Climate Heritage Network 2021 Annual Report "Mobilising Culture for Climate Action"

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2021 ANNUAL REPORT

MOBILISING CULTURE FOR CLIMATE ACTION


ABOUT THE COVER: (Top to Bottom) (1) G20 ministers of culture meet at the Colosseum in Rome with climate and culture on the agenda (Photo Courtesy Ministry of Culture of Italy and G20 Italy); (2) On International Day of Action for Rivers 2019, a raft with ‘no dam’ sign is launched on the Salween River at Ei Tu Hta internally displaced camp on the Myanmar-Thailand border. Karen State, Myanmar (Photo Credit: Jittrapon Kaicome). This action is featured in the CHN Working Group 7 report ‘Models of Supporting Climate Action by Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples’ launched at COP26 (see Page 7); (3) Ibrahim Tchan of Ecomusée Tata Somba (Benin) arrives in Glasgow as part of the CHN’s official COP26 observer delegation (Photo Credit: Andrew Potts); (4) the CHN is a proud partner in the new Race to Resilience campaign; (5) This ‘Keep 1.5° Alive’ logo was created for the CHN by South African designer Natali Wolhuter for use at COP26. OPPOSITE: Public interventions in the Historic Center of the City of Mérida, Mexico as part of the SensaCitizens citizen science project. The project promotes experiences with technology and art in public space, technological empowerment, and the deployment of air quality devices to raise awareness and make visible current challenges. The project is co-sponsored by FabCity Yucatán AC, a member of the CHN, and is featured in the ‘The Role of Culture in Climate Resilient Development’ report produced in 2021 by the CHN and UCLG (see page 7).


WHAT IS THE CHN?

We believe that arts, culture and heritage constitute an invaluable resource to help communities reduce greenhouse gas emissions and strengthen adaptive capacity, even while the risks to those resources from climate impacts must also be addressed. The Climate Heritage Network is a global network whose members are committed to mobilising arts, culture and heritage to address climate change and support communities in achieving the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. Launched in 2019, the CHN seeks to scale up culture-based climate action and to foreground the cultural dimensions of climate policy through coordination and cooperation among its members. CHN members work with all types of culture including arts and music; museums and libraries; landscapes, heritage sites and archaeology; and intangible heritage, traditional knowledge, and Indigenous ways of knowing. CHN members include units of government at all levels, Indigenous Peoples’ organisations, civil society, universities, cultural institutions, artists, creative industries, and design and other businesses.

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ABOVE: A 10kW rooftop solar PV array was installed by Brighton Energy Coop at the historic St George's Church in Kemptown, East Brighton, UK which is designed to generate 10,500kWh of electricity annually. Built in the 1820s, the church is a Grade II listed building with an active congregation and community outreach programme. (Photo Credit: Ruth Knight (via Climate Visual Project)).

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MOBILISING ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE FOR CLIMATE ACTION The members of the Climate Heritage Network proudly present this Annual Report of the Network’s activities for 2021 – the CHN’s second full year of operation. It was October 2019 when advocates from around the world came together in Edinburgh in search of new ways to mobilise art, culture and heritage for climate action. They were driven by a recognition that business as usual leads to an ever-warming globe with catastrophic consequences for the planet, its peoples, and their cultures and heritage – and dogged by a conviction that culture’s power to help people imagine and create a different future was yet to be realised. So the CHN was born -- not as a new organisation but as a true network, a voluntary coalition of diverse collaborators who believe that as culture-climate advocates, they are stronger together. These are the organisations doing the #ClimateHeritage research, implementing the programs, and championing the policies. As CHN members, they also are doing one more thing --sharing. Members created the CHN to have a place to connect, learn, exchange, and coordinate. And in 2021, their number grew by nearly 100 organisations. That CHN membership would grow in 2021 was not assured. Not in a world still in the grips of a COVID-19 pandemic that sorely challenges the capacity of many to do culture-based climate programming. But many CHN members were able to persevere. They found creative ways to keep acting on climate, to keep sharing, and to keep growing the CHN platform that supports that sharing. Across the pages of this Annual Report are the stories of foundations laid, tools and resources created, teams built. These accomplishments expand the leverage that comes from collaboration and speaking with one voice. The climate emergency rages on. The quest for low-carbon, climate resilient futures continues and, increasingly, the world is counting culture in!

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The Melting Snow and Rivers in Flood project links water sites in Uganda and the UK in a unique South-North dialogue about community-led response to heritage sites at risk of severe flooding, highlighting the use of traditional knowledge of Uganda’s ethnic groups. The project uses a cultural rights lens by highlighting how changing climate is threatening the values and cultures of frontline communities. The project is sponsored by The Cross-Cultural Foundation of Uganda, the National Trust, and the International National Trust Organisation (INTO), with support from the British Council’s Cultural Protection Fund, in partnership with the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. This project is featured in the ‘The Role of Culture in Climate Resilient Development’ report produced by the CHN and UCLG (see page 7).

Photo: The spiritual leader performs a mountain cleansing ritual at the Nzwiranja-Nyamwamba-Mulyambuli river confluence. Photo credit: Kisa Kasifa, CCFU

CREATING A CULTURE O


OF RESILIENCE


WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED TOGETHER

LEFT to Right (pages 6-7): (1) Photo Credit: Adam Wilson @fourcolourblack (Calton Hill in Edinburgh, UK, site of the 2019 launch of the CHN); (2) Photo Credit: Artur Kraft @ kraft (Buchanan Galleries in Glasgow, UK, host city of the COP26); © Monika Kozub; (4) © 2018 Yadid Levy/ Alamy Photo (Mali Djenne People working on restoring and apply the Grand Mosque with fresh mud); (5) Photo Credit: Aaron Kato @aaronkato (San Francisco, USA)

New Resources for Mobilising Culture for Climate Action The immense potential of culture and heritage to drive climate action & support just transitions towards low carbon, climate-resilient futures often goes untapped. The Climate Heritage Network released a plan to help dismantle barriers to realising this potential at the 2019 UN Climate Conference (COP25) in Madrid. Dubbed the Madrid-to-Glasgow Arts, Culture & Heritage Climate Action Plan, its release kicked off two years of culture-based climate action by six CHN Working Groups that culminated in 2021 at COP26 in Glasgow. The outputs of this work (summarised below) have been collected in a new, online Climate Heritage Resource Library.

Communicating Climate Heritage Toolkit At the heart of this Toolkit is the belief that anyone can be an advocate. An Advocacy Guide provides tips for anyone with passion for the role of culture in climate action to strengthen advocacy to a range of audiences, including peers, workplace leaders, and policymakers. A companion Climate Heritage Mission Statement can help form the backbone of climate and culture advocacy approaches. A Resource Mapping and Analysis assesses available climate heritage resources with a focus

MADRID-TO-GLASGOW ACTION PLAN

on their intended audiences and main call to action. The Toolkit was coordinated by Sara Crofts (Icon), Claire McGuire (IFLA), Sarah Sutton (Sustainable Museums), & Heather Ann Viles (Oxford University Heritage Network), with input from other CHN Working Group 1 members.

