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Sunday, February 26, 2012

Clermont County 4-H program holds open house Local clubs share information about programs and activities BY KRISTIN BEDNARSKI Sun staff

Doors to Clermont County’s 4-H hall in Owensville were wide open Feb. 18, welcoming in residents to browse clubs and collect more information about what the organization has to offer. “We offer this to the county to give people an opportunity to get to know 4-H,” Ashley Willis, Clermont County 4-H committee president, said. “It’s a great program for kids.” Willis said they decided to host an open house again this year because of the success they had at last year’s event. She said 10 children joined after coming to the open house last year, and the club continues to grow throughout the county. “We are growing every

year with more than 900 members,” Willis said. “A lot of suburban areas don’t know about 4-H or agriculture, why not keep spreading the word?” Willis said whether children are interested in the animals, shooting sports or other projects, there is a 4-H club or project for almost every interest. “Many people have a perception that 4-H is just livestock,” she said. “There is definitely a project for everyone.” Several clubs from the area set up booths at the open house and provided information and examples of what activities children can get involved with if they join. Clubs within Clermont PHOTOS / KRISTIN BEDNARSKI

Julie Norton talks with a family about dog training at the 4-H open house in Owensville Feb. 18. From left are Norton and Dobby the dog, Brant Ulsh, Griffin Ulsh, Celeste Buttermoore-Ulsh and Eli Ulsh.

See 4-H, Page 5

Volunteers help maintain 50-mile trail Eleven interested in becoming county commissioner

Adopt-a-Trail program still looking for help

Republican committee to make appointment March 14

BY KRISTIN BEDNARSKI Sun staff

With spring on the horizon many Clermont County residents will soon be hitting the trails for a walk, run or bike ride. And while many residents may know about the local “bike trail,” that stretches more than 50 miles with access points in downtown Milford and Loveland, some may not know about the organization that helps maintain the trail on a regular basis. “Any time you go down the trail and encounter a fence that doesn’t have vegetation growing through it, that’s us,” Aaron Rourke, Adopt-a-Trail coordinator said. “Anytime you come to a road and you can actually see the right-of-way, that’s us.” Rourke said the nearly 55 mile bike trail, which is of-

BY KRISTIN BEDNARSKI Sun staff

PHOTOS / KRISTIN BEDNARSKI

An access point for the Little Miami State Park trail is located in Milford. The trail runs from just south of Milford to just south of Xenia in Ohio and much of the trail is maintained by Friends of the Little Miami State Park.

ficially called Little Miami State Park, has access points in Hamilton, Warren, Clermont and Green counties in Ohio, and originally was maintained by Ohio Department of Natural Re-

sources, Ohio State Park employees. Rourke said as state parks had to tighten their budget, maintenance of the trail dwindled. He said Simeon Copple, owner of The Cor-

INDEX

win Peddler, who lives close to the trail, hosted a meeting in November of 2008 to recruit volunteers See Trail, Page 5

Eleven Clermont County residents have expressed their interest in being appointed as county commissioner to fill the seat left by Archie Wilson, who resigned from his position Feb. 2. Clermont County Republican Party Committee Chairman Tim Rudd released the names of the individuals Feb. 20, and central committee members will vote to appoint someone as commissioner March 14. “The prerequisite will be to not only fill the position until the November election, we are looking to put someone in who is willing to assume office and run in November,” Rudd said.

He said the committee members will vote in one motion to both appoint someone as commissioner and endorse him or her for the November election. Those interested in becoming commissioner include Doug Auxier of Batavia Township, Dave Bednar of Loveland, George Brown of Jackson Township, John Donohoo of Miami Township, Allen Freeman of Pierce Township, Eric Kelso of Monroe Township, Gary Knepp of Milford, Jack Kuntz of Goshen Township, Dan Owings of Pierce Township, Doug Thompson of Pierce Township and Ken Tracy of Miami Township. Rudd said since he has been chairman of the com-

B R O A D S H E E T O D D

See Vacancy, Page 5

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Sudoku ................................... 5 Real Estate ....................... 13 Classified ......................... 12 Business Directory .................. 11 Calendar ........................... 7

Our photographer snapped this photograph outside Grammas Pizza on Main Street in Batavia. If you know of a spot, public or secret, in the county you think is without compare, tell our photographer where it is located by calling (513) 732-2511, Ext. 119, or email a photograph of that special someplace to clermontsun@fuse.net.

Buy 1 week and get 2 WEEKS FREE! That’s 3 weeks of advertising for as low as $9.50! Classified Liner Special for the Month of March Get up to 20 words for $9.50, 10¢ for each additional word.

Call Darlene at 513-732-2511 or Angie at 937-444-3441 today! Classified special pertains to liner ads only, classified display are regular price. All ads are prepay.

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Page 2 - The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012

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In addition, local governments spend millions each year to impound and euthanize homeless animals. We must keep in mind that animals can reproduce at an exponentially higher rate than humans. Dogs can have two litters a year with an average of six to nine puppies in each. Cats can produce three litters a year with about four kittens in each. For every person born in the U.S., 15 dogs and 45 cats are born. My colleagues and I ardently believe that most dogs and cats should be spayed or neutered. Animal shelters are full of adoptable pets with nowhere to go, the result of accidental or poorly planned breeding. Some owners might be lucky enough to find good homes for unwanted litters, but that doesn’t help the animals already in shelters. In fact, it reduces the number of potential adoptive families. Simply put, the most important thing you can do to prevent animal suffering is

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It was a typical weekday morning at the hospital until we heard the thump outside. A cardboard box had landed in our driveway, apparently thrown from a moving vehicle. As it skipped across the pavement, five three-weekold kittens tumbled out. By the time we reached them, three were struggling to crawl, one was paralyzed, and another’s tiny head was crushed. We could not save the two injured kittens, but the three shivering survivors were treated at our hospital and literally nursed back to health with a bottle. This story is not unusual. We have all heard about the cat abandoned in a dumpster or the dog left to die by the side of a road. Overpopulation remains a heartbreaking problem. In seven years, one can cat can multiply to 420,000 over just two generations. It’s no wonder that 6 million cats are euthanized each year in the U.S. There could never be enough homes and shelters for them all. Strays lead miserable lives, plagued by disease, starvation, exposure, vehicle hits, and attacks by other animals. They are also a major public nuisance, causing property damage, injury to humans, and the death of livestock and family pets.

at the usual place of holding elections in each and every precinct in Clermont County or at such places as the Board may designate, to NOMINATE PARTY CANDIDATES FOR THE FOLLOWING OFFICES: • For Delegates-at-Large and Alternates-at-Large to the National Convention • For District Delegates and District Alternates to the National Convention (2nd District) (Republican Ballot only) • For U.S. Senator • For Representative to Congress (2nd District) • For Justice of the Supreme Court (Full Term Commencing 1/1/13) • For Justice of the Supreme Court (Full Term Commencing 1/2/13) • For Justice of the Supreme Court (Unexpired Term Ending 12/31/14) • For Judge of the Court of Appeals (12th District) • For Member of State Central Committee, Man (14th District) • For Member of State Central Committee, Woman (14th District) • For State Senator (14th District) • For State Representative (65th District) • For State Representative (66th District) • For Judge of the Court of Common Pleas (Full Term Commencing 1/1/13) • For Judge of the Court of Common Pleas (Full Term Commencing 1/2/13) • For Judge of the Court of Common Pleas (Full Term Commencing 1/3/13) • For County Commissioner (Full Term Commencing 1/2/13) • For County Commissioner (Full Term Commencing 1/3/13) • For Prosecuting Attorney • For Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas • For Sheriff • For County Recorder • For County Treasurer • For County Engineer • For Coroner • For Member of County Central Committee (Democratic Ballot only)

and to determine the following Question and Issue: Issue 1 - Miami Township 1 - Local Option-TJ Capital Investments LLC, DBA The Talon Tavern, 1151 St. Rt. 131, Milford, OH 45150, Sunday Sales of beer, wine and mixed beverages and spirituous liquor (11 a.m. and midnight). Issue 2 - Forest Hills Local School District - Additional Tax Levy - (3.9 mills) - for a continuing period of time - for Current Expenses. (Union Township N and P1P Splits)

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TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2012

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The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012 - Page 3

Today in Clermont County History

Some of this week’s headlines Students second place in Future City competition More than 40 schools from across the state competed

Covered bridge restoration is on hold Plans to be revised as compromise sought

Union Township sponsors grant New business operation could be located on US 50

SporTS Burg’s Kendal Young scores 1,000th point New Richmond blows out Ross in first round On Newsstands now through Tuesday, Feb. 28.

Your hometown newspaper

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The source for local news that your neighbor gets sent directly to his home is also available throughout Clermont County. Single copies of The Clermont Sun are available Thursday mornings at these locations: Afton Boar’s Head Amelia Kroger (2 Stores) H&M Deli Lindale Grocery Batavia Clermont Inn box UDF - Main St. UDF - Bauer Rd. Marathon - Main St. Marathon - Bauer Rd. Riverside Cafe Clermont Mercy Hospital Post Office box Bethel IGA box Kate’s Carry Out Sam’s Food Mart Bethel B.P. Sunoco Eastgate/Summerside Earl’s Market (Old 74) Ameristop (Old 74) Eastgate Village Marathon (Old 74) Thorton’s Exxon WalMart Felicity Felicity IGA Goshen Kroger BP Station

Holtman Bakery Dave’s Carryout Pohlman’s Hamersville McKinney’s Laurel Laurel Country Store Milford Kroger (Milford) Kroger (Mulberry) BP Station (131) Tollgate Carryout Sunoco New Richmond Lindale Grocery Nicholsville Grocery New Market Berry’s Pharmacy Collins Cardinal Market River City BP Point Pleasant Grocery Newtonsville Coogan’s Bluff Wood’s Country Store Owensville IGA BP Station York Drug Sunoco Williamsburg BP Station Fitzgerald’s Hilltop Quick Stop Holtman Bakery

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practice that spans 76 years. March 3 1828: Tomorrow, Woodville is laid out by Jesse Wood. 1864: Ulysses S. Grant is commissioned Lieutenant-General of the United States Army, the first man after George Washington to achieve this rank. 1983: Glen Este High

School senior Pat Evans wins the first of two state one-meter diving championships. This information was taken from “The Clermont County, Ohio, Bicentennial Book of Days” written in the year 2000 by Clermont County Historian Richard Crawford.

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February 26 1867: The Mount Repose Post Office is established. 1908: The first news is received in Clermont County of the Night Riders’ attack on Neville. 1960: Washington Township native, William Bulow, the first Democrat governor and U.S. Senator in South Dakota, dies in Washington, D. C. February 27 1866: The Mount Holly Post Office is established. 1913: This month, Abbie C. McKeever, noted Clermont County poetess, dies near Williamsburg. February 28 1798: William Lytle marries Eliza Stall in Philadelphia, Pa. 1825: Aaron Cleveland, future stage line owner and assistant Postmaster-General of the U.S., is born near Amelia. February 29 1801: Samuel Medary is born in Montgomery Co., Pa. He becomes the first editor/publisher of the “Ohio (Clermont) Sun.” 1880: Cornelius Washburn, Jr., nephew of Clermont County frontiersman Cornelius Washburn, dies in Newtonsville, a town he helped found, 1924: Ohio Congressman William Roudebush dies in Batavia. March 1 1803: Ohio becomes the 17th state of the Union. 1805: Clermont County loses land to newly formed Highland County. 1873: The Cincinnati, Georgetown, and Portsmouth Railroad is incorporated. March 2 1752: Philip Gatch is born near Baltimore, Md. He becomes a Methodist minister and one of Clermont County’s two representatives to the first Ohio Constitution Convention. 1859: Dr. William Eberle Thompson of Bethel begins a medical

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our 184th Year!! Thursday Feb. 23, 2012


Page 4 - The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012

From left are Katie Speigel, RN; Angela Joyce, RN; Kevin Estep; Kim Hillard, RN; and Kristin Shelley, RN.

Mercy Health - Anderson Hospital patient gives ‘heartfelt’ thanks

B R O A D S H E E T E V E N

Kevin Estep believes the nurses and staff at Mercy Health – Anderson Hospital saved his life and he wanted to be sure they knew how much he appreciated it. Mr. Estep, who lives in Williamsburg, Ohio, was discharged from the hospital on Valentine’s Day in 2011, after spending a month there while being treated for Diverticulitis – a condition that causes internal infection and can be very serious. He was so moved by the care and compassion he received from the nurses that he returned to the hospital this Valentine’s Day, bringing heart-shaped boxes of chocolates and flowers for the nurses.

“I feel like they are the unsung heroes of the hospital, so I wanted to make sure they know how much I appreciated what they did for me.” Estep noted that as he went through the long days of laying in a hospital bed and receiving around-theclock treatment, he was amazed at how caring and attentive the nurses were. “I wasn’t alone, I never felt alone during that time,” he said. “The nurses were all extremely helpful and positive, I felt like I was surrounded by angels.” During his recent return to the hospital, Mr. Estep got the chance to meet many of the nurses who cared for him to say thank

you. His gratitude, and the candy, were appreciated by the staff. “It’s so nice to hear from our patients and to see how they are doing after they leave the hospital; it is really encouraging and keeps us motivated,” said Katie Speigel, RN, one of the nurses who cared for Estep. It’s this type of care that makes a difference for patients every day at Mercy Health – Anderson Hospital. It’s also one of the key reasons it is again rated one of the 100 Top Hospitals in the nation for overall care by Thomson Reuters – this is the eighth time the hospital has earned this prestigious recognition.

Youth turkey hunt to be held Young turkey hunters will be able to take advantage of a permit only Youth Turkey Hunt at Paint Creek State Park during the 2012 spring turkey season. Hunters 17 years of age and younger, accompanied by a non-hunting adult, are eligible to apply for a drawing to hunt within four specified zones April 21, 28 and May 5, 12 and 19, 2012. Registration for the draw-

ing gets underway at the Fallsville Wildlife Area, 10221 Careytown Rd., New Vienna, OH 45159 on Saturday, March 17 beginning at 1 p.m. The drawing will be held promptly at 2 p.m. The non-hunting adult that will be accompanying the youth hunter on the hunt must enter the drawing. The permit will be issued in the adult’s name. If drawn, the youth hunter must purchase an Ohio hunting license and

youth turkey permit. The contact number for Fallsville Wildlife Area in (937) 987-2508, interested hunters can also call the Wildlife District Five Headquarters at (937) 372-9261. All youth hunt information is posted at www.wildohio.com. Hunting hours are all day on April 21. Hunting hours are 1/2 before sunrise to noon for all other dates.

