity, initially supporting members in need, but subsequently also outsiders. In modern times, the Clothworkers’ charitable activity has been channelled through its grantmaking charity, The Clothworkers’ Foundation, and its associated trusts which focus on relief in need, education and blind welfare. The Company passes its income, having paid the expenses of running the Hall and its activities, across to the Foundation each year. This, together with income from the Foundation’s own investments, is distributed to a broad range of charities. The Company remains a membership organisation, although there are no longer direct links with its original trade. Members join as Freemen or Freewomen, and some are elected to the Livery, when they take a more active role in the Company. The Court of Assistants, headed by the Master, runs the affairs of the Company, acting as a board of directors. The Board of Trustees of the Foundation is drawn from the Court and Livery of the Company. The Company has owned a Hall on the same site

since the fifteenth century. This contains the administrative offices, together with function rooms used for member meetings and events. The latter are available for hire to third parties to make the venue accessible when not required for the Company’s own purposes and to contribute to the considerable cost of maintaining the building. This Review covers the key activities of the Company: in textiles (where the Foundation is also active), its commitment to trusteeship and its support for the armed forces. It also contains information on the broad range of charitable activity undertaken by the Foundation. The financial information on our charity and the list of grants made relate to the calendar year 2011. However, some of the commentary extends to activities in the first half of 2012. Going forward, the Review will cover the previous calendar year and be published annually in the spring. The Review is directed both at the members of the Company as well as interested outside parties; we hope it will make interesting and informative reading on the modern role of an ancient City Livery Company.

The grand staircase in Clothworkers’ Hall

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Textiles

Textiles The Clothworkers’ roots are in cloth finishing, and in modern times we have endeavoured to be supportive of our trade, even though we no longer have a direct involvement.

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Colour@Leeds One of the major projects of the year was to support the re-birth of colour science at Leeds University. The Clothworkers helped to fund the Department of Dyeing and Tinctorial Chemistry in 1883 and it has become a centre of excellence with an international reputation. However, in recent years it has suffered from low student numbers and a lack of critical mass in research-active academics, which has taken its toll on the Department’s finances. Following an in-depth review by the University, and under the new leadership of Professor Long Lin, there is now a clear strategy to build on the Department’s strengths and grow its capabilities. An important element in the re-launch has been the creation of purpose-designed laboratory and office facilities for Colour@Leeds, which will bring together capabilities in colour science from across the University campus, including textiles, food science and medicine. We contributed a package totalling £400,000 towards the building and equipment costs for Colour@Leeds, comprising a new grant of £137,000, assignment of a previous £40,000 award, and deploying £224,000 of

matched funding from the Higher Education Funding Council of England (arising from other charitable donations to Leeds from the Foundation); we are also funding a PhD project in the research of smart inks. The new facilities are scheduled to open in November 2012. Support for Higher Education In mid 2011 we committed grants totalling £208,000 towards the second phase of a collaboration initiative between Leeds and Manchester Universities in the field of non-wovens. Our funding supports a PhD student at each University, together with specialist equipment in the two departments. Chelsea College of Art and Design is one of the leading UK institutions in textile design. Following a discussion with them on their capital requirements, we agreed a grant of £25,000 to allow them to acquire a single head digital embroidery machine, with the necessary software, and a flat bed laser cutter for use by MA and BA students at the College. Innovation Since its establishment in 2005, the Company has invested £400,000 alongside Leeds University to fund early stage innovations in textiles and colour science. In 2011, we agreed to contribute a further £300,000 over the next three years to the Clothworkers’ Innovation Fund to support new such projects.

Visit by Clothworkers to Leeds

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Textiles

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Chrysanthi Katsilouli, winner of the New Designers Printed Textile Prize, with Scarlet Oliver, Clothworker

Preserving our textile heritage The Clothworkers’ Organics Conservation Studio will be part of the British Museum’s new World Conservation and Exhibition Centre which is due to open in 2014. The Museum’s world-leading collection of organic material objects includes a huge number of textiles. We have made a grant of £750,000 to fit out the conservation studio. In addition to supporting the refurbishment of the William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow, East London with a £75,000 grant, we also provided £30,000 to National Museums Scotland for the cataloguing and conservation of the archive of the celebrated textile designer Bernat Klein. Encouraging young adults We have established a partnership with Cockpit Arts to provide six recently-qualified weavers with studio space and access to two new double back beam looms at Cockpit’s facility in Deptford, South East London. Our support of £39,000 provides a 50% subsidy on the studio rent and business mentoring support for the weavers for a year, together with creation of the studio space and purchase of the two looms. We are also very pleased to be able to work with a fellow Livery Company, the Weavers, on the successful work placement scheme they have been operating for a few years. This brings together talented graduating students

