Page 1

PHS Senior Profile

Brush Creek Access

Page 7

Issue 28, Volume 44

U.S. Postage Paid Mailed From Zip Code 45693 Permit No. 20

Page 5

Breaking news at peoplesdefender.com

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Thyme to trim the Christmas Tree Local guild donates festive herbal tree to Shawnee Lodge BY PATRICIA BEECH PEOPLE’S DEFENDER Bringing seasoning to the Season! It's an idea that has become the unique calling card of the Adams County Herb Guild whose members have added their Herbal Christmas Tree to the copious holiday trimmings that deck the halls of Shawnee Park Lodge in Scioto County. “Ours is the only tree in the lodge that features

herbs,” says Guild President, Pam Westfall. “All the other trees are supplied by local flower guilds.” The guild's 17 members share an enthusiastic interest in herbs - from preserving the ancient knowledge of their healing powers to promoting their use in a variety of cuisines. “This is our second year at the lodge,” says Westfall. “We hope our tree helps to educate others about all of the different uses for herbs.”

The Guild, founded in 1986, celebrates its 30th anniversary this year and Westfall says that its members all share a common vision. “Our purpose has always been to promote interest in the cultures and uses of herbs through education, and to share the knowledge we have gained with others in our community.” The guild was established as an extension of the Lewis Mountain Herb Festival. After the Lewis

festival ended the guild continued to remain active in the Wheat Ridge Herb Festival held each fall at Grindstone Farm on Tater Ridge Road, as well as many other local fall festivals where they share their knowledge and skill. “We sell our own blend of herbs and spices at the local festivals,” says the guild's Vice President, Lindsay Willman. “And we talk to people about grow See Tree / 5

Community turns out for SSCC Adams County Campus meeting on Nov. 17 BY KRIS CROSS DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS The boards of Adams County Ohio Valley Schools and Southern State Community College cohosted a Community Meeting Nov. 17 to further explore the possibility of a Southern State campus adjacent to ACOV’s central Submitted photo administrative office and career and technical center. This “herbal” Christmas tree, decorated by the ladies “I’m excited about what of the Adams County Herb Guild, is one of the deco- we have to share this rations at the Shawnee Park Lodge. evening,” said Mike Pell,

Chair of the SSCC Board of Trustees. “I’m passionate about education and about Adams County, and I am committed to providing our residents with a college facility to give them better access to post-secondary education.” An informational presentation was given by members of the Southern State Community College administration, followed by an opportunity for public comment and questions. “Bringing a Southern State campus to Adams

County is not a new idea. We’ve long wanted to do it and we’re committed to making it a reality,” said Dr. Kevin Boys, SSCC President. “We have been working with the Adams County Ohio Valley Schools on a proposal to co-locate our campus adjacent to the Ohio Valley Career and Technical Center in West Union. Throughout the planning process, it became clear that for sustainability purposes, an Adams County campus needed to be centrally locat-

ed in order to reach all corners.” Dr. Boys outlined three aspects of the co-location proposal: purpose, need, and goals. “First, our purpose with this project is to deliver on our mission of providing affordable, accessible, high quality education to the people of Adams County. Second, the need in Adams County is reflected in these statistics – only 16.8 percent have post-secondary credentials, 23.1 See SSCC / 5


LOCAL NEWS

2 West Union People’s Defender

Sunday, December 4, 2016

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OBITUARY

West Union People’s Defender

Michael G. Tincher

Michael G. Tincher, 71 years, of Winchester passed away Monday Nov. 28, 2016 at his home in Winchester. He was born the son of the late Raymond and Barbara (Moore) Tincher in Olive Hill, Ky. on March 2, 1945. Besides his parents, he was also preceded in death by one son, Will Stern and one granddaughter, Kirsten Stern. Michael served in the National Guard in Manchester and retired as a Mechanic from Gil and Mike's Transmission in Owensville. Michael is survived by his wife Carma Tincher of Winchester; two daughters, Emily Stern of Dayton, and Elizabeth (Russell) Warren of Peebles; one brother,

Donnie (Kaiajade) Tincher of Peebles; sister Shirley (Richard) Arn of Winchester; two nieces, Amanda (Jim) Schroeder and Tandra Tincher; two nephews, Matthew (Trini) Arn, and Chad Tincher; five grandchildren; Allen and Connor Head, Reagan and Ryne Warren, and Ethan Stern; several great nieces, great nephews, cousins and a host of friends. Services were held at 1 p.m. on Thursday Dec. 1, 2016 at the Bradford Sullivan Funeral Home in Winchester with Reverend Dan Harrison officiating, and a burial followed at the Cherry Fork Cemetery. The family asks that donations be made to a charity of the donator's choice in Michael's memory.

Jeffrey A. Daley Sr. age 53 years of Manchester, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 at the University Of Cincinnati Hospital. Mr. Daley was born Feb. 3, 1963, the son of Eugene and Shirley (Knox) Daley in Adams County. Funeral services were

held on Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 at 1 p.m. at the Thompson-Meeker Funeral Home in West Union with Doug Shelton officiating. Burial followed in the Palmer Cemetery. Memorials can be made to the family of Jeffrey Daley Sr.

Nov. 18-23, 2016

Wesley M. Baldwin, Sheila Baldwin to Michael R. Baldwin, Monroe Twp, 9.806 ac. Wesley M. Baldwin, Wesley M. Baldwin Trustee, Wesley M. Baldwin Trust, Sheila Baldwin, Sheila Baldwin Trustee, Sheila Baldwin Trust to Wesley M. Baldwin Trustee, Wesley M. Baldwin Trust, Sheila Baldwin, Shelia Baldwin Trust, Winchester Twp, 79.238 ac. Charlene Grooms Trustee, Michael Grooms Trustee, Ruby J. Evans Trust to Michael S. Grooms, Charlene Grooms, Tiffin Twp, 0.69 ac. Ikey Elwood Cox to John R. Easter, Crystal Easter, Jefferson Twp, 22.428 ac., Brush Creek Twp, 76.027 ac. Jeffrey Post, Michelle M. Post to Michael L. Murtland Properties LLC, Monroe Twp, 63.865 ac. Phyllis C. Grooms, Arthur A. Grooms to Cedar Grove Baptist Church, Brush Creek Twp, 0.458 ac. Daril Arnold, Judy Sturgill to Zachary Scott Lowe, Liberty Twp, 10.064 ac. Wilbur Shelton, Mary Ellen Shelton to Ty R. Mitchell, Sarah W. Mitchell, Manchester Village, lots 29, 66

Chester A. Mann

Chester A. Mann, 71 years of Winchester, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, at the Meadowview Regional Medical Center, Maysville, Ky. Chester was born Sept. 29, 1945, in Greenfield, Ohio, the son of the late Edgar Carl Mann and Ada B. Kauffman. Chester worked in assembly at the Copeland plant in West Union. He is survived by his sister, Carol (Thomas) Porter, of Seaman; three nephews, Darryl (Pam)

Pence celebrating 90th birthday

Sunday, December 4, 2016 3

LOCAL NEWS Porter, David (Lori) Porter, and Devin Porter, all of Seaman; and several great-nieces, greatnephews, cousins, friends and neighbors. Services will be held at 1 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 5, 2016 at the BradfordSullivan Funeral Home in Winchester. Pastor Steve Warnock will officiate, and a burial will follow at the Winchester Cemetery. Friends and Family may call from 11 a.m. until the time of services on Monday at the funeral home.

Representative Johnson receives 20-Year Faithful Service Medal from Ohio Adjutant General

Jeffery Daley, Sr.

Submitted photo

Allen Pence will be turning 90 on Dec. 15. The family would like to invite everyone to come celebrate his life on Sunday, Dec. 4 from noon - 3 p.m. at the Winchester United Methodist Church at 70 Washington Street. A meal will be provided. No gifts please.

Land Transfers Vickie L. Frost, Doug Frost to Michael Cox, Rome Village, 0.04 ac., lot 6 Joyce Jones, David E. Jones, Joyce Bowser to Gary Rowland, Meigs Twp, 1.397 ac. Ronald L. Styles, Sally Styles to Corey Green, Tiffin Twp, 1.599 ac. Joyce Jones, Joyce Bowser, David E. Jones to Jason Laporte, Meigs Twp, 53.741 ac. Julia Faye Tolle, Michael Gail Tolle to Carl Tolle, Franklin Twp, 13.857 ac. Martin K. Vesole to MKV Investments LLC, Peebles Village, 0.76 ac. Judy K. Watson, Rodney L. Dryden to David E. Fay Trustee, David E. Fay, Trust, Pamela A. Fay Trustee, Pamela A. Fay Trust, Sprigg Twp, 0.231 ac. Fredricka Jenkins, Roy Carpenter to Matthew W. Wright, Sheila A. Wright, Manchester Twp, 11.90 ac., Manchester Village, 11.72 ac. Harvey Schrock, Anna Schrock to John Alan Miller, Laura Miller, Oliver Twp, 88.127 ac. Mary J. Jones to Kyle Douglas Roehling, Vickie Barr, Manchester Village, lot 578, pt 577

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Submitted photo

Ohio Representative Terry Johnson was awarded his 20 Year Faithful Service Medal from the Ohio Adjutant General on Tuesday, Nov. 29 during House Session. PRESS RELEASE

Representative Terry Johnson received his 20 Year Faithful Service Medal from the Ohio Adjutant General on Tuesday, Nov. 29 during House Session. “The 21 years that I served in the Ohio Army National Guard were among the best of my life. My primary job was to care for our soldiers, to look after all aspects of their health and keep them battle ready. In the process, I got to travel the world and do and see things that I never could have in my civilian practice. What an honor it was, and this service medal will now be at hand to remind me of this remarkable time,” said Johnson. Johnson, who is a retired colonel, served in the Ohio Army National

Looking for a fur-ever home

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Hi, I'm Quartz! I'm smart and fun and very, very artistic. I like to rearrange my cage every day, and I also like to hide under my blanket to see the world from a different perspective. I need a minor eye surgery, but it's not enough to slow me down. Every day spent with me will be interesting, I promise. Come to the HSAC and see.

Guard from 1990 to 2011. He ended his military career as the Army Guard’s State Surgeon, the highest position attainable for a Medical Corps officer at that time.


THE

4 West Union People’s Defender

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THE

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LOCAL NEWS

Community Announcements

Venture Productions accepting toys for Christmas Sharing Venture Productions is now accepting new, unwrapped toys for the Christmas Sharing Project. Toys can be dropped off to Venture Productions between 7 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday-Friday. Deadline for dropping toys off is Dec. 6. Homeless Shelter looking for holiday donations The Adams County Homeless Shelter would like to wish everyone a wonderful holiday season, but urge everyone to keep in mind those who are struggling and homeless. Please consider a donation office at (937) 695-0680. Democrat Club meeting is Dec. 3 The Adams County Democrat Club covered dish meeting will be Saturday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. at Venture Productions. The meeting is hosted by Manchester and there will be an $8-10 gift exchange and a visit from Santa. ACCV will meet Dec. 6 Adams County for

Christian Values will hold their next meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at the Adams County Christian School, starting at 7 p.m.

Agricultural Society Meeting is Dec. 8 The Adams County Agricultural Society will hold its December meeting on Dec. 8 at 7:30 p.m. at the fairgrounds. Bids for the last Grant Project will be opened during the meeting.

Humane Society Open House is Dec. 10 The Humane Society of Adams County is hosting a SantaPaws Open House on Dec. 10 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at their Adoption Center at 11481 St. Rt. 41 South in West Union, OH. Enjoy pictures with Santa, refreshments, Leash/Toy/and Collar Drive, and view our adoptable pets and meet the staff of the Humane Society of Adams County. For information contact (937) 5448585 or email adamscountyanimals@gma il.com.

meet Dec. 10 The scheduled Nov. 29 meeting of the Adams County DAV Chapter #71 has been cancelled and changed to Dec. 10 because of the conflict with the Thanksgiving holiday. The Dec. 31 meeting has also been moved to Dec. 10 because of the conflict with the New Year holiday.

Aberdeen Hometown Christmas is Dec. 10 The 2016 Aberdeen Hometown Christmas will be held on Dec. 10 at the Aberdeen Community Center, with doors opening at 4:30 p.m. Santa will arrive at 5:30 p.m. and free food and door prizes will be available for all ages. COAD4Kids offers childcare services If you are a parent searching for care or an individual interested in providing childcare, COAD 4Kids can help. Call 1-800-577-2276 or locally 740-354-6527 for information about childcare and the free services offered.

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Ohio Can meets in Seaman Ohio Can, a non-profit group pro-active in raising money to get the community involved in drug awareness and prevention, will meet on the first Thursday of every month from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Seaman Community Building. The group plans on putting together meaningful events to gather support in Adams County. Snacks and beverages will be provided. For more information, call 937-2171527 or email solaceofadamscounty@gmail.com Reformers Unanimous to meet The Reformers Unanimous Addiction Recovery Program is held 7 p.m. every Friday at 106 Rice Drive in West Union. For information contact Phil Fulton at 937-5871797 or Ron Baker at 937544-4110.

Celebrate recovery A Christ-centered recovery program for people who struggle with addictions or any life-controlling issue will meet on Mondays from 6 -8:30 p.m. at Church 180 located at 2556 Moores Road, in Seaman. A program for

children (ages 5-12) of parents who attend the program is available as well. For more information contact Dan Sheridan at 937205-5464 or Carol Sheridan at 513-509-3911. Solace of Adams County meeting twice a month Solace of Adams County, a local community group that supports individuals who have suffered the loss of a loved one to drugs, will meet on the second and fourth Friday of every month from 6:308:30 p.m. in the second floor Conference Room of the Adams County Regional Medical Center. The group will also provide support to recovering addicts, as well as advocating prevention and bringing awareness into the community. Snacks and beverages will be provided and for more information, call 937-217-1527 or email solaceofadamscounty@gm ail.com

Narcotics Anonymous meeting every Thursday Narcotics Anonymous a 12-step recovery plan, will meet at 7 p.m. on Thursdays at the Holy Trinity Parish at 612 E. Mulberry Street in West Union.

Do you have enough hay for the winter?

