Page 1

Sixth Form Ad Caelestia Sequere


Course List Subject

Exam Board

Entry Requirements

Page

Advanced Level Art

Pearson Edexcel

Art 6

Advanced Level Biology

AQA

Biology 6 (or Combined Science 6-6)

Advanced Level Business

WJEC Eduqas

Business Studies 6 (if taken) or English Language 5 and Mathematics 5

Advanced Level Chemistry

AQA

Chemistry 7 (or Combined Science 7-7) and Mathematics 7

Advanced Level Computer Science

OCR

Computing/ICT 6 or Mathematics 5

Advanced Level Dance

AQA

Dance 6 (if taken)

Advanced Level Design and Technology – Product Design

AQA

Product Design (or the equivalent) 6

Advanced Level Drama and Theatre

Pearson Edexcel

Drama 6, English Language 5 and English Literature 5

17

Advanced Level Economics

AQA

Economics 6 if taken (or English Language 5) and Mathematics 7

18

Advanced Level English Language and Literature

Pearson Edexcel

English Language 6 and English Literature 6

19

Advanced Level English Literature

Pearson Edexcel

English Language 6 and English Literature 6

Extended Project Level 3

Pearson Edexcel

Motivation and excellent time management skills

20 21

Advanced Level Film Studies

WJEC Eduqas

English Language 5 and English Literature 5 or text based humanities subject 6

22

Advanced Level French

Pearson Edexcel

French 6 (highly recommended)

23

Advanced Level Geography

AQA

Geography 6

Advanced Level German

Pearson Edexcel

German 6

24 25

Advanced Level History (Option 1)

Pearson Edexcel

History 6

26

Advanced Level History (Option 2)

Pearson Edexcel

History 6

27

Advanced Level Mathematics

Pearson Edexcel

Mathematics 7

Advanced Level Mathematics – Further

Pearson Edexcel

Mathematics 7

28 29

Advanced Level Media

AQA

English Language 5 and English Literature 5

30

Advanced Level Music

Pearson Edexcel

Music 6 and Grade 5 standard in the ABRSM/Trinity syllabus - possible exceptions for those without GCSE Music with Grade 6 in ABRSM/ Trinity examinations

31

Advanced Level Photography

Pearson Edexcel

Art (or the equivalent) 6

Advanced Level Physical Education

AQA

Physical Education 6, Science 6 and English Language 5

Advanced Level Physics

AQA

Physics 7 (or Combined Science 7-7) and Mathematics 7

Advanced Level Politics

AQA

Humanities subject 6 or English Language 5 (recommended)

34 35

Advanced Level Psychology

AQA

Biology 6, Mathematics 5 and English Language 5

36

Advanced Level Religious Studies

AQA

English Language 5 and Religious Studies 6 (if taken) or English Language 5 and a text based humanities subject 6

37

Advanced Level Sociology

AQA

English Language 5 or another humanities subject 6

Advanced Level Spanish

Pearson Edexcel

Spanish 6 (highly recommended)

38 39

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

32 33


Page 3

Welcome Sixth Form study is an exciting prospect – a time to build on GCSE successes and maximise opportunities for the next stage in life – and Highworth is the ideal place to fulfil your ambitions. We are fortunate in that we can offer a large number of diverse A Level courses which gives everyone plenty of choice to study subjects that really inspire them. Teachers at Highworth are specialists and have fantastic subject knowledge that enables students to enjoy their learning in a challenging but supportive environment.

Paul Danielsen Headteacher

We pride ourselves on not only our high academic achievement, but also our high quality student care and support. Hence, it is no surprise that our Sixth Form is thriving with the majority of students gaining their first choice university course, including places at Oxbridge and Russell Group universities. We want our students to be confident, independent, co-operative and sophisticated learners who develop wider skills such as creativity, resilience and resourcefulness – qualities which are essential for the twenty-first century. Highworth offers exciting challenges and we look forward to meeting you and welcoming you to our vibrant, innovative and successful school.


Page 4

Sixth Form Team Sixth Form is potentially the most rewarding two years of your schooling and at Highworth you have the choice to study across a broad curriculum where our outstanding academic results are testament to our students’ abilities, hard work and their teachers’ expertise.

Students new to the school quickly settle into the supportive, friendly atmosphere and there is a strong emphasis on career guidance for life after Highworth, with students going on to Higher Education in the UK, Europe and beyond, as well as Higher Level Degree Apprenticeships. Our school Alumni of over 1000 members represents the wide range of career pathways our students follow.

Studying the Extended Project Qualification alongside your A Level subjects is a way of demonstrating a love of learning which underpins our approach to post-16 education, encouraging you to take responsibility for your own learning. Our A Level Mindset course inspires students to maximise their potential by building resilience, systems and the confidence to face challenges.

Our Sixth Form Team look forward to welcoming you to our successful Sixth Form where your individual talents and strengths will flourish in an exciting, challenging and supportive environment. Susan Welch, Head of Sixth Form


Page 5

Careers

Alumni

The Careers Department provides individual meetings, guidance sessions and external careers advice.

My time in the Sixth Form at Highworth gave me a safe and supportive environment to try new things.

Sixth Form students are supported in the completion of post-18 applications for whatever pathway they choose, whether that be university, apprenticeships, studying abroad or other opportunities. Our links with various organisations ensure that information available to students is as up to date and as relevant as possible. In addition, our Alumni visit school regularly to share their insights.

The encouragement of the teaching staff and the opportunities offered to me alongside my studies allowed me to be able to direct and produce my first piece of theatre at the Whitstable Playhouse through my Extended Project, meet industry professionals and learn more about the world I was desperate to throw myself into. My Extended Project, time on the school Tech Team and assistance on projects such as the RSC regional Shakespeare programme have continued to provide me with amazing stories and talking points in interviews, applications and networking.

We have extensive experience of guiding students through: the UCAS process; writing personal statements; completing entrance examinations; applying for specialist courses; and preparing for Oxbridge interviews. We help students to make informed decisions about their future and prepare each individual for the choices and transitions that they will face in their education and working life. Laura Savage, Careers Manager

The hard work has definitely paid off because I am now able to say that, before I have reached 20, I have achieved my career ambition of working for the National Theatre! Highworth Sixth Form supported me in these goals and gave me the platform to go out into the world and achieve them. Charlotte Churm, Highworth Alumni


Page 6

Tilly Atkinson

Max Willis

Hannah Snowden

Nathan Chisvo

Student Profiles Tilly Atkinson, Head Girl

Hannah Snowden, AB Community Captain

As Head Girl, I am proud to represent Highworth. I enjoy the opportunities to speak to prospective students about everything we have to offer and the many benefits of attending our Sixth Form. My A Levels are History, Politics, Economics and the Extended Project Qualification. One of the biggest strengths of this school is the support system and staff offer plenty of advice on how to be productive and efficient. I have enjoyed participating in extracurricular activities focused on preparation for Law, public speaking and the History and Current Affairs Society. My ambition is to complete an Education Studies degree and then go onto work in the Education Department of the Civil Service.