Building Reuse is Climate Action! This resource promotes historic and existing building reuse as an economical and efficient means towards achieving meaningful carbon reduction in the construction industry sector, which contributes, directly or indirectly, up to half of all global carbon emissions. Sources of construction carbon are identified and quantified using an analysis method that demonstrates the potential carbon savings from the reuse of a similar existing building. Case studies illustrate the carbon reductions realized from retention and adapted reuse. This resource was authored by Mark Thompson Brandt (MTBA), Lori Ferriss and Jean Caroon (Goody Clancy), Nathan Lott (PRCNO), Stephanie Phillips and Shanon Shea Miller (City of San Antonio), Larry Strain, and Carl Elefante (AIA), with contributions from members of CHN Working Group 3.

Report on the HiCLIP Pilot Project for Understanding the Integration of Culture into Climate Planning

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N OUTCOMES

ABOVE: In the run up to COP26, the CHN partnered with Historic England to present Climate Heritage Mobilisation @ Climate Fridays — a weekly webinar series that explored each of the new resources launched as part of the CHN’s Madrid-to-Glasgow Action Plan.

The Heritage in Climate Planning (HiCLIP) project was undertaken by CHN Working Group 4 to support the mainstreaming of culture and heritage into climate planning at national, regional, and local levels. This report presents the results of a HiCLIP pilot that assessed the treatment of cultural resources in climate plans from Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Colombia, Cameroon, Scotland, New Zealand, California, San Antonio (USA), Yarra (Australia), and Lagos (Nigeria). The report also highlights areas for culture and heritage to become more effective in climate policy and identifies some of the biases in planning that may prevent efficient collaborations. The pilot was led by Dr Paloma Guzman (NIKU) and Dr Cathy Daly (University of Lincoln) working with numerous members of WG4.

Report: The Role of Culture in Climate Resilient Development Science has confirmed that climate change poses a ‘severe threat’ to future sustainable development. The concept of Climate Resilient Development Pathways (CRDPs) has emerged as a key process for capturing the interplay between sustainable development and the deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and transformative climate adaptation also needed to tackle the climate emergency. This report sketches some of the ways that arts, culture and heritage can enable CRDP design and implementation. It is meant to be of use to both culture and climate advocates looking to advance sustainable development, eradicate poverty and reducing inequality in a warming world. This report was produced by United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) under the leadership of Jordi Pascual in cooperation with CHN Working Group 5 and includes 33 case studies contributed by partners around the world.

Models of Supporting Climate Action by Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples and local communities are on the frontlines of tackling the climate crisis. How can cultural organizations be allies to them as they speak their truth, taking formidable stands to confront our climate emergency? How can cultural organisations support their invaluable efforts to restore nature at scale? This collection includes over a dozen examples of cultural organizations in all parts of the world working together with Indigenous Peoples and local communities towards the common goal of combating climate change. This resource was coordinated by Suwaree Wongkongkaew and the Chiang Mai City Arts & Cultural Center with contributions from Working Group 7 members & partners.

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WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED TOGETHER

BRINGING CULTURE AND CLIMATE TO

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O THE G20

BRINGING CULTURE AND CLIMATE TO THE G20 2021 saw an important policy breakthrough with the organisation of the first ever meeting of G20 ministers of culture by Italy, the G20’s 2021 president. What is more, ‘Addressing the climate crisis through culture’ was selected as one of the meeting’s priority areas, marking the first time the topic has been featured by the organisation whose members account for 78 percent of global GHG emissions. The Climate Heritage Network contributed to the planning of two preparatory webinars organised by the Italian Ministry of Culture, at which CHN members and other speakers offered ideas to feed the Minister’s culture and climate change discussions. The Minister’s meeting was held in July in Rome and led to the unanimous adoption of the 32-point Rome Declaration. The Declaration includes a notable statement on culture as a climate change solution, as well as a ground-breaking request that countries consider including culture and heritage in their national Adaptation Communications under Article 7 of the Paris Agreement. These themes were amplified at a ministerial-level, G20themed culture event at the COP26 UK Pavilion featuring Italian Minister of Culture Dario Franceschini and Nadine Dorries, UK Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

CLOCKWISE: (1) Julian Bickersteth, President of the International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (IIC) speaks at a G20 Culture Preparatory Webinar; (2) Erminia Sciacchitano of the Ministry of Culture of Italy and a CHN Steering Committee member leads a G20 Culture webinar; (3) G20 Culture Ministerial working session at the Palazzo Barberini. Rome; (4) the 2021 G20 included the 1st ever meeting of ministers of culture.

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WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED TOGETHER

CVI AFRICA

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CVI AFRICA CHN members from around the world overcame daunting COVID-19 challenges in 2021 to contribute to a new project to support climate action in Africa through cultural heritage. Known as CVI-Africa, the project piloted application of the Climate Vulnerability Index methodology for the first time in Africa. Promoting solidarity with frontline communities is a key aim of the CHN. Africa is projected to warm more rapidly than most other regions, meaning this already vulnerable continent will be hard-hit by climate change. CVI-Africa provided foundational training to 6 heritage professionals from across Africa. It culminated in community workshops at two climate change-impacted sites— the Sukur Cultural Landscape (Nigeria) and The Ruins of Kilwa Kisiwani and Songo Mnara (Tanzania). Assessment reports for these sites as well a video library of training resources are expected in 2022. Dr Will Megarry of Queen’s University Belfast leads the project, alongside Dr Albino Jopela (AWHF), Dr Jane Downes (University of Highlands and Islands) and Dr Ewan Hyslop (Historic Environment Scotland) and numerous other partners. The project is funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Global Challenges Research Fund and the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS). CLOCKWISE: (1) CVI-Africa was launched at a ceremony held on Africa Day (25 May) featuring Souayibou Varissou, African World Heritage Fund (AWHF) Executive Director and other dignitaries; (2) ) Photo Credit: Daniel Mwada (the Sukur Cultural Landscape CVI-Africa team at work); (3) the CVI-Africa training course included participants from Cabo Verde, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, Tunisia, and Uganda.

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In opening remarks at COP26, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson painted a bleak picture of a warming world, one he said could see cities like Alexandria, Egypt disappear under rising seas. The prospect of a world without this 2000-year-old city made global headlines, underscoring the power of iconic heritage to communicate about the climate emergency. And, while the full extent of Alexandria’s vulnerability is complex, the increasing threats posed by climate change are well documented. Science establishes that every increment of warming is of consequence with the impacts of 2°C global warming significantly worse than those at 1.5°C. The Climate Heritage Network has recommended a precautionary approach that pursues pathways to limiting global warming to 1.5°C as the most effective approach for the safeguarding people, planet, and the earth’s cultural and natural heritage.

Photo: © Sima Diab (Concrete blocks acting as wave breakers are the only protection against rising sea-levels for the 15th Century Qaitbey Castle in Alexandria, Egypt. January 2016).

