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SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES

community by informing funders

marked improvement in math and

about relevant issues, encouraging

social studies for 513 “ little buddies."

interaction and collaboration, and

Mrs. Wolf’s generosity also made

permitting a useful exchange of ideas

possible the Anisfield-Wolf Book

The funds expended for special phil­

and opinions. Staffing and space are

Awards; for a report, see page 47.

anthropic services go primarily for

provided by The Cleveland Foundation.

the operating costs of The Cleveland

Subjects covered in recent luncheon

Foundation but include support for

meetings have included regional

SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES GRANTS

services to other Northeast Ohio

economic issues, crime, fair housing,

The Cleveland Foundation (Inc.)

charitable institutions with limited

community-based development, and

Anisfield-Wolf Community Service and Book Awards $31,000 Council on Foundations National Agenda for Community Foundations leadership grant 30,000 Grantmakers Forum 53,500 Investment policies and performance evaluations 20,000 Operating budget of The Cleveland Founda­ tion (Inc.) for the year 1987 2,006,000

or no staff— services such as the regional library and field office of The Foundation Center of New York, which makes available the professional expertise of two full-time staff persons. The library houses materials relat­ ing to the grantmaking process, cor­ porate and federal funding sources, nonprofit organization and manage­ ment, and nongrant fundraising, as well as specific information (such as annual reports and tax returns) on the policies and interests of founda­ tions around the state and nation. In 1986, 2,296 grantseekers and 198 grantmakers from Cleveland and the Midwest visited The Foundation Center;

696 persons attended the weekly free orientation sessions structured to teach grantseekers how to use the library’s resources more effectively, while an expanded schedule of out­

teen pregnancy.

The Anisfield-

Wolf Memorial Award for Outstand­ ing Community Service, established in 1963 by the late Cleveland philan­ thropist Edith Anisfield Wolf, is annually awarded to a local social service agency selected by the Federa­ tion for Community Planning from a list of nominees. This year the 110,000 award was given to the Child Conser­ vation Council for its Big Buddy/Little

The Foundation Center, New York, New York Operating support for The Foundation Center— Cleveland for the year 1987 45,800

TOTAL SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC GRANTS— UNDESIGNATED

$2,186,300

Buddy program, which matches responsible high school and college students with pre-adolescent children seen as potential school dropouts or

(Following recipient and program designated by donor and for general support unless otherwise noted)

problem youngsters. Nine new clubs

The Cleveland Foundation (Inc.) $ 480

were formed in 1986, resulting in

Staff services for Special Fund No. 3

3,000

TOTAL SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES GRANTS DESIGNATED $3,480 TOTAL SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES GRANTS—DESIGNATED AND UNDESIGNATED $2,189, 780 —

reach programs offered in cooperation with agencies such as the Federation for Community Planning and Grant­ makers Forum served another 677 nonprofit organizations.

Grant­

makers Forum, another organization supported by the Foundation, is a two-year-old informal association of 165 grantmakers representing 77 foundations, corporate contribution

Buddy power: a 66

programs and trust companies

percent improvement

operating in the Greater Cleveland area. It offers a series of programs designed to foster better grantmaking in the

in reading skills and a 56percent improvement in math skills fo r 513 potential dropouts

31

Cleveland Foundation – 1986 Annual Report