As we move toward the winter months, there are lots of things to get done. Some people are already feeding hay, and some still have some stockpiled grass for the livestock to graze into the winter months. In either case, here are a few things to consider as we move into the month of December. Some of these need to be done as soon as possible to maximize the effort. 1. Cull cows that need to go. If you have kept good records, this is one of the times they will come in handy. Look at the records to see things like production of pounds of calf, the age of the cow, and the ability to breed back on time. These should all be considered. Also look at the soundness of the cow’s feet and legs. She needs to be able to get around well for grazing over several acres. Do not forget the udder soundness. The cows should be productive in all quarters and not have an udder that is difficult for newborn calves to nurse. Do not forget the eyes. There are some early signs of problems that can lead to “cancer eye” in cows, like little pink tumors on the eye or eyelids, as well as other signs. Examine the eyes the next time you put the cows through the chute. Last, but not least, cull any cows that have bad attitudes. If you have a cow that has an attitude problem, she needs to go even if you have enough feed. I know, she produces good calves, but she is still a problem that you do not need. If you still have more

DAV Chapter #71 will

cows than you have feed, start looking at the older cows first. Cows begin to decline around 10 years of age, so knowing how old your cows are is another good use of the records that you keep. You may want to check the cow’s teeth to help evaluate her age and her ability to use the feed that you make available to her. 2. Get your forages tested. Regardless if you have decent hay, corn stalks, CRP hay, or soybean stubble, knowing what nutrition your forage will provide will give you a better idea of what you need to do to meet the needs of the cows with a supplement. 3. Realize that corn is not as high as it sounds when you compare it to other feeds. Corn at $4 per bushel is just a little over seven cents per pound and $142.86 per ton. Corn can be bought for well under $4 per bushel now if you have storage. A few gravity beds will hold several bushels of temporary storage. That still is not as cheap as it was a few years ago, but when you compare the energy you get compared

Holiday Craft Show Wrap up your Christmas shopping

December 10, 2016 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Adams County Fairgrounds Administrative Building Free Admission Handcrafted items, candies, baked goods Provided by Local Crafters

to a ton of low quality hay or corn stalks, it is something to look at, because the feed value is not even close. Buying corn, distiller’s grain, corn gluten, soybean hull pellets or other feed stuffs now will most likely save you money, as prices typically rise in the coming months. Granted, we are not in a typical year. Things are not close to typical right now when it comes to prices or predictions. When it comes to feeding the cows, you have some work to do. It is hard to predict what kind of weather we will have in the coming months. Keep in mind you need to meet the nutritional needs, not just keep them full. If you are feeding lower quality hay, then supplementing them with corn may be a good option for your herd. If cows are in less than ideal condition, don’t wait any longer to try to put weight back on them for winter. Keep in mind that cows that are bred for spring calving may be at their lowest need for nutrients right now. I said may be because spring calving is a term used kind of loosely. If spring calving means cows start dropping calves in March and April, then the lower nutrition needs in November is accurate unless they are in poor body condition as I mentioned earlier. However, if spring calving means calves on the ground in January, then the game just changed. To be more accurate, the cows will need the least nutrition when they are without a

nursing calf and at least three months prior to calving. With that said, you should be feeding your poorest quality hay at least three months prior to your calving season. The cows will need additional energy and protein in the last three months of pregnancy. Dry cows should have at least seven to eight percent protein, while young cows (two and three year olds) are still growing, they will need 11 to 12 percent protein. The protein should be increased on the last three months of pregnancy to around 11 percent and keep it there while they are nursing calves. Ideally heifers and young cows should be separated from the older cows. For starters, it is impossible to feed different protein levels if they are together, but also keep in mind that the younger cattle will most often be pushed aside by the more dominant older cows, thus not receiving the protein or energy that they require. 4. Realize that cows do not need to have their head stuck in a hay ring from Christmas until Easter to survive the winter. Cows can be fed limited hay with a supplement and be just fine. Cows fed 10 or so pounds of corn per day with a protein supplement can be fine with 10 pounds of hay. This may require feeding hay in a location that you can keep the cows out of for part of the day. Ideally feeding the corn in the morning, and then allowing them to the hay rings for two or three hours about six or seven hours after the corn

would work best. This will require extra management, but time might be cheaper than letting them eat all of the hay they want. 5. Maintain a good mineral program. Loose mineral is the best bet for cows getting what they need on a daily basis. The cost of the mineral is not the only thing you need to look at when deciding which mineral to use. Keep in mind that you need to feed your cattle, but not the parasites. Maintain a good parasite control program throughout the year. I addressed this in this column a couple weeks ago. Consult your local veterinarian for more information.

FROM THE OHIO DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE

cord. One cord, when properly stacked, should be 8 feet long by 4 feet high and 4 feet wide (128 cubic feet). - If sold in bulk, firewood must be purchased by the weight in ton measurements. This must be weighed on a certified scale. -It is illegal to sell firewood by any other unit of measurement such as a rick, rack, face cord or truckload. If a consumer believes that a seller did not comply with these rules and regulations, the person should immediately contact the seller. - If non-packaged firewood is purchased, the seller must present the consumer with a delivery ticket or sales invoice that includes contact information and the terms and conditions of the sale. - If the firewood is

advertised and sold as a certain type of wood, the load must contain at least 90 percent of that species. - Be aware of different firewood movement regulations in place concerning invasive species such as gypsy moth and Asian longhorned beetle. It is always good practice to not move firewood long distances and to buy local and burn local. - When burning firewood for heat, the State Fire Marshal advises to follow all necessary safety practices to avoid any serious problems. If you have questions or concerns with a firewood sale, and the seller will not correct the problem, contact the Ohio Department of Agriculture's Division of Weights and Measures at (614) 728-6290 or contact your county auditor's office.

Weed School in Wilmington

With the problems weeds have caused in recent years, maybe we need to consider different options for controlling them. Resistance has been an issue for years and the list of resistant weeds continues to grow year after year. Now we also have additional weed species showing up in Southern Ohio. On Thursday, Dec. 8, OSU Extension will offer a Weed Management Program at the Clinton County Fairgrounds in Wilmington. The program will begin at 1 p.m. and is scheduled to last until 3:30 p.m. or so. Discussion will involve several of the problem weeds, management strategies, sprayer information and more. Pleases RSVP by Dec. 7 at the Clinton County Extension Office (937) 382-0901.

Tips for purchasing firewood As winter quickly approaches and more people look to firewood to help heat their homes, the Ohio Department of Agriculture is offering some basic tips to help when purchasing wood. "Many Ohioans rely on firewood to heat their homes during the cold winter months," said David Daniels, director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture. "That's why it's important to know the laws about how firewood must be sold in order to make sure you, the consumer, are getting what you pay for." The following firewood rules and regulations are helpful to review before making purchases: - Non-packaged firewood must be sold by the cord or by fractions of a


People get old before their time

LOCAL NEWS

West Union People’s Defender

Submitted photo

Ohio Brush Creek Canoe/Kayak access completed

Pictured here is the recently completed canoe/kayak access area at the State Rt.. 125 Bridge.

Grand opening/ribbon-cutting set for spring BY TOM CROSS PEOPLE’S DEFENDER

The two new personal watercraft access sites on Ohio Brush Creek have been completed and are now open for public use. A project by the Adams County Travel and Visitors Bureau to provide canoe and kayak access to Ohio Brush Creek had been in the works all summer long. Construction of the sites by Cooper's Excavating of Winchester began in September with the last site completed on Nov. 29. The two canoe access sites are located off St. Rt. 348 at the St. Rt. 348 Bridge over Ohio Brush Creek and at the St. Rt. 125 Bridge. It is an approximately three mile float from the St. Rt. 348 Bridge to the St. Rt. 125 Bridge access. Parking is available at both sites. This project will open up recreational opportunities for both visitors and residents, will provide a boost to ecotourism, and will provide untold benefits in recreation, business, education, and appreciation of Adams County’s outdoors and nature for years to come. According to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), canoes and kayaks are the fastest growing segment of watercraft usage. With this in mind the Adams County Travel and Visitors Bureau looked to tap into this growing watercraft market and sought funding to undertake the project. “I had contacts within the ODNR that I thought could help direct me to a source of funding,” said Executive Director of Adams County Tourism Tom Cross. “I had

SSCC

Submitted photo

New signage provided by the Ohio Department of Transportation will guide visitors to the new access sites for canoes and kayaks on Ohio Brush Creek. wishes to develop two sites but was ready to settle for one depending on the cost. Late in 2015 acting Ohio Division of Watercraft Chief Mike Miller called and said ODNR would grant the Adams County Travel and Visitors Bureau (ACTVB) $10,000 to build two access sites on Ohio Brush Creek. That started the wheels in motion, however, the Bureau had to apply for a permit from the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) to develop sites at the St. Rt. 348 and 125 Bridge.” Cost estimates to develop the two canoe sites came in at around $15,000, $5,000 over budget, but James Zehringer, Director of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, agreed that ODNR would cover the additional expense to develop two sites and increased the grant to $15,000. Construction cost for the access at the St. Rt. 348 Bridge cost $6,821.33. Cost for construction at the St. Rt. 125 Bridge has not been tabulated yet, but total construction cost for both sites are expected to total $1517,000. with the ACTVB

covering any additional expenses. Construction included excavation of the sight, using railroad ties for steps which were doubled and pinned together with ¾ inch rebar, reinforced with large gravel, and covered with concrete to stand up against flooding. Above the flood plain, gravel was used on the path leading to the steps. After construction, the area was landscaped, seeded, and covered with straw. ODOT provided new signage at both locations and have committed to improving the parking area at the St. Rt. 125 Bridge and any other improvements that might be needed. Ohio Brush Creek is a beautiful free flowing stream and considered one of the gems of southwest Ohio. “This project is one of many that has been undertaken by the Adams County Travel and Visitors Bureau to enhance and develop Adams County's tourism,” said Cross. A grand opening and ribbon cutting is planned for next spring.

From page 1

percent do not have a high school diploma, 23 percent live in poverty, and 26 percent participate in public assistance programs. We are confident Southern State can make an impact through education. “And finally, our goals are pretty straightforward. We want to raise the educational attainment level in Adams County and strengthen the workforce by giving them a competitive advantage,” said Dr. Boys. Dr. Nicole Roades, SSCC Vice President of Academic Affairs, addressed the topic of academic programming considerations for a new campus. “Of the 326 Adams County students currently enrolled at Southern State, approximately half are high school students participating in the College Credit Plus program,” said Dr. Roades. “The other half are enrolled in our Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degrees which indicates to us they’re here for transfer purposes and they’re using Southern State as a steppingstone to that next destination—a four-year university. Most of our current enrollees are what are considered traditional college students. “What we see then is a huge opportunity to also capture those who do not fall into that traditional category—the student who still needs to attain a GED, the student interested in a technical degree or workforce training, and the adult student juggling work and home life. “We also see opportunities to forge partnerships with the Career and Technical Center, to articulate pathways with nearby four-year institutions, and to collaborate with local employers.”

Sunday, December 4, 2016 5

and challenging topic. Ed declares, "I like it when we get together unarmed and unrehearsed." Ed is now 92 and gratefully proclaims, "I give God all the credit for my longevity. He is my pilot and my guide, my judge and my jury." Ed carries a beeper and cell phone and still LOREN HARDIN does STRAIGHT PATHS taxes for select clients. He drives about 3,000 miles a month taking his developmentally disabled daughter Barbie, daily rides in his Ford Escort, "Because she loves it.” Ed shared, "People tell me all the time, 'Pops, you're too old to do that.' But I just tell them, 'I don't count my birthdays, I count my blessings. I don't think about how old I am, I think about the job I have to do,'"Ed added, "When I'm driving I just obey the signs and keep it between the lines." Ed admitted, "I get frustrated when I hear people talk about being too old to do this or that." And he contends, "People get old before their time, because they get old in their minds". I'm reminded of a Home

Ed was 88 years old when we met. He promised his friend he would look after his wife after his friend's death. Ed orchestrated Gladys' care, checked on her at least twice a day and eventually hired 24-hour care. During our first meetings we tackled some difficult challenges and took care of some pressing business, but our meetings became less task-oriented and more personal. We shared experiences, ideas, beliefs and philosophies. When Gladys's health declined, keeping her at home became no longer possible and we arranged admission to a local nursing home. It was to be our last visit. Ed signed the form to revoke Gladys from Hospice and I stated, "Ed, I guess this is the last time we'll be seeing each other." Ed appeared surprised. But I explained that Gladys was no longer our hospice patient and that I was no longer their Social Worker. Then Ed asked, "But can't we just meet as friends?" We've met as friends every other Thursday for three years now. Ed frequently brings me a stack of verses, poems or articles and states, "I thought these might help you in your job. I really like this public relations stuff." Our meetings are very spontaneous but we always end up on a personally and spiritually relevant

Care patient I met several years ago. She and her husband were both Polish immigrants and were both in their late seventies. There was a small piano in the corner of the living room with several "Easy-Play" music books standing on the ledge of the keyboard. I asked, "Who plays the piano?" The husband replied, "My wife does. She always wanted to play the piano, so she started teaching herself about five years ago. And we've experienced so much enjoyment singing together." One more story and I'll close. While driving, I was listening to a call-in radio show, "Doctor Toni". A lady called in for advice about whether to enroll in college to pursue a new career. She shared, "I'm 54 years old. It will take me at least four years to get my degree so I'll be 58 years old when I finish." She then asked, "Dr. Toni, am I too old to start all over?" Dr. Toni asked, "How old will you be in four years if you don't go back to school and get your degree?" "May it never be chiseled on your tombstone, 'Died, age forty, buried age seventy'". ("Coloring Outside the Lines", Howard Hendricks) Loren Hardin is a hospice social worker at Southern Ohio Medical Center and can be reached at hardinl@somc.org or at 740-356-2525.

Submitted photo

The ladies of the Adams County Herb Guild. From left, Lindsay Willman, Shayla Taylor, Cindy Cates, Pam Westfall, Sandra Back, Nancy Higby, and Diane Vickery. local individuals to speak at long-term herbalists or just our events,” says Willman. beginners,” says Willman, From page 1 “Next year we're hoping to “We give our members the put up a herbal Christmas opportunity to share their ing and using herbs for diftree right here in Adams knowledge and talents, and ferent purposes.” County.” each month we have a Guild members are comThe guild meets the third speaker who shares their mitted, not only to mainMonday of each month at knowledge and skills with taining a group of people the First Presbyterian the group.” who share generational Church at 104 South Anyone interested in knowledge of herbs, but Second Street in West joining the guild or attendwho also actively contribute Union. ing a meeting may call to the community. “We buy “We encourage anyone Lindsay Willman at (937) our plants from local nurswho is interested in herbs to 779-7991 for more informaeries, and we invite and pay join us, whether they're tion.