THE IRREPLACEABLE AT


AT RISK


WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED TOGETHER

YOUTH-LED #CLIMATEHERITAGE ACT

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TION

YOUTH-LED #CLIMATEHERITAGE ACTION Climate action as intergenerational equity and the power of youth-led care for culture to drive change emerged as major #ClimateHeritage themes in 2021. This work culminated with the release of Youth Recommendations on Climate Heritage Action and the launch of a new Climate Heritage Network Youth Forum at an event held on COP26 Youth Day (5 November) hosted by ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability in the COP26 Multilevel Action Pavilion. The hybrid event featured CHN youth leaders from around the world, as well opening remarks by Mayor Tunç Soyer of İzmir, Turkey. Inputs into the design of the Recommendations and the Forum came from the Climate Heritage Narratives, a series of three youth-led intergenerational dialogues held in September and October as part of the #All4Climate programme organised by Italy, host of the 2021 Pre-COP. Leadership came from the CHN Youth Working Group, representing a cross-section of the youth movements of CHN members from five continents. ABOVE: CHN Youth Forum Launch Event at COP26 featured illustrations by Melanie Joan/ClimateChangeBowl. LEFT to RIGHT: CHN Youth Forum Co-Convenors: Louise Kelly (Historic Environment Scotland); Rim Kelouaze (Africa World Heritage Fund Youth Programme, Algeria); Yoloxochitl Lucio Orizaga (ICOMOS, Mexico)); Pravali Vangeti (European Students’ Association for Cultural Heritage).

The new CHN Youth Forum is open to young people and emerging professionals between ages 16 and 35. It aims to facilitate both intergenerational and peer learning and help bring local insights to global climate-heritage challenges. More information is available at the CHN Youth Forum Instagram page: @chnyouth.

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WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED TOGETHER

RUNNING THE RACE TO RESILIENCE

ABOVE: The CHN Race to Resilience Initiative was launched at COP26 at an event held in the Resilience Hub. Keynote speakers included HRH Princess Dana Firas, President of the Petra National Trust (a founding member of the CHN) and Prof Karima Bennoune, former UN Special Rapporteur in the Field of Culture Rights. The programme included a video prepared by Google and Arts and Culture featuring its Heritage on the Edge project and closed with a reading by the Shetland poet Rosanne Watt. ABOVE RIGHT: A companion public launch event was held at held COP26 entitled “Running the Race to Resilience Together: Communities tapping their shared cultures and heritage for climate action.” Pictured is a slide presented by Rosie Paul (Masons Ink, India) showing natural additives used in traditional building practices of Kerala, India to increase durability.

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Tackling climate change requires an all-of-society-effort but too often the cultural dimensions have been missed. The announcement in September 2021 of the addition of the Climate Heritage Network as a partner in the Race to Resilience (RTR) was a turning point for mainstreaming culture into climate action, marking the first-time culture and heritage have been included in a major UN climate campaign. The RTR aims to catalyse a step-change in global ambitions to build the resilience of 4 billion people by 2030. The CHN’s RTR Partner Initiative will support this goal by catalysing 200 cities and regions to offer culture-based strategies to help vulnerable groups and communities become more resilience to climate risks. The Initiative was developed with inputs from a series of regional ‘November Dialogues’ on culture, climate and resilience held across the globe in late 2019, co-hosted by the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage and National Trust of South Australia; Historic Environment Scotland and the African World Heritage Fund; and the City of San Antonio, Texas and Municipality of Cuenca, Ecuador. The CHN RTR Initiative will be implemented by CHN members and partners through 2025.

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WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED TOGETHER

LEFT to Right: (1) CHN Coordinator Andrew Potts and Izmir Mayor Tunç Soyer discuss the Mayor’s philosophy of ‘Circular Culture’ at the CHN’s COP26 Youth Day event hosted by ICLEI and co-sponsored by UCLG; (2) CHN Steering Committee member Carl Elefante (photo, far left) representing the CHN at Architecture 2030’s ‘65% by 2030 / ZERO by 2040’ event, joining the American Institute of Architect’s (AIA) Peter Exley (3rd from left), Kotchakorn Voraakhom of the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) (far right) and other speakers; (3) CHN COP26 delegate Rosie Paul (Masons Ink) introducing COP26TV viewers to #ClimateHeritage.

AMPLIFYING CULTURE AT COP26

COP26: Breakthrough Cultural Engagement but Much Remains to be Done After a year of pandemic-related delay, the 2021 UN Climate Conference known as COP26 was held from 1-12 November in Glasgow, UK. COPs are the planet’s most important venue for climate policy making, but there has always been a culture-sized hole in their agendas. Filling this gap is a founding aim of the CHN. The CHN’s COP26 engagement was coordinated by its Working Group 8 chaired by Ewan Hyslop (Historic Environment Scotland) and Juli Polanco (State of California).

Creating Common Narratives; Supporting Climate Activists

A COP is not, however, a single event but a happening that unfolds in streets, halls, conference rooms, and ministers’ offices around the world. Fully engaging cultural voices takes bringing people together across multiple artistic mediums, scales, disciplines, sectors, and territories. As a first step, a WG8 Task Team was asked to create a short COP26 statement around which diverse cultural organisations, their constituents, members, and audiences could unite. The result was the Manifesto Accelerating Climate Action through the Power of Arts, Culture and Heritage. Hundreds of diverse organizations and leaders signed on, enabled them to share complementary messages on key COP26 issues

like climate justice and the campaign to ‘Keep 1.5° Alive.’ Cultural action has always thrived in the streets, halls, and galleries surrounding the COPs. To help promote to diverse audiences these creative expressions, as well parallel events around the world and online, Museum Galleries Scotland partnered with the CHN and HES to create the Culture at COP26 website (www.cultureatcop.com). Hundreds of artistic performances and cultural actions were listed by CHN members and non-members alike; events that helped educate, inspire, and activate people around the world.

Bringing Culture to the COP Policy Agenda While cultural climate action flourished in Glasgow’s streets, it was nearly invisible in the blue zone where diplomats were negotiating COP26’s legal outcomes. To help cultural actors engage with this complex agenda, WG8 prepared COP26 and Climate Policy, a Guide to the Cultural Dimensions. A companion set of digital ‘issue cards’ helped them join the online debate. Despite these efforts, the goal of mainstreaming culture into COP decisions remained elusive. References to culture in the Glasgow Climate Pact and the Action for Climate Empowerment decisions being notable exceptions. Between the streets and the diplomatic offices is another COP dimension: the green and blue zones, where thousands of credential observers mix with diplomats, scientists, and politicians, exchanging ideas and

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exploring future initiatives. The CHN was able to give multiple culture advocates access to this space courtesy of COP26 observer status ob– Glasgow Climate Pact, paragraph 93 tained by ICOMOS. This included two global LEFT to RIGHT: south delegates: Rose Paul (Masons Ink, India) and Ibra(1) CHN Steering him Tchan (Ecomusée Tata Somba, Benin), whose particiCommittee pation was generously supported by other CHN members. member Andrea Carmen of the Several CHN member organisations with their own obInternational server statuses also sent delegates, including Sustainable Indian Treaty Museums (Sarah Sutton), An Taisce, American Institute Council addresses the topic of of Architects, Julie’s Bicycle, and INTO.

“The Conference of the Parties … emphasizes the important role of indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ culture and knowledge in effective action on climate change …"

non-economic loss on behalf of the Facilitative Working Group of the Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform of the UNFCCC at a COP26 Warsaw Mechanism session; (5) Alison Tickell of Julie’s Bicycle speaking on climate resilience, creativity, and adaptive learning at the launch event for the CHN’s Race to Resilience Culture Initiative in the COP26 Resilience Hub.