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS Planning A Wedding? k

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of years. We want to mimic natural processes as much as possible." Hoorman will discuss the use of ECO Farming during a workshop March 6 at the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference. The workshop, which begins at 10:50 a.m., will offer strategies and tips for growers on everything they'll need to know about ECO Farming and the positive benefits to soil and the financial boost to farmers, he said. While most soil statewide has anywhere from one to three percent organic matter, using ECO Farming can increase help increase its levels, translating into more money saved for growers, Hoorman said. "By growing two crops year round, the soil organic matter increases due to the increased root mass coupled with long-term no-till," he said. In fact, Hoorman said he saw a 6- to 9-bushel soybean yield difference last year in Mercer County in fields with cereal rye as a cover crop versus no cover crops. In corn, a 10- to 30bushel yield advantage was seen when a winter legume cover crop was used. "ECO Farming restores the organic matter because we have live plants in the soil for 12 months a year as compared to conventional farming, which utilizes soil with live plants for only four to five months a year and requires growers to spend more money on fertilizers and herbicides," he said. "The input costs for conventional farming can be

very expensive, but if we do it the way Mother Nature does it, a lot of these problems that we're spending millions to fix will start to solve themselves." For example, Ohio soil has lost some 60 to 80 percent of organic matter over the past 100 years, which has left the soil denser and more compacted, Hoorman said. As a result, growers are now paying some 75 cents per pound for nitrogen. So a farmer who uses 200 pounds of nitrogen but gets only 30 to 40 percent efficiency is essentially wasting large sums of money, he explained. "With cover crops, we can tie nutrients up in the organic matter and begin to take credit for those nutrients," Hoorman said. "After a few years of using cover crops, we can get the soil stabilized and use less fertilizer and have more nutrients available for crop production. Every one percent of soil organic matter holds 1,000 pounds of nitrogen and about 100 pounds of phosphorus." The Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference is sponsored by OSU Extension, OARDC, Northwest Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Districts, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Ohio No-Till Council. The full schedule and registration information can be found at http://ctc.osu.edu. Participants may register online or by mail. Information is also available in county offices of OSU Extension.

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Ohio crop growers looking to increase the organic matter content in their soil to the tune of $900 per unit increase in organic matter, may want to consider a move to ECO Farming, advises an Ohio State University Extension educator, who says that switching to the technique could result in raising soil organic matter levels by several percentage points depending on soil type. ECO Farming, which stands for Ecological Farming and includes using eternal no-till, continuous living cover and other best management practices, is not only economically viable, it is also ecologically sound and environmentally sustainable, said Jim Hoorman, an assistant professor studying cover crops and water quality issues, who is based in Mercer County. It uses a combination of cover crops and no-till worked into a corn/soybean/wheat rotation to more efficiently use the inputs farmers add to their soil, "reducing the amount of nutrients they may need to buy in the future," he said. "Fertilizer prices are going up, soil quality is going down, and we're losing soil nutrients to Lake Erie," Hoorman said. "What cover crops do for us in ECO farming, mimics Mother Nature by tying up the nutrients and carrying them forward in the soil to the next planting instead of resulting in soil nutrient runoff into our streams. "ECO Farming allows growers to work more with Mother Nature, who has been doing this for millions

Why hire a US veteran? Workforce One of Clermont County invites local businesses to attend a free seminar on the benefits of hiring veterans. The seminar will be held on Monday, Feb. 27, 2012, from 8:30 a.m. until 9:30 a.m. at the Workforce One office, located at 756 SR74 in Union Township. “The seminar will highlight tax credits and on the job training funds that may be available to businesses that hire vets,” said Workforce One Business Serv-

ices Representative Cathy Sahlfeld. “There are many reasons businesses should strongly consider hiring a veteran when they have a vacancy,” said Director of the Clermont County Veteran’s Service Office Dan Bare. “Veterans know the importance of teamwork, and efficient performance under pressure. The military trains people to lead by example through direction, delegation, motivation, and inspiration; these are all

highly desired qualities in the workplace.” Sahlfeld said Total Quality Logistics recruiter Matthew Disher will be among those on hand for the seminar to discuss benefits he has experienced while recruiting veterans for employment. To register for the free seminar, representatives of businesses should call (513) 943-3721 or email sahlfc@odjfs.state.oh.us.

Hospitals earn Commission on Cancer accreditation The Jewish Hospital – Mercy Health, Mercy Health – Anderson Hospital, and Mercy Health – Fairfield Hospital recently earned three-year accreditation with commendation by the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons. All three hospitals received the accreditation with commendation following on-site evaluations by a physician surveyor. During the evaluations, the hospitals demonstrated a commendation level of compliance with one or more standards that represent the full scope of the cancer program. Those standards include cancer committee research, cancer data management, clinical services, research, community outreach and quality improvement. Receiving care at a Commission on Cancer-accredited cancer program ensures that a patient will have access to: • Comprehensive care, including state-of-the-art services and equipment • A multi-specialty, team approach to coordinate the best treatment options • Information about ongoing clinical trial and new treatment options • Access to cancer-related information, education and support • A cancer registry that collects data on type and stage of cancers and treatment results, and offers lifelong patient follow-up • Ongoing monitoring and improvement of care • Quality care close to home The American Cancer Society estimates that more

than 1.5 million cases of cancer were diagnosed in 2011. There are currently more than 1,400 Commission on Cancer-accredited cancer programs in the United States and Puerto Rico, representing almost 25 percent of all hospitals. The Accreditation Program sets quality-of-care standards for cancer programs and reviews the programs to ensure they conform to those standards. Accreditation by the Commission on Cancer is given only to those facilities that have voluntarily committed to providing the highest level of quality cancer care and that undergo a rigorous evaluation process and review of their performance. The Cancer Program Performance Report cited many areas of commendation at the hospitals, including excellent compliance with the College of American Pathologists' protocols for cancer pathology reports; high clinical trial enrollments; community outreach activities and excellent patient care improvements each year. The Commission on Cancer also credited the hospitals for Cancer Registry activities that included timely data collection and participation in educational national conferences. The Jewish Hospital is one of Cincinnati’s premier cancer care centers, offering a full spectrum of cancer treatments including the Blood & Marrow Transplant Center, the region’s adult bone marrow transplant program in the region. Mercy Health hospitals offer a wide range of diag-

nostic and treatment services for cancer, including on-site chemotherapy, radiation, and active Women's Centers. There are also many programs to provide assistance to both our patients and their families as they cope with a diagnosis of cancer. Support services include nutritional support, spiritual support, rehabilitation, palliative care, educational programs, and information on access to clinical trials and cancer support groups and programs, many of which are provided through participation with the American Cancer Society. Mercy Health makes quality healthcare easy to help you be well in mind, body and spirit. Mercy Health is a premier healthcare provider that has been serving Greater Cincinnati for more than 160 years. Mercy provides an integrated network of leading physicians, compassionate caregivers, comprehensive services and exceptional care at more than 80 locations across the region. The Mercy Health network of care includes six awardwinning hospitals, eight senior living communities, primary and specialty care physician practices, outpatient centers, social service agencies, fitness centers and a variety of outreach programs. To learn more visit, www.e-mercy.com and engage in the conversation via Mercy Health’s social media channels (@mercy_health on Twitter and Mercy Health on Facebook.)

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ECO farming saves growers money, benefits environment


The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012 - Page 5

James Zehringer. “People can choose to make a positive impact to benefit the state nature preserves or Ohio’s endangered wildlife through the income tax check-off program and know their donations will be used responsibly.” The tax check-off monies are used to protect the public investment made over the last 40 years to set aside and maintain the very best remaining natural areas in the state. The donations help support critical ecological management activities, including efforts to remove non-native and invasive species that pose a serious and ever-growing threat to sensitive habitats in the fragile state nature preserve system.

Ohioans can donate all or part of their state income tax refund by checking the appropriate boxes on the state tax return form (line 25b – natural areas/endangered species or 25c – wildlife species/endangered wildlife - of IT 1040 form; line 18b Ohio form IT 1040EZ; or line 13d-2 – natural areas/endangered species – or line 13d-3 wildlife species/endangered wildlife - of the TeleFile worksheet) for the amount they wish to donate to either of the program. Taxpayers who are not receiving a refund this year can still contribute by sending a check to: ODNR Division of Natural Areas and Preserves’ Natural Areas Fund or ODNR Di-

4-H: New members sought Continued from page 1 County include equestrianfocused clubs, shooting sports, livestock clubs, a dog training club, shooting sports and general projectrelated clubs, which focus on many different interest areas such as cooking, clothing, photography and more. In addition to developing skills and having to complete projects as part of their club, children in 4-H also learn how to run business meetings and work with others. “They gain a sense of accomplishment, structure and it builds character,” David Esz, advisor of Town and Country 4-H Club, said at the open house. Esz, who grew up participating in 4-H, said now that he is an advisor for the club his children are in, he is able to watch children grow. He said he recognizes a huge difference in the personality and abilities of the children after they participate in the program. In fact, according to na-

tional 4-H youth development research, available at 4-h.org, children who participate in the program have higher educational achievement, are more likely to go to college, make healthier choices and are more involved in their government or community than their peers who are not involved with the program. “It has taught me leadership and how to be a follower,” Jacob Cohen, a 14-year-old member of the Shooting Sports Club said about being in 4-H. “It can teach you skills you can use in the future.” Some of these statistics as well as the opportunity for children to get involved with hobbies they are interested in, are reasons some families came to the open house Feb. 18. “I thought it would be a great resource and an opportunity for the kids to explore,” Celeste Buttermoore-Ulsh, said about coming to the open house. Buttermoore-Ulsh said her son Griffin is interested

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Trail: Volunteers Continued from page 1 who would help maintain the trail on a regular basis. Friends of the Little Miami State park was born, and the non-profit organization is committed to the preservation and improvement of the park, which includes the paved trail from Avoca Park, just south of Milford to Hedges Road, just south of Xenia. The organization does much to help keep the park and the bike trail safe and enjoyable and holds regular board meetings to discuss issues and improvements that could be made. Rourke said he knew right away he would want to be involved with the maintenance of the trail and he became coordinator of the Adopt-a-Trail program within the organization. He said the program was designed to enable volunteers to complete many maintenance tasks within the park so that state park employees could focus on the larger tasks, such as mowing the trail during the spring and summer months. “Adopt-a-Trail’s number one mission is to keep the fences clean and push back the vegetation to where it used to be,” Rourke said. Program volunteers also clear back dead or fallen trees, clean up after storms, pick up trash and complete many other small tasks that become large eye-sores or safety hazards on the trail. “We still have plenty of work to do,” Rourke said about maintaining the trail. “My goals in these next three months are to clean the rest of the fences, mow the right of way and get our there with a chainsaw to cut down all that stuff.” He said they will be removing many of the dead trees and limbs that are close to the trail and will also remove brush and weeds from the sides of the trails to make it easier for state employees to mow. Rourke said Adopt-aTrail volunteers were originally able to select their

own section of the trail to maintain. Now all 24 sections have been adopted, but he said there are still plenty of ways people can volunteer. “The way people can still get involved is they can become co-adopters or they can join our Adopt-a-Trail volunteer list and they can join in on All-Comers days.” He said All-Comers days are group clean-up events on sections of the trail where volunteers can come out and help with trail maintenance. Rourke said people can also support the program by donating money, which helps pay for maintenance equipment and other tools and materials. They can also sign up to help plan fund-raising events. He said there will be several opportunities to volunteer in the coming months, especially in preparation for the warm weather and busy season. For more information about Friends of the Little Miami State Park visit http://www.littlemiamistatepark.org/. To volunteer contact Rourke at adopt-atrail@flmsp.org or (937) 654-9493.

in archery and her older son Eli is also interested in shooting sports and they all came to the open house to get more information. She said a family member suggest she look into the program, and when she arrived, Buttermoore-Ulsh said she was surprised by all of the other clubs and activities available within 4H. “It was perfect timing,” Buttermoore-Ulsh said. “I am excited we could come look.” Another family that came out to explore the different 4-H clubs and projects was the Benton family. And while Nina Benton’s three children are already members of 4-H, she said she came to the open house to get more information about market goats, which her son Justin is going to show this year. “It’s a great program to be in,” Benton said about 4H. “It keeps them busy and out of trouble.” For more information about the Clermont County 4-H program, visit http://clermont.osu.edu/, or call (513) 732-7070.

vision of Wildlife’s Wildlife Diversity Fund, 2045 Morse Road, Columbus, Ohio 43229. ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Learn more by visiting the ODNR website at ohiodnr.com.

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Ohio’s rare and irreplaceable ecosystems are better protected, thanks to Ohioans making donations to the state’s income tax check-off program benefiting natural areas/endangered species or wildlife species/endangered wildlife. Since it is tax preparation season, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources asks taxpayers to consider a contribution to help protect unique and special areas around the state. The tax check-off program allows people to make a donation quickly and conveniently. “We appreciate the support of Ohio’s residents throughout the year who visit our nature preserves and support conservation,” said ODNR Director

Vacancy Continued from page 1 mittee, they have not had to appoint someone to be commissioner. He said committee members are aware that it is one of their most important functions under the Ohio Revised Code. According to Rudd, the meeting to appoint a commissioner will be similar to an endorsement meeting. The central committee meeting will begin at 7 p.m. March 14 at Holiday Inn in Eastgate. Candidates will address the committee, and questions from committee members will be allowed unless there is not enough time. Rudd said it would be beneficial for candidates seeking appointment to begin conversations with committee members ahead of time, so they are able to get to know the candidate before the meeting. For more information about the process visit www.gopclermont.org.

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Check-off program help protect Ohio’s nature


Page 6 - The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012

SBC Girls’ Basketball Standings

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SBC Boys’ Basketball Standings

Weekly Scoreboard

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Tuesday, February 14 Milford 60, Kings 50 Milford – Roof 1 0 2, Greve 5 2 13, Farrell 8 2 19, Mayleben 2 4 8, Taylor 1 0 3, R. Overbeck 5 1 11, C. Overbeck 2 0 4. Totals: 24 9 60. Kings (9-10, FAVC 7-8) – Bird 4 2 10, Brashear 2 0 4, Ayers 1 4 7, Melfi 1 0 3, Hilderbrand 4 1 9, Schnee 6 1 14, Woody 1 0 3. Totals: 19 8 50. Halftime: Milford 21-16. 3pointers: M 3 (Greve, Farrell, Taylor); K 4 (Ayers, Melfi, Schnee, Woody). Glen Este 58, Anderson 49 Anderson (7-11) – Kaiser 2 1 5, Rogers 4 0 8, Cossins 7 3 17, Martina 1 0 2, Carroll 2 0 5, Huntington 0 1 1, Murdock 4 3 11. Totals: 20 8 49. Glen Este (7-12) – Holloway 2 3 7, Fultz 9 5 25, Scardina 1 0 3, Crooks 1 0 2, Harris 6 1 14, Flanigan 1 1 3, Rieck 2 0 4. Totals: 22 10 58. Halftime: Anderson 26-24. 3-pointers: A 1 (Carroll); G 4 (Fultz 2, Scardina, Harris). New Richmond 75, Cincinnati Country Day 62 CCD (9-10) – Kistinger 2 0 4, Tregre 2 0 6, Menifee 6 11 24, Fletcher 2 1 6, Walton 3 0 8, Mink 4 6 14. Totals: 19 18 62. New Richmond (9-10) – Hawkins 1 3 5, McKinley 4 0 11, Gundler 3 2 9, Wells 0 3 3, Leffler 2 2 6, Nort 2 2 6, Hill 4 2 12, Ernst 8 5 21, Horn 1 0 2. Totals: 25 19 75. Halftime: New Richmond 32-23. 3-pointers: C 6 (Tregre 2, Fletcher, Menifee, Walton 2); N 6 (McKinley 3, Gundler, Hill 2). Felicity-Franklin 69, White Oak 57 White Oak (6-13) – Stratton 1 0 2, Docter 1 0 2, Meyers 4 0 8, Bulter 1 0 2, Seip 11 1 23, Taggert 5 0 10, Carraler 3 2 10. Totals: 26 3 57. Felicity (5-14) – Jones 3 6 14, Moore 7 2 16, Shouse 5 8 18, Smith 4 3 11, Wehrum 1 0 2, Fry 0 2 2, Reese 3 0 6. Totals: 23 21 69. Halftime: Felicity 35-30. 3pointers: W 2 (Carraler 2); F 2 (Jones 2). Bethel-Tate 63, Fayetteville 46 Fayetteville (5-14) – Iles 2 2 6, T. Lykins 3 0 6, Kranz 1 1 3, Durham 4 2 11, Clark 4 4 13, Fowler 2 2 7. Totals: 16 11 46. Bethel-Tate (3-16) – Atkins 8 7 26, Hartley 2 0 6, Rees 3 0 6, Cherry 2 0 6, Schinkle 5 2 12, Adams 2 2 7. Totals: 22 11 63. Halftime: Bethel-Tate 3320. 3-pointers: F 3 (Durham, Clark, Fowler); B 8 (Atkins 3, Hartley 2, Cherry 2, Adams). Wednesday, February 15 Western Brown 53, Amelia 42 Amelia (9-11) – Stewart 1 2 4, Moeves 1 0 2, Luginbuhl 3 1 7, Crowler 2 0 4, Simon 4 3 11, Hacker 1 3 5, Dean 1 1 3, Carson 0 4 4, Clark 1 0 2. Totals 14 14 42 Western Brown (17-3, SBC 10-0) – Carroll 0 2 2, Purdon 6 4 19, Woodyard 1 0 3, Allen 4 0 8, Nickell 5 1 12, Kuttler 0 1 1, Howard 2 0 4, Siemer 2 0 4. Totals 20 8 53 Halftime: Western Brown 24-16. 3-Pointers: W 5 (Purdon 3, Woodyard, Nickell)