Being elected as Community Captain by the students of Amy Beach Community has been one of my greatest achievements at Highworth. The role has been challenging and rewarding, allowing me to develop skills in teamwork, time management and communication. I have had the pleasure of getting to know students from all year groups through events such as Community Drama, Sports Day and Rounders Day. I am studying Product Design, Mathematics and Physics to enable me to become a Design Engineer in the future. My experience of Sixth Form has given me the confidence, drive and determination to accomplish my goals.

Max Willis, Head Boy

Nathan Chisvo, Medical Society Prefect

The role of Head Boy within Highworth is important because boys do need an ambassador to discuss everything from sports teams to school facilities. I am taking English Literature, French, History and Psychology and I have found that teachers are always willing to provide feedback and extra help. There are societies and clubs to accommodate all fields of study from Medicine to Politics. Students often take an active role organising and presenting sessions, helping Sixth Formers to become independent and pragmatic individuals. I would like to study Law at university and, even though I know this course is really competitive, Highworth has prepared me for the process.

The main thing I enjoy about being a Medical Society Prefect is that it is a great opportunity to discuss the latest advances in medicine with my peers. I also offer advice to students in younger years about meeting challenges and managing workloads based on personal experience. I study A Levels in Biology, Chemistry and Mathematics; I have also chosen to engage in the genetic engineering debate in my Extended Project to develop my subject knowledge and independent study skills. I am hoping to pursue a career in medicine and I believe that Highworth Sixth Form was the correct choice for my journey.


Page 7

How do I Apply? Please use the link below to enable you to apply to our Sixth Form: www.ucasprogress.com/provider/79555/highworthgrammar-school

All A Level courses are linear with examinations at the end of the two year course.

If you are applying from outside of Kent, please contact our Sixth Form Manager, Miss M Khalil, who will send you an application form: m.khalil@highworth.kent.sch.uk

If, however, there are insufficient numbers, a course may not run.

Deadline for applications is: WEDNESDAY 6 FEBRUARY 2019

Entry Requirements As a basic entry requirement to join our Sixth Form, you must have achieved at least 6 GCSE subjects at Grade 6 or above including: • at least Grade 5 in English • at least Grade 5 in Mathematics • the specific entry requirements for each of your subjects Applicants may choose 3 or 4 subjects to study at A Level. Choosing to study the Extended Project Qualification will be an additional course choice. Your study programme will also include timetabled supplementary study sessions and you will be expected to be involved in a co-curricular activity such as a volunteering or work experience placement, Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme, music lessons or a regular sporting commitment.

PLEASE SEE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR FURTHER DETAILS.

Application Process Following your application, we confirm with your school that you are on target to meet the entry requirements for the courses you wish to study by requesting a reference from them. You will then be invited for a consultation with a senior teacher in March/April. The purpose of the meeting is simply to allow us to get to know you and to talk to you about your aspirations; it is not a factor in deciding whether or not to offer you a place, which is done purely on academic criteria. We have a Taster Day in the Summer Term where you will meet your teachers and receive some summer tasks to complete in preparation for your courses.

Open Morning You are welcome to attend our Open Morning on Thursday 24 January 2019 9.00am – 10.30am.


Page 8


Page 9


Page 10

Advanced Level Art Entry Requirements You will need to have followed a GCSE Art course and achieved Grade 6 or above. Being able to work independently and creatively is essential. You can get advice from your art teacher if you are interested in this course. The aims and objectives of the Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Art are to enable students to develop: • Intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive capabilities • Investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills, aesthetic understanding and critical judgement • Independence of mind in developing, refining and communicating ideas, intentions and personal outcomes • An interest in, enthusiasm for and enjoyment of art, craft and design, working with a broad range of media • An understanding of the inter-relationships between art, craft and design processes and an awareness of the contexts in which they operate • Knowledge and experience of real-world contexts and links to the creative industries • An awareness of different roles, functions, audiences and consumers of art, craft and design, preparing students for further study and employment

Course Content and Examination Format Component 1: 90 marks available, 60% of Final Mark You will be expected to complete an exciting range of skill based workshops looking at the following areas of study and looking at the formal elements of Art: Painting and Drawing; Printmaking; Sculpture and Lens-Based Image Making. You will develop your Personal Investigation portfolio to a more sophisticated depth and breadth, continuing to work closely

with a designated Art tutor who will be responsible for setting and marking your work each week as you are set specific tasks to complete. You will create a personal theme to fulfil the expectations of the unit of coursework. You will be expected to conduct extensive, focused and academic research into your Personal Study with a related written study of between 1000–3000 words being completed in the second year of study. The Personal Study comprises 12% of the total qualification and is marked out of 18. During this second year, you are encouraged to build upon skills and techniques learnt in order to produce a more considered body of coursework with supporting work and final outcomes. The emphasis is on personal independent creative work, supported by regular tutorials and guidance. Visits to galleries and exhibitions will be used to enhance and develop your work. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to work from a life model. All work will be graded by the Art Department before being moderated by an external moderator. Component 2: 72 marks available, 40% of Final Mark Your final assessment is the Externally Set Assignment which starts at the beginning of February of your second year. You will be given a set starting point or theme and will be expected to develop a body of preparatory work over eight weeks, followed by a 15 hour examination. During the 15 hour period of sustained focus under examination conditions, students will produce final outcome(s) extending from their preparatory studies in response to the Externally Set Assignment; this is normally spread over three days. Portfolio work must cover all four Assessment Objectives and will be marked by your Art teachers before being moderated by an external moderator. We celebrate the work of our students each year with an impressive exhibition.


Page 11

Advanced Level Biology Entry Requirements

Examination Format

We require either: 1. Grade 6 or above in GCSE Biology; or

You will be assessed on your ability to: • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of biological ideas, processes and procedures (35%)

2. Two Grade 6 results in Combined Science. You will also need:

• Apply knowledge and understanding of biological ideas, processes and procedures (40%)

• An interest in all aspects of Biology and related issues, including plants!

• Analyse, interpret and evaluate biological information, ideas and data (25%)

• Enjoyment of carrying out laboratory experiments or ecology field work on the field trip

In addition:

• The ability to learn a lot of factual information in great detail – much more than at GCSE • A good grasp of Chemistry and Mathematics • The ability to write a 25 mark essay in Paper 3

Course Content

• 10% of the overall assessment will contain mathematical skills • 15% of the overall assessment will assess practical work Paper

Content

Weighting %

Length

1

TOPICS 1–4 including relevant practical skills

35

2 hours

2

TOPICS 5–8 including relevant practical skills

35

2 hours

3

TOPICS 1–8 including relevant practical skills

30

2 hours

1. Biological Molecules 2. Cells 3. How organisms exchange substances with their environment 4. Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms 5. Energy transfers in and between organisms 6. How organisms respond to change 7. Genetics, evolution and ecosystems 8. Control of gene expression


Page 12

Advanced Level Business Entry Requirements

Examination Format

If you have not taken GCSE Business Studies, you need to have GCSE English Language at Grade 5 or above and GCSE Mathematics at Grade 5 or above. If you have taken GCSE Business Studies, you need to have achieved Grade 6 or above.

Component 1: Business Opportunities and Functions

You will need to keep up with current events by watching news programmes and business documentaries on television, as well as reading the business sections in the newspapers.

Section B: compulsory data response questions

You will need to communicate your ideas clearly and concisely in a logical way and show some creativity in answering discussion type questions. An enquiring mind and a good memory for facts and figures are a great advantage.