These delegates, joined by remote colleagues around the world, mounted over a dozen culture and heritage-related events, connecting cultural content to COP’s themes. Collectively, these sessions allowed almost 50 CHN members to contribute their voices and work to the COP conversation. Venues included the LGMA Multi-Level Action Pavilion and the GlobalABC’s Buildings Pavilion. The UK Pavilion hosted a groundbreaking ministerial level-culture event with Italy and the UK. A European Union Pavilion event spotlighted G20 Culture and the 2021 European Culture Heritage Green Paper, a project of Europa Nostra in which the CHN had participated. No venue hosted more cultural programming than the Resilience Hub, where the CHN was tapped by the UN High-Level Climate Champions Nigel Topping and Gonzalo Muñoz to co-curate an innovative ‘culture theme’ along with the British Council and PRAXIS/University of Leeds. Key CHN support came from Hannah Fluck and Robyn Pender (Historic England). Nearly a dozen Hub events addressed the intersections of culture, resilience and topics like gender, coastal communities, traditional knowledge, the built environment, and food sovereignty.

Also included: an unforgettable preview of 'The [uncertain] Four Seasons,’ a recomposition of Vivaldi’s iconic work using site-specific climate data and AI to reflect a changing climate.

Laying Plans for the Future Whether COP26 itself was a success is hotly debated. The meeting is credited with ushering in several long-overdue shifts in climate policy, including a focus on 1.5°C, not 2°C; on 2030, not 2050; and on non-state actors. A new work plan towards a Global Goal on Adaptation was launched. Yet loss and damage finance, just transition, and other urgent issues with profound cultural dimensions were largely deferred. And in the end, the post-COP26 world remains headed to dangerous levels of global warming, a catastrophe in the making by any standard. What happens next will be critical. The connections made, initiatives conceived, and policies engaged at COP26 by CHN members and partners will be invaluable as they continue the work to fill that culture-sized hole in the world’s plans for tackling the climate emergency.

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WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED TOGETHER

BRIDGING CULTURE, HERITAGE AND C

LEFT: The International Co-Sponsored Meeting on Culture, Heritage and Climate Change featured three public panels. Pictured are panellist in the session on the intersection of culture & heritage and climate impacts, loss, damage, & adaption (L to R): Dr Will Megarry, Queen’s University Belfast/ICOMOS; Dr Brenda Ekwurzel, Union of Concerned Scientists; Prof Aziz Ballouche, University of Angers; Gabriela Mora Navarro, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (Mexico); and Prof May Cassar, UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage.

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CLIMATE SCIENCE

INTERNATIONAL COSPONSORED MEETING ON CULTURE, HERITAGE AND CLIMATE CHANGE Culture and heritage need to be better reflected in climate science, but so too must cultural researchers and actors better align their priorities with the needs of climate science. Achieving these goals took an important step forward in December 2021 with the long-awaited International Co-Sponsored Meeting on Culture, Heritage and Climate Change. Co-sponsored by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the world’s leading climate science body, along with ICOMOS and UNESCO, the Meeting marked the first time in IPCC history that scientists and experts working in these areas were brought together in one forum. The CHN hosted the original scoping session for the Meeting in 2019. Nearly 100 scientists, policymakers, practitioners, and traditional knowledge holders, including numerous CHN members, participated in 15 virtual sessions during the week of 6 December, helping to develop and review the state of knowledge regarding connections of culture, heritage and climate change and to identify gaps. A Meeting Report due in mid-2022 will address ways to catalyse research and collaboration around culture, heritage and climate change. The report is also expected to provide culture and heritage inputs into key climate science initiatives being launched as part of the IPCC’s forthcoming Seventh Assessment cycle (AR7), including a Special Report on Cities and a new assessment by IPCC Working Group II on climate impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; as well as IPCC input into the UNFCCC Global Goal on Adaptation work plan launched at COP26. 23


In Ireland, people living in peatland communities have cultural and property rights to cut turf for energy, but this traditional practice now clashes with efforts to conserve bog habitats for biodiversity and carbon sequestration. As part of Just Transition efforts, the Community Wetlands Forum is working to address tensions and encourage solutions that focus on the needs of local communities, farmers and others impacted economically by conservation policies. A variety of strategies, including art and heritage-based projects, encourage transition from peat extraction towards more sustainable forms of employment, promoting Ireland’s wetlands as places for enjoyment of the outdoors and heritage, environmental education, clean water, and biodiversity. This project is featured in the ‘The Role of Culture in Climate Resilient Development’ report produced by the CHN and UCLG (see page 7).

Photo: Cloughjordan Community Development Committee on Scohaboy Bog, County Tipperary, Ireland.

DRIVING A JUST TRANS


SITION


WHO WE ARE

GOVERNANCE Climate Heritage Network Co-Chairs

Albino Jopela African World Heritage Fund, Africa and the Arab States CoChair

Elizabeth Erasito† National Trust of Fiji, Asia-Pacific CoChair

Dr Ewan Hyslop Historic Environment Scotland | Àrainneachd Eachdraidheil Alba, Europe and CIS Co-Chair

Pedro Palacios Mayor of Cuenca Ecuador, Latin America and the Caribbean Co-Chair

Julianne Polanco California Office of Historic Preservation, North America Co-Chair

International Steering Committee

Adam Markham Union of Concerned Scientists

Isabel C. RiveraCollazo† UCSD Department of Anthropology and Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Andrea Carmen International Indian Treaty Council

Jacqui Donnelly Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht (Ireland)

Angélica Arias Undersecretary of Social Memory, Ministry of Culture and Heritage of Ecuador

Jordi Pascual United Cities and Local Governments

Saúl Vicente Vázquez Instituto Nacional de los Pueblos Indígenas (INPI) del Gobierno de México

Anthea M. Hartig National Museum of American History, Smithsonian

Katherine Malone-France National Trust for Historic Preservation

Shanon Shea Miller Office of Historic Preservation, City of San Antonio

Carl Elefante American Institute of Architects

Mark Thompson Brandt Zero Net Carbon Collaboration for Existing & Historic Buildings

Shipra Narang Suri UN-Habitat

† Served partial term

Erminia Sciacchitano Ministry for Cultural Heritage, Activities and Tourism (Italy)

Hu Xinyu Trustee Beijing Cultural Heritage Protection Centre (CHP)

Suwaree Wongkongkaew Chiang Mai City Arts and Cultural Centre

Hannah Fluck Historic England

Navin Piplani Indian National Trust for Art and Culture Heritage INTACH Heritage Academy

Sara Crofts The Institute of Conservation

Yunus Arikan ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability

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WHO WE ARE

WHO IS WHO IN THE CLIMATE HERITAGE NETWORK

The Climate Heritage Network is a volunteer network of networks. It acts through its members and the volunteer service of their staffs and members. The following individuals gave generously of their time and talent in 2021 in support of CHN activities. Their service and their commitment to mobilising culture for climate action is deeply appreciated.