Tree

Above is a possible rendering of what a new Southern State Community College campus in West Union might look like. Jim Buck, SSCC Vice President of Business and Finance, presented a schematic of what a site plan for an Adams County campus could look like. “What we are considering is implemented in two phases, with each building comprised of approximately 25,000 square feet, adjacent to the Career and Technical Center on Lloyd Road,” said Mr. Buck. “This plan approaches a commitment to establish a facility in Adams County, and a way to be well positioned for future growth. “The project timeline is roughly 24 months start to finish giving us an optimistic opening for Fall Semester 2018, but the very first step would need to be a land agreement partnership with Adams County Ohio Valley Schools.” Dr. Boys closed the SSCC’s administration’s presentation by acknowledging legislative support for the Adams County project. “I want to give credit where it’s due,” said Dr. Boys. “Representative Terry Johnson and Senator Joe Uecker have been extremely supportive of this project all along. State resources are notoriously difficult to land, but in the most recent capital bill we received $2 million toward the project. That, combined with $1.25 million from the previous capital bill and more than $700,000

from the sale of the college’s closed South Campus, brings us to just shy of $4 million. We are well positioned to build the first phase of this project. Southern State is ready to move forward.” No formal action was taken during the informational community meeting. The next meeting of the Southern State Community College Board of Trustees will be at noon Wednesday, Jan. 25, in the Community Center of the college’s Fayette Campus, 1270 U.S. Route 62 SW, Washington C.H.

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Sports

Dryden’s Lady Devils roll past Paint Valley in season opener Hupp’s 20 helps lead North Adams to Den: a 56-32 victory Week 13 in the NFL 6

THE PEOPLE'S DEFENDER

BY MARK CARPENTER PEOPLE'S DEFENDER

Last Week: 13-3 Season: 102-73-2 TNF: Dallas at Minnesota – Both squads played last Thursday but with different results. The Cowboys continued their winning streak by defeating Washington in a

Scott Dryden Guest Columnist

thriller. The Vikings had the lead for most of the game – then as Aretha Franklin finally ended the National Anthem, the Lions completed the comeback. Minnesota’s offensive line is a mess, expect more turnovers from Sam Bradford. Dak Prescott and Ezekiel Elliott will have a much stiffer test in the land of 10,000 Lakes but the Boys get their 11th straight victory. DAL 23 MIN 17 Kansas City at Atlanta – The Chiefs are still flying under the radar but are a very good well-rounded squad. Their elite pass rush must play at a very high level to slow down the high-flying Falcons. The Kansas City defense will have an impact but Alex Smith cannot lead enough scoring drives to pull out the road victory. ATL 24 KC 20 Detroit at New Orleans – The Lions find themselves in sole possession of first place after their Thanksgiving Day victory over Minnesota. They are a gritty bunch that plays hard and keeps games tight. They have been behind in every fourth quarter this season. The Saints destroyed the Los Angeles Rams which featured Sean Payton pulling out all the stops to show up L.A. defensive coordinator Gregg Williams. A big game for both squads, this time Dree Brees is too much for a Detroit comeback. NO 31 DET 24 Los Angeles at New England – The Rams have plenty of issues, starting with Head Coach Jeff Fisher, but Jared Goff isn’t one of them. The rookie signal caller is going to be a good one. He will move the ball in New England but no doubt Bill Belichick’s defense will be ready – starting with former Ram Chris Long. Tom Brady could be without Gronk but will still muster enough points to get the victory. NE 24 LA 13 Denver at Jacksonville – The Broncos suffered a heartbreaking divisional loss on Sunday Night Football. They now find themselves in third place in the AFC West. The Jags continue to suffer catastrophic meltdowns. In a tight game, Jacksonville pulls off the big upset. JAX 23 DEN 20 Houston at Green Bay – The Texans are struggling mighty on the offensive side of the ball. The pressure is mounting on quarterback Brock Osweiler. They face a Packer team that bounced back in a big way Monday night in Philadelphia. Houston’s

It was opening night at North Adams High School on Tuesday night for Coach Rob Davis and the 2016-17 Lady Devils basketball squad as they played host to the Paint Valley Lady Bearcats. The Lady Bearcats had a game under their belts, having easily defeated Northwest, but they left Seaman on Tuesday with their record dropping to .500 as the Lady Devils, behind a 20-point effort from junior Lakyn Hupp, raced out to an early double digit advantage and never looked back, handing the Lady Cats a 56-32 defeat. “This was a good game for us to get everyone some minutes,” said Coach Davis in a post game interview. “All of our girls need to be ready at all times. Some games they will

Sunday, December 4, 2016

get lost of minutes and some games they might not, so they have to be ready when the call comes.” “We had some trouble with their zone a little tonight and sometimes didn't shoot it well, but we hit some key shots at times.” Paint Valley was playing without Lexi Woods, their injured leading scorer, and the Lady Devils took immediate advantage, though it took awhile as neither team scored in the game's first two minutes, a span marked mostly by turnovers both ways. That drought ended with an Avery Harper basket for North Adams , followed by Harper hitting Hupp with along outlet pass for an easy score. Another Harper bucket in the paint, a Maddie Toole steal and layup, plus a Grace McDowell free throw made it 9-0 home team.

Mark Carpenter | People’s Defender

Maddie Toole (5) and Charlee Louden (10) put the always present North Adams defensive trap on this Paint Valley ballhandler in action from Tuesday night’s Lady Devils’ win.

Mark Carpenter | People’s Defender

North Adams’ Lakyn Hupp (11) and Grace McDowell (22) converge on a Paint Valley shooter in action from Tuesday night’s varsity contest. Hupp and McDowell combined for 32 points as the Lady Devils won their season opener by a final score of 56-32. The Lady Bearcats finally got on the board at the 4:00 mark on a basket by Emily Davis basket, but that would be their only score of the quarter as the North Adams pressure defense continually stymied the visitors. A bucket by Madison Jenkins and a three off the wing by Caitlin Young gave the Lady Devils a 14-2 advantage as the first period closed. The lead continued to grow early in the second stanza when McDowell drilled the first of her three treys in the game and a later 8-0 run, with three baskets by Hupp and another by Charlee Louden, propelled the home team to a commanding 29-8 lead at the halftime intermission. After the break, Paint Valley got the first two scores of the third quarter, but Hupp nullified that with a three-pointer that kept the lead at 3212. That trey was part of an 8-2 run that included a McDowell three from the corner as the Lady Devils contin-

ued to roll. Late in the third with North Adams up 43-17, the Lady Cats put together their best stretch of the night, finishing the period on a 70 spurt and then beginning the fourth quarter with a 6-2 spurt to close the gap to 45-30. With their lead cut to 15, the Lady Devils decided to erase all doubts of the outcome and reeled off the game's next eight points, getting a three from Taylor Hesler, a put back by Jenkins, and a trio of Hupp free throws. The final basket of the game came on the final trey of the night by McDowell as the North Adams girls slammed the door and claimed their first of what will likely be many victories this season, knocking off the Lady Bearcats by a final count of 56-32. A pair of Lady Devils reached double figures in the game, though eight different girls scored. Lakyn Hupp led the way with 20, with Grace McDowell adding 12. Avery Harper added

8 with Madison Jenkins and Maddie Toole chipping in 4 apiece. Harper topped the team with 5 rebounds and added 5 steals, while Toole was a terror on the defensive end, collecting 7 steals. “Lakyn kind of got off to a slow start and she just has to let the game cone to her,” said Coach Davis. “Once she settled down, she became the key to the game for us. It's all about learning and getting better at what we want you to do.” Paint Valley was paced by Lea McFadden with 9 points and Katelyn Hackworth with 7. With one win secured, the Lady Devils faced a very tough early test on Thursday evening, Dec. 1 as they jumped into the fire of Southern Hills Athletic Conference play with a road game to preseason favorite Lynchburg-Clay in an early and much anticipated match up of two of the top teams in the con-

Junior High Lady Hounds get season-opening sweep

See Lady Devils / 7

7th and 8th grade girls both get wins over visiting Northwest BY MARK CARPENTER PEOPLE'S DEFENDER

It was a successful beginning to the 2016-17 junior high girls basketball season for the squads from Manchester Junior High as they entertained the Northwest Lady Mohawks on Monday, Nov. 28 in the Hound Pound in Manchester. The husband and wife coaching duo of John and Jill Kennedy went home happy as their seventh and eight grade teams swept the night, with Jill's seventh graders winning 29-13 and John's eighth grade gang winning 49-27. It looks like a good year is in store for both of the MJH girls' squads, especially if Monday night was any indication, as both teams grabbed relatively easy victories, though the struggle was a little more for the seventh grade, who found themselves trailing the Lady Mohawks 8-3 after one quarter of play. That changed quickly in the second period as the Lady Hounds scored the first nine points, holding Northwest scoreless until the final 30 seconds of the stanza. The 9-0 run began with a basket by Sophia Paul and then came seven straight points from See NFL Picks / 7 McKenzie Morrison,

including a three pointer and at the half, it was Manchester now in front, but just by a 12-10 margin. The seventh grade Lady Hounds pulled away after halftime, holding the visitor scoreless for six minutes, while putting up nine of their own, beginning with two baskets by Kileigh Mitchell, another by Morrison, and one by Jada Francis. After three quarters of action, the Manchester girls now held a 21-10 lead. Northwest scored the first three points of the fourth period, but that was all they would get as the Lady Hounds finished things off, getting two more buckets from Francis and two offensive rebounds and scores from Zoe Arnold as they claimed the 29-13 win. A balanced scoring attack by the home team was paced by 9 points from Morrison, 8 from Francis, 6 from Arnold, and 4 from Mitchell. The Manchester girls took an amazing 66 shots in the game, a lot of that due to hauling in 23 offensive rebounds. Their defense was solid, forcing 34 Northwest turnovers. Northwest 8 2 0 3 –13 Manchester 3 9 9 8 --29

Mark Carpenter | People’s Defender

Manchester’s Emily Sweeney (23) glides through the lane between Northwest defenders for this shot attempt in action from the eighth grade girls basketball game Nov. 28 in Manchester. Sweeney scored 10 points in a 49-27 win for the Lady Hounds. Northwest (13): Montgomery 5, Knittel 5, Jenkins 1, Lewis 2 Manchester (29): Mitchell 4, Paul 2, J. Francis 8, Morrison 9, Arnold 6

Coach John Kennedy

then brought his very talented eighth grade group to the court, a group with high expectations after playing up in the eighth grade league last season as seventh graders. They lived up to expectations in their

first outing, putting up a huge 22 points in the first quarter on their way to a 49-27 triumph. The scoring began early when Manchester's Emily Sweeney drained

See Lady Hounds / 7


THE PEOPLE’S DEFENDER SENIOR PROFILE Lady Devils SPORTS

West Union People’s Defender

SPORTS EDITOR’S NOTE: Each week, The People’s Defender will profile an Adams County senior student/athlete so our community and readers can get to know better these outstanding young people who participate both in athletics and academics in their high school.

From page 6

ference.

Paint Valley 2 6 16 8 --32 North Adams 14 15 14 13 --56

NAME: Jessica Johnson

SCHOOL: Peebles High School

PARENTS: Amy Lightner and Alex Johnson

SPORTS PLAYED IN HIGH SCHOOL: Volleyball, Cheerleading

FAVORITE SPORT: Volleyball

FAVORITE THING ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS: Riding the bus and singing loud LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS: “Four Corners”

MOST MEMORABLE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS MOMENT: Getting my nose bloodied by Brittany

Jessica Johnson

FAVORITE MUSICAL ARTIST OR GROUP: Justin Bieber

PLACE YOU’D LOVE TO TRAVEL TO: Paris YOUR FAVORITE MOVIE: “Fault In Our Stars”

FAVORITE TV SHOWS: Teen Mom FAVORITE SCHOOL SUBJECT: Math

Lady Hounds From page 6

a three from the wing and continued when Brooke Kennedy did the same from the top of the key, giving her team an 8-3 advantage. The Lady Hounds then finished the first quarter with a 14-0 run, fueled by an old-fashioned threepoint play by Sydney Cox and baskets by Karigan Turner and Abby Young. Two buckets on the inside by Cox finished off an impressive 22-3 quarter for the home side. The Lady Mohawks rebounded from that first quarter bombardment to use a three-pointer to pull within 25-10, but Sweeney answered that with her second trey of the game, this time from the corner to make it 28-10. Northwest got the next two scores, but Kennedy got a bucket with five seconds left before the break to give her team a 30-14 halftime lead. A nice baseline drive and score by Turner began the third period and two later Kennedy free throws extended the lead to 3616. Two free throws from Sweeney and a basket by Kiersten Saunders left the Lady Hounds leading comfortably 42-17 after three periods. With the big lead, the Lady Hounds may have let off the gas a bit in the fourth quarter, but still got baskets from Braxlynn McClanahan and Yasmin Lucas to stay well in front.