Whitworth Art Gallery – work by Michael Brennand-Wood interested in a career in textile manufacturing with employing companies. The scheme pays for 50% of the salary for the first six months as an inducement to the company; a number of the placements have resulted in permanent employment. In 2011, seven graduates were placed in companies including Abraham Moon, Johnstons of Elgin, and Camira Fashions. Our £20,000 support allowed the Weavers to fund a greater number of placements. Design competitions We continue our support of the key textile design competitions in the UK – New Designers (print prize), Texprint (fabric design for interiors prize) and the Bradford Textile Society (seven of the fourteen prize categories).

Texprint winner Tania Knuckey and the Clerk

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Textiles

Charitable Grants 2011

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British Museum Fit-out of the new Organics Conservation Studio £750,000

University of Manchester – Whitworth Art Gallery Conservation studio

Universities of Leeds and Manchester Non wovens collaboration initiative to support two PhD students £208,000

Bradford Textile Society Fabric design competition

University of Leeds – Department of Colour Science Refurbishment of building and purchase of equipment £137,000 William Morris Gallery Creation of Merton Abbey Workshop room in refurbished gallery £75,000

Total

£20,000

£6,000 £1,444,000

Company Support 2011 New Designers Printed Textile Prize

£2,150

University of Leeds – School of Design PhD bursaries in textile coloration and waterless dyeing £60,000 Textile Conservation Foundation MPhil bursaries at the University of Glasgow £48,000 Cockpit Arts Purchase of looms and a bursary programme for young weavers £39,000 National Museums Scotland Cataloguing and conservation of Bernat Klein collection £30,000 University of the Arts (Chelsea College of Art and Design) Purchase of digital embroidery machine and flat bed laser cutter £25,000 University of Leeds – Department of Colour Science Thermal analysis instrument

£25,000

University of Manchester – Department of Textiles BSc bursaries in Textile Science and Technology £21,000 Designs by some of the winners of the Cockpit Arts/Clothworkers’ Foundation Award 2012

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Trusteeship

Trusteeship A common purpose The Company has determined that it should have a common purpose which binds its members together. In recognition of the serious shortage of individuals prepared to join the governing bodies of charities, we have chosen trusteeship as this common purpose. Our objective over time is that the majority of our members should be actively involved in some form of pro bono activity, whether as a trustee of a charity, a school governor, member of a Parochial Church Council etc. The Court accepts that this initiative will take time to gather momentum. Our approach takes two forms – support for our members, and support for better charity governance generally. Support for our members Having worked for several years with the charity Reach Volunteering, which acts as a broker between volunteers seeking roles and charities seeking trustees, we established an arrangement with them to help our members secure suitable trustee roles. This support includes talks and facilitation. More recently, we are piloting with Reach and Prospectus (a specialist voluntary sector recruitment firm) a premium service which provides more individually-tailored support. We have also held events at Clothworkers’ Hall to enthuse and inspire our members to seek a role as a trustee; these have included a supper where Lord Browne of Madingley spoke about how pro bono

work had contributed to his development, and the first annual Trustees Dinner, where Clothworker trustees bring the Chairman or a fellow trustee of their charity to meet other like-minded individuals. Supporting better charity governance The Company continues to invest selectively in initiatives to improve the quality of charity governance generally. We have held a number of trusteeship seminars at the Hall in conjunction with New Philanthropy Capital. These are well-attended by a range of trustees, including some Clothworkers. Recent topics have included Trusteeship, leadership and impact, Improving financial sustainability through social investment and Payment of trustees. In March 2012, NPC published a report The benefits of trusteeship, funded by the Company, which contained case studies of individuals, charities and employers and their experience of trusteeship. In addition, we have contributed to the cost of revising the Code of Good Governance which The benefits helps charity boards work of trusteeship effectively, and are sponsoring the continuation of the Governance Forum, a group of influential experts in the area which is holding its meetings at Clothworkers’ Hall.