CHN Youth Forum/Pre-COP26 Youth Event Planning Group Louise Kelly, Co-Convenor, Historic Environment Scotland and the #HistoricScot Youth Forum (UK) Rim Kelouaze, Co-Convenor, Africa World Heritage Fund Youth Programme (Algeria) Yoloxochitl Lucio Orizaga, Co-Convenor, ICOMOS Emerging Professional Working Group (Mexico) Pravali Vangeti, Co-Convenor, European Students’ Association for Cultural Heritage (ESECH)

Members: Ken Bernstein, City of Los Angeles / Office of Historic Resources Alexander Lamont Bishop, International National Trust Organisation (INTO) Carl Elefante, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Paloma Guzmán, Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) Kara Kempski, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Lucy Latham, Julie’s Bicycle Melissa Morancy, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Yvonne Ploum, ErfgoedAcademie (Heritage Academy of the Netherlands)

Members:

Geoff Rich, Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

Mark Allotey, Youth for Creative African Art Focus

Isabel Rivera-Collazo, UC San Diego and Scripps Institution of

Rza Aliyev, World Monuments Fund Junior Board

Oceanography (UCSD)

Vijaya Beejadhur, African World Heritage Fund Youth Programme (Mauritius)

Phoebe Ronn, MSDS Marine

Alexander Lamont Bishop, International National Trust Organisation

Paula Seidel, American Institute of Architects (AIA)

Chiara Bocchio, Italian Unesco Youth Association

Sarah Sutton, Sustainable Museums

Shari Bone, European Students’ Association for Cultural Heritage

Heather Ann Viles, Oxford University Heritage Network

Catherine Childs, National Trust for the Cayman Islands

Eryl Wentworth, American Institute for Conservation / Foundation for

Marion Cloarec, Union Rempart

Advancement in Conservation

Rachael Rowley, Museums Galleries Scotland

Amber Ebanks, National Trust for the Cayman Islands Annie Liang-Zhou, World Monuments Fund Junior Board Njeri Mbure, African World Heritage Fund Youth Programme (Kenya) Avenir Meikengang, African World Heritage Fund Youth Programme (Cameroon) Ishanlosen Odiaua, ICOMOS Nigeria

CHN Working Group on Valuing Traditional Knowledge (WG2) Coordinating Organisation: Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage and University of California, San Diego Isabel Rivera-Collazo, WG 2 Co-Coordinator, Department of

Priyanka Panjwani, ICOMOS India

Anthropology and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego

Adèle Relouzat, Union Rempart

Navin Pipliani, WG2 Co-Coordiator, Indian National Trust for Art and

Manon Richard, Union Rempart

Cultural Heritage (INTACH)

Erminia Sciacchitano, Italian Ministry of Culture

Amanda Millin, WG2 Project Manager, University of California, San Diego

Mohammad Safi ul Alam, Youth Foundation of Bangladesh Emmanuel Wabwire , African World Heritage Youth Programme (Uganda) Isabela Watler, National Trust for the Cayman Islands

CHN Working Group on Communicating the Role of Cultural Heritage in Climate Action (WG1) Coordinating Organisation: Icon (Institute of Conservation) Sara Crofts, WG1 Coordinator, Icon (Institute of Conservation) Claire McGuire, WG1 Project Manager, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)

Members: Mansoor Ahmed, University of Management and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan Inas Aljbour, Exemplary Enviornmental Association (Jordan) Julia Betancor, Julia Betancor and Associates Francesco Calzolaio, Venti di Cultura Andrea Carmen, International Indian Treaty Council Jade D’Alpoim Guedes, University of California, San Diego Bartomeu Deya, ICOMOS (Spain) Tripti Dutta, Council of Royal Roots

27


WHO WE ARE

VOLUNTEERS

Visanu Euarchukiati, The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage

Dima Cook, EVOQ Architecture

Hannah Fluck, Historic England

Peter Cox, Carrig Conservation International Ltd.

Keolu Fox, University of California, San Diego

Sara Crofts, Icon

Fabrizio Galeazzi, StoryLab Research Institute, Anglia Ruskin

Tessa De Marie, Flemish Heritage Agency

University

Anna Donarelli, Swedish National Heritage Board

Irem Yaylalı Gençer, ICOMOS (Turkey)

Carl Elefante, American Institute of Architects (AIA)

Ewan Hyslop, Historic Environment Scotland (HES)

Natalie Feinberg Lopez, Built Environment Evolution

Kanitha Kasina-Ubol, The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage

Hannah Fluck, Historic England

Nicholas Kunga, DETRA Africa

Keolu Fox, University of California at San Diego

Thorsten Ludwig, Interpret Europe

Mauro García Santa Cruz. Iniciativa Patrimonio y Cambio

Jordi Mallarach, Future for Religious Heritage

Climático

Katherine Malone-France, National Trust for Historic Preservation

Piet Geleyns, Flemish Heritage Agency

Fantaye Matiyas, ICOMOS (Ethiopia)

Nigel Griffiths, Sustainable Traditional Building Alliance

Thomas H. McGovern, City University of New York Graduate

Emily Guy, MTBA Associates

Center Human Ecodynamics Research Center

Franziska Haas, Eurac Research

Amanda Millin, University of California, San Diego

Elodie Héberlé, CREBA – Centre de Ressources pour la Rehabilitation Responsible du Bati Ancien

Isabrelle Quemener, ICOMOS (France) Queen Quet, Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition Zazanda Salcedo, ICOMOS (Boliva) Ibrahim Tchan, Ecomusée Tata Somba Cherry Truluck, Custom Food lab Mohammad Safi Ul Alam, Youth Foundation of Bangladesh Matthew Hu Xinyu, Beijing Cultural Heritage Protection Center (CHP)

CHN Working Group on Making the Case for Building Reuse as Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Pathway (WG3)

Daniel Herrera, Eurac Research Aase Hofeldt-Eskevik, Directorate of Cultural Heritage, Norway Heather Holdridge, Lake|Flato Architects Ewan Hyslop, Historic Environment Scotland Kara Kempski, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Adala Leeson, Historic England Andrés Litvak, CREBA – Centre de Ressources pour la Rehabilitation Responsible du Bati Ancien Nathan Lott, Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans Jordi Mallarach, Future for Religious Heritage (FRH) Shanon Miller, City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation Melissa Morancy, American Institute of Architects (AIA)

Coordinating Organisation: California Office of Historic

Aneta Nerguti, Carrig Conservation International Ltd.

Preservation and Zero Net Carbon Collaboration for Existing

Michael Netter, Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) (UK)

and Historic Building (ZNCC)

Ewelina Pekala, Sendzimir Foundation

Julianne Polanco, WG3 Co-Coordinator, California Office of Historic

Douglas Phillips, Historic England

Preservation

Stephanie Phillips, City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation

Mark Thompson Brandt, WG3 Co-Coordinator, ZNCC, MTBA Architects Lori Ferriss, WG3 Co-Coordinator, ZNCC, Goody Clancy Mark Huck, WG3 Project Manager, California Office of Historic

Andrew Potts, ICOMOS International Stephane Pressault, ICOMOS Canada Caroline Engel Purcell, Carrig Conservation International Ltd.