Mark Carpenter | People’s Defender

The Lady Hounds’ Jada Francis looks for an opening to the basket during seventh grade girls action last Monday night in Manchester. A Kennedy three-pointer with 1:45 to play was the final icing on the cake in a 49-27 opening night win for the Lady Hounds. Like their seventh grade counterparts, the MJH eighth grade girls had a balanced scoring attack, led by 12 points from Brooke Kennedy. Also hitting double figures was Emily Sweeney with 10, followed by Sydney Cox with 9 and Karigan Turner with 8. The Lady Hounds shot 51% from the field and hit 4 of 8 three-point attempts, while scoring 24 points in the paint. “The eighth graders started out just the total opposite of the seventh graders,” said Coach John

P. Valley (32): Nawland 2 0-0 4, Crawford 2 0-0 5, Davis 2 0-0 4, McFadden 4 0-0 9, Hackworth 3 1-2 7, Dobbins 1 1-2 3, Team 14 2-4 32. N. Adams (56): Hesler 1 0-0 3, Toole 2 0-0 4, Louden 1 0-0 2, Hupp 8 3-4 20, Shipley 0 0-2 0, C. Young 1 0-2 3, McDowell 4 1-2 12, Jenkins 2 0-0 4, Harper 3 2-4 8, Team 22 6-14 56. Three-Point Goals: FAVORITE SPARE TIME P. Valley (2): Crawford 1, McFadden 1 ACTIVITY: Fishing N. Adams (6): Hesler 1, FAVORITE Hupp 1, C. Young 1, RESTAURANT: McDowell 3 Toro Loco WOULD LOVE TO TRADE PLACES FOR A DAY WITH: A.J. Green’s wife

Sunday, December 4, 2016 7 The Lady Devils were also winners in the JV contest as Coach Tony Williams and his squad overcame a sluggish start to top Paint Valley 37-18. North Adams led just 6-2 after the first quarter, getting two baskets from Alaina Eiterman, part of her game-high 16. Eiterman and Carolyn Shupert combined for 8 points in the second quarter, helping the Lady Devils to a 167 halftime advantage. In the third period, the Lady Devils maintained the lead, getting a threepointer from Abbi Stacy, a basket from Whitney Hill, plus six more from Eiterman to lead 28-14. Stacy drilled another trey in the fourth period and a basket hy Desiree Ison helped seal the deal in a 37-18 win. “I was pleased overall for our first game,” said

Coach Williams. “It was a great effort by everyone. We didn't shoot it real well, but credit our girls for battling on the boards and getting 24 offensive rebounds. We have to continue to get better at finishing plays and taking advantage of our opportunities.” P. Valley 2 5 7 4 --18 N. Adams 6 10 12 9 --37

P. Valley (18): Uhrig 3 1-2 8, Knauff 0 1-2 1, Hollis 1 0-0 2, Rogers 1 0-0 3, Brannon 2 0-0 4, Team 7 2-4 18. N. Adams (37): Sonner 0 1-2 1, Stacy 2 2-2 8, Brown 1 0-0 2, Hill 2 02 4, Ison 1 0-2 2, Eiterman 6 4-10 16, Shupert 2 0-0 4, Team 14 7-18 37. Three-Point Goals: P. Valley (2): Uhrig 1, Rogers 1 N. Adams (2); Stacy 2

FUTURE PLANS: Go to college and become a nurse

COMING NEXT WEDNESDAY: Ethan Thompson from West Union High School

Kennedy. “The seventh graders were a little too excited and started slow, but their eighth graders showed their experience and started out red hot. Jumping out to an early lead like that was a good way to start our season and ended up being a good win for us. We shot the ball well and passed the ball well, getting 15 assists on our 19 made field Mark Carpenter | People’s Defender goals.” “We got a little loose with the ball and our pass- North Adams freshman Alaina Eiterman goes up for two of her game-high 16 points as the Lady Devils’ JV squad defeated Paint Valley 37-18 in their season es in the second half and that is something we need opener on Nov. 29. to tighten up. Defensively, we played okay, but we just didn't rebound well enough, but we will address that in practice.” After their season opening wins, the Lady Hounds face a much tougher task when they open Southern Moores Chapel Fellowship Hall Seaman Community Methodist Hills Athletic Conference play on Saturday, Dec. 3 63 Broadway St. Seaman, Ohio 2484 Wintersteen Rd. Blue Creek, Ohio when they host two very Sign-Ups: Wed. December 7th Sign-Ups: Wed. December 7th tough squads from North 10 a.m. to Noon and 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. 10 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Adams.

Christmas Sharing Sign-Up Locations for Food

Northwest 3 11 3 10 -27 Manchester 22 8 12 7 – 49 Northwest (27): Webb 7, Throckmorton 1, Brumfield 9, Eury 6, Wamsley 4 Manchester (49): Turner 8, Creamer 2, Young 2, Lucas 2, Kennedy 12, Sweeney 10, Cox 9, Saunders 2, B. McClanahan 2 Three-Point Goals: Northwest (2): Webb 2 Manchester (4): Kennedy 2, Sweeney 2

Adams County Ministerial Association PO Box 307 Seaman, Ohio 45679

Donations are needed and can be mailed to:

Questions: Please call (937) 386-2467 Only one sign-up per household.

Toys Available. Call (513) 518-3660 Thursday, Dec. 8th, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Sunday ,November 4, 2016 8

SPORTS

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A WEEKLY SPIN AROUND COLLEGE FOOTBALL

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Alabama (12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;0, vs. Florida) Ohio State (11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1) Clemson (11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1, vs. Virginia Tech) Washington (11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1, vs. Colorado) Michigan (10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2) Wisconsin (10-2, vs. Penn State) Oklahoma (9-2, vs. Oklahoma State) USC (9-3) Penn State (10-2, vs. Wisconsin) Colorado (10-2, vs. Washington) Florida State (9-3) Oklahoma State (9-2, at Oklahoma) West Virginia (9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2, vs. Baylor) Louisville (9-3) Western Michigan (12-0, vs. Ohio) Auburn (8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4) Florida (8-3, vs. Alabama) LSU (7-4) Virginia Tech (9-3, vs. Clemson) Iowa (8-4) Nebraska (9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3) Stanford (9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3) USF (10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2) Navy (9-2, vs. Temple) Pittsburgh (8-4)

HEISMAN TROPHY RACE 1. Lamar Jackson, QB, Louisville Another Louisville loss was not enough to knock Jackson from the top spot â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even though he had a costly turnover late in the Kentucky game. The sophomore quarterback threw for 281 yards with two touchdowns and three interceptions and rushed for 171 yards and two scores in the 41â&#x20AC;&#x201C;38 loss.

Myles Gaskin and the Washington Huskies face Colorado on Friday night in Santa Clara, Calif., in the Pac-12 Championship Game.

Huskies playing for playoff A win in Pac-12 title game should secure a spot for Washington WASHINGTON VS. COLORADO (PAC-12) > = < ;: 987 695 :< 57;4 53= 3457349215034< 4= < 6950: / .57;= 75-:,4 25+05765*5= 92504 3) ;= 0< 54(/ 442425*5 4(04 / 7= 7:69< '5& ;4 5% +< .: 4< 5/ = 004256$ $ 5= 5# = 94 35348+- = 35 < 4= < 6 95 " :7;5 = 5!5 " :95 = 75> = < ;: 987 695 7= 745:95 = 5" :994 3)7= .4 )= --5 00-45 +0'5 69,4 97 :69= -5" :< 26 5< +884 < 7< 57;= 757;4 5% +< .: 4< 5 5 6,4 3= --5" :--5 #4 5:95 7;4 5 6- -4845 67 #= --5 -= 16$ $ 5" :7;5 = 5" :95 :95 7;4 5 = / )5 7:7-458= 4'5 6- 63 = 265 :< 5043;= 0< 57;4 5 6< 75< +3 03:< :985 74= 5:95 7;4 59= 7:6 9'5 $ 7435" :9) ($ ("  -)-& )!  -0) & ".  " ' , $ ( $ %   (-2+ 5 , 6 + ,- -#+ , ,)(, 7;4 5 +$ $ = -64 < 5" 695 7;4 56+7 3:8;7 5 6+ 7;5 :,: < :695 7:7-45" :7;5 = 95 5 34/ 63 2'5 " !

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)!  -# '  $ ) +   ,- ! )+  -# ,  )(  ,-+ $ " # - , ,)(  # , , )+  6 / -).  #  )0(, $ ( $ -, &,- ! ). +  " ' ,  -5 ,  $ ! 6  . &- -)(/ $ ,$ )(  ,(+ $ ) $ ( " ; :/ ; 57; 45 = 76 3< 526 549 6 + 8; 56 9 56 $ $ 49 < 4576 5 = . 45 -= # = = 5< " 4= 7'5 9 5:9 743) 4< 7:9 859 6 745= # 6 + 757; :< 58= 4 5 75 4= 9 < 5, 4315-:77-4576 5 -= # = = 5* 56 7; 4357; = 9 5 6 006 37+ 9 :71576 5= 225= 9 6 7; 435 5/ ; = 0:6 9 < ; :0576 5:7< 5736 0; 15/ = < 4' 5 , 49 5 " :7; 5= 5-6 < < 57; 45 3: < 6 9 5& :245" 6 + -25# 45= 5, :37+ = -5-6 / . 5$ 6 35= 5< 06 75:9 57; 45 6 -) -4845 6 6 7# = --5 -= 16 $ $ ' 5 ! ! !

TEMPLE AT NAVY (AAC) 49 5 :+ = 7= -6 -6 5/ 6 9 7:9 + 4< 576 5" 6 3. 5; :< 5 = 8:/ 5= 75 = , 1' 5& ; 45 :2< ; :0 49 5 ; = , 45" 6 9 5= 75-4= < 754:8; 758= 4< 5$ 6 357; 454:8; 7; 57: 45:9 5; :< 59 :9 45< 4= < 6 9 < 5= < 5 7; 45# 6 < < 5:9 5 9 9 = 06 -:< ' 5 4< 0:7457; 45-6 < < 56 $ 5 5< 7= 3743< 56 9 56 $ ) $ 49 < 4 57; 45 :22:4< 5= , 43= 8425! ' 51= 32< 5= 9 25! ' 506 :9 7< 50435 8= 4' 5& 4 0-45:< 5# = / . 5:9 57; 45 57:7-458= 45$ 6 357; 45< 4/ 6 9 25 < 73= :8; 75< 4= < 6 9 5* 5< 6 47; :9 859 6 75 = 9 15= 9 7:/ :0= 7425= $ 74357; 45 " -< 56 049 4257; 4514= 35" :7; 5= 5-6 < < 5= 75; 6 4576 5 3 1' 5 :9 / 45 > 44. 5 5& 4 0-45; = < 5" 6 9 59 :9 456 $ 5 5" :7; 57; 45-6 < < 4< 5# 15< 4, 49 5 06 :9 7< 56 9 57; 4536 = 25, < ' 5 49 9 5 7= 745= 9 25 4 0; :< ' 5 !

2. Jake Browning, QB, Washington Browning shined in the Huskiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17 win over Washington State, throwing for 292 yards with three touchdowns and no interceptions. For the season, he has thrown for 3,162 yards with 40 TDs and seven INTs. 3. Deshaun Watson, QB, Clemson Watsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final home game was memorable; he threw for 347 yards and six touchdowns to lead the Tigers to a 56â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7 win over rival South Carolina. For the season, the junior has 3,626 passing yards, 444 rushing yards and has accounted for 38 touchdowns. 4. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford McCaffrey moved up to fourth in the nation in rushing (145.7 ypg) after running for 204 yards in the Cardinalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 41â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17 win over Rice. The junior running back has averaged 198.2 yards rushing in the last five games. 5. Dede Westbrook, WR, Oklahoma Westbrook and the Sooners did not play last week. He ranks fourth nationally in receiving yards per game (123.1) and receiving touchdowns (15). He has at least 100 receiving yards in seven of the past eight games.

WESTERN MICHIGAN VS. OHIO (MAC) Mitch Light Athlon Sports Executive Editor @AthlonMitch

"

> 4< 7439 5 :/ ; :8= 9 5:< 57; 456 9 -1574= 5:9 57; 459 = 7:6 9 59 6 759 = 425 -= # = = 57; = 75; = < 59 6 75-6 < 75= 58= 4' 5& ; 45 36 9 / 6 < 5; = , 49 75 0-= 1425= 583+ 4-:9 85< -= 74 5# + 757; 415= 345 5= 8= :9 < 75 6 " 435 56 0) 06 9 49 7< 5" :7; 5" :9 < 5= 75 6 37; " 4< 7439 5= 9 25 --:9 6 :< 5:9 5 4074 ) # 43'5 5" :9 56 , 435 ; :6 5" 6 + -250+ 75> 5:9 506 < :7:6 9 576 54= 39 5= 5  $   -)   0  + 5 ,

  )0& , -# -)*  + (%   - ' ! + )'  G36 + 056 $ 5 5/ 6 9 $ 4349 / 4' 5" !

CLEMSON VS. VIRGINIA TECH (ACC)

LOUISIANA TECH AT WESTERN KENTUCKY (C-USA)

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ALABAMA VS. FLORIDA (SEC) > 4 25-:. 4576 5# 4-:4, 457; :< 5" :--5# 45= 5/ 6 047:7:, 458= 4 5# + 757; 459 + # 43< 5 < +884 < 756 7; 43" :< 4' 5 -= # = = 5$ = 35= 9 25= " = 157; 45# 4< 7574= 5:9 57; 459 = 7:6 9 5; = < 5 = --6" 425= 576 7= -56 $ 5 506 :9 7< 5:9 5:7< 5-= < 75$ 6 + 358= 4< ' 5 -6 3:2= 57; 45/ ; = 0:6 9 5

SAN DIEGO STATE AT WYOMING (MOUNTAIN WEST) 67 ;5 74= < 5< 4/ +3 4257;4 :35< 067 5:95 7;4 5 6+97 = :95 > 4< 757:7-458= 45#4 $ 63 45 7;4 154,4 95 0-= 1425-= < 75" 44.4 925 *5 = 925 :75< ;6" 42'5 = 95 :4865 7= 745-6< 75= 75 # )'  -)  )&)+ ) -- 

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NUMBERS TO KNOW 9

PRIME TIME PLAYERS Vanderbilt quarterback Kyle Shurmur threw for 416 yards with two touchdowns and one interception in the Commodoresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;34 win over Tennessee. Shurmur threw for a combined 296 yards with no TDs in the first three SEC games this season. â&#x20AC;Ś Patrick Mahomes threw for 586 yards with six touchdowns and no interceptions to lead Texas Tech to a 54â&#x20AC;&#x201C;35 win over Baylor in Arlington,

Texas. â&#x20AC;Ś UTEP running back Aaron Jones rushed for 301 yards and four TDs in the Minersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 52â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24 win over North Texas. Jones rushed for at least 200 yards in three of the final four games. â&#x20AC;Ś LSU sophomore Derrius Guice set a single-game school record with 285 yards rushing on 37 carries in the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 54â&#x20AC;&#x201C;39 win at Texas A&M on Thanksgiving night. â&#x20AC;Ś Mississippi State quarterback Nick Fitzgerald

threw for 109 yards and three touchdowns and rushed for 258 yards and two scores as the Bulldogs topped Ole Miss 55â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 in Oxford. Fitzgerald ended the season with 1,243 rushing yards, setting the school record for a quarterback previously held by Dak Prescott. â&#x20AC;Ś Middle Tennessee wide receiver Richie James caught four passes for 120 yards and rushed 22 times for 207 yards in the Blue Raid-

ersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 77â&#x20AC;&#x201C;56 win over FAU. Running back Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Tavius Mathers, a transfer from Ole Miss, added 213 yards rushing. â&#x20AC;Ś Memphis quarterback Riley Ferguson threw for 409 yards with four touchdowns and no INTs to lead the Tigers to a thrilling 48â&#x20AC;&#x201C;44 win over Houston. â&#x20AC;Ś Adoreeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jackson scored on a pass reception (52 yards), a punt return (55) and a kickoff return (97) as USC rolled past Notre Dame 45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27.