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Friday, February 17 Milford 55, Little Miami 30 Milford (13-7) - Roof 1 0 3, Zurschmieae 0 1 1, Farrell 3 8 14, Maylebrn 1 0 2, Taylor 2 0 6, Conley 1 1 3, R. Overbeck 6 2 14, C. Overbeck 4 0 8, Bullock 2 0 4. Totals 20 12 55. Little Miami (3-17, FAVC 1-15) - Schoettinger 4 0 9, Graham 6 4 18, Rothermund 1 1 3. Totals 11 5 30. Halftime: Milford 28-11. 3pointers: M 3(Taylor 2, Roof), L 3(Graham 2, Schoettinger). Kings 63, Glen Este 47 Glen Este – Harris 2 1 6, Flanigan 1 0 2, Burdick 2 1 5, Jutze 0 2 2, Rieck 5 0 11, Crocks 1 2 4, Holloway 2 0 4, Fultz 6 1 13. Totals: 19 7 47. Kings (10-10, FAVC 7-9) – Bird 4 3 11, Brashear 3 2 10, Ayers 1 5 7, Melfi 1 0 2, Hilderbrand 5 3 13, Schnee 5

0 10, Copeland 1 0 2, Wheeler 2 0 4, Beard 0 2 2, Pucke 1 0 2. Totals: 23 15 63. Halftime: Kings 22-13. 3pointers: G 2 (Harris, Rieck); K 2 (Brashear 2). Batavia 68, FelicityFranklin 59 Batavia (9-11) – Cooper 7 1 16, Wilson 2 0 5, Hawk 1 0 3, Smith 4 3 12, White 5 0 10, Gilbert 5 0 10, Schmitgen 2 0 6, Pelphrey 2 2 6. Totals 28 6 68. Felicity (5-15) – Jones 1 1 3, Rock 5 0 13, Moore 6 4 16, Shouse 7 5 22, Smith 2 0 4, Fry 0 1 1. Totals 21 11 59. Halftime: Batavia 44-42. 3Pointers: B 6 (Schmitgen 2, Smith, Hawk, Wilson, Cooper); F 6 (Rock 3, Shouse 3). New Richmond 48, Goshen 42 Goshen (5-15) — Wake 1 0 2, Fischer 10 3 24, Ashcraft 3 1 10, Edwards 1 0 3, Messer 1 1 3. Totals: 16 5 42. New Richmond (10-10) — McKinley 2 0 6, Gundler 1 0 2, Wells 3 4 11, Nort 1 0 2, Hill 4 3 12, Ernst 6 3 15. Totals: 17 10 48. Halftime: New Richmond 21-10. 3-Pointers: N 4 (McKinley 2, Wells, Hill); G 5 (Ashcraft 3, Edwards, Fischer).

Girls’ Basketball Wednesday, February 15 Division I At Kings McAuley 55, Milford 40 Milford (15-6) – Simmons 5 0 10, Yee 2 0 5, Wolcott 3 0 7, Canter 2 1 5, Rheude 2 0 4, Glasgow 3 1 9. Totals 17 2 40 McAuley (14-7) – Scherpenberg 4 2 10, Pifher 4 1 9, Bove 4 0 8, Egbers 6 5 20, Vogelpohl 3 0 6, Lamber 1 0 2. Totals 22 8 55 Halftime: McAuley 28-13. 3-Pointers: MI 4 (Glasgow 2, Yee, Wolcott); MC 3 (Egbers) Note: McAuley advances to play Ursuline Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Division II At Withrow Indian Hill 65, Batavia 34 Indian Hill — Perry 1 0 3, Marsh 2 0 6, J. Arington 5 0 14, Newton 1 0 3, Bell 10 0 27, S. Arington 6 0 12. Totals: 25 0 65. Batavia — Taulber 3 0 6, Wagoner 1 0 2, Richardson 2 2 6, White 1 0 2, Everhart 1 0 2, Fraley 2 3 7, McElfresh 4 1 9. Totals: 14 6 34. Halftime: Indian Hill 34-21. 3-Pointers: I 15 (Bell 7, J. Arington 4, Marsh 2, Newton, Perry). Note: Indian Hill advances to play Aiken Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Division III At Wilmington Georgetown 67, Felicity Franklin 16 Georgetown (19-2) – Hatfield 4 0 8, Smith 1 0 2, Carrington 3 0 6, Kidwell 4 4 13, Carter 6 2 14, Jones 2 0 4, Dowd 0 1 1, Pack 3 3 9, Gast 2 0 4, Sullivan 1 0 2, Keith 2 0 4. Totals 28 10 67 Felicity (3-18) – Stutz 1 1 3, Mitchell 2 0 4, Kessen 1 0 2, Grooms 0 3 3, Arkenau 2 0 4. Totals 6 4 16 Halftime: Georgetown 308. 3-Pointers: G 1 (Kidwell) Thursday, February 17 Division I At Kings Winton Woods 59, Amelia 46 Amelia (10-10) – Mentzel 2 0 5, Terry 1 2 4, Lang 1 0 2, Simon 9 4 27, Bailey 2 0 5, Whited 1 1 3. Totals: 16 7 46. Winton Woods (19-1) – James 4 0 9, Partlow 11 0 22, Harper 4 5 13, Primus 2 1 5, Stokes 2 0 5, Harris 0 1 1, Mack 1 0 2, Harvey 0 2 2. Totals: 24 9 59. Halftime: Winton Woods 32-27. 3-pointers: A 7 (Mentzel, Simon 5, Bailey); W 2 (James, Stokes). Note: Winton Woods will play Fairfield Monday at 6 p.m. at Kings. Division II At Withrow New Richmond 42, Ross 20 Ross – Bennett 1 0 2, Merril 0 4 4, Pennekamp 2 1 5, Harris 1 1 3, Golsch 1 2 4, Price 1 0 2. Totals: 6 8 20.

New Richmond (17-4) – Workman 7 0 15, Shoemaker 1 0 2, Lawrence 1 0 2, Buckingham 4 3 11, Martin 1 0 2, Grogan 4 1 10. Totals: 18 4 42. Halftime: New Richmond 23-5. 3-pointers: N 2 (Grogan, Workman). Note: New Richmond will play Talawanda Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at Withrow. Saturday, February 18 Division III At Wilmington Greeneview 81, Williamsburg 56 Greeneview (18-4) – Walters 2 1 5, Rice 1 1 3, Siebenaler 2 2 6, Lovely 14 9 45, Liming 3 0 6, Sonneman 5 0 10, Combs 3 0 6. Totals 30 13 81. Williamsburg (13-8) – McManus 6 5 21, Wetzel 3 2 9, Clark 0 1 1, Meisberger 2 0 4, Dennis 4 7 15, Guess 2 0 6. Totals 17 15 56. Halftime: Greeneview 3531. 3-Pointers: G 8 (Lovely); W 7 (McManus 4, Guess 2, Wetzel). Note: Greeneview advances to play Fayetteville, Thursday at 7:30 p.m.

Boys’ Bowling Wednesday, February 15 Crossgate Lanes Sectional Team scores (top five teams qualify to district): 1. Northwest 4103, 2. Moeller 4064, 3. Lakota West 3953, 4. Lebanon 3953, 5. Wilmington 3907, 6. Glen Este 3887, 7. Loveland 3849, 8. Maon 3803, 9. Franklin 3744, 10. Deer Park 3714, 11. Hamilton 3675, 12. Kings 3464, 13. Little Miami 3390, 13. Sycamore 3372, 14. Goshen 3344, 15. Monroe 3214, 16. Fenwick 3098, 17. Lakota East 3079. Individual scores: 1. Newbry (Wilmington) 714, 2. Cleves (Moeller) 661, 3. Bender (Northwest) 661, 4. Schweer (Loveland) 637 *, 5. McDonald (Mason) 617 *, 6. Gay (Lakota West) 616, 7. Meyer (Kings) 615 *, 8. Goddard (Moeller) 611, 9. Grismer (Mason) 607 *, 10. Austin (Lebanon) 605. * individual qualifiers Other individual qualifier: Hoffner (Franklin) 600. Colerain Bowl Sectional Team scores (top seven teams qualify to district): 1. St. Xavier 4175, 2. Oak Hills 4137, 3. Fairfield 3934, 4. Elder 3902, 5. Anderson 3875, 6. LaSalle 3839, 7. Badin 3808, 8. Middletown 3803, 9. Princeton 3776, 10. Roger Bacon 3741, 11. Milford 3730, 12. Mt. Healthy 3644, 13. Harrison 3632, 14. Taylor 3630, 15. Walnut Hills 3626, 16. Colerain 3622, 17. Edgewood 3542, 18. Purcell Marian 3393, 19. McNicholas 3365, 20. Reading 3340, 21. Cincinnati Christian 3171, 22. Winton Woods 3133, 23. Turpin 3061, 24. Wyoming 3019, 25. Clark Montessori 3014, 26. Norwood 2954, 27. Summit 2817, 28. Woodward 0. Individual scores: 1. Hehn (Anderson) 683, 2. Gourley (Oak Hills) 654, 3. Harrell (Badin) 653, 4. Weisbrod (Oak Hills) 643, 5. Centers (Edgewood) 641 *, 6. Sullivan (Elder) 638, 7. Hesse (Oak Hills) 632, 8. White (Walnut Hills) 627, 9. Brauch (Elder) 622, 10. Bruns (St. Xavier) 616. * individual qualifiers Other individual qualifiers: McCowan (Harrison) 612, Wilhelm (roger Bacon) 607, Morrow (Clark Montessori) 603, Buffett (Colerain) 601, Waites (Walnut Hills) 596, Brown (Wyoming) 589.

Girls’ Bowling Friday, February 17 Crossgate Lanes Sectional Team scores (top five teams qualify to district): 1.Mercy 3650, 2. Middletown 3470, 3. Loveland 3450, 4. Glen Este 3265, 5. Lebanon 3237, 6. Princeton 3137, 7. Wilmington 3114, 8. Seton 3101, 9. Milford 3071,10. Monroe 2946, 11. Turpin 2838, 12. Ursuline 2807, 13. Mount Notre Dame 2762, 14. Deer Park 2747, 15.

Sycamore 2658, 16. Kings 2605, 17. Goshen 2556, 18. Little Miami 2447. Individual scores: 1. Weibel (Mercy) 590, 2. Corso (Mercy) 580, 3. Harris (Middletown) 541, 4. Feie (Mercy) 539, 5. Hottinger (Wilmington) 537*, 6. Hayes (Lebanon) 531, 7. Sullivan (Loveland) 523, 8. Campbell (Glen Este) 522, 9. Shanks (Kings) 516*, 10. Vogelsang (Glen Este) 515. *individual qualifiers Other individual qualifiers: 12. Camp (Wilmington) 509, 13. Schmidt (Seton) 508, 17. Sealock (Monroe) 494.

Boys’ Wrestling Saturday, February 11 Division I Sectional At Hamilton Team scores: 1. Mason 247.5, 2. Fairfield 241.0, 3. Glen Este 172.0, 4. Colerain 127.5, 5. Winton Woods 116.5, 6. Hamilton 115.0, 7. Oak Hills 108.5, 8. LaSalle 62.0, 9. Northwest 47.0, 10. Mount Healthy 35.0, 11. Withrow 34.0, 12. Turpin. 30.0, 13. Walnut Hills 10.0. (Top four from each weight class advances) First Place match 106: Caleb Ervin (Glen Este) maj. dec. Patrick Kearney (Mason) 17-8; 113: Anthony Milano (LaSalle) dec. Matt Sicurella (Glen Este) 63; 120: Max Byrd (LaSalle) tech. fall Max Meddings (Fairfield) 21-6; 126: Jorge Gonzalez (Mason) dec. Patrick Allen (Colerain) 4-3; 132: Drew Kearns (Glen Este) dec. Marquis Nash (Fairfield) 1411; 138: Adam Sams (Fairfield) maj. dec. Gage Asher (Hamilton) 12-0; 145: Jake Neyer (Fairfield) maj. dec. Max Davis (Glen Este) 120;152:Eoin Walden (Mason) dec. Dylan Lauffer (Fairfield) 5-4; 160: Detuan Smith (Colerain) dec. Brian McCrea (Mason) 5-2; 170: Thomas Danis (Mason) pin Michael Plunkett (Fairfield) 2:36; 182: Tegrey Scales (Colerain) maj. dec. Jake Suess (Mason) 145; 195: Matt Allgor (Mason) pin Shane Blevins (Glen Este) 5:18; 220: Tyler Sandy (Fairfield) dec. Daniele Tedoldi (Mason) 4-2; 285: Jon Neihaus (Colerain) dec. Desmond Jarman (Winton Woods) 4-3. Third Place match 106: Demarco Davis (Fairfield) tech. fall Nicc Wells (Hamilton) 15-0; 113: Jacob Artrip (Mason) maj. dec. Greysun Barden (Fairfield) 12-3; 120: Austin Cox (Colerain) pin Rickie Underwood (Withrow) 2:11; 126: Brandon Thompson (Oak Hills) pin Xavier Vines (Winton Woods) 4:48; 132: Kaleb Miller (Oak Hills) pin Rodrick Lattimore (Winton Woods) 1:40; 138: Caleb Dimerling (Mason) maj. dec. Julian Daniels (Northwest) 13-1; 145: Devon Graves (Winton Woods) dec. Tyler Saurwein (Colerain) 5-3; 152: Quinn Hoenie (Turpin) dec. Alex Murray (LaSalle) 20; 160: John Mikolay (Glen Este) maj. dec. Seth Dixon (Fairfield) 11-3; 170: Billy Foster (Oak Hills) dec. Devin Obermeyer (Glen Este) 3-2; 182: Stephen Ludwig (Fairfield) pin Austin Rowan (Glen Este) 1:33; 195: Kewante Steele (Mount Healthy) pin Jonathon Thomas (Fairfield) 1:39; 220: Jake Venable (Hamilton) pin Nick Isaacs (Withrow) 0:00; 285: Ameer Daniels (Northwest) pin Bobby Dennis (Oak Hills) 4:20. Division II Sectional At Western Brown Team scores: 1. New Richmond 290, 2. Bethel-Tate 203, 3. Wyoming 182.5, 4. Western Brown 131, 5. Goshen 124, 6. Batavia 89.5, 7. Taylor 67, 8. McNicholas 53.5, 9. Clermont Northeastern 50, 10. Hughes 46, 11. Norwood 14, 12. Indian Hill 3. (Top four from each weight class advances) First Place match 106: A.J. Rostetter (New Richmond) dec. Tyler Adkins (Western Brown) 4-0; 113: Brody Hooks (New Richmond) tech. fall Adam Baca (McNicholas) 15-0; 120: Austin Skaggs (New Richmond) maj. dec. Aric Peters