2 hours 15 minutes, 80 marks, 33.3% of qualification

Course Content

2 hours 15 minutes, 80 marks, 33.3% of qualification

There are three components which are assessed in final examinations. Students will study: business opportunities and functions; business analysis and strategy; and business in a changing world. Work from each component underpins the work that follows to allow students to tackle longer synoptic essays and case studies at the end of the course.

Section A: compulsory questions based on a case study

The topics are designed to equip students with an understanding of how to launch and manage the day to day running of a variety of different business structures. There is a strong focus on decision making within the business environment, with an emphasis on the practical implications of  running a successful business.

2 hours 15 minutes, 80 marks, 33.3% of qualification Section A: compulsory short-answer questions

Component 2: Business Analysis and Strategy

Compulsory data response and structured questions Component 3: Business in a Changing World

Section B: one synoptic essay from a choice of three


Page 13

Advanced Level Chemistry Entry Requirements

Second year:

A Level Chemistry is highly regarded by universities and many subjects, such as Medicine, make it an entry requirement to their courses. A Level Chemistry is a rigorous, challenging and ultimately rewarding course that develops scientific skills and knowledge.

Physical: Thermodynamics, quantitative kinetics and equilibria, electrode potentials and electrochemical cells.

Success at A Level means building on strong results at GCSE and so we require a Grade 7 or above in GCSE Chemistry, or two Grade 7 results in Combined Science. Chemistry A Level requires a lot of mathematical manipulation; consequently, Grade 7 in GCSE Mathematics is also required. To attain good grades in Chemistry you should: • have a curiosity about the subject • be able to work independently as well as part of a team • communicate ideas effectively in your written work • research and think critically about chemical problems

Course Content The course is arranged into the traditional three branches of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry.

First year: Physical: Atomic structure, mole calculations, bonding, energetics, qualitative kinetics and equilibria. Inorganic: Periodicity, the chemistry of the Alkaline earth metals (group 2) and the Halogens (group 7). Organic: The reactions of alkanes, halogenoalkanes, alkenes, alcohols and organic analysis.

Inorganic: Period 3 elements and their oxides, transition metals, the reactions of aqueous ions. Organic: Optical isomerism, the reactions of carbonyls and their derivatives, aromatic chemistry, amines, amino acids and polymers, including proteins as well as DNA, NMR spectroscopy and chromatography.

Examination Format Paper 1: Inorganic and physical chemistry with relevant practical skills (2 hours) 35%. Paper 2: Organic, with relevant physical chemistry and practical skills (2 hours) 35%. Paper 3: Practical skills and synoptic assessment (2 hours) 30%. There is no separate practical examination as the practical skills will be examined within these papers. However, if 12 practical investigations are completed during the course to a satisfactory level, this will be acknowledged by an A Level Practical Endorsement on the certificate.


Page 14

Advanced Level Computer Science Entry Requirements

Programming Project

The A Level Computer Science course will help you to develop the capacity to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically. You will need to gain an understanding of the organisation of computer systems, including software, hardware, data, communications and people. You will also develop skills in individual investigation, project management, time management and practical programming. Prospective candidates should have attained at least a Grade 6 in GCSE Computing/ICT, or Grade 5 in GCSE Mathematics.

In this project, students have the opportunity to create a programmed solution to a problem that they have defined. They will: investigate and analyse the problem; design and build a software solution to it; and document, test and evaluate its implementation. This project allows students to show their programming skills and creative flair, which has resulted in some releasing their work publicly.

Examination Format

Course Content

Unit

Length of Examination

% of Total A Level Mark

Computer Systems

01

2 hours 30 minutes

40%

Students will investigate: the hardware and software that make up a computer system; the presentation, structure and management of data; the transmission and networking of data; the system’s development life cycle; the characteristics of information systems; and the implications of computer use in society. Students also cover the need to design solutions to problems by developing an understanding of the structure of procedural programs, different data types and data structures, as well as investigating the common facilities of procedural languages.

02

2 hours 30 minutes

40%

03

Project

20%

Algorithms and Programming This unit looks at computational thinking, including how computers are used to solve problems, and how algorithms may be used to describe them. Students investigate how to think abstractly, procedurally and logically. Using object orientated languages, they examine programming techniques and computational methods to solve problems. Students also develop skills writing maintainable programs, as well as testing and running solutions.


Page 15

Advanced Level Dance Entry Requirements

Examination Format

This course is particularly suitable for students who have studied GCSE Dance and wish to study Dance at a higher level. If a student has completed GCSE Dance, Grade 6 or above is required. Prior experience of performing, membership of dance companies and dance clubs is essential. The course aims to develop the skills students have acquired at GCSE level and foster an analytical appreciation of professional dance works. Throughout this course, students will have to demonstrate the ability to work both individually and in a team.

Component 1: Performance and Choreography (50%)

Course Content A Level Dance allows students to embody knowledge and understanding through the exploration of areas of study, practitioners and set works. The course provides students with the opportunity to gain experience of performance and choreography and to develop critical thinking about Dance. This course is a dynamic qualification which encourages students to develop their creative, physical, emotional and intellectual capacity. It is assessed through both practical performances and written examinations. A Level Dance provides a firm foundation for further study and links with the professional dance world.

Practical Examination (80 marks) • Solo performance linked to a specified practitioner within an area of study • Performance in a quartet • Group choreography Component 2: Critical Engagement (50%) Written Examination (100 marks) 2 hours 30 minutes Knowledge, understanding and critical appreciation of two set works: • One compulsory set work within the compulsory area of study (Rambert Dance Company 1966–2002) • One optional set work within the corresponding area of study (the independent contemporary dance scene in Britain 2000–current)


Page 16

Advanced Level Design and Technology – Product Design Entry Requirements

Examination Format

Candidates should have studied GCSE Product Design (or the equivalent) and achieved Grade 6 or above. Students who have not studied a Design related subject will be considered on an individual basis. You need to:

Two examination papers worth 50% of the total marks (Mathematics and Science contribute 15%) and Nonexamination assessment (NEA) worth 50% of the total marks. The NEA consists of a single design and make activity. Students are free to choose and develop their own design.

• be able to cope with the coursework commitments • be organised to cope with a structured approach and frequent deadlines • be good at and enjoy problem solving tasks • be creative and pay attention to detail • be able to present work to a high standard • be competent with ICT and willing to extend your skills

Course Content • Students will develop intellectual curiosity about the design and manufacture of products. They will explore, design, create and evaluate innovative solutions in response to realistic design contexts

Paper 1: Written examination of 2 hours at the end of Year 13 (100 marks – 25% of A Level) Paper 2: Written examination of 2 hours at the end of Year 13 (100 marks – 25% of A Level) Non-Examination Assessment: Approximately 40 hours in Year 13 (100 Marks – 50% of A Level) Students will undertake a substantial design and make task and produce a final prototype. The context of the task will be determined by the student. Assessment criteria include: • Exploration

• Students will develop knowledge and understanding of the core technical, designing and making principles for product design

• Designing

• Subject content is split into three key sections with suggested opportunities to deliver relevant integrated mathematics and science skills

• Analysis and Evaluation

• Making


Page 17

Advanced Level Drama and Theatre Entry Requirements Students should be motivated, independent learners with excellent organisational skills. They will need to have a keen interest in the history of drama and the study of practitioners, theatrical forms and conventions that make theatre such a compelling and exciting subject. Students must also be competent performers or designers and be able to work collaboratively in groups.