Two months ago, Penn State returned home with a 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2 record after a 49â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 loss at Michigan. Now, eight wins later, the Nittany Lions are headed to the Big Ten Championship Game. Penn State capped off its unlikely run to the title game with a convincing 45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12 win over Michigan State.

From page 6

defense keeps them in the game but Aaron Rodgers pulls away in the fourth. GB 31 HOU 23 Philadelphia at Cincinnati â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Eagles are struggling mightily on the offensive side of the ball. The talent is obvious in rookie quarterback Carson Wentz â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he simply doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough weapons. Their defense has played well but struggled against Green Bay on Monday night. The Bengals stayed in the game at Baltimore but their offensive line once again had major issues. Expect a tight low scoring game with the Eagles doing just enough to earn a much needed victory. PHI 16 CIN 13

20

Vanderbilt scored 11 touchdowns in its last two regular-season games after scoring a total of seven in its first six SEC games. Pittsburgh and Syracuse combined for 20 touchdowns in the Panthersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 76â&#x20AC;&#x201C;61 win over the Orange. The two teams set an FBS record for most points scored in a game (137).

Alabama has not allowed a touchdown in the last four games. The Crimson Tide shut out LSU, gave up three points to both Mississippi State and Chattanooga and 12 points to Auburn in the Iron Bowl.

4

STOCK REPORT

NFL Picks

11

Florida has not scored an offensive touchdown against Florida State in the last nine quarters. The Seminoles have won four straight in the series.

Tennessee, the overwhelming favorite to win the SEC East, finished the regular season with a 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 mark in league play after losing to Vanderbilt 45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;34 in Nashville. The Volunteersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense allowed an average of 661 total yards in its last three games â&#x20AC;&#x201D; wins over Kentucky and Missouri and the loss to Vanderbilt.

Miami at Baltimore â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Dolphins are hot, winning six in a row. It typically isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pretty but they are getting the job done when it counts. The Ravens are similar to Miami â&#x20AC;&#x201C; gutting out close victories in ugly fashion. They are tied for first place in the AFC North, which sets up a big game for both squads. In a tight contest, the Ravens force Ryan Tannehill to win the game â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. BAL 23 MIA 17 San Francisco at Chicago â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A game that could have a huge impact on the 2017 NFL Draft â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not much more to say than that. Expect a tight game, with Colin Kaepernick being the difference. SF 27 CHI 23 Buffalo at Oakland â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A pivotal contest between the Bills (6-5) and the first

Navy lost 10 starters on offense â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including recordsetting quarterback Keenan Reynolds â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from a team that went 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2, yet the winning ways continue for the Midshipmen. Navy is 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2 overall and won the tough AAC West Division title with a 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1 record on the strength of an offense that is averaging 41.7 points per game.

place Raiders (9-2). The Bills have won two in a row which has placed them squarely in the wild card race. In the Raiders' exciting victory over Carolina â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Derek Carr came back to the field with a dislocated finger to get the victory. He is a tough, smart quarterback with a bright future. Buffalo looks like a different team with wide receiver Sammy Watkins back on the field. This should be a fun game to watch. The Silver and Black win another close one. OAK 31 BUF 27 New York Giants at Pittsburgh â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The G-Men are an impressive 8-3 but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play like an upper echelon team. No matter the opponent, things are often dicey late in the game. This is one of their stiffest challenges of the

UCLA ended one of the most disappointing seasons in school history with a 36â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 loss at California. The Bruins finished with a 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 record overall and a 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7 mark in the Pac-12. Coach Jim Mora will be back for a sixth season, but he announced on Sunday that offensive coordinator Kennedy Polamula will not be retained.

season, traveling to Pittsburgh to face a squad that is tied for first place. Ben Roethisberger vs. Eli Manning, two of the top players in the 2004 NFL Draft, each will make plays but the versatility of the Steelers offense will be the difference. PIT 34 NYG 24 Washington at Arizona â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Skins played well at Dallas but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pull off the win. Kirk Cousins started out slowly this season but has settled in nicely. The Cardinals once again struggled and are now facing potential playoff elimination. This is a must win and if they pull it out they are still alive. Expect Cousins to rack up yards but Arizona rides David Johnson to a big home victory. ARI 34 WASH 30 Tampa Bay at San

Arizona had three players top 100 yards rushing in its 56â&#x20AC;&#x201C;35 win over Arizona State in the Territorial Cup â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brandon Dawkins (183 yards on 12 carries), Samajie Grant (176 on 19) and Zach Green (126 on 14).

3

Photos: Athlon Sports

Diego â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Buccaneers are playing with confidence, big wins over Kansas City and Seattle will do that for a young team. Their defense is playing well as are Jameis Winston and Mike Evans. With a win, the Chargers would be at .500 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who knows from there? In a tight game, rookie Joey Bosa harasses Winston while Phillip Rivers once again plays well. SD 24 TB 20 SNF: Carolina at Seattle â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Panthers played well in Oakland but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pull off the road upset. The loss for all intents and purposes ended their playoff hopes. Their once vaunted defense is a playing nowhere near the level of years past. The Seahawks were humbled in Tampa. Leading up to the game it appeared

Seattle was back, but they were physically dominated by the Buccaneers. In a physical tight game, Russell Wilson and the home crowd is the difference. SEA 27 CAR 24 MNF: Indianapolis at New York Jets â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Jets battled the Patriots but succumbed late in the second half. They are far removed from any playoff aspirations but Todd Bowles has them playing hard. The Colts are only ½ game out of first place. If Andrew Luck can remain upright and healthy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they have to like their chances. The Jets keep it close but Luck shines on the Monday night stage. IND 31 NYJ 27 Bye Week: Cleveland, Tennessee


CLASSIFIEDS

West Union People’s Defender

ABCAP ADAMS BROWN HEAD START PROGRAM

BUS MONITOR/TEACHER’S AIDE for the Head Start Program (34 -40 hrs./wk., 32 - 36 wks./yr.). We are looking for individuals who enjoy working with children and their families and who have a friendly and positive attitude. Duties include: working with pre-school children and their families, assisting the Bus Driver on the bus and the Head Start Teacher in the classroom, maintaining confidentiality, attending all required trainings and following all established rules and policies on the bus and in the center at all times, completing all required paperwork and duties in compliance with the Federal Performance Standards and Licensing agencies. Qualifications include: Must have or attain a Child Development Associate credential or Associate of Arts in Early Childhood Education, must obtain CDLSchool Bus/Passenger endorsement within one year of hire. All applicants must have a valid Ohio Driver’s License and must be insurable under ABCEOI’s fleet insurance policy and pass Criminal Record Checks and a drug screen. We offer benefits such as vacation, holiday pay, health, dental and vision insurance as well as a retirement plan. To apply, please submit your resume by December 9, 2016 to: Head Start Director, Adams Brown Head Start, 406 W. Plum Street, Georgetown, OH 45121. ABCAP IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, DRUG-FREE WORK-PLACE

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING Aetna is Hiring, Full time 3rd shift Janitorial in Peebles, Apply on line: www.aetnais.com or call (304)344-4041

A Family Business for Over 35 Years ************ CDL-A Driver

$1,000 sign on Bonus 2 years experience Percentage Pay Health Insurance Vacation + Holiday Regional Position

513-724-7140

WE HAVE JOBS!!!! Landscape, General Labor Window Mfg., Construction Painters, Material Handlers Shipping, Warehouse Inspectors, Packers, Electrician, machine Operators/maintenance, Welders, Construction. Call 513-842-8000 today for an immediate interview! or apply online at www.expresspros.com Select the Cincinnati East office. EXPRESS EMPLOYM E N T PROFESSIONALS

ACTIVITIES COORDINATOR NEEDED Have fun at work! Schedule outings, attend community happenings, develop and implement onsite projects, and work with others! We are a non-profit social service company in need of creative and highly motivated team members! This position requires flexible hours. We also have a part time, second shift job site coordinator position open. Applicants must have GED/Diploma, clean driving record, able to pass DOT physical and drug screen, and have a clean background check. Contact us at 937378-2786 Ext. 3 for more information!

Drivers

Regional. Home Weekly/Bi-Weekly Guaranteed. Paid Loaded & Empty/Rider Program. No-Touch, Benefits & Monthly Bonuses. 877-758-3905

DRIVERS WANTED Tanker Endorsement Needed Earn up to $300 a day 2 Years Experience Class A CDL Local Hauling $500 Sign-on Bonus (See details at TCB office) Call TCB Trucking 513-309-7559 513-625-8183 APTS UNFURNISHED

Now Accepting Applications Island View Apartments at 302 Cemetery St., Manchester. We offer 1 and 2 bedroom apartments for family, elderly, handicap, or disabled residents. Rent based on 30% of adjusted income. Contact Kay Chandler 937-5491324 or Richards Management at 888576-6468 for details. TTD/TTY 800-7500750. This Institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and equal housing opportunity.

BATAVIA - TWO and THREE bedroom apartments available with open wait list. Accepting applications M-F, 9a.m.-4p.m. Apartments are income based. 513-732-3804 APT FOR RENT Small 2 BDR Apt at 448 Hickory St, WU, Must have references, No Pets $425 per month,+deposit, includes water, sewage, yard care, all appliances, washer/dryer (937)205-5200 FOR RENT Apartment For Rent in Manchester, water & sewage included (513)404-5438

ABCAP Home Care Assistant Daycare Manager

ABCAP HOME CARE is seeking an Assistant Daycare Manager for the Golden Years Activity Center (28 – 32 hours per wk.). Candidate must have STNA OR CNA certificate or at least 2-years’ experience as a home health aide. This position covers many areas including direct care, homemaker and social services, etc…Multitasking is a must. A genuine concern for the elderly is required. Attendance and punctuality are extremely important. We offer benefits such as vacation, holiday pay, health, dental and vision insurance as well as a retirement plan. All applicants must have a valid Ohio Driver’s License and must be insurable under ABCEOI’s fleet insurance policy and pass Criminal Record Checks and a drug screen. Please apply in person by December 9, 2016 at 406 W. Plum Street, Georgetown, Ohio or call (937) 378-6041 or 1-800-553-7393, Ext. 255, Monday - Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ABCAP IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, DRUG-FREE WORK-PLACE

PINE RIDGE PINE VILLAGE RESIDENTIAL HOMES INC

NOW HIRING DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF/STNA’S FULL & PART TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE • 2ND & 3RD SHIFTS DIRECT CARE STAFF 11.50 PER HOUR STNA’S 13.00 PER HOUR

QUALIFICATION’S INCLUDE: PASS A DRUG SCREEN • CLEAN BACKGROUND CHECK • VALID DRIVERS LICENSE • HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA/GED • 18 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER • STNA’S MUST CARRY A CURRENT VALID CERTIFICATION YOU WILL BE ASSISTING INDIVIDUALS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES IN THEIR HOME AND COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENT’S

SIGN ON BONUS OF $800.00

( after 400 hours worked ) Employee health insurance plan paid by the company, Vacation pay , Birthday pay, Aflac APPLY AT 146 NORTH 3RD STREET WILLIAMSBURG OHIO 45176 M-F 9 AM - 5 PM

HOUSES FOR RENT

House For Rent Newly remodeled 3 BDR, 1BA home in Manchester area, big back yard, new appliances, washer, dryer hook up, $575 month plus deposit + water deposit. No Hud. No animals. Available Dec. 1st. Call for more information: (937)779-7387 MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

FOR RENT Accepting Applications for a mobile home for rent, 2BR, 1BA on 4th Street in Peebles, $450 per month + deposit, water, trash, sewage paid. Please call (740)947-1947

FOR RENT 2BR mobile home for rent in Peebles. No pets. $375 Month +deposit. Call Chris (937)587-2427

FOR RENT 2BR mobile home, 102 Diamond St., Peebles. Require 2 Ref. $425 deposit, $425 rent includes water, (937)779-7796 MISC. FOR RENT

FOR RENT Furnished room for one in West Union (937)470-7821

HOUSES FOR SALE

HOUSE FOR SALE 410 E. 7th Street, Manchester $55,000 or Rent to Own with $3,000 down, $500 per month, 2 1/2 bedrooms, metal roof, vinyl siding, new vinyl windows, hardwood floors, wrap around front porch with large covered deck, partial basement Call Lauvon 937-533-1754 BUSINESS SERVICES

Rubber Stamps Self-Inking and Rubber Stamps Copy Paper $35 Delivered. Call Adams County Press, LLC (937)-892-6307 Serving Adams County since 2009. FIREWOOD

Firewood For Sale Please Call: (937)203-5763

FIREWOOD Cut up slab wood, firewood, $10.00 a pick up load, 636 McFarland Rd, West Union FOR SALE SEASONED FIREWOOD & OUTSIDE FURNACE WOOD All year round. Local. I would like to haul 14’ dump loads. Scott Malott 937-213-3193

Sunday, December 4, 2016 9

ABCAP ADAMS BROWN EARLY HEAD START PROGRAM

HOME VISITOR for the Early Head Start Program (40 hrs. per/wk., 52 wks/yr.). Must have good communication and organizational skills; have knowledge of child growth and development; make home visits and maintain records from the visits: develop positive working relationships with parents, coworkers, and other agency professionals; and attend community and agency meetings as well as out-of-town trainings. Qualifications include: CDA or Associates Degree within one year of hire. Must have reliable transportation available for work. Must have valid Ohio Driver’s License with clean driving record which meets agency’s fleet insurance company standards. We offer benefits such as vacation, holiday pay, health, dental and vision insurance as well as a retirement plan. To apply, please submit your resume by December 9, 2016 to: Bonita Haas, Director, Adams Brown Head Start, 406 W. Plum Street, Georgetown, OH 45121. ABCAP IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, DRUG-FREE WORK-PLACE

NOW HIRING! SENIOR HOMECARE UNLIMITED, LLC., a rapidly growing company in Mt. Orab, Ohio is seeking

CNA's, STNA's & HHA's IN ADAMS, BROWN AND HIGHLAND COUNTIES. If you enjoy working with the elderly and a flexible schedule please contact us at

937-444-0930 PETS AND SUPPLIES

RAT TERRIER PUPPIES FOR SALE Registered, one male and three female, Ready for Christmas, $350.00 each, Call (937)892-9306 HAY & GRAIN

MIXED HAY FOR SALE - 5x5 round bales $30.00, also square bales $4.00 937-618-1410

HAY FOR SALE 4 X 5 Round bales mixed grass hay, stored inside, second cutting square bales, Delivery available, Call (937)217-1095, leave msg HAY FOR SALE $25.00 per roll, Good quality 4X5 ft bales, will discount to volume buyers. Hauling available! (937)544-7133 HAY FOR SALE Mixed hay, 4 X 4 rolls, $15 per bale, 4 X 5 net wrapped, $25 per bale, (937)544-3216 leave msg

HAY FOR SALE Pure Timothy, Pure Orchard Grass, Pure Alfalfa, Alfalfa/Orchard Grass Mix, Mixed Grass. Large Round Bales (4 X 5 net wrapped) and small square bales available. Crawford Farms 937-779-7560

MISC. FOR SALE

Logans Lane Greenhouse Fresh Cut Evergreen Wreaths, Swags, Centerpieces, Cemetery arrangements, Yule Logs, Mail box huggies, Open 10am to 4pm, 2749 Logans Lane, WU (937)544-0114

FOR SALE Butcher Hogs Delivery & bookings available. Call Hattan Farms 937-780-6401.