Preservation

Geoff Rich, Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

Members: Ken Bernstein, City of Los Angeles / Office of Historic Resources

Catherine Ross, Church of England

Inge Appermont, Flemish Heritage Agency

Kate Sector, Lake|Flato Architects

Allison Arlotta Marte Boro, Directorate of Cultural Heritage, Norway Andrea Carmen, International Indian Treaty Council (IITC) Jean Carroon, Goody Clancy Katherine Carter, Historic Environment Scotland

Christophe

Rivet, ICOMOS Canada

Susan Ross, Carleton University Paula Seidel, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Morwenna Slade, Historic England Ione Stiegler, IS Architecture Ibrahim Tchan, Ecomusée Tata Somba (Benin) Alice Tofts, Mortice Consulting Limited

28


Mohammad Safi Ul Alam, Youth Foundation of Bangladesh Fernando Vegas Lopez-Manzanares, ICOMOS (Spain) Chris Warden, MTBA Associates Chris Weibe, National Trust for Canada Joe Jack Williams, Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Margaret Woodruff, Charlotte Library (USA)

CHN Working Group on Mainstreaming Culture and Heritage into Climate Planning (WG4) Coordinating Organisation: International Council on Monuments & Sites (ICOMOS) Paloma Guzman, HICLiP Project Manager, Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research, Department Heritage and Society Cathy Daly, HICLiP Project Manager, University of Lincoln, School of History & Heritage Andrew Potts, WG4 Coordinator, ICOMOS

Coordinating Organisation: United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) Committee on Culture Jordi Pascual, WG5 Coordiantor, UCLG Committee on Culture Members: Joyce Purmar Adzinku, Opportunity Two Excel Foundation Andrea Carmen, International Indian Treaty Council (IITC) Juan delGado, Outgrain Arts Diane Drubay, We Are Museums Sofia Fonseca, ICOMOS Keolu Fox, University of California at San Diego Constanze Fuhrmann, The German Federal Environmental Foundation (Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt DBU) Fabrizio Galeazzi, StoryLab Research Institute, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge Campus Mauro García Santa Cruz, Iniciativa Patrimonio y Cambio Climático Tawanda Gatsi, Heritage Innovation Trust Aaron Gross, City of Los Angeles

Members:

David Norcott, Wessex Archaeology

Olufemi Adetunji, NERD Multi-Concepts, Nigeria

Julianne Polanco, California Office of Historic Preservation

Mansoor Ahmed, University of Management and Technology, Lahore,

Andrew Potts, ICOMOS International

Pakistan

Cecilie Smith-Christensen, World Heritage Catalysis

Inge Appermont, Flemish Heritage Agency

Ibrahim Tchan, Ecomusée Tata Somba

Francesco Calzolaio, Venti di Cultura

Mohammad Safi Ul Alam, Youth Foundation of Bangladesh

Jacqui Donnelly, CHN Steering Committee

Sari Uricheck, Cultural Heritage Finance Alliance

Álvaro Gómez-Ferrer Bayo, ICOMOS (Spain)

Ege Yildirim, ICOMOS

Jenny Hay, City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation

Yky, www.resi-city.com

John Hurd, ICOMOS (UK) Eric Huybrechts, ICOMOS (France) Henry Chibueze Ivo, Henivoc Project Consult Limited, Nigeria Isuf Koci, Kosovo Council for Cultural Heritage Rosa Milito, ICOMOS (Canada) Shanon Miller, City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation Michael Netter, Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) (UK)

CHN Working Group on Supporting Climate Action by Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples (WG7) Coordinating Organisation: Chiang Mai City Arts & Cultural Center and Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition

Ishanlosen Odiaua, ICOMOS Nigeria

Queen Quet Marquetta L. Goodwine, WG7 Co-Coordinator, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation

Witiya Pittungnapoo, Naresuan University, Thailand

Suwaree Wongkongkaew, WG7 Co- Coordinator, Chiang Mai City Arts

Julianne Polanco, California Office of Historic Preservation

& Cultural Center (CCAC)

Donovan Rypkema, Heritage Strategies International

Ajirapa Pradit, WG7 Project Manager, Chiang Mai City Arts & Cultural

Erminia Sciacchitano, CHN Steering Committee

Center (CCAC)

Ibrahim Tchan, Ecomusée Tata Somba, Benin Khandokar Mahfuz ud Darain, Architecture Discipline, Khulna University, Bangladesh Stacy Vallis, ICOMOS (New Zealand)

Members: Mansoor Ahmed, University of Management and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan

Nell Ziehl, Maryland Historical Trust

Juan delGado, Outgrain Arts

CHN Working Group on Using Culture to Promote Climate Resilient Sustainable Development (WG5)

Carine A. Durand, Musée d’ethnographie de Genève

Paul V. Dudman, University of East London: Archives Tripti Dutta, Council of Royal Roots (India) Ewan Hyslop, Historic Environment Scotland (HES)

29


WHO WE ARE

VOLUNTEERS

Henry Chibueze Ivo, Henivoc Project Consult Limited, Nigeria Nicholas Kunga, DETRA Africa Thomas H McGovern, City University of New York

Ege Yildirim, ICOMOS Culture at COP26 Webpage Advisory Group Kanitha Kasina-Ubol, Siam Society and the Southeast Asian Cultural Heritage Alliance

Graduate Center Human Ecodynamics Research Center

Stephanie Shapiro, American Association of Museums

Ave Paulus, ICOMOS (Estonia) Navin Piplani, Indian National Trust for Art and

Claire McGuire, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)

Cultural Heritage (INTACH)

Jenny Hay, City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation

Kimberly Rose, ACKlimate Nantucket

Rachel Rowley, Museum Galleries Scotland

Rachael Rowley, Museums Galleries Scotland

Alison Tickell, Julie’s Bicycle

Ibrahim Tchan, Ecomusée Tata Somba

CHN MEMBER ORGANISATIONS

Mohammad Safi Ul Alam, Youth Foundation of Bangladesh Margaret Woodruff, Charlotte Library

Working Group on Building the Arts, Culture and Heritage Constituency for COP26 (WG8) Coordinating Organisation: California Office of Historic Preservation and Historic Environment Scotland Ewan Hyslop, WG8 Co-Coordinator, Historic Environment Scotland Julianne Polanco, WG8 Co-Coordinator, California Office of Historic Preservation Members: COP26 Manifesto Drafting Group Veronica Arias, CC35/Capital Cities of the Americas Yunus Arikan, ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability Alexander Lamont Bishop, International National Trust Organisation Carl Elefante, American Institute of Architects Silja Fischer, International Music Council Hannah Fluck, Historic England Robert Janes, Coalition of Museums for Climate Justice Daniela Micanovi, IFLA Europe Ishanlosen Odiaua, ICOMOS Nigeria Jordi Pascual, United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) Committee on Culture Navin Piplani, Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage Erminia Sciacchitano, Italian Ministry of Culture Tarisi Vunidilo, Pacific Islands Museums Association

Mauro García Santa Cruz, Iniciativa Patrimonio y Cambio Climático

Units of Government, Indigenous Peoples’ Organisations Agency for Cultural Heritage Management, City of Bergen, Norway Associazione Culturale Imago Mundi Onlus (Italy) Cadw (Wales UK) City of Cuenca City of Fort Worth (USA) City of Krakow City of Los Angeles City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation City of San Antonio Office of Sustainability California Office of Historic Preservation Edmonton Historical Board ErfgoedAcademie (Heritage Academy of the Netherlands) English Heritage Finnish Heritage Agency Flanders Heritage (Onroerend Erfgoed) Glasgow City Heritage Trust Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition Heritage NL (Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador) Historic England Historic Environment Scotland Instituto Metropolitano de Patrimonio de Quito Jamma Children Foundation (Gambia) Kosovo Council for Cultural Heritage Maryland Historical Trust Montana State Historic Preservation Office National Association of Tribal Historic Preservation Officers (USA) National Historic Ships UK National Trust of Fiji New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission Persepolis Foundation (Iran) Riksantikvaren – Directorate for Cultural Heritage (Norway) Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales

30


WHO WE ARE

CHN MEMBER ORGANISATIONS

SIMTUR (Italy) Swedish National Heritage Board The National Archives, UK Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation

Universities/Higher Education Athabasca University (Canada) Carleton University Chiang Mai University School of Public Policy City University of New York Graduate Center Human Ecodynamics Research Center Faculté de laménagement / Faculty of Environmental Design, Université de Montréal Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft for the advancement of applied research Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, Weitzman School of Design, University of Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Master’s Degree Program, Pratt Institute Institute of Disaster Mitigation for Urban Cultural Heritage, Ritsumeikan University, Japan Khulna University, Architecture Discipline (Bangladesh) Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), University Museum Nottingham Trent University PRAXIS/University of Leeds Rochester Institute of Technology School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh StoryLab Research Institute, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge Campus The Heritage Hub at Queen’s University Belfast The University of Exeter UCL Centre for Applied Archaeology, incorporating Archaeology South East UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage UCLA Interdepartmental Program in the Conservation of Cultural Heritage UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures at Linnaeus University Universidad Católica de La Plata, Argentina, Instituto de Investigación en Arquitectura y Territorio, Facultad de Arquitectura y Diseño University of East London: Archives University of Lay Adventists of Kigali (UNILAK) University of Lincoln University of Management and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan University of Oxford Heritage Network University of the Highlands and Islands

Cultural Institutions Australia ICOMOS NSCES Charlotte Library (USA) Church of Scotland General Trustees Cornwall Museums Partnership Council for Brisitsh Archaeology Creswell Crags Museum and Heritage Site Custom Food Lab (UK) Dundee Heritage Trust Ecoartscotland Ecomusée Tata Somba (Benin) Ethnographic Park & Botanical Garden Piramides de Guimar Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo Fundacion Santa Maria la Real Guild of St George Heritage Trust Network Instituto Moreira Salles (Brazil) Museum Geelvinck National Galleries of Scotland San Francisco Heritage Sisimiut & Kangerlussuaq Museum (Greenland) Society of Antiquaries of Scotland Stichting Terramar Museum (Bonaire, NL) The Lagunitas Project The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage TRAKT Cultural Tourism Centre Transport Trust Venti di Cultura (Italy) World Monuments Fund Britain

Businesses, Artists, Design Professionals Abrams Archaeology Ltd Albalqa Innovation Institute (Jordan) Archeologie Cornelissen Australia ICOMOS NSCES A. Ege Yildirim Heritage Planning BAC/Architecture + Planning, PLLC Built Environment Evolution Carrig Conservation International LTD Christo Aitken+Associates Codifi LLC Dennis Rodwell, Architect-Planner, Consultant in Cultural Heritage and Sustainable Urban Development Design Aid, Cultural Resource Management & Resilient Environments Donna Graves, Public Historian

31


WHO WE ARE

MEMBERS

EducationEdge

We Are Museums

Externetworks

Web2Learn

EVOQ Strategies

Wessex Archaeology

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

World Heritage Catalysis

Fjordr Ltd.

Yky

GJM Heritage Goody Clancy

NGOs/Civil Society

Hall Conservation Ltd

ACKlimate Nantucket

Henivoc Project Consult Limited

Adapt Northern Heritage

Heritage Strategies International

African World Heritage Fund

HistoryView

American Alliance of Museums

Ingatestone Consulting

American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works

International Heritage Conservation and Management

American Institute of Architects

IS Architecture

American Planning Association

Janice Gooch Heritage Consultancy

An Taisce – The National Trust for Ireland

John Gilbert Architects

Antiquities Coalition

Joseph K. Oppermann Architect

Arab Center for Heritage

Judith Coombes Museums and Heritage Consulting

Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland

julia betancor

ASOCIACION MEXICANA DE VOLUNTARIADO INTERNACIONAL A.C.

Kassandra Srls

Association for Preservation Technology

Knowsley Safari Lake|Flato Architects

Associazione dei Comitati Privati Internazionali per la Salvaguardia di Venezia

Lamb Ink

Australian Library and Information Association

LF Conservation and Preservation

Boston Preservation Alliance

L – P : Archaeology

Built Environment Forum Scotland

MCR URBAN CONSULTING

California Preservation Foundation

Moder Dy CIC

Canadian Museum Association

Mortice Consulting Limited

Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals

MSDS Marine

Cathedral and Church Buildings Division,

MTBA Associates Architecture Urbanism Conservation

Archbishops Council, Church of England

Nic Boyes Consultant Conservator

Catrine’s Heritage Action Team

NTK

Chartered Institute for Archaeologists

Osinowo and Associates

Chisomo Mission Group

Outgrain Arts

Coalition of Museums for Climate Justice

PROSKENE Conservation & Cultural Heritage

Council Of Royal Roots

Quota Heritage

Council On Training in Architectural

Robert A Moore Architects and Heritage Consultants

Conservation (COTAC)

Sam Rose Associates

Creative City South (South Africa)

Sara Bronin/Voladizo LLC

CREBA – Centre de Ressources pour la Rehabilitation Responsible du Bati Ancien

Sons and Daughters of Africa Space Architects Sustainable Museums Talent Connected Worldwide Teiduma, Consultancy on Heritage and Culture The Craig Group Urbanex d.o.o.

Croatia Green Building Council Cultural Agents. Inc. Cultural Heritage Finance Alliance CyArk DasKlaerwerk Verein zum Erhalt des Klärwerks e.V. (Germany) DC Preservation League

32


DETRA-Africa (Kenya)

National Trust of South Australia

Docomomo US

NEMO – Network of European Museum Organisations

Edinburgh World Heritage

NERD Multi-Concepts Nigeria

EFFORTS : European Federation of Fortified Sites

Opportunity Two Excel Foundation (Ghana)

ENCATC

Oxford Preservation Trust

eurac research

Petra National Trust

Europa Nostra

Preservation Pennsylvania

European Historic Houses

Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans

Exemplary Environmental Association (Jordan)

Save Edinburgh Central Library

FABCITY YUCATAN A.C.

The Sendzimir Foundation

Folk Alliance International

Shetland Amenity Trust

For Africa

SOS Archivi (Italy)

Foundation The Routes of the Olive Tree

Susan Christopherson Center for Community Planning

Fundació Catalunya La Pedrera

Sustainable Traditional Buildings Alliance

Future for Religious Heritage (FRH)

Svamz (Slovenia)

German Federal Environmental Foundation

The Arctic Institute

Hawai’i Institute for Human Rights

The Cockburn Association

Heritage BC (Canada)

The Cross-Cultural Foundation of Uganda (CCFU)

Heritage Innovation Trust (Zimbabwe)

The Foundation for Virtualization of the

ICOMOS – International Council on Monuments and Sites

National Heritage of Culture (Poland)

ICOMOS Canada

The Heritage Alliance

ICOMOS Germany

The Heritage Management Organization

ICOMOS ISC20C

The Heritage Porthole (Malta)

ICOMOS-Nigeria

The National Trust

Icon

The National Trust for Canada

IFLA Europe

The National Trust of Norway

IHBC

The National Trust for Scotland

The Indonesian Heritage Trust (BPPI / Badan Pelestarian Pusaka Indonesia)