(Bethel-Tate) 11-3; 126: Cody Gabelman (New Richmond) dec. Brian Carter (BethelTate) 8-2; 132: Chip Ratcliff (Bethel-Tate) pin Corbin Guggenheim (Wyoming) 1:40; 138: Jake Latham (Western Brown) pin Robbie Lemar (New Richmond) 5:57; 145: Ryan Zawacki (New Richmond) dec. Mikey Gonzalez (Wyoming) 14-13; 152: Anthony Carome (Goshen) dec. Clay Loadman(New Richmond) 6-4; 160: Brandon Strochinsky (Taylor) pin Cory English (New Richmond) 2:49; 170: Aluor Nyamor (Wyoming) pin Kevin Reid (New Richmond) 4:38; 182: Chaz Gresham (Goshen) maj. dec. James White (New Richmond) 18-7; 195: Jon Ward (Bethel-Tate) dec. Payton Bailey (Western Brown) 10-5; 220: Nathan Dixon (New Richmond) pin Ethan Padnos(Wyoming) 2:52; 285: J.R. Forsee (New Richmond) dec. Adam Blum (Wyoming) 8-3. Third Place match 106: Nate Closser (BethelTate) pin Joey Gallick(Wyoming) 2:07; 113: Travis Bee (Bethel-Tate) dec. Tanner Rahm (Goshen) 7-2; 120: Chad Wendel (Clermont NE) maj. dec. Asa Palmer (Wyoming) 10-0; 126: Blake Silvis (Western Brown) pin Billy Combs (Goshen) 4:57; 132: Tyler Loyd (New Richmond) pin Max Neumann (Taylor) 0:32; 138: Daniel Zimmerman (Wyoming) pin Tyrell Grace (Hughes) 4:30; 145: Mike Almond (Batavia) pin Tyler Krekeler (BethelTate) 1:54; 152: Ryan Strochinsky (Taylor) dec. Josh Sagan (Wyoming) 6-0; 160: Josh East (Bethel-Tate) over Tyler Gumbert (McNicholas) default; 170: Matthew Battaglia (McNicholas) pin Zach Bixler (Clermont NE) 2:54;182: Andy Wallace (Western Brown) over Gabe Archer (Batavia) default; 195: Zane Ellis (Goshen) pin Nicholas Bonavita (Batavia) 1:18; 220: R.J. Stanfield (Bethel-Tate) pin Cody Wilson (Western Brown) 3:58; 285: Kian Mollette (Bethel-Tate) pin John Jackson (Norwood) 0:57. Division III Sectional At Blanchester Team scores: 1. Reading 229.5, 2. Blanchester 184, 3. Deer Park 161, 4. CHCA 157, 5. Mariemont 108.5, 6. Madeira 101, 7. Purcell Marian 92, 8. Williamsburg 89.5, 9. North College Hill 73, 10. Roger Bacon 69, 11. Summit Country Day 50, 12. Lockland 37, 13. Finneytown 21, 14. East Clinton 17, 15. Cinncinnati Country Day 0. (Top four from each weight class advances) First Place matches 106: Taylor Bemerer(Reading) fall Tyler Goodpaster (Deer Park) 3:33; 113: Zachary Alvarado (Cin. Hills Chr.) maj. dec. Jake Macke (Deer Park) 8-0; 120: Kealii Cummings (Cin. Hills Chr.) fall Trenton Macke (Deer Park) 2:28; 126: Austin Fitzhugh (Reading) dec. Alvi Ibarra (Madeira) 5-2; 132: Chance Manzler (Madeira) maj. dec. Dylan Huston (Blanchester) 12-2; 138: James Tecco (Mariemont) Fall Tad Morris (Deer Park) 2:56; 145: Austin Siemon (Deer Park) tech. fall Chris Collins (Reading) 15-0; 152: Jamey Perdue (Reading) tech fall Jordan Dawson (Blanchester) 21-6; 160: Austin Horwitz (Madeira) dec. Ray Day (Reading) 6-3; 170: Kalub Jones (Purcell Marian) dec. Brandon Breezley (Blanchester) 7-4; 182: Aaron Wilson (N. College Hill) fall Tyler Dixon (Cin. Hills Chr.) 3:06; 195: Joe Dilbert (Reading) fall Tim Lee (Blanchester) 1:37; 220: Travis Boyd (Blanchester) maj. dec David Quiambao (Mariemont) 17-6; 285: Jordan Smith (Williamsburg) fall Devon Thomas (Roger Bacon) 1:34. Third Place match 106: Dominick Butler (Mariemont) fall Max Damaska (Summit Co. Day) 2:29; 113: Mike Turner (Roger Bacon) fall Dylan Smith (Blanchester) 1:40; 120: Mikiel Kendall (N. College Hill) dec. Jon Beauvais (Lockland), 6-5; 126: Riley

Henderson (Mariemont) fall Tim Sutton (N. College Hill) 4:12; 132: Trevor Andrews (Deer Park) dec. Pat Hinkle (Purcell Marian) 8-7; 138: Vince Meinking (Purcell Marian) fall Stuart Seltman (Summit Co. Day) 3:42; 145: Phoenix Romero (Cin. Hills Chr.) fall Elijah Votaw (Lockland) :27; 152: Tyler Williamson (Madeira) fall Parker Roe (Cin. Hills Chr.) 3:31; 160: Tucker Morrow (Cin. Hills Chr.) fall Shane Jeffers (Williamsburg) 1:59; 170: Ryan Roberts (Reading) fall Trevor Cash (Mariemont) 1:24; 182 Shane Roy (Rea ding) dec. Ian Craig (Williamsburg) 10-7; 195: Darren Boothby (Williamsburg) dec. Dante Barker (N. College Hill) 13-8; 220: Tate Johnson (Deer Park) fall Ricky Thamann (Reading) 1:38; 285: Kody Bray (Reading) fall Tyler Kirbabas (Cin. Hills Chr.) :59.

Weekly Schedule Friday, February 24 Boys’ Basketball Division I Sectional At Oak Hills Milford vs. Western Brown, 8:30 p.m. Division II Sectional At Mason Bethel-Tate vs. Aiken, 8 p.m. Division III Sectional At Western Brown Williamsburg vs. Roger Bacon, 6:30 p.m. Boys’ Wrestling Division I District Tournament At Fairfield, 2 p.m. Division II District Tournament At Goshen, 2 p.m. Division III District Tournament At Kettering Fairmont, 2 p.m. Saturday, February 25 Boys’ Basketball Division II Sectional At Mason Goshen vs. Wilmington, 11 a.m. New Richmond vs. Norwood, 12:30 p.m. Batavia vs. Taylor, 2 p.m. Division IV Sectional At Oak Hills Felicity vs. Christian, 4 p.m.

Cincinnati

Girls’ Basketball Division II Sectional At Withrow Goshen/Mount Healthy vs. Aiken/Indian Hill, 2 p.m. New Richmond/Talawanda vs. Western Brown/Wyoming, 4 p.m. Boys’ Wrestling Division I District Tournament At Fairfield, 10 a.m. Division II District Tournament At Goshen, 10 a.m. Division III District Tournament At Kettering Fairmont, 10 a.m. Girls’ Bowling District Tournament At Eastern Lanes, 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, February 29 Boys’ Basketball Division I Sectional At Oak Hills Amelia vs. Moeller, 6:30 p.m. Division I Sectional At Lakota West Glen Este vs. La Salle, 6:30 p.m.

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The Wayne Fire and Rescue Auxillary will hold its annual fish fry from 5:30 - 8 p.m. every Friday from Feb. 24 through April 6. Phone orders are welcomed. Call (513) 6256212.

a different charity. Guests have a chance to win free play for the entire night. Split the Pot and Bring a Friend Awards.

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The Clermont County Chess Club meets at 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at the Withamsville Church of Christ, located at 846 Ohio Pike. All are welcome. Visit the club’s website at www.clermontchess.com. For more information write clermontchess@yahoo.com or call Bill Pursel at (513) 4775708.

A meeting of the Clermont County Korean War Memorial Committee will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 29 at the Clermont County Veterans Services meeting room. Project plans and funding will be discussed. The meeting is open to all Korean war veterans and other interested parties.

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❑❑❑ ❑❑❑ All-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner to benefit the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America and Team Kristin's Crohnies for the 2012 Take Steps Be Heard Walk at 4 - 7 p.m. Saturday, March 3 at the Emmanuel United Methodist Church, which is located at 4312 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Batavia. Adults $5, children 5-12 $2, under 5 are free. For more information call (513) 680-7488. ❑❑❑ The Men’s Club of St. Peter Catholic Church in New Richmond is sponsoring a Fish Fry every Friday during Lent, beginning Friday, Feb. 24 through Friday March 30, from 5 - 7:30 p.m. Choice of deep fried cod, French fries or macaroni & cheese, and cole slaw; baked cod with toss salad and baked potato. Also grilled cheese. Eat in or carry out. Homemade dessert and drink included with price of meal. The church is located at 1192 Bethel-New Richmond Road in New Richmond. Proceeds to benefit parish projects. ❑❑❑ The Wayne Township Board of Trustees has announced that the board meetings will be moved from Mondays to the first Thursday of each month and the second trustee monthly meeting will be held on the third Thursday of odd numbered months at 7 p.m. at the township office, located at 6320 state Route 133. ❑❑❑ AARP 3435 Clermont County Chapter regular meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the American Legion Post 72 located at 495 Cincinnati/Batavia Pike in Mt. Carmel. Issues concerning members such as new legislation and community needs are discussed and if possible acted upon. Additionally, each meeting ordinarily includes a speaker on topics of interest to seniors and/or entertainment. Light refreshments are served. Interested persons are welcome to attend a meeting and see what the chapter may have to offer them.

A support group for parents that have lost children, The Compassion Friends, meets the fourth Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at St. Timothy Episcopal Church, Beechmont Ave. ❑❑❑ The Clermont County Historical Society and Harmony Hill Association (Williamsburg Historical Society) museums will be open to the public the first Saturday of the month from 1 - 4 p.m. The museums are located at Harmony Hill, 299 S.Third Street, Williamsburg. The Harmony Hill Association display features William Lytle, Father of Clermont County, and Williamsburg’s history. The Clermont County Historical Society archives will be open for research of Clermont County history. Also at the site is the Lytle Diary House, the oldest building in Clermont County. There is no admission charge. The museums can also be visited by making an appointment. ❑❑❑ The East Fork Wood Carvers meet from 6 - 9 p.m. the second and fourth Monday of every month at the Union Township Civic Center. New members, and anyone interested in learning how to carve, are welcome to attend. For more information call John Dotson at (513) 753-1389. ❑❑❑ The Clermont County Stamp Club meets twice each month at SEM Laurel Recreation Center, 203 Mound Street in Milford, on the first Tuesday of each month for an informal meeting and the third Wednesday for a formal meeting. For more information call (513) 752-3817. ❑❑❑ The Commodore 64 and 128 are still alive and kicking! They’re even using PC’s as slaves to increase their storage capacity, can be expanded to 16 megs and made to operate 20 times faster than their original speed. E-mail cbmusers@yahoo.com. For more information call Roger Hoyer at 248-0025.

Cincinnati/Batavia Pike in Mt. Carmel. Issues concerning members, such as new legislation and community needs are discussed and if possible, acted upon. Additionally, each meeting ordinarily includes a speaker on topics of special interest to seniors, and/or entertainment. Light refreshments are served. ❑❑❑

Weekly meetings will be held of the Milford Job Search Focus Group from 8:30 - 10 a.m. Tuesdays at Milford Christian Church 844 State Route 131 Milford, Ohio 45150. This group will have three main focuses: Career Education; Networking; Character Development. Reaching out to unemployed men and women in the surrounding area. For more information contact Karen Tracy at ktracy@cinci.rr.com The Depression Bipolar Support Group meets from 12:30 - 2 p.m. Wednesdays at Emmanuel United Methodist Church, located at 4312 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Batavia. ❑❑❑ A widow’s support group meets from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month at Union Township Activity Center (in the Union Township Civic Center), 4350 Aicholtz Road, Eastgate. For information on this group or any of the support groups sponsored by Clermont Senior Services, call Linda Tennison, certified bereavement facilitator, at (513) 724-1255.

It’s important to understand which investments to own, and when to buy them. But you should also know when it’s time to sell an investment — and why. Unfortunately, many people sell investments for the wrong reasons. Some people want the money to purchase so-called “hot” investments, even if these new investments aren’t appropriate for their needs. Others own investments that have lost value, and fearing further losses, they decide to sell — thereby violating the oldest rule of investing: “Buy low and sell high.” These types of behavior can lead to at least two major problems. First, if you’re constantly selling investments, you’ll likely incur fees, commissions and taxes that can erode any returns you did manage to achieve. And second, by frequently selling off your investments and buying new ones, you’ll find it difficult to follow the type of consistent, long-term financial strategy that’s essential to help you work toward your goals. If you shouldn’t sell investments to find quick gains or to avoid losses that may not even occur, when should you sell? You might want to sell: • If your goals have changed — You bought cer-

tain investments because you thought they would help you make progress toward your objectives. But over time, your goals may change, so in response, you may need to sell some investments and use the money to purchase new ones that are more suitable for your new goals. For example, early in your career, you might have benefited from owning investments that offered high potential for growth, but as you near retirement, you may need to shift some — but certainly not all — of your growthoriented vehicles to incomeproducing ones. • If the investments themselves change — You might have bought a stock because you liked the company’s products, business plan or management team. If any of these factors change significantly, though, you might need to re-evaluate your ownership of this investment. • If you need to rebalance your portfolio — You may have decided that your investment portfolio should be composed of specific percentages of stocks, bonds and “cash” instruments. But due to changes in the value of your investments, these percentages can shift somewhat, resulting in a portfolio that no longer reflects your goals and risk tolerance. If

that happens, you’ll need to rebalance your holdings, which may require you to sell some of your investments. • If an investment has chronically underperformed — Sometimes, an investment simply doesn’t perform as well as you had hoped. When this happens, you may be better off by selling the investment and using the money to pursue new opportunities. However, don’t rush to judgment. Before you sell an underperforming investment, try to determine why it hasn’t done well. Is it because the market as a whole has slumped? If so, your investment could rebound when the market does. Or are there separate factors, unique to this investment, that have caused its problems? If the investment’s fundamentals and prospects still look good, you might want to simply give it time to prove its worth. By knowing when you should hold an investment, and when you shouldn’t, you can avoid costly mistakes and help improve your chances for long-term investment success. Article submitted by S. Christian Wilks, an Investment Representative with Edward Jones, Milford.

❑❑❑ Vietnam Veterans of America, Inc. Clermont County Chapter 649 meets at 7:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month at the Union Township Civic Center. For more information call (513) 722-1970 or visit www.vva649.org.

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❑❑❑ The Eastside Goldwing Road Riders Association Chapter E-2 meets at 7:30 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at the New England Club, 8135 Beechmont Ave. Come join the fun, all are welcome. For more information, call Bill Martin at 732-3528 or go to web site at www.cincye2.org.