Component 2: Text in Performance (20%)

The entrance requirements for this course are Grade 6 or above in GCSE Drama and Grade 5 or above in both GCSE English Literature and GCSE English Language. Prior experience of working on productions, membership of youth theatres, drama companies and dance clubs is also an advantage. The course aims to develop the skills students have acquired at GCSE and foster an analytical appreciation of theatre.

Component 3: Theatre makers in Practice (40%)

Course Content

2. Page to stage: realisation of one key extract from a performance text.

The course is practical, intellectual and artistic. Students will be expected to explore the structural elements of theatre from the page to the stage. They will work to develop the skills to analyse and critically deconstruct theatrical performance. The course requires the study of two contrasting set plays and the practical exploration of three others, in addition to developing experience of responding to live theatre and developing devised performance. Component 1: Devising (40%) Students use one key extract from a performance text and a theatre practitioner as stimuli to devise an original performance piece. Design and performance options are available. They will be assessed for the performance/realisation of the design (10%) and for their supporting portfolio 2500–3000 words (30%).

Students work together in groups to stage a key extract from a performance text for a visiting external examiner. Students must also present a monologue or duologue as part of the assessment process. The unit is broken into two sections and in both, if a candidate wishes, design options are available.

Synoptic written examination in which students must apply the knowledge they have acquired throughout the course responding to live performance and the study of two set texts. The examination will contain three sections: 1. A live theatre evaluation.

3. Interpreting one complete performance text, in light of one practitioner for a contemporary audience.

Examination Format Component 1: Performance and portfolio assessed internally by Drama Department staff with video recording and sample portfolios submitted to the Edexcel Examination Board for moderation. Component 2: Marked externally by visiting Edexcel examiner. Component 3: Written examination marked externally.


Page 18

Advanced Level Economics Entry Requirements

Examination Format

If you have not taken GCSE Economics, you need to have GCSE English Language at Grade 5 or above and GCSE Mathematics at Grade 7 or above. If you have taken GCSE Economics, you need to have achieved Grade 6 or above.

All units will be assessed externally through examinations, with each unit worth 33.3% of the total A Level grade. There is no coursework element included in the specification.

You will need to keep up to date with current events by watching news programmes and reading a broadsheet newspaper.

Units 1 and 2: Examinations of 2 hours each Section A: Data response questions requiring written answers; choice of one from two contexts (40 marks)

You will need to communicate ideas effectively, analysing a range of models and their applications within class discussions and written assignments. You should also be comfortable working with numerical data.

Section B: Essay questions requiring written answers; choice of one from three (40 marks)

Course Content

Section A: Multiple choice questions (30 marks)

The course introduces the basic concepts of micro and macroeconomic theory.

Section B: Case study questions requiring written answers (50 marks)

Unit 1: Markets and Market Failure Tackles the basic economic problem of how resources should be allocated and includes topics such as market failure, efficiency and government intervention. Unit 2: The National Economy Focuses on the role of the government in maintaining the UK economy and includes topics such as macroeconomic performance and policy. Unit 3: Economic Principles and Issues A synoptic paper designed to highlight the interdependence of economic themes across all of the topics covered in Unit 1 and Unit 2.

Unit 3: Examination of 2 hours


Page 19

Advanced Level English Language and Literature Entry Requirements

Component 2: Varieties in Language and Literature

As this course builds on GCSE skills, you should have GCSE qualifications in English Language and English Literature of at least Grade 6 or above.

The component focuses on the ways in which different writers convey their thoughts or ideas on a theme in literary and nonfiction writing. You will study three texts exploring the theme of Society and the Individual, as well as a range of non-fiction texts on the set theme in preparation for an unseen text in the examination. The set texts are The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Othello by William Shakespeare and The Whitsun Weddings by Philip Larkin.

We study the Edexcel English Language and Literature specification which allows you to: • develop and apply knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation • develop and apply understanding of the concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis and study of language

Component 3: Coursework - Investigating and Creating Texts

• engage creatively and critically with a wide range of texts, exploring the ways in which texts relate to each other and the contexts in which they are produced and received

The coursework has been designed to allow you to demonstrate your skills as a writer, crafting their own original texts for different audiences and purposes. You will study two texts that link to either the topic of The Struggle for Identity or War and Conflict to produce two creative assignments and one analytical piece.

Course Content You will pursue the study of literature and language through the study of a minimum of six texts from the genres of prose fiction, poetry, drama and non-literary texts. Component 1: Voices in Speech and Writing This component has a focus on the concept of ‘voice’ and how voices are created in literary, non-literary and digital texts. The set text is A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams. You will also study an anthology of non-literary and digital texts from the 20th and 21st centuries.

Examination Format Component 1: Written examination (40%) Open book, 2 questions, 2 hours 30 minutes Component 2: Written examination (40%) Open book, 2 questions, 2 hours 30 minutes Component 3: Coursework (20%) Including two pieces of original writing and one analytical commentary (2500–3000 words in total)


Page 20

Advanced Level English Literature Entry Requirements

Examination Format

As this course builds on GCSE skills, you should have GCSE qualifications in English Language and English Literature of at least Grade 6 or above.

Component 1: Written examination (30%) Open book, 2 questions, 2 hours 15 minutes

We study the Edexcel English Literature specification which allows you to: • Compare a range of texts across genres, themes and periods from 1300 to present day • Study critical comments and apply these to texts • Have a deeper understanding of the various traditions of literature in English

Course Content You will further your appreciation of a wide range of English literature by studying 4 components (3 examined, 1 coursework) covering a wide range of texts, periods and genres. Component 1: The study of a Shakespeare play, either a tragedy or a comedy, and one other drama (either tragedy or comedy) Component 2: The study of two prose texts on a chosen theme; one text will be pre-1900 Component 3: The study of poetry, both post and pre-2000 Component 4: A comparative coursework essay studying two texts not covered elsewhere in the course; 2500–3000 words Studying English Literature will allow you to: voice your own opinions; lead discussions by giving presentations; develop sophisticated writing skills; acquire and use specialist terms; research writers, genres and periods; and engage actively in dynamic ways with the texts.

Component 2: Written examination (20%) Open book, 2 questions, 1 hour Component 3: Written examination (30%) Open book, 2 questions, 2 hours 15 minutes Component 4: Coursework (20%) An independent comparative study of two texts, 2500–3000 words


Page 21

Extended Project Level 3 Entry Requirements

Examination Format

The Extended Project is a Level 3 qualification. It is a major piece of individual project work and, therefore, students will need to be motivated, independent learners with excellent time management skills. It is essential that those considering the course have some initial ideas for potential areas of study.

Extended Project students must submit one of the following coursework formats for internal assessment:

Please note that this course does not count as an A Level choice and can only be selected in addition to the main A Level subjects.

• A performance based project

Course Content

All students will need to produce: a project proposal form; a project activity log; an essay of 2000–6000 words; an oral presentation; and an evaluation.