HAY, STRAW & FIREWOOD FOR SALE Square bales of hay & straw and season firewood, Delivery available Call (937)217-4218 386-2507 FOR SALE Butcher Beef Buy half of half, half or whole. Bookings & delivery available December & January. Call Hattan Farms 937-780-6401. NO TRESPASSING

NO TRESPASSING Leroy/Norma Logan, All landLiberty/Wayne and Liberty Townships, No hunting, fishing or trespassing

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

for 1 & 2 bedroom apartments at:

Markley Square Apartments located at 610 MARKLEY AVE. GEORGETOWN, OH 45121 or call for details at

937-378-6460

Stove, refrigerator, and on site laundry. RENT BASED ON INCOME TDD #419-526-0466

“This institution is an equal opportunity provider.”

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

for 1 & 2 bedroom apartments at:

Georgetown 1 Apartments: 401 Marshall Ave. Georgetown, OH 45121 APPLY AT: 610 MARKLEY AVE. GEORGETOWN, OH 45121 or call for details at:

937-378-6460

Stove, refrigerator, and on site laundry. Possibility of rental assistance. "Metro Accepted" TDD #419-526-0466 “This institution is an equal opportunity provider.”

YARD/GARAGE SALE

GIANT BARN SALE DEC. 15-17 (9 a.m. - 5 p.m.) LOCATED AT: 5426 ST. RT. 134 Rain or Shine 1 1/2 MILE FROM DODSONVILLE TOWARD BUFORD ON 134 Call Wendy at 937-444-1885 Cincinnati Reds items, sports pennants, Budweiser tins, Miller items, classic car items, Beatles items, sports cards, lamps, Hummels, dolls, Partylite, jewelry, DVDs, Danbury Mint lighthouses, tools, Pepsi items, records, stereo, Christmas items, Easter items, old hand saws, Fenton, Bluegrass items, Life magazines, books, Vintage clothing, china, Boyd glass, 1950’s tables, old license plates and much more!!!!!

ARMINTA’S CHRISTMAS CRAFT SALE 1548 Starling Rd (4 miles East of Bethel, OH) Friday & Saturday only. December 2 & 3, December 9 & 10, December 16 &17. 9 am to ? Wreath’s, snowmen, center pieces, gifts, candles, window wall hangers, primitive in and outdoor furniture, handmade baskets, jewelry, quilts, throws, flags, much much more. Something for everyone. Come bring a friend, and feel the Christmas spirit with us! Merry Christmas one and all.


CLASSIFIEDS

s Patch Work Work s Potholes Potholes

s Seal Coating

s Line Striping

s FREE Estimates

Owner HEAATH SMAR SM MARRTT HEATH SMART

(937) 386-4007

Since 1980! t*OUFSJPS&YUFSJPS3FFNPEFMJOHt t3PPN"EEJUJPOTt/FX)PNFTt

+PIO$IBNCMJO

Phil & Dan The Handymen 40038415

YES WE ARE OPEN

FOR ALL YOUR PLUMBING NEEDS!

40834057

Monday - Friday 8-3; Saturday 8-?

Zach Christman 937-779-9043 Owner 937-695-6045 christmanplumbing@gmail.com Licensed & Insured

937-695-0050 or 937-654-1239

BLUE-J CONSTRUCTION

D. Fryman

(937) 544-5509 (937) 469-4817

Place your business directory ad in The People’s Defender!

Call Amber at 937-544-2391 1x1 Ad..................9 Weeks for $ 54.00 2x1 Ad..................9 Weeks for $ 99.00 2x1.5 Ad...............9 Weeks for $144.00 1x4 or 2x2 Ad.......9 Weeks for $189.00 2x4 Ad..................9 Weeks for $369.00

Remodeling - Repairs General Maintenance

62 Rice Drive, West Union, Ohio

Hours:

Specialize In: • Shingled & Metal Roofs • Paint Roofs & More

Bringing New Life To Your Old Home!

937-544-3595

RIDEOUT’S MUFFLER SHOP (937) 544-3777 (937) 892-0017

Contact John Gutman 513-460-6877

REMODELING ODELING G& CONST NSTTRUCTION

Affordable Construction Roofing, Siding, Guttering & Framing. Call for a quote today!

40038375 40827956

s Driveways s Parking Lots

40831780

Residential & Commercial

Sunday, December 4, 2016

OHIO VALLEY ROOFERS 40826908

Midwest Asphalt

40854898

10 West Union People’s Defender

Int-Ext Remodeling Drywall, Paint & More

(937) 217-6477

28 years experience

People’s Defender HUGE AUCTION

Rt. 52, Ripley, Sun. Dec. 11th 10:00 J.D. 450C Dozer- 90’ Int. 4900 14’ Tandem Dump Truck- 12 Ton Trailer- 97’ Ford F-350 P.S.- 20’ GN. Stock Trailer- 95’ Winnebago MH- Farmall H Restored Tractor- Ford 600- Ferguson 30- Viking Garden Tractor- Used Trailers- 2 Go CartsQuincy QT- 15 Air Comp.2 Elec. Stair LiftsAdvertising SignsVending MachinesHousehold Items- Nice Oak Pool Table- Hand, Power & Machinist ToolsTables Full New Building Material HD Metal RoofingLumber- Great Selection of Hardwood FlooringKitchen Cabinet SetsMany End of the Year Close Out Specials- 100’s of Items to Choose From Sold As Is- 1st Time Writing Check Bring Bank Letter of Guarantee- Call or See Web for List & Terms Towler’s Auction Service Inc. 513-315-4360 Randy Myers, Auctioneer

Towlersauctioninc.com

BAXLA TRACTOR SALES INC. CONSIGNMENT EQUIPMENT AUCTION Located at Baxla Tractor Sales, between Seaman & Winchester, Ohio, at 4595 TriCounty Hwy. (Old St. Rt. 32).

SAT., DECEMBER 31, 2016 at 10:00 WE ARE TAKING CONSIGNMENTS NOW! ITEMS MAY BE CONSIGNED UP TO THE DAY OF AUCTION; IF YOU WANT YOUR ITEMS ADVERTISED, CONTACT BAXLA TRACTOR SALES, INC., BEFORE DECEMBER 14 Items will be kept behind chain link fence for security; Consign & bring items early so they can be on display for the buyers to view! Tractors will be offered throughout the day in the lines. TERMS: Cash or check w/ proper ID. Financing available w/ prior approval through CNH Capital - Contact Larry Calvert at Baxla’s call 937-695-0766, 513732-2300 or 740-335-8821; Any announcements made by auctioneer on day of sale take precedence over this ad. SPONSORED BY: BAXLA TRACTOR SALES, INC. Ph. 937-386-2440 OR 937-695-0766

HESS AUCTION CO., LLC

• Auctioneers • GLENN HESS (937) 446-2455 BRAD HESS (937) 446-4455 JOHN GROVER (937) 466-2882

Buford, Ohio 2596 St. Rt. 138 • Sardinia, Ohio 45171

LIcensed in Ohio

www.hessauctionco.com

R10 – MLS# 1501234 – Two bedroom mobile home in good condition. Tenant has occupied for over ten years. $400 per month rent. 1980 Commodore. Parcel to be surveyed off current parcel and water/sewer tap separated. Manchester, $18,000. Owner will consider financing down payment. Asking $18,000.

R2 - MLS# 1517794 - NEW LISTING!!! ATTRACTIVE AND AFFORDABLE! Check out this 1.5 story vinyl-sided home with 3 BR, 2 Baths, , Remodeled kitchen with all appliances included. L.R. with hardwood flooring. Also, unfinished basement, carport, gas FA furnaces. Great investment for the asking price of $58,900. R13 - MLS# 1501253 - 1972 Kirkwood mobile home. Parcel to be surveyed off and water/sewer tap separated. Owner will consider financing the down payment. Asking $15,000. R14 - MLS# 1501279 - Solid single story home renting for $425 per month. Parcel to be surveyed off. Water and sewer to be separated. Asking $30,000.

R17 - MLS# 1511110 HUGE PRICE REDUCTION! INCREDIBLY CONVENIENT Located on outskirts of town, this solid brick ranch combines convenience with a touch of country living. Home has spacious L.R./dining area, family room, kitchen, 3 BR, 2.5 bath utility. Attached carport, storage building, city water and sewage Handicapped accessible. Asking $98,500. WAS $75,000 REDUCED TO $70,000.

R27 - MLS# 1477041 - PRICE REDUCED! YEARNING FOR YESTERDAY? Try this

F2 – MLS# 1518373 - NEW LISTING!!! 210 acre, hard to find family farm. Acreage is partially tillable, plenty of pasture, remainder wooded. 2 Larger barns and smaller outbuildings. Pond and creek runs through property. Land is mostly flat-rolling. Located on dead end road. 2 story brick home with large finished family room in basement, with wood burning fireplace. 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths, home is heated with outdoor wood stove, also has a propane furnace. Features fireplace on first floor, dining room and eat in kitchen, oak cabinetry. Attached 2 car garage. $679,000.

older 2-story colonial in mint condition in West Union. Home features (3) bedrooms, (1) bath, full basement and hot water heat. All new windows, carpet and vinyl throughout. An additional 92x63 adjoining lot goes with this property. All this for the very affordable price of $77,000. NOW $75,000. H1 - MLS# 1505090 - Single story home on 1.9 acres in Decatur. Could use a little TLC. Furnace and air conditioning in need of repair. Currently using window a/c and wall heater. Asking $45,000.

H5 – MLS# 15111414 - COUNTRY ACRES with very nice home featuring 3-4 BR, 2 full bath, spacious L.R., D.R., Kitchen, Family Room, Laundry Room, and attached garage. Also, 952 sq. ft. detached building with concrete floor and finished upper floor. Chain-link fenced in rear yard and covered front porch. Attractive home for an attractive price of $94,500.

H7 - MLS# 1505806 - Affordable country living! A three bedroom, two bath single story home with detached garage on 1.75 acres. Near town and school. Large open living room, covered front deck with vinyl railing, sidewalk, and large yard. Asking $58,000. H9 - MLS# 1501229 - A Rare Find Meticulously Entirely Renovated - All brick

H11 - MLS# 1510687 - 5 plus acres partially wooded, country setting, chain linked fenced in front yard with various out buildings and mobile home. Asking $25,000.

ranch on a corner lot. This 3 bedroom 2.5 bath home features many upgrades and fine quality throughout. Convenient location in a neighborhood with pride in ownership. Asking $194,700. H20 - MLS# 1506610 - Acreage, location, and amenities is what this farm offers with 28.7 acres of fenced acreage, 3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch home, large newer building w/shop area, office and livestock areas, and all located adjacent to the 4 lane. Home is back off the road and acreage is all usable. Asking $325,000.

H21 - MLS# 1507738 - 2 bedroom, 2 bath with open living area, permanent foundation full slab in the crawl space. View that is spectacular. Asking $59,000. H22 - MLS# 1507421 - Private country setting, home needs some TLC. Asking $96,000.

V14 - MLS# 1492641 - Residential lot with underground utilities. Electric, water & sewage available at the street. Newer subdivision with easy access to 32. Asking $15,900.

V15 - MLS# 1443208 - 2 acres of vacant property with 6 water and sewage taps. Great investment opportunity. Convenient

H14 – MLS# 1502562 - OWN YOUR OWN PONDEROSA on this 10 ac. mini-farm with additional acreage available! There’s room on this range to keep your horses, cattle, goats, llamas, or whatever you want to raise, including kids! The 42x36 barn w/lean to be complete with horse stalls and workshop. This beautiful 5 bdrm., 3 bath home is sure to please with over 2,600 sq. ft., adjoining mother-inlaw suite, gleaming hardwood floors, partial walk-out basement, attached garage and carport. Too many extras to mention, 12’ stocked pond, orchard, grape vineyard...the list goes on and on. Put your brand on this spread for the asking price of $239,000. Definitely not a drive-by! to town. Asking $99,500.

V16 - MLS# 1490712 - PRICE REDUCED on this 3.5 wooded acres located in Green Twp. Located near public boat dock and perfect for campsite or week-end get-away. Utilities available. Was $8,500, now asking $7,500.