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March 2012 Clare Yeowart Dinah McKenzie


History

Our History We have recently announced the launch of the Records of London’s Livery Companies Online: Apprentices and Freemen, 1400-1900 (ROLLCO). ROLLCO provides free access to the historic membership records of the Clothworkers’, Drapers’ and Goldsmiths’ Companies, with the Mercers’ and other Companies’ records to follow soon.

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ROLLCO is the culmination of a five-year partnership with the Centre for Metropolitan History and The Institute of Historical Research to make available to the public, free of charge, all information recorded in the Company’s registers of apprentices and Freedom Admissions over four centuries. ROLLCO was initiated to meet an ever-increasing interest in our membership records from both academic researchers and genealogists, as the family history industry continues to flourish. Through them it is possible to trace the lives and careers of many thousands of young men and women who came to London to learn a trade in centuries past. However, they also have great potential for analysis, enabling researchers to answer a range of historical questions about the social and economic roles of the Company over time and the history of London more generally. ROLLCO has not been developed without investment on our part; however, from the outset the project has reaped benefits, shortening the length of time taken to answer enquiries and in so doing reducing unnecessary access to fragile original registers with difficult palaeography.

In 2010, the Drapers and Goldsmiths’ Companies joined the project and we are pleased that the Mercers’ Company’s records will be added to ROLLCO in 2013. It is our hope that in time further Companies will come on board and, following a successful launch of the website at the Hall in June, The Centre for Metropolitan History are now talking to a number of other Livery Companies.

Apprenticeship register, 1641-1661

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Genealogical research The ROLLCO database so far contains records of 270,000 individuals, including 60,000 apprenticeships and 40,000 Freedom admissions. Many of these individuals are well known London figures, such as Sir John Robinson, Master 1656-7 and Lord Mayor of London in 1662-3. Born in Long Whatton, Leicestershire, Robinson came to London in 1630 to take up an apprenticeship with a Clothworker and was made Free of the Company in 1645. As an influential figure in the Restoration, Robinson has been written about widely; however, using ROLLCO it is possible to learn a great deal of important information about his earlier career. Over the course of three decades following his Freedom, Robinson established himself as a successful merchant ‘trading beyond the seas to Muscovia, Levant and East India’, and took a total of twenty-five apprentices through the Company. One apprentice, John Grey, the second son of Henry, Earl of Stamford is of particular note. Lord Grey had fought against the Royalists during the Civil War and having witnessed the eclipse of his family’s fortune, must have wished to secure his son a more prosperous future. As a staunch royalist, Robinson’s motives for agreeing to take on John Grey in 1652 remain unclear, but the premium of £1,200 (worth in excess of £75,000 today) received from the apprentice’s Event Date: 04/02/1852 father and Year: 1852 Freedom brother, may Freedom Method: Patrimony Freedom Notes: have acted as an Details Role Status inducement. Willm. Broadhurst (Male) Witness Citizen and Ironmonger. Made Free 22nd June 1813 Henry Taylor (Male) Witness Citizen and Fanmaker. Made It is also Free 20th January 1841 Frederick Robert Whalley (Male) New freeman, Son Co Clothworker possible to trace John Whalley (Male) Father of freeman Assistant, Co Clothworker, Is Robinson’s dead John Goodhart Whalley (Male) New freeman, Son Co Clothworker places of residence in the ROLLCO records Event Date: 1863 Apl 23 from St Year: 1863 Freedom Swithin’s Lane Freedom Method: Servitude Freedom Notes: to Sherborne Details Role Status Lane in the Albert James Austin (Male) New freeman, Son Co Draper 1640s to Milk James Austin (Male) Father of freeman Gent Lane in the Henry Collier (Male) Master Citizen and , Co Draper 1650s and ‘at the Tower’ by Sample data report from 1670. It should ROLLCO from individuals be noted that based in Mincing Lane this was in his Not stated - Unknown