The Extended Project gives students two years to pursue independent research and achieve a deeper understanding of a subject area. Lessons will focus on: how to manage a project; how to research and reference effectively; how to analyse the validity of sources; how to write an extended essay; and how to deliver findings in a formal presentation. This course is an opportunity to personalise learning and extend knowledge and skills in ways that are new and challenging. Students with a strong drive to pursue a certain career or undergraduate course can use this qualification to demonstrate early commitment and develop valuable expertise. Those aiming for places at the most prestigious and competitive universities would find it a distinct advantage to be able to discuss their Extended Project in UCAS applications and university interviews. In addition, those creating performances or artefacts will produce a recording or sketchbook portfolio which can be used to evidence their skills in any future creative pathway.

• A dissertation (a theoretical written essay) • An artefact (essay and sketchbook) • A study based on practical, investigatory work


Page 22

Advanced Level Film Studies Entry Requirements

Component 3: Production

Students will need to have achieved a minimum of Grade 5 in GCSE English Language and English Literature or Grade 6 in another text based humanities subject.

Students will produce:

Course Content The course builds on the knowledge students have already gained informally of film and cinema. They will engage with a wide range of different kinds of films, developing their creativity and practical skills in both audio visual and written forms. Component 1: Varieties of film and filmmaking Students will study: • Two films from Hollywood 1930–1990 • Two American films made since 2005

• either a short film (4–5minutes) or a screen play for a short film (1600–1800 words) plus a digitally photographed storyboard of a key section from the screen play • for both options, students will produce an evaluative analysis (1250–1500 words)

Examination Format Component 1: Varieties of film and filmmaking (35%) Written Examination: 2 hours 30 minutes Component 2: Global filmmaking perspectives (35%) Written Examination: 2 hours 30 minutes

• One documentary film

Component 3: Production (30%)

• One compilation of short films

Non-examined assessment (coursework)

Component 2: Global filmmaking perspectives Students will study: • Two British films made since 1995 • Two global films – one European and one produced outside of Europe • Film Movements – silent cinema – one silent film or group of films • Film Movements – Experimental film 1960–2000 – one film


Page 23

Advanced Level French Entry Requirements

Examination Format

It is highly recommended that you have Grade 6 or above in GCSE French. You also need to have grasped the tenses studied at GCSE: the past, present, future and conditional. Above all, you must show an ability to express your views confidently; you should enjoy communicating in French and be interested in finding out more about French culture.

Unit 1: Listening, reading and translation (40%)

Course Content

• Translation and essay writing skills, focusing on two works of French literature and/or film

The following topic areas are covered through oral, listening and written communication:

• Short tasks testing receptive skills • 1 hour 50 minutes Unit 2: Writing (30%)

• 2 hours 40 minutes

1: Changes in French Society Changes in family structures; education; world of work (set in the context of France only)

Unit 3: Speaking (30%)

2: Artistic and Political Culture in French Speaking Countries Music; media; festivals (set in the context of francophone countries and communities)

• Approximately 20 minutes

3: Immigration and Multicultural French Society Integration and multiculturalism; rise of the Far Right (set in the context of France only) 4: Occupation Resistance (set in the context of France only) Alongside these themes, we will also be studying some works of French literature and film. During the course, students will be expected to attend regular oral lessons with the Foreign Language Assistant and will be encouraged to participate in a range of cultural activities. You will be encouraged to read French newspapers and watch the news online to develop your understanding of French current affairs. You will also have the opportunity to explore French culture by watching French films and researching current issues on our laptops.

• Responding to questions on the above themes and an independent research project


Page 24

Advanced Level Geography Entry Requirements

Examination Format

You will need to have a GCSE in Geography at Grade 6 or above. Ideally you will have studied hazards, rivers, coasts and urban environments as part of your GCSE course. To achieve highly at A Level Geography you need to be able to research, plan and write extended essay answers on geographical issues. The ability to analyse, evaluate and come to supported conclusions is also key to success at A Level. In addition, you will need to have an interest in the world around you, such as the environment and current affairs, as this will form part of the course requirements.

Unit 1: Written examination (40%)

Course Content Unit 1: Physical Geography • The water and carbon cycles • Coastal systems and landscapes • Hazards Unit 2: Human Geography • Global systems and global governance • The nature and study of changing places • Contemporary urban environments Unit 3: Geographical Investigation Students will undertake a personal investigation using data collection techniques learnt during a residential field trip in the Lake District at a cost of approximately £300; this unit will be submitted and assessed as coursework.

Question types include source-based, short answer and extended prose (2 hours 30 minutes) Unit 2: Written examination (40%) Question types include source-based, short answer and extended prose (2 hours 30 minutes) Unit 3: Non-examined assessment (20%) Personal investigation of 3000–4000 words (coursework)


Page 25

Advanced Level German Entry Requirements

Examination Format

To consider doing A Level German, you should really enjoy speaking the language. Since 30% of the examination is decided on your oral skills, you should feel confident in your ability to discuss a number of issues in German. You should also have grasped all of the grammar and tenses studied at GCSE, because there is much more at A Level. It is therefore suited to candidates who achieve at least a Grade 6 in GCSE German.

Unit 1: Listening, reading and German-English translation (40%)

Course Content

• English-German translation and essay writing skills, focusing on two works of German literature and/or film

1. Development of German Society • Environment; education; world of work 2. Political and Artistic Culture in the German Speaking World

• Short tasks testing receptive skills • 1 hour 50 minutes Unit 2: Writing (30%)

• 2 hours 40 minutes Unit 3: Speaking (30%)

• Music; media; festivals and traditions

• Responding to questions on the above themes and an independent research project on a topic relevant to a German speaking country

3. Immigration and the Multicultural German Society

• Approximately 20 minutes

• Integration and multiculturalism; economic and social effects of immigration 4. German Reunification • Society before and after the reunification Alongside these themes, we will also be studying some works of German literature and film.


Page 26

Advanced Level History (Option 1) Entry Requirements

Examination Format

You will need a broad and enthusiastic interest in the political, social and economic developments which have helped to shape Britain and the Modern World. You should also enjoy studying a range of different historical periods and individuals.

• One examination paper with a focus on Germany and West Germany between 1918 and 1989

It is expected that students wishing to take this course will have achieved at least Grade 6 in GCSE History.

• One examination paper with a focus on rebellion and disorder under the Tudors

Course Content

• One extended coursework task that will be completed as a part of your Year 13 studies

You will study three topics. The first is a thematic breadth study that charts German history from 1918 to 1989, with a historiographical focus on Hitler’s foreign policy. In addition, you will explore the rise and fall of Fascism in Italy between 1911 and 1946. In both cases, you will need to investigate political, economic and social change and analyse why Fascist dictatorships formed with such success in Europe during the first part of the 20th century. The focus of the third unit of study centres on British history and the protest and rebellion that developed during the Tudor period. In particular, you will consider the differing types of rebellion that came about as a result of the question of succession, religion, economic issues, Mary Queen of Scots and Ireland. You will complete a coursework unit that focuses on a historical controversy related to your studies. This coursework assignment is designed to test your historical skills and understanding and will challenge you to consider and critique a range of different interpretations.