V17 - MLS# 1510781 - Two level lots in Cherry Fork with frontage on State Route 136, $6,500 each or both for $10,000. Each lot is .4 acres.

C1 - MLS# 1500036 - Cash producing duplex at an affordable price! Solid home with two bedroom units is a great value $30,000.

C4 - MLS# 1419908 - HUGE PRICE REDUCTION! ATTENTION INVESTORS! Great business opportunity with this two story brick that has six separate units. Two store-fronts, plus four- 2 BR second floor apartments, all currently occupied. It will pay for itself plus give you a tax - sheltered cash flow. An opportunity that deserves your immediate investigation. Call for more details. WAS $59,000. NOW ONLY $49,900.


CLASSIFIEDS

West Union People’s Defender

HUGE SURPLUS AUCTION FARM STORE MERCHANDISE Located At: 8 W. Main St. Mowrystown, OH. 45155 (30 Minutes from Cincinnati) “2” Rings Used All Day!

SATURDAY DEC. 10TH, 10:00 AM. STORE RETURNS - CLOSEOUTS - OVERSTOCK ITEMS SCRATCH & DENT - ETC! Furniture: (4) brown suede rocker recliners; camo two-cushion sofa; camo rocker recliners; child’s recliners; high-top patio table; sev. wood porch swings; sev. 3-person yard swings; 6 ft. picnic table; lg. metal patio fire pit; (25+) folding lawn chairs of all kinds; sev. EZ-Up canopies; Housewares: to include (2) Hamilton Beach 22 qt. roaster ovens; Carey elec. pressure cooker/canner; Foodsaver vacuum food sealer; (5) Presto 23 qt. pressure cooker/canners; Lodge cast iron skillets; lots of box fans; (50+)port. heaters including infrared, kerosene, sm. space heaters, elec. fireplaces, etc! (all checked & good!); (2)5,000 BTU A/C Units; (20) As Seen on TV “My Pillows; Humidifiers; Ball canning jars; sev. lg. ice cream makers; coffee makers; watermelon slicers; toasters; can openers; etc.; Hunting Items: (20) Jaguar 175 lb. Adult crossbows w/scopes; Youth compound bows; (10) game cameras; sev. LED red laser sights; Daisy BB guns; sev. archery targets; sev. port. hunting blinds; sev. live box traps w/2 lg. ones; (3) Bear Arms 24 Gun Safes; Stack-On 40 gun safe; lg. Canon gun safe; tons of flashlights; Coleman quick beds; lg. camping tents; wagonload of Clothing to include tons of jeans, bibs, sweatshirts, etc., in all sizes & kinds, plus many prs. Workboots in all sizes; StackOn pistol safes; tons of good Tools to include (2) 9500 lb. truck winches; alum. port. work platforms; 4 ft. LED shop lights; LED mini light bars; shop vacs; sump pumps; backpack, hand held, & ATV sprayers; tree pruners; 8” bench grinders; hand grinders; saws; drills; rotary tools; etc; roll Hobart mig wire .030; 3 gal. port. air compressor; (10) scratch & dent, upright air compressors for repair or parts; sev. welding helmets; 4 ft. levels; 10” sliding compound mitre saw; Wayne 1 . hp. lawn pump; (20+) port. battery chargers; sev. battery chargers on wheels; air tools of all kinds; hydraulic cylinders; Goodyear jump packs; trailer dolly; foot pedal wood splitter, 8 ton; 2500 psi gas power washer; sm. garden tiller; one man gas posthole digger; 3-ton floor jack; sev. bottle jacks; Toys Ertl Big Farm JD combine; Ertl Big Farm grain semi; plus other Ertl farm toys; Bruder toy trucks; (2) pallets full of R.C. helicopters & trucks, sold individually & by the skid; Step 2 child’s pull wagon; child’s big wheel; hobby horses, plus many other toys!; (100+) Android Nextbook 8 tablets (sold in large wholesale lots!); (15) full Gaylord bins, full of misc. items & “need repair” items sold by the bin!; Misc. charbroil meat smokers; glass drink dispensers; solar landscape lights; dog beds; (10) lg. wire Dog Crates; egg incubators; (10) Zareba fence chargers (solar, battery, & electric powered); stack of dolly tires; outdoor security lights; tons of 50 & 100 ft. garden hoses; bug zappers; galv. poultry waterers; lg. galv. tub; thermometers; rope hammocks; H.D. hose carts; vintage tractor, yard fountains; (2) port. Coleman Lazy-Spa hot tubs; mailboxes; galv. 2-hole pig feeder; yard wagons; lg. insulated dog houses; sev. alum. 500 lb. cargo carriers; sev. low profile floor creepers; 4-camera, surveillance systems; 10 ft. wood frame windmill; plus many more items boxed & unseen by Auctioneer! Terms: Cash or Check with Proper I.D. All information is believed accurate, but NOT guaranteed! Announcements made day of auction take precedence over any & all ads. All Items Sold in “As Is” Condition! Buyers Must Make Their Own Inspections! No Warranties Expressed or Implied!!! *Items will be sold individually & in Large Wholesale Lots! *Items are straight from one of the largest Farm Stores in the Country! * Many items new in box & ideal for Christmas presents! Klayton Juillerat –Auctioneer (937) 205-5256

Sunday, December 4, 2016 11

SPECIAL OF THE WEEK

NEW LISTINGWINCH ESTERBEAUTIFUL 1900’S COLONIAL HOME IN DOWNTOWN WINCHESTER. 4 BR, 2 BATH, EAT-IN KITCHEN, LIVING ROOM, DINING ROOM, + BONUS ROOM. FULL BASEMENT ON CORNER LOT. ALL NATURAL WOODWOOK AND DOORS. HARDWOOD FLOORS THROUGHOUT. LARGE BARN/GARAGE. LANDSCAPED YARD WITH REAR DECK AND LARGE FRONT PORCH. ASKING $129,900. CALL DAN SR.

BROWN CO- SARDINIAVERY CLEAN 3BR, 1 BATH HOME W/ NEW CARPET DOWNSTAIRS. A GREAT GARAGE PREVIOUSLY USED AS A BUSINESS. A 28X45 GARAGE W/ 24X28 ADDITION, PAVED DRIVEWAY & PARKING AREA, FULL BASEMENT W/FAIRLY NEW FURNACE & HOT WATER HEATER. QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR SR 32, CITY UTILITIES. THIS PROPERTY WON’T LAST LONG. REDUCED PRICE ASKING $74,900. CALL DAN SR.

DANNY D. DECLAIRE, BROKER

Sardinia, OH 45171 • Phone: 937-446-2610 (Office) 1-800-967-6166 Sardinia, OH Sardinia, OH Sardinia, OH Sardinia, OH Mt. Orab, OH Georgetown, OH

Charles Griffin Dennis DeClaire Ellen Housh Kenneth Kelch Roger Courts Dan DeClaire II

937-446-2239 937-446-2610 937-446-2681 937-446-2895 937-444-2461 937-515-1687

VISIT US @ WWW.DONDECLAIREREALESTATE.COM

"Double OU" Across 1 Crude group? 5 Afternoon: Sp. 10 Distort 14 Long (for) 15 Crazy as ___ 16 Emanation 17 Org. with eligibility rules 18 Locomotive locale 20 Bread type 22 North of Virginia 23 Pacific ring 24 Bindle bearer 26 Big ___ Conference 27 Far down 30 Some hosp. cases 32 Once, once 33 Grand Ole ___ 36 On the ___ vive 39 "No question" 42 ___-Jet (winter vehicle) 43 Mouth, slangily 44 Dundee denials 45 Negative word 47 Cooking wine 49 CBS cop show 52 Starting place 55 Job ad abbr. 56 Bellybutton type 58 Total 63 Restaurant special 65 "This can't be!" 66 ___ Nostra 67 Boxer Liston 68 Pooch's name 69 Newspaper piece 70 River to the Missouri 71 Put one over on

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Town crier's cry Kid's name Nosy Parker Sign on a plane facility Magic amulets "___ sera!" Apple bestseller Mao Tse-___ Mississippi feeder Bring to ruin Hammer or sickle WWII entertainers


Adams County Common Pleas Court Report COURT NEWS

12 West Union People’s Defender

Nov. 25, 2016

Civil Division

Capital One Bank (Usa), Na vs Candace M. Mitchell, Judgment Entry: Entry granting motion for continuance filed. (Upon application of plaintiff the hearing previously scheduled on 11/3/16 at noon is hereby continued to 1/6/17 at 1 p.m.) Christina Hayslip vs Francis Steward, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry Filed. Judgment found in favor of plaintiff Vanetta Hayslip and Christina Hayslip against defendant. Sheila R. Hattan vs Marie Young, Judgment Entry: Dismissal Entry Filed. Selene Finance Lp vs Penny Prater, Judgment Entry: Final judgment entry for foreclosure filed. (It is ordered, adjudged and decreed the sums to be paid within three (3) days from the date of the entry of this decree. Order of sale shall issue to the Sheriff of Adams County.) John Yates vs General Motors Llc, Judgment Entry: Pre-trial order jury trial filed. (Trial by Jury will commense on 5/15/17 at 9 a.m.) John Yates vs General Motors Llc, Judgment Entry: Scheduling order filed. (Final pre-trial on 4/28/17 at 11:30 a.m. and trial to the court on May 15, 16 and 17, 2017.) Shawn Vogler vs Grange Mutual Casualty Company, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. (Matter before court on motion of counsel for defendant to continue mediation set for 11/18/16. Court finds motion well taken, mediation is rescheduled to 1/20/17 at 9 a.m. Final pretrial on 2/10/17 at 11:30 a.m. and Jury trial on 3/6/17 and 3/7/17 at 9 a.m.) Mary Ethel Smiley vs Dale Smiley, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry Filed. (Matter before court on 5/20/16 for injunction hearing. Agreement was entered.) William D. Attinger vs Schurman Construction Llc, Judgment Entry: Court trial order filed. (Trial to the court on 8/10/17 at 9 a.m.) William D. Attinger vs Schurman Construction Llc, Judgment Entry: Scheduling Order Filed. (Final pre-trial on 6/23/17 at 11:30 a.m. and trial to the court on 8/10/17 and 8/11/17.) Citimortgage, Inc vs The Unknown Heirs/Betty Lyons, Judgment Entry: Finding and decree in foreclosure (In REM) filed. (It is ordered that sums hereinabove found to be due to plaintiff are to be fully paid within three (3) days from date of the entry of this decree. Order of sale may issue to the sheriff of this county.) Toby P. Smalley, CoTrustee vs William L. Smalley, Trustee, Judgment Entry: Entry Filed. (Upon motion of defendants and for good cause shown matter is hereby continued. (Temporary restraining order hearing shall be rescheduled for 12/29/16 at 1:30 p.m.) Lakeview Loan Servicing, Llc vs Jennifer Mccullah, Judgment Entry: Order for service by Publication Filed. Fifth Third Bank vs Tim L. Setty, Judgment Entry: Order of dismissal filed. Criminal Division

State of Ohio vs Rodney Huff, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry on sentence filed. Defendant convicted of ORC. 2919.21 (B), Non-support of dependent, 5th degree felony. Sentenced to five (5) years community control. Must pay restitution of $3,883.80 to V. Newman, maintain employment, make regular and timely payments

of current child support. State of Ohio vs Ricky Unger, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry on sentence filed. Defendant convicted of non-support of dependents, ORC 2919.21 (B), a 5th degree felony and non-support of dependents, ORC 2919.21 (B), a 5th degree felony. Defendant sentenced to 40 hours of community service (80 total withcase NO:20150026), Restitution payable to victim of $7,244.94. Defendant must make regular and timely payment of current child support order of $91. Defendant sentenced to five (5) years community State of Ohio vs Ricky Nelson Unger, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry on sentenced filed. Defendant convicted of 2919.21 (B), Non-support of dependants, 5th degree felony and 2919.21 (B) Non-support of dependents. 5th degree felony and 2919.21 (B) Non-support of dependents. 5th Degree felony. Sentenced to five (5) years community control. Community service of 40 hours, restitution of $2,336.68 and to make regular timely payments of current child support order of $61.21. State of Ohio vs Brandi Kidder, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. Court appoints Sarah Shelton as public defender. Bond set at $50,000 cash or surety with 10% provision. Full revocation set for November 29, 2016 at 10 a.m. State of Ohio vs Melissa Daulton, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry on sentence filed. (Def. convicted of possession of heroin F5 and sentenced to a stipulated prison term of 9 months to run concurrent to 20160139 for a total of 9 months in ODRC, Credit for 16 days is granted as of 11/8/16, $1,500 fine, pay cost and DNA test.) State of Ohio vs Jeremy Fuller, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. Bond modification was held on 11/17/16. Defendant’s bond is modified for him to attend wedding of his daughter. Bond modified at $20,000 O.R. Defendant shall be ordered to appear at 9:15 a.m. for drug testing prior to sentencing. State of Ohio vs Robert Long III, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. (Having come to courts attention that sentencing entry dated 9/9/16 inadvertently recited the incorrect date for defendant to report to Adams County Jail to begin serving term of local incarceration over Thanksgiving holiday. Correct date to report is 11/19/16 at 9 a.m. with release date 12/1/16 at 9 a.m. Dates of local incarceration of 12/16/16 at 9 a.m. to 1/2/17 at 9 a.m. remain correct and it is so ordered.) State of Ohio vs Rachel Rodano, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. Defendant tested positive. Sceen sent for independent analysis. Bond is revoked and set for $30,000 CA/SUR. Prior cash bond posted is forfeited minus 10% processing fee. State of Ohio vs Kelly Bradford, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. (The court finds it necessary to continue the suppression due to subpoenaed officers not showing up. Suppression hearing will now be 2/16/17 at 9 a.m., final pretrial will be 3/2/17 at 1 p.m. and Jury trial 3/20 – 21/16 at 9 a.m.) State of Ohio vs Zachary McKee, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry on supplemental indictments arraignment filed. (Bond set at $250,000 plus attached conditions, $25 bond surcharge, IDSF of $60 due within 60 days, $25 public defender fee if applicable.) State of Ohio vs Zachary Mckee,