NEW HOURS ARE: MONDAY 7:00PM - 9:00PM TUESDAY 9:00AM - 11:00AM WEDNESDAY 7:00PM - 9:00PM THURSDAY 9:00AM - 11:00AM SATURDAY 12:00 NOON - 2:00PM

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qqq The Bethel Ministerial Association operates a community clothing store that offers free used clothing to those in need. The store is located at 234 W. Plane Street in Bethel and is open from 1 - 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Volunteers are needed to help in sorting the clothes. Childrens clothing is always needed.

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❑❑❑ ❑❑❑ If you have struggled with thoughts of suicide or you have lost someone to suicide and need to talk or share your feelings, please come to our support group. Meetings are every Tuesday 6 - 8 p.m. at the Batavia Public Library. If you need more information contact Barbara at (513) 3716054.

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Everyone is invited to a free meal 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday at the Kitchen of Hope. The Kitchen of Hope is located at Bethel United Methodist Church and its doors are open to anyone who wants a hot meal. Those who are elderly, young, unemployed, underemployed, in need of a hot meal or just in need of fellowship are invited to attend. The church is located 402 West Plane Street, in Bethel.

A caregiver support group meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the main office of Clermont Senior Services, 2085 James E. Sauls Sr. Drive (across the parking lot from the YMCA). This support group is open to anyone caring for and/or making decisions for an older adult living in Clermont County. There is no charge for participation, but pre-registration is helpful. Please call Pam at (513) 536-4038.

The Disabled American Veterans Clermont County Chapter 63 and its auxiliary will hold monthly meetings on the second Monday of the month. Meetings are held 7 p.m. at the American Legion Post 237, located just off old state Route 32 on Memory Lane in Batavia. All disabled veterans are invited to attend the meetings.

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National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) support meetings for family/friends are held on the third Monday of every month. The support group meets from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. The educational program begins at 7:30 and covers a variety of topics related to mental illness. The meetings are held at the Union Township Civic Center, Queen City Room A, 4350 Aicholtz Road, Cincinnati, OH 45245.

A general support group offering a safe place to share your experiences coping with mental illness meets every Wednesday from 12:30 - 2 p.m. at Emmanuel United Methodist Church, 4312 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Batavia. For more information call (513) 732-5418.

❑❑❑ The Clermont Charity Club hosts a Bid-N-Win Auction (25 cents auction) from 7 - 9 p.m. on the first Tuesday each month at the WT Ball Fields Community Building, 937 Ohio Pike in Withamsville. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The Bid-N-Win features products from Avon, Longaberger, Pampered Chef, Scentsy Candles, 31 gifts, Tupperware, Joyful Creations, Usborne books, Tastefully Simple, Mary Kay, and more. A raffle is held each month for

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❑❑❑

❑❑❑ qqq AARP 3435 Clermont County Chapter regular meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the American Legion post 72, at 495 located

B R O A D S H E E T

Saturday, March 31st 8 AM to 12 PM

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A monthly meeting of the TOPS Support Group will be in Mt. Orab at St. Michael’s Church, S. High Street each Monday. Weigh in is from 5:45 - 6:25 p.m. The meeting will be held from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. For more information call (937) 444-6908 or write sgpierce@insightbb.com.

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Last Name: Email:

First Name:

M.I.:

Age:

Phone:

Mailing Address: Social Security # (optional): Physician’s Name:

D.O.B.: City:

Please check if you are a Brown County School District employee: PRE-REGISTRATION FORM may be dropped off, faxed or mailed by 3/29/2012 SOUTHWEST REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER Attn: Dennis Lewis, 425 Home Street, Georgetown, OH 45121 fax 937-378-7728

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February 2012

with The Clermont Sun Publishing Co.

Help is available for caregivers Home Care helps keep seniors at home

B R O A D S H E E T E V E N

Elaine and Joe have There are a lot of persuaded him and been married for good people around.” Elaine to move here to many years. be near family. They were livIn the last few ing their dream years, Joe has of retiring to the been getting mountains of progressively N.C., but it worse. Now Joe came to an requires 24abrupt end. hour care. He After living can pivot to get there four from his bed years, Joe sufinto a wheelfered a devaschair, but he no tating stroke. is longer walks. Now he home-bound, He doesn’t and Elaine is speak either, his fulltime but Elaine caregiver. believes that he When asked Joe and Elaine receive help from u n d e r s t a n d s how she copes, Clermont Senior Services that what she says. she says, “I allows Joe to continue living in Both in their pray a lot. I his home. eighties, Elaine thank God that needs help in Joe is not in order to keep pain. Things could be After his stroke, Joe Joe at home. The coua lot worse. If you try, needed a lot of care, ple receives homeyou’ll find the good. and their daughter making and respite

care from Clermont Senior Services, which allows Elaine time to go to the grocery and her own medical appointments. She tells everybody that all the gals are nice, but she especially likes Bonnie, and feels like she is part of the family. Of course, they use CSS transportation as well, since Joe must be transported in his wheelchair to medical appointments. Elaine always assists him, because he cannot be left alone. They also receive help from family, caring friends and neighbors. Church friends come every two weeks and bring Communion. A neigh-

bor, a retired policeman, takes out trash, changes light bulbs, and helps out in other ways. When Elaine had knee replacement surgery a few years ago, a volunteer, Beth Rawdon, did her grocery shopping. Beth is now the Manager of Scheduling and Nutrition Services for CSS. Elaine says Beth has a great crew. She and Beth continue to stay in touch and have been good friends for over five years. Beth continues to visit Elaine and Joe with her husband and three year old son. Whenever Elaine is ill or recovering from surgery, Joe must live in a nursing home until she is able to

care for him. She always tries to get him back home as quickly as possible. When Joe is gone, Elaine says she really misses his company. Clermont Senior Services is available to help fill in the gaps in help that families cannot provide. Often, however, families live far away and cannot provide hands-on support for their loved one. For many elderly people CSS is the sole support and critical lifeline that keeps them in their own home. The agency offers many services on a donation basis. If you or someone you know needs help, call Clermont Senior Services at 724-1255.

Adult Day Care is available to help family caregivers

Welcome Center is the name of the Adult Day Service program of Clermont Senior Services. Caring, friendly staff are ready to greet each person and encourage them to enjoy their day. Comfortable furnishings, colorful murals, handcrafted wall hangings, and an outdoor patio/garden area provide a homelike atmosphere. The Welcome Center hosted an open house on January 26. Families and guests toured the facility, joined center participants

in a project of their choice, and watched videos of seniors participate on a daily basis. Sewing projects, artwork, and crafts created during the last year were on display. Pam Scott RN, facilitator of the Caregiver Support Group, was present with information and helpful personal care items. Over 150 seniors, family members, and guests attended the event. The Welcome Center is an adult day service program for people with physical or mental impairments who need socialization in a

supervised setting and is the only program of its kind in Clermont County. For more information, call CSS

at 724-1255. Financial assistance is available for eligible participants.

Welcome Center (Adult Day Center) participants and their families enjoy making new craft items, as well as viewing the center’s art and craft show.

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The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012 - Page 11

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To be considered for the 2012 Ohio New Product Award, entries must have been primarily developed and manufactured in Ohio and placed on the market between Sept. 1, 2008 and Sept. 1, 2011. Applica-

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513/265-5349 • 724-5505 • 404-2037 contractorsplus.bz

INTERIOR • EXTERIOR DECKS • DRYWALL WALLPAPER

937-446-4256 513-305-3691 3-1

Flooring Electrical Work Lawn/Landscaping Plumbing Siding 3-4 TFN Painting

Painting

Have Danny Do Your “Honey Do’s”

DICK CLIFTON 513-550-0378

“We Do It All”

• Doors • Windows • Skirting • Faucets • Steps 8-26

937-444-9494

Handyman Dan

BASEMENT REMODELS DIVISION

Room Additions Pole Buildings/Garages Interior Remodeling Decks & Patios Roofing Concrete (flatwork)

• Tubs • Surrounds • Sinks • Furnaces/Parts • Heat Pumps/AC

MULCH • CARPORTS • GRAVEL

Handyman

TOM CLIFTON 937-213-1266

Contractor’s Plus

Mobile Home Parts Store & Service MOBILE HOME PARTS STORE

POST FRAME CONSTRUCTION DIVISION

Construction

513-724-3963

FOR SALE

RED - FREE ESTI INSU MA Y L TE NEW HOME L S FU CONSTRUCTION DIVISION LARRY CLIFTON 513-407-3949

TFN

Full Landscaping & Lawn Mowing

Flooring/Cabinets

CLIFTON BROTHERS

898 W. Main St., Hillsboro, OH

7 %2!)-)-' !++1 7 %#*1 7 !2).1 7 03#*)-' 7 5#!4!2)-' 7 %%$)-' .$$)-' TFN

Hauling Gravel, Sand & Topsoil • Clearing Ground • Digging Ponds Bobcat Service • Water Lines • Culvert & Driveway Repair • Demolition Work

Building / New Homes / Remodeling Construction / Basement Remodeling

Tune-Ups - Overhauls or Complete Restorations 1939 Thru Current FORD Tractors Serving the area Since 1949 2-26 8/11

2-26

BOWMAN EXCAVATING

www.cmtruss.com

SALES - PARTS

“Surround the things you love” ...for less than you think 3-18

Heating • Indoor Air Quality • Duct Cleaning Air Conditioning • Service Agreement Jacob Bros. service all brands of equipment and is certified Amana carrier. TFN

Tel: (513) 533-3600

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

3-4

Save Your Home & Add A New Roof

1x1 Ad 6 weeks for $58.00

O D D

(937) 393-4258

Excavating

8319 Ashridge Arnhiem, Sardinia, Ohio 45171

MOON TRACTOR CO.

No Job Too Big or Small

Office 513-910-2038

Excavating

corn, pellet, wood, & gas Free-standing & Add-on units

Tractor Sales & Service

• Roofing • Siding • Baths • Windows • Kitchens • Insulation • Decks and Gutters Visit our website at: www.ResidentialRenewal.info 4-1 for 10% Off Coupon. TFN

B R O A D S H E E T

(937) 446-4443 TFN 3-18

FULLY INSURED • REFERENCES AVAILABLE

OHIO VALLEY FLAG

300 W. Main Street, Batavia, Ohio 45103 Stephen G. Handra • Shirley Handra

11256 Hamer Rd. Georgetown, OH 45121

(513) 876-3984 (513) 490-3342

esidential R enewal

Flags & Flagpoles Sales & Installation www.ohiovalleyflag.com

INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL, RESIDENTIAL

(513) 732-0484

3-4 TFN

H

Flags/Flagpoles

Electric Supply

3-4 TFN

Owner: Calvin Nissley (937) 446-3400 (937) 515-7506

INDUSTRIAL - RESIDENTIAL ALL TYPES OF WOOD & CHAINLINK • SPLITRAIL • KY BOARD • CHAINLINK • FARM FENCE FREE ESTIMATES

513-582-4861 or 513-734-1453

CMYK

ROOFING COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS GARAGES RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL - AGRICULTURAL

(513) 753-4400

for local news, sports, and obituaries

(937) 444-3043

WITH

A new KFC/LJS restaurant has opened at 3787 Waterford Parkway and a grand opening ribbon cutting celebration was held Friday, Feb. 17. The Amelia KFC/LJS completely rebuilt a brand new state of the art restaurant at their new location this past December. Many “energy savings green” improvements can be seen throughout the restaurant including the full use of L.E.D. lighting. The KFC/LJS of Amelia restaurant is open from 10:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and from 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The Amelia KFC/LJS Management team includes Melody Shaffer, Mary Boyd, Matt Burton, and Lisa Middleton as the Above Restaurant Leader. KFC is the world’s most popular chicken restaurant chain. There are more than 13,000 KFC outlets in more than 80 countries and territories around the world, serving some eight million customers each day. Long John Silvers is the US’s largest fish and seafood restaurant branch

clermontsun.com

Eastwood Rd. and St. Rt. 32

Attorneys at Law 108 S. High Street Mt. Orab, OH 45154 937-444-2563 or 1-800-364-5993

KFC reopens newly rebuilt, state of the art restaurant

online at

For Sale or Lease

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY If you are unable to work or you have been denied Social Security we may be able to help. KELLY & WALLACE

Several apartment sizes and floor plans to choose from.

The Clermont Sun

2 (WITH MONTHS FREE EXTENDED LEASE) CMYK

The Ohio Society of Professional Engineers is looking for Ohio’s best new engineering product for the 2012 Ohio New Product Award competition. “Ohio’s engineers are making incredible advancements in technology. They work every day to make buildings, equipment and travel safer and more convenient,” says OSPE Executive Director Tim Schaffer. “Recipients of the Ohio New Product Award are the best examples of Ohio’s strong tradition of developing products that improve people’s lives.” The purpose of the Ohio New Product Award, established by OSPE’s Professional Engineers in Industry practice division, is to stimulate and recognize the full spectrum of benefits that come from the research and engineering of new products. These benefits include added employment, eco-

CMYK

CMYK

OSPE seeks best new engineering product

Over 35 Years Experience

40 YR WARRANTY

FREE ESTIMATES METAL • SHINGLE

937-446-2917

3-4

877-463-0359


Page 12 - The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012

THE CLERMONT SUN / SUNDAY SUN

Make One Call and Reach More Than

45,000

Monday-Thursday • 9:00 am -5:00 pm Friday • 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

...By Fax 1-513-732-6344

Monday-Friday • 24 Hours/7 Days

24 Hours/7 Days FAX & E-MAIL ORDERS:

The Clermont Sun Publishing Co. reserves the right to correctly classify, edit, cancel or decline any advertisement without notice.

All line ads will be $9.50 for 20 words or less, 10 cents for each additional word for one week, but the special is, you get the next 2 weeks free!!!!

What a bargain! THREE WEEKS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE!!!!!!! Take advantage of this special because it only lasts for the month of March! (This only pertains to line ads. Display ads will be regular price.)

CARE GIVERS FT/PT ALL SHIFTS No prior experience needed to work in our 8-client family home in Maineville. You’ll help teach our developmentally disabled clients daily living skills. Our orientation is paid & our comprehensive training includes FA/CPR. With a HS diploma/GED; clean background check & acceptable driving record, you could be working immediately.

Community Concepts, Inc. is a drug free workplace Call Cindy today: 513-649-7148

200 - HELP WANTED

E V E N

ALLIED AMBULANCE currently has positions open for EMT’s basic, intermediate & paramedics. To apply call 937-379-1404 from hours 4am-4pm.

200 - HELP WANTED Looking for

EXPERIENCED

CHANGES & CANCELLATIONS

Report all errors or misclassifications immediately. We will assume responsibility for only one incorrect insertion.

Will not be accepted after deadline. Deadline is 1 PM on Tuesday unless changed due to holiday.

For More Info. Call

CAREGIVERS JOIN a team of professionals providing non-medical care for seniors in their home. Includes personal care and homemaking services. Clermont County 230-5111

DRIVERS: COMPANY/OWNER OP’s Local & Long Haul. Dedicated Runs. Pd Loaded/Unloaded. Good Home time. CO.-Excellent Benefits. O/OP’s-100% FSC, Fuel Cards. CDL-A: 2yrs. OTR exp. Tank & Haz. end a +

877-402-4228 DRIVERS: FLATBED, Class A, $.40-.50/exp. based, driver wages recently increased, 2yrs. exp. req., Trinity Logistics Group - EEO/AA 800-628-3408. DRIVERS: GETTING home is easier. Chromed out trucks w/APU’s. Chromed out pay package! 90% Drop & Hook CDL-A, 6/mos. experience. 888-247-4037.