Not stated - Unknown

Colonial Brokers Clerk - 16 Mincing Lane in the said City, London

Not stated - Unknown

Bankers Clerk - 62 Threadneedle Street in the City

© Guildhall Art Gallery

History

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Sir John Robinson capacity of Lieutenant of the Tower of London, and not as a prisoner. Most of the men and women who appear in the ROLLCO records were more modest individuals, but the resource enables us to search across the archives of several Companies to investigate living and working practices across the City over several hundred years, identifying networks of craftsmen and establishing where particular trades were concentrated. Although the area around Clothworkers’ Hall was home to many of the City’s tailors and packers of cloth in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries for example, wine merchants, sugar, tea and colonial brokers had taken up residence in Mincing Lane by the nineteenth century.

of London, London

custom house agent - 2 Dunster Court, Mincing Lane, London

Not Stated - 12 Kingsland Place Kingsland, Middlesex

Not Stated - 2 Dunster Court, London

(C) Copyright the University of London and contributing Livery Companies

Please note, the records in this file are generated from a search of individuals. If more than one individual in a given apprenticeship or freedom admission met the search criteria, then the details of that event will be repeated accordingly.

Advanced searching and other benefits Genealogists will be aware that ROLLCO is not the only online resource providing access to Livery Company records; however, it is the only one available that is free of charge to all users. It has also been designed to offer advanced and aggregate searching facilities and results can be downloaded and saved, either as print ready pdf files or as structured data ready for analysis. Through ROLLCO it is therefore possible to identify and analyse trends in membership over time – a capacity that is not possible with any other resources – and, for example,

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History

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Number of apprenticeship bindings

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2,500

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1,500

–– Clothworkers –– Drapers –– Goldsmiths

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Decade

Number of apprenticeship bindings in the Clothworkers’, Drapers’ and Goldsmiths’ Companies 1400-1900 (ten yearly totals)

establish where each of the Companies drew their pool of apprentices from, whether the children of particular socio-economic groups favoured particular professions etc., and how this changed over time. Preliminary analysis shows that the Clothworkers recruited new apprentices and Freemen in far greater numbers than the Drapers and Goldsmiths’ Companies in the seventeenth century but that the 1660s witnessed significant drops in numbers in both the Drapers and Clothworkers’ cases, followed by further decline thereafter. Whether this can be attributed to the impact of the Great Plague and Great Fire of London in 1665 and 1666 respectively or is evidence of the beginning of these Companies’ separation from their crafts is now open to further analysis, using ROLLCO’s data. ROLLCO is a rich resource which will benefit genealogists and historians alike and the Clothworkers are proud to have been at the forefront of developing this innovative, freelyavailable tool.

Interested in finding out about your ancestors or the history of London? Visit the ROLLCO website at www.londonroll.org to begin your research.

Register of Freedom Admissions, 1545-1661

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Jubilee

Celebrating the Jubilee In June 2012, the Company took part in the celebrations for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. Supporting Fields In Trust As one of the Great Twelve Livery Companies, the Company gave £15,000 towards a £150,000 donation to the Fields In Trust’s (FIT) Jubilee-themed Queen Elizabeth II Fields Challenge. This programme enables FIT (a national UK charity that works to safeguard recreational spaces) to preserve 2,012 fields, parks and open spaces as a Jubilee legacy. Our support, along with that from others and a number of volunteers, helped FIT to reach their half way target by the Jubilee weekend. It has been the practice of the Great Twelve to mark a Royal Jubilee by making a gift to the monarch. For the Golden Jubilee, we presented a new stained glass window in the Chapel Royal at St James’s Palace. Royal Luncheon On Tuesday 5 June, the Company, along with a number of other Livery Companies, hosted a luncheon for The Queen and other members of the Royal Family at Westminster Hall. The event was organised to give thanks to Her Majesty for her service, but also to highlight the charitable endeavours of Livery Companies. The 700 guests were entertained by The National Children’s Orchestra of Great Britain who performed at the meal. Our guests were individuals and representatives of organisations we have supported.

River Pageant Again, as one of the Great Twelve, we chartered a boat, the William B, and sailed in the 1,000-boat Jubilee River Pageant on Sunday 3 June. The barge was positioned in the Royal Squadron. The event was believed to be the largest flotilla since Charles II and Catherine of Braganza’s pageant from Hampton Court to Whitehall in 1662. Clothworker and diarist Samuel Pepys wrote in his diary at the time that he could not see the water for the number of boats on the Thames. Livery Companies have a long history with pageantry on the River Thames, as they began accompanying the Lord Mayor in ceremonial river processions from the 15th century. The Drapers’ Company were the first Livery Company to commission their own barge in 1453; the Clothworkers owned a barge until 1799. Despite the wet weather, over a million people lined the Thames to watch the Pageant. The Company was privileged to be part of this exciting celebration.