• One examination paper with a focus on the rise and fall of Fascism in Italy between 1911 and 1946


Page 27

Advanced Level History (Option 2) Entry Requirements

Examination Format

You will need a broad and enthusiastic interest in the social and political developments which have helped to shape Britain and the Modern World. You should also enjoy studying a range of different historical periods and individuals.

• One examination paper with a focus on Britain, 1625–1701: conflict, revolution and settlement

It is expected that students wishing to take this course will have achieved at least Grade 6 in GCSE History.

• One examination paper with a focus on The Golden Age of Spain, 1474–1598

Course Content

• One extended coursework task that will be completed as a part of your Year 13 studies

You will study three topics. The first relates to conflict and revolution in Britain between 1625 and 1701, including the English Civil War and the Cromwellian Protectorate. In addition, you will then study Russia in revolution between 1894 and 1924. In both cases, you will need to explore political and social change and analyse the factors that led to revolutionary change. The focus of the third unit of study centres on the Golden Age of Spain, 1474–1598. You will explore key events and developments in Spanish history at a time when Spain exercised a major influence on Europe as a whole and became what can possibly be described as the first truly world power. You will complete a coursework unit that focuses on a historical controversy related to your studies. This coursework assignment is designed to test your historical skills and understanding and will challenge you to consider and critique a range of different interpretations.

• One examination paper with a focus on Russia in revolution, 1894–1924


Page 28

Advanced Level Mathematics Entry Requirements

Examination Format

A Level Mathematics is a challenging course but is becoming increasingly popular; it now represents one of the largest courses in the Sixth Form. It should be taken by students who enjoy the satisfaction of pursuing and completing demanding and sophisticated mathematical problems and concepts. Hence, you will need to achieve Grade 7 or above at GCSE. Please be aware that even good GCSE candidates will not succeed in the course without hard work and commitment. If you are considering applying for medicine, then you are advised to take A Level Mathematics.

Each of the three papers will have an examination of 2 hours. The Statistics questions will involve a pre-release data set. There is no separate synoptic paper and no coursework component.

Course Content The Pure topics rely on algebraic skills and so you should enjoy thinking in abstract terms; you should also be confident and accurate in your use of algebra and manipulation of complex algebraic expressions. It is important to achieve a good mark in the algebra summer tasks set at the end of Year 11 and the end of Year 12, as the course relies heavily on prior knowledge. You will sit two Pure papers in Year 13. The Applied topics cover Statistics and Mechanics. For the Statistics topics, you should: enjoy the data handling topics in GCSE; be competent at calculations, with and without a calculator; and understand the logic of probability and statistical diagrams. To succeed in the Mechanics topics, you should find it easy to analyse practical problems and have enjoyed the Mechanics topics in GCSE Physics. This pairs up well with the work studied in A Level Physics. You will sit one Applied paper in Year 13.

Calculators You will be expected to purchase the Casio ClassWiz fx-991EX calculator to support you in your studies. These currently retail at about £25 and the Mathematics department will organise a bulk order at the start of Year 12.


Page 29

Advanced Level Mathematics – Further Entry Requirements

Course Content

To take Further Mathematics, it is essential that you have gained Grade 7 or above in the GCSE examination and are particularly confident in algebra. Further Mathematics follows a similar structure to A Level Mathematics except that there are some additional topics and it is more challenging! Further Mathematics continues from A Level Mathematics and the two qualifications count as two separate A Levels.

The Core Pure topics extend some concepts studied in A Level even further but you will also be introduced to new areas of Mathematics that are more challenging and vital for university study. They include proof, complex numbers, matrices, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions and differential equations. You will sit two papers in Year 13, each 90 minutes in length.

This course is for those students who: enjoy Mathematics; are keen to learn and understand more; and who also intend to study a Mathematics-based subject, such as Engineering, Computing or Science. Homework is a vital component of the course and so it is important that it is done punctually. There will also be an expectation that you attend extra lessons outside the main timetabling framework, especially when examinations are due. Please be aware that some university courses are including Further Mathematics as an entry requirement of the degree course. It is also important to note that even good GCSE candidates will not succeed at Further Mathematics unless a great deal of time, effort and hard work are spent on the course. Further Mathematics should be taken as a fourth subject to ensure that you still have breadth in your choices.

The two Options papers allow you to further explore areas of Mathematics that interest you. Various units are available in Decision Mathematics, Statistics and Mechanics. The precise content of the course varies from year to year depending on numbers and also staff availability. The current cohort is studying Decision Mathematics.

Examination Format Each of the four papers will have an examination of 1½ hours.

Calculators You will be expected to purchase the Casio ClassWiz fx-991EX calculator to support you in your studies. These currently retail at about ÂŁ25 and the Mathematics department will organise a bulk order at the start of Year 12. Students can purchase a graphical calculator, if wished, but this is not essential.


Page 30

Advanced Level Media Studies Entry Requirements

Examination Format

Study of Media at GCSE is not a requirement but will obviously support your understanding as this course builds on GCSE skills. You should have GCSE qualifications in English Language and English Literature of at least Grade 5 or above. The subject has a practical element but 70% of the course is through written examined content.

Media One (35%)

We study the AQA Media Studies specification which allows you to: • View, evaluate and analyse a variety of media products, and develop practical skills spanning a range of media forms • Find contemporary, diverse topics and varied and engaging content, helping you to develop research and problemsolving skills, as well as developing your creativity • Refine your debating skills through the discussion of contemporary issues from a range of perspectives

Course Content Media Studies is a truly contemporary subject which is relevant to all of our lives. The media saturates everything we do in the developed world in the 21st century. Giving you the tools to analyse and critique the media, affords you the chance to see the ways in which the media pervades your life. Your study will focus on four areas of Media Studies: Language; Representation; Industry; and Audiences across nine Media forms (Television, Film, Radio, Newspapers, Magazines, Advertising, Social Media, Video Games & Music Videos). Forms will range from the historic and the contemporary allowing you to explore your own interests and tastes, while expanding your learning and understanding within a range of challenging Media products.

• Written examination of 2 hours • A range of questions relating to an unseen source and Close Study Products • Two essay questions (20 marks), one of which is an extended response question Media Two (35%) • Written examination of 2 hours • One medium length unseen analysis question • Three essay questions (25 marks), one of which is an extended response question and one of which is a synoptic question NEA (Non-Examination Material): Creating a cross-media production (30%) Students produce from a choice of one of six annually changing briefs, set by AQA: • A statement of intent • A cross-media production made for an intended audience


Page 31

Advanced Level Music Entry Requirements Students should have achieved at least Grade 6 in GCSE Music. They also need to be able to read music confidently and to be playing an instrument, or singing, at Grade 5 standard or above in the ABRSM or Trinity syllabuses, whether or not they have taken the examination. There may be exceptions for students who do not have GCSE Music if they have achieved Grade 6 or above in ABRSM or Trinity examinations.

Course Content Unit 1: Performing Music Students will perform as soloists and/or as part of an ensemble. Music from any style can be chosen. Any instrument(s) and/or voice(s) are acceptable as part of an assessed recital performance of at least eight minutes. Notated and/or improvised performances may be submitted. The standard expected at the end of Year 13 will be equivalent to Grade 7–8. Unit 2: Composing Music Students must complete two tasks in this unit. Task one is to compose a piece of at least 4 minutes in duration to a brief from a list, or a free composition. Task two is to compose to a brief in a specific style and be of at least one minute in duration – usually two chorale harmonisations in the style of J S Bach. The combined duration of the compositions needs to be at least 6 minutes.