HOME CARE Agency serving DDS (FKA) MRDD seeks experienced & mature direct care professionals for 24/7, homes in Milford & Amelia. Experience with behaviors preferred. Immediate openings available. 513681-2472. Leave message.

LOUISO TRUCKING, Inc. Full-time Class A CDL driver for Regional driving. Tanker endorsement a plus, not required. Percentage Pay, Company match Simple IRA, Vacation & Holiday Pay. Call 513-724-7140. LPNS: LOOKING for caring, responsible, energetic individuals to care for our residents. Please call 937-444-2920 or 513-579-9949. Must be dependable. NOW HIRING: Companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. OH-7268 PT LPN Evenings & Weekends - IMMEDIATE NEED at the Clermont Co. Juvenile Facility. Great PT position for those looking for extra income with flexibility. Minimal Hours available each evening. 17+ hrs/wk. available. Must have Clear Background. Drug Free Workplace. For interview call 888-231-2888 or apply online at: www.southernhealthpartners.com

RECEPTIONIST/VETERINARY HOSPITAL, experienced preferred not required, some evenings & Saturdays, send resumes to Bethel Animal Health, 120 E. Plane St., Bethel, OH 45106. SOUTHERN HILLS Therapy Services would like to hire full-time & PRN Occupational Therapist & Occupational Therapist Assistant for home health & skilled nursing settings in the Clermont Co. area. Excellent benefits & pay. For more information contact us at 937-6950839.

FREE $ 1900 FOR 3 WEEKS

clermontsun.com browncountypress.com

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DIRECT CARE PROFESSIONALS 1st & 2nd Shift Caring, dedicated direct care staff are needed to work with adults with disabilities in several Clermont County Group Homes. Must have a valid driver’s license and high school diploma or GED. Excellent pay, benefits, and in depth training provided. Print application at: www.cincinnatiepilepsy.org (return instructions provided) or call (513) 721-2905 if you don’t have access to a printer.

Interior Trim Carpenters

937-444-0820

DRIVERS-PROFESSIONALS WILLING to Team. $4500-5500/mo. average. Great benefits, hometime! HAZ Freight & Explosives. CDL-A. 800-835-9471.

CMYK

ERRORS, MISCLASSIFICATION

All ads are prepay!

Call Darlene at 513-732-2511 or Angie at 937-444-3441

PER COUNTY

Your ad will appear on our websites at no charge:

Include the following information: • Full name, billing address and phone number • Date(s) you want the ad to appear • Name and daytime phone number of contact for any questions or clarifications

CLASSIFIED SPECIAL FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH!!!!!!!

9 PER WEEK PAY FOR 2 WEEKS GET THIRD WEEK

Add .10¢ each additional word.

...E-Mail classifieds@fuse.net

B R O A D S H E E T

Words or Less

50

200 - HELP WANTED STATE TESTED Nurse Aides: Looking for caring, responsible, energetic individuals to care for our residents. Please call 937-444-2920 or 513-579-9949. Must be Dependable.

300 - APTS. UNFURNISHED 2BR & 1br apartments, Batavia, multi-family house, laundry on-site, deposit, no smoking, no pets, 2br, $500/mo., 1br, $425, tenants pay electric. 513-532-1724. ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR Hamant Villa Apartments, Mt. Orab, mature living, 1-story, W/D hookup, call for WINTER special. Starting at $550/mo. 513-724-2841 or 513-313-8262. AMELIA - 2-br equipment kitchen, water furnished, no pets, $475/mo. plus deposit. 513-266-7931. APARTMENT, LARGE 2br, eat-in kitchen, washer/dryer hookup, yard, deposit & references required. $445/mo. 513-876-3017.

BATAVIA - Nice clean 1br, patio, 1st month rent FREE, FREE heat forever, deposit required, $495/mo. 513-732-0532. FELICITY GARRISON PLACE SENIOR APARTMENTS 62 & OVER Rent Subsidized Free Utilities Secure Bldg. On-site laundry Pets allowed

513-876-3590 TTY 800-750-0750

300 - APTS. UNFURNISHED CLERMONT VILLA 371 W. Main Street Owensville, OH (513) 732-3855 Accepting applications for 1, 2 & 3br apartments Quiet country setting in a newly renovated affordable community. Office hours: 8:00am-5:00pm Call or stop by to see all that we have to offer. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

TDD 1-800-750-0750 Equal Housing Opportunity

HEALTHSOURCE OF OHIO, A network of community health centers offers quality care close to home, has many opportunities now available. MEDICAL ASSISTANT/RECEPTIONIST Goshen - 40 hrs/wk Graduate from a Medical Assisting program required. At least one year medical office experience desired. We offer an excellent benefit package Please visit our website at: www.healthsourceofohio.com Email resumes to: resumes@healthsourceofohio.com Or fax to: 513-576-1018 M/F/D/V Equal Opportunity Employer

300 - APTS. UNFURNISHED MILFORD, NEAR 275, now leasing spacious 2br apartments & town homes. Ask about specials. 513-576-9232. MT. ORAB Candlelight Apartments 2br Townhouse Starts at $565 With discount. Visit our website: briarcreekproperties.com

or call 513-532-5291 or 937-515-3092 Ask about our student, senior & other discounts

GEORGETOWN - 2 & 3br apartments available for immediate occupancy. 2br, 1ba, c/a, all kitchen appliances, w/d hookup, $560/mo & util., $560/dep. 3br, 1.5ba, 1-car att. garage, c/a, all kitchen appliances, laundry room, $675/mo & util. $675/dep., 513-253-8170 or 513-616-3504.

GREAT SPECIAL Efficiency & 1 Bedroom Energy Efficient Private Entry & Patios Quiet, Single Story Community! Ready Now Don’t Miss This Deal!!!

513-724-3951 LYTLE TRACE Senior Apartments. 62 & over, rent subsidized, secure building, free utilities, on-site laundry, pets allowed. Call 513-724-3358. TTY 800-750-0750.

OWENSVILLE - Modern 1br/apartment, equipped kitchen, WW carpeting, balcony, a/c, PETS additional! $395/mo plus deposit required, off street parking. 513-561-6055 WILLIAMSBURG SPACIOUS 2BR ground floor apartment, off street parking, heat/water included, $575/mo. plus deposit. 513-732-5771.

303 - HOUSES FOR RENT 3BR, 2BA house, Williamsburg area, large rooms & nice large yard, newly remodeled, utilities not included, $795/mo., $795/dep. Also, same type of home in Mt. Orab, $650/mo., $650/dep. 513-703-2430.

303 - HOUSES FOR RENT BETHEL - Large 2-story 3,000 sq. ft. on 2-acres, 4br, 2.5ba, 2-car garage, much more, $1000 per month, requires references, deposit, 1st & last month rent. Call to inquire, 513-582-4116 (option to buy). EASTGATE - Off Clough, near TQL, 4br, 2.5ba, 2-car garage, full basement, FP, FR, 1/2 acre, newly remodeled, $1475/mo. plus deposit. 513-753-8200. FELICITY - 3br, 2ba doublewide home, C/A, $500/mo. plus deposit, no inside pets. 937-444-3006 or 513-315-3890. FELICITY AREA - Rt. 52, river view, beautiful 2br, 2ba on 5-acres, large great room, FP, kitchen pantry, $785/mo. 513-553-4177. HAMERSVILLE, 3BR, 1ba, attached garage, all appliances furnished. Absolutely no pets. Credit references, $695/mo. plus deposit and utilities. 937-392-6052 or 513-734-4460. RENT OR BUY, 2BR HOUSE, all stainless steel appliances, W/D, garage, very nice in Williamsburg, $675/mo. 513-724-3196.

3BR, 2ba, 2-car garage $750/mo, $750/dep. 1.5yrs. old, 513-404-4543.

WANTING TO rent 3 or 4br house in Clermont Co., must allow pets. 513-429-3994.

3BR, 2BA, bi-level w/garage, New Richmond area, close to school shopping, & river, available immediately, $750/mo. plus deposit, large lot, built in 2003. 513-305-0468.

307 - MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT 3BR, 1-ACRE lot, storage shed, newly remodeled, no pets, good credit, $500/mo plus deposit. 937-444-3701.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY HOME HEALTH AIDES Are you Caring, Compassionate, Reliable, and Dependable? Want to Care for Others? Interim HealthCare, the Nation’s leader in Home Care is seeking Home Health Aides for the Clermont and Brown County. We are proud to offer a starting pay of $10.00 per hours. Qualifications: Must already be trained as an Aide and have a certificate (CNA, STNA, HHA training), able to pass a drug screen and criminal background check; have reliable transportation; be dependable; attentive, caring and respectful to others. Must have a valid driver’s license. For more information, please contact Allison at: 513-792-7643 ext. 154 Our Main Office is located at 8050 Hosbrook Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45236

308 - OFFICE/BUSINESS SPACE FOR RENT

403- MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE

AMELIA FREE-STANDING office, formally AllState, 24x30, $850/mo. plus utilities, front of Clermont Counseling Center. All electric & half bath. 513-753-8200.

2012 FAIRMONT Harmony 16x80 3br, 2ba. 73homes.com $38,900. 937-725-6213 Wilmington, OH.

400 - HOUSES FOR SALE FARM WITH nice 1.5 story older home w/basement, 3 car detached garage, barns & 20 rolling acres with large rock lined creek and woods, great for hunting or farming, more or less acreage available, Bethel New Hope Rd., 1 mi. from Clermont County line, Western Brown but close enough for Bethel. Asking $215,000 513-734-6349 or 937-444-6925 Dan (May also sell for less with fewer acres)

403- MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE 2008 CLAYTON 28x80 Repo, 4br, 2ba, excellent condition, $56,900. Route 73 Homes. 937-725-6213. 2009 CLAYTON 28x52 Repo, 3br, 2ba, excellent condition, $47,900. Route 73 Homes 937-7256213.

NEW MODULAR homes on sale! Starting at $59,900, 3br, 2ba ranch, route73homes.com 937-725-6213, Wilmington, OH.

405 - LOTS & ACREAGE

BEAUTIFUL 50ACRES W/large rock lined creek & woods, great for hunting or farming. More or less acreage available. Bethel New Hope Rd. 1-mile from Clermont County line, Western Brown but close enough for Bethel.

Asking $199,500 Dan 513-734-6349 or 937-444-6925 (Smaller parcels also available) 504 - BUSINESS SERVICES SIMON’S LANDSCAPING leaf removal, curbside leaf pick-up, free estimates. 513-235-4146.

CMYK

CMYK

...By Phone 513-732-2511

$

CMYK

20

PLACE YOUR AD

Readers Throughout the Area


The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012 - Page 13

506 - CLEANING RESIDENTIAL CLEANING or just needing some spring cleaning, great rates, and even better references. Call for a quote, or for more information. 513-255-4342. SPARKLE & Shine House Cleaning Services New Customers receive $15 off Your First Clean! This family owned & operated business serves customers in Clermont County and the greater Cincinnati area for house & business cleaning needs. School is back in & the holidays are just around the corner! If you need an extra helping hand, call today to schedule your free consultation & ask for Dee. 513-923-7875

508 - ENTERTAINMENT

CALL 513-304-2280 BIG JIM’S

“JUNK” CAR REMOVAL $$$$$$$$$$ PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR “JUNK” CARS TRUCKS & VANS

513-304-2280

808 - AUTOS FOR SALE 1930’S-PRESENT

MARK WANTS running, wrecked, dead cars and trucks. Now paying $150 - $400/cash for complete vehicles. FREE TOW! 937-446-3021 or 513-739-0774 JUNKED, WRECKED unwanted autos, autos, trucks, motorcycles, etc., some towed free, cash paid for some. Call 513-734-1650

PROFESSIONAL DJ 22 years experience **Bridal Special** Call 513-732-1664

606 - FARM MERCHANDISE SYNTHETIC GYPSUM available locally for Agricultural Fields. EPA approved, increases crop yields, helps control erosion. 2011 pricing extended. Call 513-442-5606.

Property Transfers From the office of Linda L. Fraley, Clermont County Auditor, for the week ending January 20th, 2011. BATAVIA Leslie Edgar Lewis, Executor to Maria Gilkison, 3546 St. Rt. 132, Amelia, OH 45102, 1.9890 acres, $15,400.00 Kelly Kooy to Jeffrey & Samantha Brickner. 1262 Champions Crossing, Batavia, OH 45103, 0.4020 acre, $358,000.00 Melinda Muncie, et al. to Jeffrey Kachelmeyer, 2031 Riverbirch Dr., Amelia, OH 0.2450 45102, acre,$60,000.00 GOSHEN HSBC Mortgage Services, Inc. to Timothy Briggs & Stacey Siller-Briggs, 2559 Allegro Lane, Loveland, OH 45140, 0.1140 acre, $84,900.00 Jeffrey Chamot to Dustin Tengler, 1520 Dorset Way, Loveland, OH 45140, 0.1930 acre, $120,000.00 David Moeggenberg, Executor to Teresa Walts, 3276 Thoroughbred Dr., Loveland, OH 45140, 0.1240 acre, $114,900.00 Joseph Neidich, Sr. to Paul & Vera Hayslip, Gibbs Rd., Goshen, OH 45122, $4,500.00 Henry & Frances Nipper to Brian Dunavent, 3025 Abby Way, Loveland, OH 45140, 0.1100 acre, $103,900.00 MIAMI Jay & Janice Jungclas to Melissa Hendrix, 6626 Paxton Guinea Rd., Loveland, OH 45140, $156,500.00 Federal National Mortgage

Assoc. to Adria McConnaughey, 1273 Deblin Dr., Milford, OH 45150, $104,000.00 Federal National Mortgage to Steven Adams, 6080 Price Rd., Loveland, OH 45140, 3.6100 acre, $203,000.00 Estate of Michael Sheridan to First Financial Bank, NA, 5766 Meadowview Dr., Milford, OH 45150, $73,334.00 Clay Becker, et al. to Bank of New York Mellon, 5752 Buckwheat Rd., Milford, OH 45150, $73,334.00 Faith Puckett, et al. to US Bank, NA, as Trustee, 1440 Emerson Lane, Milford, OH 45150, 0.4590 acre, $46,667.00 Kevin Wolbers to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, 843 Veralois Lane, Loveland, OH 45140, $60,000.00 Hal Homes/Willows Bend, LLC to John & Lori Sence, Lot 48, Willows Bend, Loveland, OH 45140, $115,000.00 Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. to Mark Mueller, 1055 Shore Point Ct. Loveland, OH 45140, 0.3400 acre, $250,000.00 MONROE Chris Haney, et al. to Suntrust Mortgage, Inc., 1600 Frank Willis Memorial Rd., New Richmond, OH 45157, 1.3020 acres, $83,334.00 PIERCE Marlene Curless to Gregg & Linda Curless, Ten Mile Rd., New Richmond, OH 45157, 1.0000 acre, $10,000.00 STONELICK Rebecca Sabota, Trust to Georgette Sabota, 5803 Belfast-Owensville Rd.,

&

608 - FARM PRODUCE

611 - WANTED TO BUY

615 - MISC. FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL WHITE Maggie Sottero wedding gown, size 8, never worn, $800 OBO Also, Chapel length veil never worn, $75 OBO For more information call:

937-515-2692

AUCTION

Don’t Shell Out a Lot of Cash; Use the Classifieds.

FORD PARTS, motors, transmission. For sale, lumber from 1830’s home, oak, all parts. 937-289-1040.