Ukrainian Tourist Guides Association

Iniciativa Patrimonio y Cambio Climático (Argentina)

Ulster Architectural Heritage

Indian National Trust for Arts and Cultural Heritage (INTACH)

United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) Culture Committee

Innovate Earth (Sweden)

Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS)

Institute for Environment and Sustainable Development (China)

Union REMPART

International Council on Archives

US/ICOMOS

International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)

Virasat, Society for the Study of Heritage of Jammu and Kashmir

IFLA (International Federation of Landscape Architects)

World Monuments Fund

International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (IIC)

Youth for Creative African Art Focus

International Music Council

Youth Foundation of Bangladesh

International National Trust Organisation (INTO) Interpret Europe – European Association for Heritage Interpretation Julies Bicycle Ki Culture Kulturel Mirasi Koruma Dernegi (Association for the Protection of Cultural Heritage), KMKD Museums Galleries Scotland National Conservation Service National Trust for Scotland

33


Through its My Tree House Children’s Library, Singapore’s Central Public Library is having a powerful new impact in favour of sustainability awareness among children. Activities focus on opportunities to learn about the environment and climate, and there is an enhanced collection of books and other materials on green issues. The programme provides a strong example of how existing cultural infrastructure like libraries can be used to support awareness and behaviour change, even from the youngest age. The role of the library space, not just as one for accessing culture, but also for expressing creativity, bringing together different stakeholders, is maximised in service of climate action. This project is featured in the ‘The Role of Culture in Climate Resilient Development’ report produced by the CHN and UCLG (see page 7).

Photo © Courtesy of National Library Board, Singapore, All Rights Reserved - Entrance to the Tree House, National Library Board, Singapore.

CULTURAL ACTION FOR C


CLIMATE EMPOWERMENT


A STRONG NETWORK

2021 CHN ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY

ABOVE CLOCKWISE: (1) AGA attendees receive an update on CVI:Africa (2) Queen Quet Marquetta L. Goodwine of the Gullah Geechee Sea Island Coalition is introduced by event chair Hannah Fluck to deliver remotely the report of CHN WG7; (3) Dr Paloma Guzman (NIKU) and Dr Cathy Daly (University of Lincoln) present the CHN WG4 HiCLIP project; (4) outgoing CHN Co-Chair representatives Julianne Polanco and Ewan Hyslop (2019-21) receive thank you gifts from Historic Environment Scotland’s Vanessa Glindmeier and Rachel Stewart, marking the conclusion of their extraordinary two-year terms of service.


36

2021 CHN ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY The 2021 Annual General Assembly of the Climate Heritage Network was held on 1 November 2021, in parallel with COP26. The Assembly was held in-person at the historic Merchant’s House, Glasgow, and virtually. Attendees were warmly welcomed by Glasgow’s Depute Lord Provost, Bailie Christy Mearns. The Assembly included a celebration of the completion of the CHN's Madrid-to-Glasgow Arts, Culture and Heritage Climate Action Plan as well as of other recent #climateheritage successes. The only formal item of business was the announcement of the results of the CHN's Regional Co-Chair Elections. Co-Chairs are elected for a two-year term by simple majority vote of the CHN Members within the relevant region. For 2021, voting occurred exclusively through electronic ballot, which was open from 21 to 30 October. The newly elected co-chairs are: - Africa and the Arab States: African World Heritage Fund - Europe and the CIS: Europa Nostra - Latin America and the Caribbean: Instituto Metropolitano de Patrimonio, Quito, Ecuador - North America: City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation

The position of Asia-Pacific Co-Chair was not filled. Historic Environment Scotland; the City of Cuenca, Ecuador/Mayor Pedro Palacios; and the California Office of Historic Preservation were each awarded the title of CHN Immediate Past Chair in grateful recognition of their service to the CHN. AGA arrangements were generously handled by Historic Environment Scotland. Following the AGA, in-person attendees were treated to a walking tour of the historic Glasgow City Centre led by Niall Murphy of the Glasgow City Heritage Trust. 37


A STRONG NETWORK

CHN COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM

To support CHN Members’ own COP26 messaging, the CHN created a series of 23 ‘Issue Cards’ addressing COP26 topics like loss and damage and carbon markets, which Members could access through a dedicated Trello Board. The CHN uses its Facebook page to message about CHN activities and spotlight the work of CHN members. It was generously set up for the CHN by Claire McGuire (IFLA).

The launch of the CHN’s Race to Resilience Initiative was accompanied by the release of a series of sharable social media cards highlighting the cultural dimensions of resilience.

The CHN sent out about a dozen eNews Alerts in 2021 to its mailing list of about 2,000 recipients. It also sent out a number of Member-only alerts covering internal CHN matters.

The CHN operates twitter feeds in English (@ ClimateHeritage), French (@PClimatique) and Spanish (@ PatrimonioClima), with the English account approaching 4,500 followers. The French account is generously managed by Claudine Déom.

38


A STRONG NETWORK

CLIMATE HERITAGE IN THE MEDIA

39


BUILDING REUSE IS CLI


The Boston University Alan and Sherry Leventhal Center project is featured in the ‘BUILDING REUSE IS CLIMATE ACTION!’ resource document prepared by CHN Working Group 3 (see page 6).

Photo: Courtesy of Goody Clancy, © Anton Grassl/ESTO

IMATE ACTION


A STRONG NETWORK

FINANCIAL SUPPORTERS MAJOR DONORS

CHN SUSTAINING MEMBERS Antiquities Coalition

GJM Heritage

NERD Multi-Concepts Nigeria

Asociacion mexicana de voluntariado

Heritage Landscapes

Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage

internacional a.c

Heritage Trust Network

Research (NIKU)

Association for Preservation Technology (APT)

ICOMOS International

Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC)

Athabasca University, Faculty of Humanities

Icon (Institute of Conservation)

Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans

and Social Sciences

IHBC -The Institute of Historic Building

Proskene SLP

Built Environment Forum Scotland (BEFS)

Conservation

The National Archives UK

Buzzeum/We are Museums

International Council on Archives

UCLA Interdepartmental Program in the

Carrig Conservation International

International National Trusts Organisation

Conservation of Cultural Heritage

Council for British Archaeology

MTBA Associates Architecture Urbanism

Union of Concerned Scientists

Cultural Heritage Finance Alliance

Conservation

University of Oxford Heritage Network

Erfgoed Académie (Pays-Bas)

National Transport Trust UK

Washington State Department of Archaeology +

Europa Nostra

National Trust of South Australia

Historic Preservation

IN-KIND DONORS

FRIENDS OF THE CHN Thomas Brogren Carl Elefante Dr Anthea M. Hartig Dr Ewan Hyslop Julianne Polanco Andrew Potts and Steve Clark

California Office of Historic Preservation

Musuem Galleries Scotland

Professor Claudine Deom

Norwegian Institute for Cultural

Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Heritage Research (NIKU)

Historic England

United Cities and Local Governments

Historic Environment Scotland

(UCLG) Committee on Culture

ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability

US/ICOMOS

International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions

World Monuments Fund

Google Arts & Culture

42


JOIN THE CLIMATE HERITAGE NETWORK AT COP27 IN SHARM EL-SHEIKH, EGYPT 7-18 NOVEMBER 2022


JOIN CLIMATE HERITAGE NETWORK www.climateheritage.org info@climateheritage.org