Chideock Parish Council unveil their Fields In Trust plaque

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Support for the Armed Forces

Support for the Armed Forces

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HMS Dauntless A highlight of the year was the visit by our affiliate Type 45 destroyer to London as part of a major defence exhibition in Docklands. The Master and several Clothworkers sailed on board the Ship as guests of the Captain from Portsmouth and up the River Thames for docking at King George V Dock for the week. We were delighted to host 100 of the Ship’s Company to lunch at our Hall, where they were able to meet with many of our members who learnt a lot about the Royal Navy’s modern role. The Dauntless is currently HMS Dauntless deployed in the South Atlantic off the Falkland Islands and thus there has been no direct contact in recent months. Scots Guards This affiliation provides regular opportunities for members of the Company to find out about the Regiment and its activities. We entertain a group of Officers to dinner at one of our major events each year and the Guards reciprocate, at St James’s Palace when on duty, at the Edinburgh Tattoo and following the Queen’s Birthday Parade. A contingent of Clothworkers visited 1st Battalion at their base in Catterick, North Yorkshire, earlier this year to see first-hand the training undertaken by the Regiment in preparation for their deployment in Afghanistan later in 2012.

We have provided several grants for extramural activities, including the annual children’s Christmas party, a family outing for the dependants of Guardsmen who are on overseas training, and F Company’s Christmas lunch at Wellington Barracks. First Aid Nursing Yeomanry We have had a link with the FANYs since 2006; although the nature of their activities limits the opportunity for interaction with our members, we enjoy their company at our dinners, and are pleased to provide some of the essential funding towards their key posts; we are currently supporting the part-time Training Officer. Cadet Forces We have a link with the Sea Cadets, through the London Area. In 2011, we provided a grant of £1,000 to allow ten cadets to attend summer camp. In 2011, we made a grant of £5,000 to the City of London and North East Sector of the Army Cadet Force towards transport costs to ferry cadets on training exercises and to allow some cadets from less privileged backgrounds to attend an adventure camp in Hong Kong.

Army Cadet Force trip to the British Consulate in Hong Kong

Tom Ingham Clark, Clothworker at the Catterick visit

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Court and Trustees T H E C L OT H WO R K E R S ’ C O M PA N Y 2012-2013 Master Robin Booth Wardens Christopher McLean May Michael Howell Michael Jarvis John Coombe-Tennant Assistants Emeriti Peter Luttman-Johnson TD Richard Horne JP John Horne Geoffrey Purefoy The Viscount Slim OBE DL Alan Mays-Smith DL Alastair Leslie TD Anthony Purefoy MBE Alastair Ingham Clark Sir John Hall Bt Philip Sumner Errol Mews John Hutchins Richard Saunders Richard Jones Paul Bowerman Paul Wates John Jones David Sutcliffe OBE DL Robert Wade Timothy Roberton

Court of Assistants John Papworth Timothy Morgan Christopher Jonas CBE Anthony West DL Neil Foster Richard Jonas John Stoddart-Scott DL Henry McDougall Michael Malyon Antony Jones Rear Admiral Michael Harris JP Oliver Howard David Bousfield Melville Haggard Timothy Bousfield Dr Carolyn Boulter JP DL Peter Langley John Wake Sir Jonathan Portal Bt Philip Portal Andrewjohn Stephenson Clarke Nicholas Horne

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T H E C L OT H WO R K E R S ’ F O U N DAT I O N Chairman Michael Jarvis

Deputy Chairman Dr Carolyn Boulter JP DL

Trustees Robin Booth Philip Portal Christopher McLean May Andrewjohn Stephenson Clarke Michael Howell Tom Ingham Clark Richard Jonas Joanna Dodd Melville Haggard Alex Nelson Michael Malyon Clerk to the Company and Chief Executive of the Foundation Andrew Blessley Director of Finance and Administration Stephen White Chief Accountant Andy Boon

Beadle and Hall Manager Michael Drummond

Grants Manager Philip Howard

Archivist Jessica Collins

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The Clothworkers Company Annual Review 2012  

The Annual Review of the Clothworkers' Company, a City Livery Company.