Unit 3: Appraising Music This unit involves the study of set works in six areas: vocal music, instrumental music, music for film, pop and jazz, fusions and ‘new directions’. Students work towards an examination which involves aural perception, melodic and rhythmic dictation, in-depth essays on set works and essays on unfamiliar music related to the areas of study.

Examination Format Unit 1: Non-examined assessment (externally assessed) 30% Unit 2: Non-examined assessment (externally assessed) 30% Unit 3: Written examination (2 hours) 40%


Page 32

Advanced Level Photography Entry Requirements An Art related background is essential and all applicants will be expected to have studied either Photography or Art (or the equivalent) to GCSE Grade 6 or above. You will need access to a Digital SLR camera as it will be essential for coursework assignments; a printer will also be useful. The aims and objectives of the course are to enable students to develop: • An interest in, enthusiasm for and enjoyment of photography with independence of mind for developing and communicating ideas into visual outcomes • The operations and principles of creating a photographic image, including the use of available and controlled light, lenses, cameras and light-sensitive material • Materials to be investigative, analytical, experimental, practical and technical including digital and non-digital, print and screen-based • Expressive skills, an understanding of the formal elements, aesthetic understanding and critical judgement • An understanding of the inter-relationships between photography art, craft and design processes and an awareness of the contexts in which they operate • An awareness of different roles, functions, audiences and consumers of photography, preparing students for further study and employment

Course Content and Examination Format Component 1: 90 marks available, 60% of Final Mark You will be expected to complete a range of skill based workshops looking at the formal elements of Fine Art Photography: Film Photography and Alternative Processes; Digital Photography and New Media.

You will develop your Personal Investigation portfolio to a sophisticated depth and breadth, continuing to work closely with a designated photography tutor who will be responsible for setting and marking your work each week as you are set specific tasks. You will create a personal theme to fulfil the expectations of the unit of coursework. You will be required to work in one or more of the disciplines to communicate your ideas and extend your understanding of the scope of photography. You will be expected to conduct extensive, focused and academic research into your Personal Study with a related written study of between 1000–3000 words completed in the second year of study. The Personal Study comprises 12% of the total qualification and is marked out of 18. During this second year, you are encouraged to build upon skills and techniques learnt in order to produce a more considered body of work. The emphasis is on personal independent creative work, supported by regular feedback. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to work from a life model. All work will be graded by the Photography Department before being moderated by an external moderator. Component 2: 72 marks available, 40% of Final Mark Your final assessment is the Externally Set Assignment which starts at the beginning of February of your second year. You are given a set starting point or theme and are expected to develop a body of preparatory work over eight weeks, followed by a 15 hour examination. During the 15 hour period of sustained focus under examination conditions, students will produce final outcome(s) extending from their preparatory studies in response to the Externally Set Assignment; this is normally spread over three days. Portfolio work must cover all four Assessment Objectives and will be marked by your Photography teachers before being moderated by an external moderator. We celebrate the work of our students each year with an impressive exhibition.


Page 33

Advanced Level Physical Education Entry Requirements

Course Content

You should have a genuine interest in sport both at a practical and theoretical level. You must be willing to keep up to date with current sporting news and events in the newspapers and on the television in order to widen your general knowledge of social and political aspects, as well as the sports themselves. You will be required to have at least Grade 6 in GCSE Physical Education but those who have not had this opportunity will be considered on an individual basis. In addition, you will need to have achieved a minimum of Grade 5 in GCSE English Language and Grade 6 in Science.

You will learn in depth about how the body works: from a movement point of view (skeleton, muscles, heart and lungs, energy systems and training); from a psychological view (learning of skills, memory, factors that affect performance, functioning as a group); and from a social, historical and cultural point of view.

You must be taking part, in your own time, in ONE sport to a very high competitive standard e.g. district or county level and above on a regular basis, or at a club. This activity needs to be sustained for the whole duration of the course as the assessment can only take place in a competitive context at the end of the second year. You will be assessed on your ability to perform effectively as a practical performer in a fully competitive version of your chosen activity.

Lessons will be a mixture of formal taught lessons, group work, presentations, videos and practical lessons whenever relevant. There is not a specific practical lesson as there is at GCSEÂ level.

Examination Format There will be a summative assessment at the end of the 2 years that will include a practical assessment (30%) and two written examinations on the theoretical aspects of the course (each worth 35%).


Page 34

Advanced Level Physics Entry Requirements

Course Content

Students will require Grade 7 or above in GCSE Physics, or two Grade 7 results in Combined Science. In addition, students will require Grade 7 in GCSE Mathematics.

Unit 1:

We are looking for students with enthusiasm to understand the physical world around them and with the determination to be successful. It is not a requirement that students studying Physics also study Mathematics. However, a good grasp of basic algebra is essential and combined study of A Level Mathematics would be beneficial. Please note that about 40% of the total marks in the A Level Physics examinations will require the use of Level 2 (Higher tier GCSE) mathematical skills. The AQA Physics specification is based around a common core of knowledge and skills and provides the skills and knowledge required to progress into Higher Education in a wide range of subjects such as Physics and Engineering, as well as Medicine, Oceanography, Meteorology and Veterinary Sciences.

Unit 2:

Particles, Quantum Phenomena and Electricity

Mechanics, Materials and Waves Year 12 Practical Components include 6 standard investigations assessed in the final examination paper Unit 3: Fields and Further Mechanics Units 4 and 5: Nuclear Physics, Thermal Physics and an Optional Topic from a choice of Astrophysics, Medical Physics, Engineering Physics or Turning Points in Physics or Electronics Year 13 Practical Components include 6 standard investigations assessed in the final examination paper

Examination Format The A Level course is assessed by three 2 hour terminal examinations. Papers will cover the knowledge, content and application of Physics concepts in Units 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. They will include a mix of long and short answer questions, along with a number of multiple choice sections. The 12 standard practical tasks which are used to gather data and assess skills are also formally assessed in the terminal examinations.


Page 35

Advanced Level Politics Entry Requirements You will need to have an interest in current events and political ideas, to follow political issues in the media and to be ready to read articles in journals and on the internet when preparing for writing essays. You should be willing to share ideas in discussion and to listen to other people’s views. It is recommended that you have a Grade 6 or above in a humanities subject, or a Grade 5 in English Language, but other students will be considered on an individual basis.

Course Content There are three parts to the course. The first deals with Politics in the UK. It involves looking at the British constitution and system of government including the role and powers of Parliament, the Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Supreme Court. The impact of devolution on the UK and the UK’s changing relationship with the EU are also considered. The nature of democracy in the UK, the role of political parties, elections and voting and the ways in which individuals and groups can participate in politics also form part of this unit. The second part involves a comparative study in which the American constitution, system of government and political culture are compared with those of the UK. As well as identifying similarities and differences between the two countries, students will also consider a range of possible explanations for the differences.