Smart shoppers know about the bargains hidden within the Classified pages. In the Classifieds, you can track down deals on 804 - AUTOS WANTED everything from tickets to trailers. It’s easy to place an ad orfind the CASH FOR items you want, and it’s JUNK CARS & used by hundreds of TRUCKS area shoppers every day.

POST & Beam Kit, 14ft.x16ft. Oak included frame, rafters, braces, etc. 6” thick wall over 9ft. high to top plate. Would make a fine shop, room, garage, etc. Other oak available 2”x8” tongue & groove pine flooring. Call 937-289-1040.

CMYK

A&A

$200 & UP CASH ON THE Go with your instincts SPOT!! and use

t h e Cl a ssi f i e ds t o day. FREE TOW!

513-720-7982

Williamsburg, OH 45176, 2.2500 acres, $28,000.00 Yan Chu Huang to Tina Richey, 4341 McKeever Rd., Williamsburg, OH 45176, 0.7130 acre, $96,390.00 AMELIA VILLAGE Linda Gillespie to Gret Lanter 34 Robin Way, Amelia, OH 45102, 0.2310 acre, $77,200.00 BATAVIA VILLAGE Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to John MacLennan, 280 Broadway Street, Batavia, OH 45103, $79,500.00 MOSCOW VILLAGE Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Freda May Walker, 77 Elizabeth Street, Moscow, OH 45153, 0.2160 acre, $30,000.00 NEW RICHMOND VILLAGE John & Lynn Benison to Anthony Cunningham, et al, Country Place, New Richmond, OH 45157, 7.3490 acres, $25,000.00 WILLIAMSBURG VILLAGE Renaissance Properties Investments, LLC to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., 278 North Second Street, Williamsburg, OH 45176, 0.1030 acre, $26,667.00 MILFORD CITY Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Chad & Virginia Carrington, 653 Wallace Ave., Milford, OH 45150, 0.1790 acre, $54,000.00 James & Rhonda Jackson to Federal National Mortgage Assoc., 975 Seminole Trail, Milford, OH 45150, $125,170.00

facebook.com/clermontsun

ALFALFA/TIMOTHY MIXED hay, 2nd, 3rd & 4th cutting, green, weed free, high quality. Small square bales. 937-373-3631. CASH PAID TODAY! Buy furniture, antiques, tools, coins, gold, beer signs, silver, game systems, DVD’s, records, zippos, “All Most Anything!” 937-378-1819 or 937-378-2850

Batavia, OH 45103, 3.0400 acres, $151,000.00 Robin Lynne Tackett to Valerie & Barry Young, 5755 State Route 132, Batavia, OH 45103, 3.5030 acres, $232,000.00 Jessica Taylor to Robert & Marion Cotter, 2290 State Route 131, Goshen, OH 45122, $60,500.00 TATE Janis Marlene Allen to Wayne Smith, State Route 222, 5.0200 acres, $19,000.00 UNION NVR, Inc. to Rebecca Sinkhorn, 971 Shephard Woods Ct., Batavia, OH 45103, 0.3260 acre, $174,510.00 M/I Homes of Cincinnati, LLC to Renee Roberts, 4171 South Gensen Loop, Cincinnati, OH 45245, 0.1510 acre, $160,695.00 Mark Monterosso to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., 552 Aspen Glen Dr. Apt. 911, Cincinnati, OH 45244, $36,667.00 Brian Curry, et al. to Beneficial Ohio, Inc., 4280 Miliane Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45245, $73,333.34 Bank of America, as Trustee to John Gable, 4281 Pinetree Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45245, $80,000.00 WAYNE Household Realty Corp. to Maggie O'Rourke, 6235 Taylor Pike, Blanchester, OH 45107, 0.6890 acre, $53,000.00 WILLIAMSBURG US Bank National Assoc., ND to Danyell Kasten, 3485 Bethel Concord Rd.,

1-800-404-3157

REAL ESTATE ONLY .87 Acres • 6,351 Sq. Ft. Daycare Building

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

CLIFTON BROTHERS NEW HOME 109 BROOKSHIRE WAY • MT. ORAB BEACON HILL SUBDIVISION

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ODD THINGS DONE Bobcat Work - Rock Hound Excavation Grass Seeding Yard/Brush Clean-up Lawn Mowing Bush Hogging Wiring Installation Telephone Jacks Installed Painting Large or Small Jobs Call 513-724-2920

804 - AUTOS WANTED

B R O A D S H E E T

March 7, 2012 @ 10:00 AM Miami Township Civic Center 6101 Meijer Drive, Miami Township, OH 45150 The property is located at 1160 State Route 131 Milford, OH 45150 Clermont County Parcel Number: 182405A084 Inspection: Drive-by Only Terms: $16,500 day of sale with balance on or before April 6, 2012 Payment Terms: Cash, Certified or Cashier’s Check. Please visit www.irssales.gov for additional information and pictures.

Keith L. Thomas, PALS

502-572-2284

Living/Great Rm Kitchen Breakfast Room Family Room Master Bedroom Bedroom 2 Bedroom 3 Full Basement

16x14 15x14 8x8 20x17 21x16 14x15 15x12

175,000

$

LARRY CLIFTON 513-407-3949 TOM CLIFTON 937-213-1266 DICK CLIFTON 513-550-0378

O D D

OWENSVILLE, OH

ESTATE AUCTION

SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 - STARTS @2PM CONDOMINIUM

ESTATE AUCTION

SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2012 - STARTS @ 2PM OPEN FOR PREVIEW MARCH 6TH FROM 6:00 TO 7:00 PM FOR PRIVATE SHOWING - CALL (513) 732-6300

VILLAGE AT ROYAL OAK CONDOMINIUMS LOCATED: 973 UNIT #6 CEDAR RIDGE DR., CINCINNATI, OH. 45245. FROM I275, TAKE THE BEECHMONT AVE. (ST. RT. 125) EXIT. GO EAST ABOUT 2-1/2 MILES TO RIGHT ON MERWIN TEN MILE RD. (SKYLINE CHILI REST.). PROCEED FOR ABOUT 3/4 MILE TO RIGHT ON CEDAR RIDGE DR. ENTRANCE TO VILLAGE OF ROYAL OAK. FOLLOW CEDAR RIDGE AROUND AND WATCH FOR BUILDING NUMBER SIGN, TO #973 UNIT 6 IS ON THE 2ND LEVEL IN THE BACK. THE NEW OWNER OF THIS CONDO WILL BE IMPRESSED WITH THIS WELL ESTABLISHED AND MAINTAINED CONDO COMMUNITY. IN ADDITION TO ITS EXCELLENT LOCATION, YOU’LL ENJOY OTHER AMENITIES INCLUDING CLUB HOUSE, TENNIS COURTS AND SWIMMING POOL. ROYAL OAK GOLF COURSE IS NEARBY THIS UNIT CONTAINS 993 SQUARE FEET OF LIVING SPACE WHICH INCLUDES 2 NICE BEDROOMS, 2 FULL BATHROOMS, LIVING ROOM, DINING AREA, EQUIPPED KITCHEN, UTILITY/LAUNDRY ROOM, WALK IN CLOSETS; BALCONY/DECK AND AN ADDITIONAL HALLWAY STORAGE CLOSET. HAS QUALITY CARPETING AND ALL APPLIANCES INCLUDING WASHER & DRYER WILL BE INCLUDED IN THE SALE. IF YOU HAVE BEEN CONSIDERING BUYING A CONDO AND ENJOYING A CARE FREE LIFESTYLE, TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS BUYING OPPORTUNITY. YOU SET THE PRICE YOU WANT TO PAY!!! LONG TIME OWNERS SAY THIS IS A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE. NOTICE PREVIEW DATE ABOVE. TERMS - CONDITIONS: BEING SOLD TO SETTLE AN ESTATE. THE ACCEPTED HIGH BIDDER TO PAY A 10% DOWN PAYMENT EARNEST MONEY DEPOSIT OF THE PURCHASE PRICE AT THE CONCLUSION OF THE BIDDING AND SIGNING PURCHASE AGREEMENT. IMMEDIATE CONFIRMATION. A 10% BUYERS PREMIUM WILL BE ADDED TO THE FINAL BID TO ESTABLISH THE ACTUAL CONTRACT SALE PRICE. 30 DAYS TO CLOSE WITH FULL POSSESSION, ALL INSPECTIONS MUST BE MADE PRIOR TO AUCTION. BROKER/AUCTIONEER REPRESENTS THE ESTATE ONLY. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REFER TO CLERMONT COUNTY AUDITOR’S OFFICE PARCEL ID#286701F306 SELLING FOR THE ESTATE OF DAVID E. GROSS J. ROBERT TRUE, ADM. - CORRINE M. FARIS, ATTY. CLERMONT PROBATE CASE #201ES8635

JOEL T. WILSON CO. AUCTIONEERS SINCE 1955 - BATAVIA, OH (513) 732-6300 - WWW.JTWILSON.COM

INSPECTION - REGISTRATION - STARTS @ 1PM MOVED FROM A ROYAL OAK CONDOMINIUM FOR SPACE AND PARKING. THE FOLLOWING WILL BE SOLD AT ABSOLUTE AUCTION IN THE GYMNASIUM OF THE OLD OWENSVILLE GRADE SCHOOL, OWENSVILLE, OH 45160. THE SCHOOL IS LOCATED ON S. BROADWAY ST. (ST. RT. 132 & 276). FROM I-275 AT MILFORD, TAKE THE HILLSBORO EXIT ONTO U.S. RT. 50, GO EAST 10 MILES TO OWENSVILLE, RIGHT ON BROADWAY. QUALITY HOME FURNISHINGS - ENTERTAINMENT ITEMS, WRIST WATCH COLLECTION - JEWELRY - COINS - ACCESSORIES - DECOR - WILDLIFE PRINTS. FURNISHINGS: FABULOUS, TOP OF THE LINE, BROYHILL SIX PIECE BEDROOM SUITE; QUEEN SIZE SLEIGH BED WITH VERA WANG SERTA BEDDING; 10 DRAWER DOUBLE DRESSER; 5 DRAWER TALL CHEST; 3 DRAWER SHORT CHEST; NIGHT TABLE AND MATCHING ROUND, WALL MIRROR; MAROON COLORED LEATHER, 2 SEAT RECLINER SOFA; BEAUTIFUL DARK RED LEATHER ARM CHAIR; FULL SIZE, 3 CUSHION SOFA W/RECLINER ENDS; MATCHING RECLINER ROCKING CHAIR; NICE SELECTION OF GLASS INSERT ACCESSORY, END CENTER AND HALL TABLES W/DRAWERS; OAK FRAME GLASS CURIO CABINET; OVAL SHAPED OAK DINING TABLE; PAIR OF SWIVEL ARM CHAIRS AND OTHER FURNITURE. SONY BRAVIA XBR FLAT SCREEN TV PLUS SONY STEREO ENTERTAINMENT EQUIPMENT W/LOTS OF ACCESSORIES. ALSO HP DESK TOP AND HP INVENT LAP TOP COMPUTER IN A LEATHER CARRYING CASE. REPRO. CROSLEY TABLE RADIO AND MORE. SEVERAL QUALITY TABLE AND FLOOR LAMPS. UNIQUE MANTLE CLOCK. SEVERAL NICE FRAMES BIRD PRINTS - SOME SIGNED. SELECTION OF MODEL RACE CARS. 38 EARTH HOME FIGURINE COLLECTION PLUS SEVERAL CRYSTAL GLASS ANIMALS; LENOX ROOSTERS. HOUSEWARES INCLUDING SET OF CUISINART COOKWARE; DISHES; FLATWARE AND SEVERAL LARGE PLASTIC TUBE FULL OF ???. SPECIAL: 22 INVICTA, HIGH END MEN’S WRIST WATCHES. (SEVERAL STYLES & FEATURES) SIX MEN’S SEIKO WATCHES. BEAUTIFUL FIVE SET DIAMOND RING; OTHER RINGS & JEWELRY. COINS: INCLUDES 1999-2009 GOLD CLAD STATE QUARTER COLLECTION IN SHOW BOX. SEV. OLD SILVER DOLLARS; HALF DOLLARS; QUARTERS; PENNIES AND COMMEMORATIVE COINS & MORE.

Some pictures on www.jtwilson.com TERMS: CASH - CHECKS W/FULL PICTURE ID. SORRY NO CREDIT CARDS: NO BUYERS PREMIUM. COME PREPARED TO REMOVE YOUR PURCHASES. BRING YOUR OWN FOOD. SELLING FOR THE ESTATE OF DAVID E. GROSS J. ROBERT TRUE, ADM. CORRINE M. FARIS, ATTY. CLERMONT PROBATE CASE #201ES8635

JOEL T. WILSON CO. AUCTIONEERS SINCE 1955 - BATAVIA, OH (513) 732-6300 - WWW.JTWILSON.COM

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Page 14 - The Sunday Sun - February 26, 2012

TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER THE BOOKWORM SEZ

B R O A D S H E E T

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E V E N

Everybody loves being first. You know how great it is to be the kid at the head of the line. You like being first to speak up, first to finish your assignments, and it’s even fun to be the first kid on the playground or ball field because you get first choice for the equipment. But not everybody can be first. Somebody has to be second and, as you’ll see in the new book “Just as Good” by Chris Crowe, illustrated by Mike Benny, coming next in line can be pretty awesome, too. Homer and his Daddy loved the Cleveland Indians baseball team. It was 1947, and they knew that baseball season was going to be great because Larry Doby joined the team that year. Doby wasn’t the first Negro pro ball player – Jackie Robinson was first overall – but Doby was the first in the American League and to Homer, that was miracle enough. Because of some bad news lately, Homer needed a miracle. It started when Coach O’Brien kicked him off the Little League team because Coach said Negro ballplayers weren’t “worth a spit!” That made Homer mad and sad, but now Larry Doby gave him hope. By fall, Homer’s dreams had come true: the Cleveland Indians were in the World Series! Everybody was excited, but nobody was more excited than Homer. On game day, he finished up his paper route and raced home to do his

“Just as Good: How Larry Doby Changed America’s Game” by Chris Crowe, illustrated by Mike Benny c.2012, Candlewick Press; $16.99 / $19.00 Canada 32 pages

chores. He had to be at Standard Drug to get his spot near the radio, or he’d miss the big game. But Daddy had a surprise: he bought a radio just so they could listen to the action on the field. The sound was crackly but they found the station and they could hear every hit, every run, and every yell from the announcer, Mel Allen. As the game played out, Homer and Daddy paced and danced and urged the Indians to hold on to their onerun lead. And you can bet the Indians did! The morning after the game, Daddy helped Homer fold newspapers for the paper route. That was nice, but Homer knew that Daddy really only wanted to be first to see the newspaper. There, he found a picture of two faces, one black and one white, smiling as big as Lake Erie ... Sometimes, it’s hard to remember how much has changed in the past few

decades. Your young sports fan, for instance, will never know a color line in any sport, and this book helps to explain why. Based on a true event, this often-overshadowed tale is spun into an exciting fictional story that kids can relate to, and author Chris Crowe also includes a nice set of historical notes as well as a bibliography that will send you running to the library. I liked that, and I liked the rich illustrations from Mike Benny. I think that, if your 4-to7-year-old slugger loves a good read-aloud, this is the book to catch. For him (or her), “Just as Good” will be up first. The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 12,000 books.