Finally, students will study the core ideas and principles of liberalism, conservatism, socialism and nationalism, particularly those relating to human nature, the state, society and the economy. This includes looking at some of the key thinkers whose ideas have helped shape the modern world. Discussion and debate will play a very important part in the course and so you should develop the ability to understand different points of view, as well as consider alternatives objectively. You should also learn to argue your own case in a convincing manner, both orally and on paper, and to select relevant evidence to support your points.

Examination Format There are three examinations, each of 2 hours in length and taken at the end of Year 13. Each paper consists of a mixture of short-answer and essay questions.


Page 36

Advanced Level Psychology Entry Requirements

Approaches in Psychology

Students will require Grade 5 or above in Mathematics and English Language, as well as Grade 6 in Biology. No prior knowledge of Psychology is necessary but you will need to be able to think critically and analyse statistical data.

Behaviourism – how we learn through reward and punishment. Freud - the unconscious mind. Humanism and how we seek to improve our lives.

Course Content

Research Methods

Year 12:

The research methods that underlie most psychological research are taught in depth throughout the course.

Memory

Year 13:

Models of memory. Explanations for forgetting. Factors affecting the accuracy of eye witness testimony as used for sentencing in law courts.

Issues and Debates in Psychology

Social Influence Why we conform in society. Why we obey people in authority. How behaviour can bring about social change.

Gender and cultural issues in Psychology. Are we driven by Free will or are our lives determined by external factors? Are we a product of nature or nurture? Romantic Relationships

Psychopathology

Attraction, maintenance and breakdown of relationships. Virtual/ online relationships and parasocial relationships, e.g. stalkers.

Explaining and treating phobias. Explaining and treating depression. Explaining and treating OCD.

Schizophrenia

Attachment Caregiver-infant interactions in humans. Deprivation and its effects, including the Romanian orphans. The influence of early attachment on childhood and adult relationships. Biopsychology Circadian Rhythms – sleep patterns, jet lag. How our brain can change and adapt to situations and events. The fight or flight response. Localisation of function in the brain – how the different areas of the brain are responsible for different behaviour.

What is schizophrenia? What are the causes, therapies and treatment, for schizophrenia? Forensic Psychology Offender profiling. Explanations of why people commit crime. Treatment and the effectiveness of prison and non-prison sentences.

Examination Format There are three written examinations of 2 hours each at the end of Year 13. There is a separate examination for each unit which is worth one third of the full A Level.


Page 37

Advanced Level Religious Studies This A Level covers Philosophy, Ethics and the impact of culture and modern society on the beliefs and practice of religion. The course takes an enquiry based approach.

Ethics

Entry Requirements

• How much free will do I have?

If you have taken GCSE Religious Studies, you need to have achieved Grade 6 or above and GCSE English Language at Grade 5 or above. Although building on the skills of GCSE, it is not a requirement to have studied it at GCSE. Therefore, if you have not taken GCSE RS, you need to have GCSE English Language at Grade 5 or above and Grade 6 or above in another text based humanities subject. To succeed and enjoy this course, you should like questioning and challenging religious beliefs, academics and how people make ethical decisions, whilst being self-reflective. You will also need to read articles and research independently when necessary.

• What makes a good action? • Is conscience God-given or the product of society? • How do we define ‘good’ and ‘bad’? • Ethical theories applied to issues e.g. abortion, embryo research, euthanasia, capital punishment, lying, animal rights

Paper 2: Christianity and Dialogues Christianity • How and why Christians differ when making ethical decisions • Christian perspectives on ethical issues • Does religion have a place in a secular society?

Course Content

• Gender, feminism and sexuality

Paper 1: Philosophy and Ethics

• The challenge of science for religion

Philosophy of Religion

• Religious pluralism

• Does God exist?

Dialogues

• Can God exist alongside evil?

• What makes religious language meaningful?

Open questions to explore the challenges and implications, good and bad, of ‘crunching’ Christianity with ethics and philosophy e.g. can you claim to be morally responsible if you have no free will? Can, and should, we prove the existence of God?

• What defines a miracle?

Examination Format

• Do we have a soul? • What happens to us after we die?

Two papers, each lasting 3 hours, examined at the end of Year 13.


Page 38

Advanced Level Sociology Sociologists use theories and research to explain the everyday social experiences that shape and influence our lives. Studying Sociology will give you an understanding of the societies in which we live, study and work.

Entry Requirements English Language Grade 5 or another humanities subject Grade 6, as Sociology is an essay based A Level. You should be prepared to read articles and textbooks to study this course.

Course Content Topic 1: Education and Sociological Methods The study of our educational system; role and function; reasons for variation in outcome by class, gender, and ethnicity; relationships in schools; pupil identity and subcultures; the significance of educational policies. Topic 2: Topics in Sociology Families and households; the relationship of the family to social structure and change; changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life-course; gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships in the family; the nature of childhood; demographic trends in the UK since 1900. Topic 3: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods The study of the sociological perspectives; differences in crime and deviance owing to gender, age, class, ethnicity and location; global crime; human rights and state crimes, crime control, prevention and punishment and the role of the criminal justice system and the sociological explanations for suicide. Students also study key debates in Sociology such as: Are we living in a postmodern world? Is Sociology a science? Is Sociology value-free?

Topic 4: Stratification and Differentiation The study of sociological perspectives and arguments around social class, gender, ethnicity and age; the dimensions of inequality; differences in life chances by social class, age, gender and disability; problems of defining and measuring social class; changes in structures of inequality; and the nature, extent and significance of patterns of social mobility.

Examination Format Paper One: Education and Theory and Methods (written examination of 2 hours) Paper Two: Topics in Sociology (written examination of 2 hours) Paper Three: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods (written examination of 2 hours)


Page 39

Advanced Level Spanish Entry Requirements

Examination Format

It is highly recommended for Spanish that you have Grade 6 or above in GCSE Spanish. You should also have grasped the tenses studied at GCSE: the present, the future, the conditional, the imperfect and the preterite. You should enjoy communicating in Spanish and have an interest in Spanish culture.

Unit 1: Listening, reading and translation (40%)

Course Content

• Short tasks testing receptive skills • 1 hour 50 minutes Unit 2: Writing (30%)

1. Development of Spanish Society

• Translation and essay writing skills, focusing on two works of Spanish literature and/or film

• Environment; education; world of work

• 2 hours 40 minutes

2. Political and Artistic Culture in the Spanish Speaking World

Unit 3: Speaking (30%)

• Music; media; festivals and traditions

• Responding to questions on the above themes and an independent research project

3. Immigration and the Multicultural Spanish Society

• Approximately 20 minutes

• Integration and multiculturalism; economic and social effects of immigration 4. Franco’s Dictatorship and Transition to Democracy • Society before and after the dictatorship Alongside these themes, we will also be studying some works of Spanish literature and film.


Sixth Form Maidstone Road, Ashford, Kent  TN24 8UD T: 01233 624910 office@highworth.kent.sch.uk  www.highworth.kent.sch.uk

This general information leaflet relates to the plans for the school year 2019–2020 and was correct at December 2018, but it should not be assumed that there will be no change in any of the arrangements before or during the year in question or in subsequent years. Published December 2018

Profile for Cleverbox UK Ltd

22884 Highworth Grammar School P16 prospectus AW  

22884 Highworth Grammar School P16 prospectus AW  

Profile for cleverbox