BY STEVE BOEHME It’s hard to imagine garden soil that couldn’t be improved with a generous helping of peat moss. We call it the “magic dust.” Why? Let me count the ways. Most of us live with hard clay soil in summer and chewing gum clay in winter. We’ve all struggled with the dense muck of early spring garden soils, so gluey and gooey that it sticks to everything. This heavy soil is the enemy for most plants, so dense and lacking in oxygen that only the toughest survivors can get anything from it. Water runs right off it instead of soaking in, but if there’s a low spot it will lay wet and refuse to ever dry out. The same soil in August is as hard as brick. If we manage to dig a hole in it, we make a bowl that traps water and drowns our plants in a few days. Most “topsoil” in this area is still heavy clay, mostly lacking in nutrients and too dense for water or air to penetrate well. Even top soils that are compostrich tend to be waterlogged at planting time, costing gardeners precious days when timing is critical. We’ve been able to plant successfully even when gardens are soggy and saturated the way they are now, from all the rain we’ve had. Our secret is adding three or four inches of peat moss on top and deep-tilling. Peat moss is bone dry and absorbs many times its weight in water, so tilling into wet soil dries things out immediately. Plants breathe through their roots. If there’s a piece of knowledge that separates “green thumb” gardeners from the rest of us, it’s that one simple idea. Roots need contact with air. Next time you buy a pot-grown plant of any kind, take a good

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‘Just as Good’ will be a great read for up and coming sluggers

Peat moss is the green thumb’s soil secret

Adding peat moss to your garden or landscape beds makes planting easier and helps plants grow better. Just spread it out and till it in, the more the better. (GoodSeed Farm photo)

look at the “soil” in the pot. It’s barely there. It dries out in a flash, and then it’s just fluff and air. Growers know that plants breathe through their roots. The more air is in the pot instead of dirt, the faster the plant will grow and bloom and sell and turn into cash, so the grower can sell it and plant the next one. Peat moss is the main ingredient in potting soils. It holds tremendous amounts of air and water, is slow to decay, and has a high acid content (low PH), which is good for most plants. Peat moss even improves sandy soils, helping them retain water instead of drying out. What all this means it that mixing peat moss will help almost any soil grow better plants. Whenever we plant gardens, trees or landscape beds we always till in plenty of peat moss to break up the clay soil. Peat moss isn’t food; it simply adds organic matter to the soil to keep it from sticking together and permit air the reach the

plant roots. We call this “making fluffy dirt.” It helps plants build healthy root systems quickly. It also makes the tiller’s work easier. It’s magic. It’s important to always have a bale of peat moss on hand. Any time you plant anything, you should add some peat to the soils as you’re digging. You’ll find that putting a pile of peat moss on top before you start makes the digging much easier, and as you mix the peat with the soil the clumps and lumps break up. Once you’ve tried it you’ll never be without it. Steve Boehme is the owner of GoodSeed Farm Country Nursery & Landscape, located on Old State Route 32 three miles west of Peebles. To e-mail your landscaping questions or subscribe to this column online click “Contact Us” from their website at www.goodseedfarm.com or call (937) 587-7021.

Clermont flag retirement ceremony set for June 10 The Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 649 invites Clermont County citizens to the second annual Flag Retirement Ceremony, set for 1 p.m. Sunday, June 10 at the Union Township Civic Center, located at 4350 Aicholtz Road. “Last year we disposed of around 3,000 American flags that were too worn and tattered to be displayed,” said VVA Board member Steve Tam. “The ceremony involves cutting the flags into strips, burning the pieces, and then burying the ashes in an air tight container. It is a very respectful ceremony.” Tam said he is saddened when he sees a tattered American flag flying at a home or business. “This is a symbol of our nation and should be respected,” he said. Federal law stipu-

lates many aspects of flag etiquette, including the requirement that when a flag is so worn it is no longer fit to serve as a symbol of our country, it should be destroyed by burning in a dignified manner. While all of the collected flags will not be burned at the ceremony on June 10, Tam said all will be handled with proper dignity and respect. There are a number of collection sites that have been set-up across Clermont County to accept worn flags from homes, schools, and businesses. The collection sites are listed on the website www.vva649.org; click on upcoming events. More information about the collection sites is also available by calling (513) 797-4693.

Steve Tam, a member of the Vietnam Veterans of America, Chapter 649, holds an old, faded, tattered American flag .

CMYK

Bookworm Sez


When sending the kids out to play, keep the following outdoor safety tips for children in mind. Adult Supervision - Adult supervision is one of the best

methods to prevent any mishaps from happening. An adult being present on the scene can not only keep a close eye on the child, but the child has someone to call out

to in case of any problem. So also, the child knows that there is someone who is around and so he will avoid doing anything that is not considered 'OK' by elders, and

which he might have done otherwise. Equipment Check - If there is a particular playground that the child visits often, or he has a fixed place that he plays in, then make sure that you have the area checked for safety in terms of equipment. Are the kids playing with something sharp, or which is rusted, or has jagged edges? All of which could pose serious threats. So also, if the kids are in the younger kids bracket, then is the equipment age appropriate for them? Can they handle it well? All these summer safety tips for children, especially, younger children are really necessary to take into consideration. Swings and Slides - Make sure that you give them a thorough knowledge of what should and should not be done when they are on slides or swings. Like tell them that standing in front of a swing when others are on it can cause them to get hurt. Or not to take skipping ropes onto ladders because of the dangers of their legs entangling in it. So also not to crowd onto equipment, sliding down one at a time, no jumping when at a height etc. Dress Code - Make sure that the kids are wearing clothes which will not get entangled in things and cause a fall. These would include scarves, loose clothes, stray strings, and hoods. So also hair should be tied instead of left open. Make sure that their feet are well covered because a playground can have several sharp objects lying around.

re Ca t

N.S. Lodwick, D.V.M. J.E. Gish, D.V.M. D.C. Chalker, D.V.M.

Life Transitions

Senior Cat

Puppy Care Adult Dog

Adult Cat Senior Dog

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Playground safety tips for kids Pe

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D S K I 9242 Hamer Rd., Georgetown, Ohio Office Hours by Appointment

(937) 378-6334

Kitten Care

Exceptional Veterinary Care For Every Stage Of Your Precious Pet’s Life!

G EORGETOWN ANIMAL HOSPITAL

“The Vet... With a Heart”

MT. ORAB FOOD COURT

937-444-4387

If you are having a gathering or party and do not have the room, you can reserve our party-room, which will accomodate up to 24 people.

CHILDREN’S BIRTHDAY PACKAGE $ 49.00 for 2 Hours

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Includes: Up to 10 Kids Meals and Drinks 10 Kids Ice Cream Cones, Balloons and Decorations This room is also available for meetings or other gatherings. Call 937-444-2601 for information.

MT. ORAB FOOD COURT 103 GLOVER DR. 937-444-2601 MT. ORAB, OHIO

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• Children 10 Years And Under •


Happy Days Preschool

Full Line of Items for Dogs, Cats, Birds, Fish, Reptiles and Any Other Pet a Family Might Own! Many Small Animals: Reptiles, Birds, Fish, Sugar Gliders, Hedgehogs and More!

402 West Plane Street, Bethel

104 N. High St. Mt. Orab

Quality preschool since 1971 For ages 3 - 4 - 5 year olds For more information call: Elaine Rector at

513-734-6822

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D S K I (937) 444-3959 Mon - Sat 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. • Wed 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.• Closed Sunday

What runs but never walks? . . Water! Why do birds fly south in the winter? . . . Because it's too far to walk! What followed the dinosaur? . . . It's tail!

Healthy traveling with kids The time for your vacation has finally arrived! Whether you're going away for a day or a week and traveling by car or by plane, we've got you covered. These foodsavvy tips will help satisfy and keep the "I'm hungry" whines to a minimum. Car Rides - If you plan ahead, it's easy to ignore all those fast food joints flagging you down along the road. For shorter rides, pack some dry, easy-to-eat snacks like pretzels and string cheese, sliced fruit like strawberries and bananas, or a homemade trail mix (dried apricots, raisins, cashews). For longer trips, it's important that cold food stays cold to keep your kids healthy (nobody likes a tummy ache on the road). Grab a cooler and ice packs, and plan a picnic. Some

healthy cooler - packing ideas: Sandwiches - peanut butter Sandwiches - peanut butter & jelly, turkey & cheese, hummus & fresh fruit (grapes, apples, bananas, tangerines) Cheese sticks or yogurt Carrot sticks, bell pepper slices, cucumber slices 100% juice boxes and bottles of water Don't forget to include a treat - a few cookies or a single-serving pudding should be enough to ward off the kids' sweet cravings and avoid a gas station candy raid. Flying - Let's face it: airports and planes are challenging with expensive food terrains. With no included meals and limited space in your carry-on, smart planning is essential. For shorter flights (under four hours), bring dry snacks from home

Adkins Athletic Apparel Teresa Adkins - Owner

937-444-9636 311 Oak Ridge Drive, Mt. Orab, Ohio 45154 www.adkinsathleticapparel.com email: sales@adkinsathleticapparel.com

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“Tired of the BULLSHIRT... try Adkins Athletic Apparel”

(trail mix, dry cereal, bitesized crackers, mini boxes of raisins), or pick up these snacks, usually available in the airport: Fresh fruit (apples and bananas are available nearly everywhere) Small bags of nuts or dried fruit Turkey and cheese sandwich Pretzels Yogurt For longer flights, expand your food options by using a small cooler or an insulated lunch bag - you can fold it up when you're finished and restock it for the ride home. Avoid packing foods with strong odors such as salami and tuna -strong smells and confined spaces are not a good combination. Food spoils quickly when out of the fridge, so put some ice in plastic baggies and store it with food. Once you arrive at the airport, you'll need to dump the ice and restock it from one of the vendors after you're through security. Toss out any leftovers upon landing. It's easy to dehydrate on the plane. Before boarding, as long as the flight is not international, you're allowed to buy a few bottles of water after passing through security. Don't forget to pack a sippy cup to refill during the flight - it will help avoid the dreaded spills (and clothing changes). Also, bring some games to keep your kids occupied - coloring books, sticker books and other activities help keep them from

eating when they aren't necessarily hungry.

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By: Toby Amidor, MS RD CDN and Jacqueline Zimmerman, MS


Healthy teeth are important - even baby teeth! Very few things warm the spirit like a child’s smile. The care of baby teeth is an essential part of every child’s overall health because baby teeth are just as important as adult teeth. The primary or baby teeth allow the child to properly chew their food for proper nutrition, digestion, and growth. Baby teeth play a role in speech develop-

ment and greatly affect the appearance of the face. One of the baby teeth’s most important functions is to hold space in the jaws for the future placement for permanent teeth. Missing or early loss of baby teeth can cause space loss that can result in crowding or blockage of the eruption of permanent teeth. A baby’s first teeth begin to

ANTHONY A. K AMP DMD, MSD Pediatric Dentist Dentistry for Infants, Children, Young Adults, and Special Needs

www.anthonykampdmd.com

appear in the mouth at approximately six months of age. The lower front teeth usually appear first. Most children will have a set of 20 baby teeth by the time that they are three years of age. The permanent teeth on average begin appearing at six years, but the baby teeth are not totally replaced in most children until 12 years of age. Just as the first teeth appear within the first year of life, it is recommended that children have their first dental visit also within the first year. These early visits allow your dentist to give anticipatory guidance to the family on oral care, diet, and prevention, so that the child can grow up cavity free. Decay of baby teeth puts the child at a higher risk for decay in the adult teeth. Early dentist office visits are important, and proper homecare is the basis for overall dental health. Your dentist can give you expert advice on raising a cavity-free child. Homecare begins by cleaning a baby’s mouth during the first few days after birth. After every feeding, the baby’s gums should be wiped with a clean gauze or wet washcloth. As the teeth begin to erupt into the mouth they should be brushed gently with a small child-sized toothbrush and water. After the age of two years, a thin layer or a pea-

ANGEL BYUS

sized amount of fluoridated toothpaste can also be used if the child can spit out the toothpaste without swallowing it. Many “training” toothpastes are available that do not contain fluoride and are safe for the child to swallow and are great ways to introduce children to brushing with a toothpaste. Also, a child needs to learn to have good eating habits. A child should have a balanced diet, choosing foods from the main food groups: grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy, and meats. In between meal snacks should be limited. Infants should finish their bottles before going to bed and should have their gums cleaned with a gauze pad or wet washcloth. Tooth decay can occur in early childhood when parents or caregivers put a baby to bed with a bottle of any liquid other than water or use the bottle as a pacifier for a fussy baby. For more information on prevention and oral care, contact your family or pediatric dentist. The American Dental Association (www.ada.org) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (www.aapd.org) are also excellent online sources for information for parents. Healthy teeth are important—even the baby teeth.

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D S K I owner stitchtech@hotmail.com Office 513-734-2999

STITCH TECH “EMBROIDERY AND SCREEN PRINT APPAREL”

fax # 513-734-2201 220 West Plane Street Bethel, Ohio 45106

COLOR AND CONNECT THE DOTS!

Anthony A. Kamp, DMD, MSD Pediatric Dentist

COLOR THE KITTY CAT!

5716B Signal Hill Court, Milford, OH

513-831-7672

Teaching children ages 6 weeks - 12 years Monday-Friday 6:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Professional environment Owner - Terry Miller Administrator - Carrie Bolender

111 West Plane, Bethel

Pressley Ridge is currently seeking skilled parents to provide food, shelter, supervision, and structure to children of all ages. These children are waiting to be a part of your family and want to live in a stable home with parents who appreciate the difficutlites of childhood. Pressley Ridge provides training, lots of support, and a generous daily stipend.

Call Brandy Mains, 513-309-4705. Training begins immediately.

SONSHINE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER 513-797-6351 Ages 6 weeks to 12 years Low Rates • Hot Meals Individual Lesson Plans • Fenced Yard Pre-school program Transportation to Holly Hill and Amelia Elementary

3396 Mauch Rd. Amelia, Ohio 45102

412 Walnut Street New Richmond, OH 45157

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513-553-1800 Purchase 1 Specialty Pizza and receive an entry for our

KID’S BIKE GIVEAWAY March 31st

• 1 entry with pizza purchase per family • Additional tickets may be purchased $1 per ticket or $3 for 5 • Bike will be on display in March • Offer good March 1st thru March 30th

$1 PER PIZZA AND PROCEEDS FROM RAFFLE WILL GO TOWARDS THE REFUGE

Kid’s Cookie Recipe No Bake Cookies Ingredients: 2 cups white sugar 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1/2 cup milk 1/2 cup butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 pinch salt 1/2 cup chunky peanut butter 3 cups quick cooking oats Directions: 1. In a saucepan over medium heat, combine the cocoa, sugar, milk and butter. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Boil for 1 minute. 2. Remove from heat and stir in the salt, vanilla, oats and peanut butter. 3. Drop by rounded spoonfuls onto waxed paper. Allow cookies to cool for at least 1 hour.

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“WHERE CHILDREN GROW THROUGH LEARNING”


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Kid’s Cookie Recipe - IceBox Cookies

If two's company and three a crowd, what are four and five? . . . Nine! What is it that even the most careful person overlooks? . . . His nose!

Ingredients

Directions

1/2 cup butter or margarine, softened 1 cup packed brown sugar 1 egg, beaten 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup chopped walnuts

In a mixing bowl, cream the butter and brown sugar. Add egg and vanilla; beat well. Combine dry ingredients; add to creamed mixture. Stir in nuts if desire. On a lightly floured surface shape the dough into three 10-in. x 1-in. rolls. Tightly wrap each roll in waxed paper. Freeze for at least 12 hours. Cut into 3/8-in slices and place on greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees F for 6-8 minutes. Remove to a wire rack to cool.

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What do you call an American drawing? . . . Yankee doodle!


Sunday Sun, February 26, 2012