Judgment Entry: Journal Entry order assigning counsel filed. (Val E. Lewis appointed as counsel) State of Ohio vs John Passmore, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. The jury trial previously scheduled for 12/1/16 is continued due to a motion to vacate trial. Defendant wishes to change his plea. Plea hearing is set for 12/28/16 at 3:15 p.m. Sentencing is set for 2/1/17 at 11:30 a.m. State of Ohio vs Jessilyn Gilman, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. (Def. failed to appear for hearing, it is ordered that a capias be issued.) State of Ohio vs Melissa Daulton, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry on sentence filed. (Def. convicted of possession of heroin F5 and sentenced to a stipulated prison term of 9 months, said term to run concurrent with term in 20160009 for a total of 9 months in ODRC, Credit for 16 days is given as of 11/8/16, pay cost and DNA test.) State of Ohio vs Dominique Singletary, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry on sentence filed. (Def. convicted of possession of heroin F5 and sentenced to a stipulated prison term of 24 months in ODRC, Credit for 59 days is granted as of 11/15/16, OL Suspension for one year commencing 4/15/16, OL Suspension for one year commencing 4/15/18, $175 fine which may be paid at the Clerks office at $20 a month, Pay cost and DNA test.) State of Ohio vs Stephen Hanson, Judgment Entry: Entry granting motion to continue filed. (Motion to continued is well taken and hearing will now be 11/21/16 at 12 p.m.) State of Ohio vs Stephen Hanson, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. Hearing on bond modification was held on 11/21/16. Bond is modified as follows: Defendant’s curfew is extended to 6 p.m. If working on farm with father and curfew is extended to 10 p.m. on 11/24/16 at 12:45 p.m. State of Ohio vs Stephen Hanson, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. Jury trial previously scheduled for 12/1/16 is continued. The plea hearing is set for 12/21/16 at 1:30 p.m. in the event there is no plea the court can re-schedule a new date. Sentencing is set for 1/27/17 at 12:45 p.m. State of Ohio vs Brady Ober, Judgment Entry: Journal Entry Filed. Jury trial previously set for 12/1/16 is hereby continued due to a motion to vacate trial setting and motion for change of plea hearing filed by defense. The plea hearing is set for 12/28/16 at 8:30 a.m. The court also sets a date for sentencing for 2/1/17 at 10:30 a.m. Domestic Cases

Brandy Hall, Peebles vs David W. Hall, Batavia, Action: Dissolution without children Domestic Relations Division

Faith (Minton)Rumpke vs Brett Rumpke, Judgment Entry: Magistrate’s Order Filed. Obligor shall appear for sentencing on 1/12/17 at 8:30 a.m. Capias for arrest shall issue if defendant fails to appear. Ruth Ann Rigdon vs Ronald Rigdon Jr, Judgment Entry: Magistrate’s Order Filed. Review hearing scheduled for 11/22/16 at 8:30 is rescheduled for 2/23/17 at 8:30 a.m. Howard L. Covert vs Carol Hart Covert, Judgment Entry: Entry Filed. The hearing scheduled for 11/28/16 is con-

Sunday, December 4, 2016

tinued until 1/23/17 at 9 a.m. Dana M. Gillespie vs Joseph R. Gillespie, Judgment Entry: Magistrate’s Order Filed. Mr. Gillespie must appear on 1/12/17 at 12:15 p.m. Obligor must have arrangements to pay the amount due within 30 days. Betty C. Young vs Justin D. Young, Judgment Entry: Magistrate’s Order Filed. Obligor shall appear for hearing on 12/8/16 at 10:30 a.m. Capias for arrest shall issue if defendant fails to appear. Bobbie A. Neu vs Johna D. Neu, Judgment Entry: Magistrate’s Order Filed. Obligor shall appear for hearing on 12/8/16 at 2:15 p.m. Capias for arrest shall issue if defen-

dant fails to appear. Samuel D. Perin vs Jessica D. Perin, Judgment Entry: Magistrates Order/Journal Entry Filed. (Julie Steddom is appointed as GAL. Each party shall deposit $375 on or before 11/28/16. Pretrial will be 1/17/17 at 10 a.m. Court to serve Sam Perin at hearing 11/18/16. Paul McComas vs Jennifer McComas, Judgment Entry: Magistrate’s Order Filed. (GAL fee to be paid to Julie Steddom) Tiffany Everhart vs John Everhart Jr., Judgment Entry: Notice of hearing and order to appear filed. (Hearing on failure to pay support set for 1/5/17 at 12:15 p.m. Courtney Ann Stepp vs Zachary Grey Stepp,

Judgment Entry: Magistrate’s Order Filed. Obligor shall appear for hearing on 1/12/17 at 9:30 a.m. Capias for arrest shall issue if defendant fails to appear. Nicholas Williams vs Janet Edmondson, Judgment Entry: Magistrates Decision Divorce Decree Filed. (Decree of divorce hereby granted to the plaintiff.) Nicholas Williams vs Janet Edmondson, Judgment Entry: Judgment Entry Filed. (Divorce decree hereby granted to the plaintiff.) Jennifer Rachelle Waldron vs Jody Charles Fenton Waldron, Judgment Entry: Magistrates Order mutual temporary orders filed. Both parties are restrained.

Nov. 22, 2016

Peebles, Fail/Sales Tax, Dismissed, Special Conditions: Dismissed without prejudice, Court costs are remitted. Adams Spencer, West Union, Disorderly/Cond., Fine $150, Court Cost $128 Frank Griffith Jr, Lynchburg, Poss/Marijuana, Dismissed, Special Conditions: Dismissed as part of plea agreement, TRC 1602117 A Michael E. Lewis, Dayton, DUS-FRA, Fine $600, Court Cost $132, Special Conditions: 2 yr probation Jacob L. Marshall, Blue Creek, No OL, Fine $100, Court Cost $55, Special Conditions: Amended No OL 4510.12C1 MM from DUS 4510.11A Jacob L. Marshall, Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $35, Court Cost $51 Jarrett A. Slusher, West Union, Fail Control, Dismissed Ethan B. Farber, Cincinnati, Speed 78/60, Fine $100, Court Cost $80 Joshua Heisler, Seaman, Fail Control, Dismissed Frank D. Griffith Jr, Lynchburg, DUS, Dismissed Frank D. Griffith Jr, Lynchburg, Marked Lanes, Dismissed Eric Stocken, Reynoldsburg, OH, Speed 73/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Benjamin A. Perez, Loveland, Speed 74/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Timothy P. Shoemaker, Alexandria, VA, Speed 81/60, Fine $150, Court Cost $80 John E. Roe Jr, Lawrenceburg, KY, Speed 74/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Karen D. Kennedy, Seaman, Failure/Yield,Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Steven M. Leonard, Manchester, Stop Sign, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Veronica B. Hayslip, West Union, Speed 69/55, Fine $22, Court Cost $80 Justin L. Stacy, Russellville, Fail to Display, Fine $25, Court Cost $51 Justin L. Stacy, Russellville, No Seatbelt, Fine $30, Court Cost $28 Patricia M. Carroll, Manchester, No Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $30, Court Cost $51 Paul L. Chapman Jr., Mt Orab, DUS/Fail Reinst, Fine $500, Court Cost $285, Special Conditions: 2 yrs probation pay $75 each month 12-19-16 Favian Vega, Hebron, KY, Speed 73/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $155 Charles Johnson, Peebles, Pass/Bad/Checks, Dismissed, Special Conditions: Dismissed without prejudice as the defendant paid the bad check, fees and court costs. Chad Michael Lewis, Manchester, Poss. Marijuana, Fine $150, Court Cost $70 Corey Florence, West Union, Poss. Marijuana, Fine $150, Court Cost $70 Denver A. Anders, Middletown, Hunt W/O Permission, Fine $150, Court Cost $70

Chad J. McSwain, West Union, Poss/Marijuana, Fine $150, Court Cost $70 William E. White, Manchester, Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $30, Court Cost $126 Jennifer Fultz, Manchester, Valid O.L., Fine $100, Court Cost $84, Special Conditions: Amended No OL No Points from DUS by court David Stutz, West Union, Physical Cont., Fine $300, Court Cost $88 Chad A. Howard, Cincinnati, O.V.I./1st, Fine $375, Court Cost $82, Special Conditions: 1 yr probation 20 days credit DDIP Mandi S. Pease, West Union, Fail Stop Sign, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Destiny T. Gay, Wheelersburg, OH, Speed 80/60, Fine $100, Court Cost $80 Elizabeth N. Finferanjen, Arlington, VA, Speed 85/60, Fine $200, Court Cost $80 Randy J. Devore, Fail Control, Dismissed Matthew L. Mosley, Piketon, Speed 75/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Robert L. Myrick II, Erlander, KY, Speed 68/55, Fine $22, Court Cost $80 Joshua W. Bro, Rarden, Fail Control, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Abigayle N. Jones, Georgetown, Speed 68/60, Fine $70, Court Cost $80 Joseph E. Lewis, Peebles, Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $30, Court Cost $51 Jordan R. Doyle, Maysville, KY, Speed 73/55, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Brittany M. Schroeder, Manchester, Speed 68/55, Fine $22, Court Cost $80 Robert R. Miller, Portsmouth, Speed 68/60, Fine $70, Court Cost $80, Special Conditions: Amended 68/60 Speed from Speed 74/60 Sharon K. Hess, Blue Creek, Speed 71/55, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Levi S. Conrad, Blue Creek, Marked Lanes, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Jeffrey E. Fisher, Peebles, FTY Right Way, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Douglas Altemuehle, Cincinnati, Speed 75/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Xavier M. Workman, Winchester, Window Tint, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Leah R. Money, New Richmond, Speed 73/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Danielle S. Morgan, West Union, Fail Control, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Danielle S. Morgan, West Union, Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $30, Court Cost $28 Derrick R. Davis, West Union, Speed 75/55, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Zachary A. Hase, Springboro, OH, Speed 85/60, Fine $150, Court Cost $80 Monica M. Cole, Cincinnati, Speed 75/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Sybil T. Ortego, Cincinnati, Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $30, Court Cost $51 David T. Pryor, Peebles, Speed 71/55, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Mamoru Kubo, Hebron, KY, Speed 78/60, Fine $100, Court Cost $80

Criminal Traffic Disposition Report

Tammy Nelson, Manchester, Disorder/Conduct, Fine $150, Court Cost $214 William Sandlin Jr., Ripley, Domestic Violence, Dismissed, Special Conditions: Dismissed without prejudice as the victim in this has not kept in contact with the State of Ohio. Matthew D. Evans, Blue Creek, Seat Belt/Pass, Fine $20, Court Cost $51 Tasha M. Risner, Peebles, Fail Control, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Steven W. Verax, Stout, Fail Control, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Steven W. Verex, Stout, Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $30, Court Cost $28 Aaron Charles Bruewer, Fairfield, Speed 70/55, Fine $22, Court Cost $80 Dexter K. Taylor, Cincinnati, Speed 73/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Katie E. Wolsefer, Franklin, Speed 81/60, Fine $150, Court Cost $80 Elijah J. Profitt, Fayetteville, Speed 79/60, Fine $100, Court Cost $80 Jacob D. Randolph, West Union, Fail Control, Fine $15, Court Cost $80 Daril W. Arnold, West Union, Speed 68/55, Fine $22, Court Cost $80 Travis A. Burris, Blanchester, Speed 66/55, Fine $22, Court Cost $80 Brenda J. Biglow, Manchester, Speed 72/55, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Terry A. Malone, West Union, Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $30, Court Cost $51 Chelsea Lorili Ray, Cincinnati, Speed 72/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Ronald L. Sandusky, Amelia, Speed 73/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Abby R. Gray, Morgantown, IN, Speed 73/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Kaitlyn M. Kingsolver, West Union, Speed 63/55, Fine $100, Court Cost $80 Dillon L. Frazee, Friendsville, MD, Speed 70/60, Fine $22, Court Cost $80 Darryl C. Whalen, Winchester, Defective Muffler, Fine $150, Court Cost $80 Zachary C. Thomas, Washington CT, OH, Speed 74/55, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Catherine D. Liddle, W. Portsmouth, Speed 72/55, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Matthew R. Kestner, Parkersburg, WV, Speed 68/60, Fine $100, Court Cost $80, Special Conditions: Amended 68/60 Speed No Points from 74/60 Speed Richard L. Wells, Maysville, Speed 73/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Dakota J. Lesher, Herndon, WV, Defective Muffler, Fine $150, Court Cost $80, Special Conditions: Amended to 4513.22 Defective Muffler from Speed 75/60 Marshall L. Grosardt, Cleves, OH, Speed 83/60, Fine $150, Court Cost $80 Brandi E. Taylor, Seaman, Speed 73/60, Fine $42, Court Cost $80 Kelly P. Barry, Elkview, WV, Speed 80/60, Fine $100, Court Cost $152 William Ogden,


‘Operation Christmas Child’ collects 1,707 shoe boxes for needy children LOCAL NEWS

West Union People’s Defender

On Monday morning Nov. 21, a trailer loaded with 1707 shoe boxes filled with gifts for needy children collected by local churches and individuals departed West Union for distribution around the world as part of "Operation Christmas Child". Operation Christmas child is a worldwide children's project of Samaritan's Purse, an International Christian relief organization headed by Franklin Graham, that collects gift-filled shoe boxes and delivers them to children living in desperate situations around the world. Since 1993, Operation Christmas Child has delivered gift-filled shoe boxes to more than 134 million children in more than 150 countries and territories. The Adams County collection point this year was

again at the West Union Christian Union Church, where volunteers collected and placed the filled shoe boxes into larger shipping boxes. On Nov. 21 they were hauled to the area collection point in Hillsboro for transport to North Carolina where they will be checked and prepared for shipment to needy children around the world. The West Union Christian Union Church would like to thank each person and church that prepared a shoe box and those who helped in the week long collection and packing effort. Any individual, church, club, or group can fill a shoe box. If you would be interested in participating next year or have questions, please call Angela Horvath, Adams County Collection Point Coordinator at (937) 2176620.

The holidays definitely impact SHEs (Sidetracked Home Executives). Because we're creative, we can go into OPM (Over Production Mode). Our perfectionism kicks in and we want to recreate the magic we see on glossy magazine covers without thinking about how fake it all is. We SHEs love the holidays, and since we're easily distracted throughout the year, this time of year can pitch us over the festive edge. The holidays don't let us off the hook when it comes to the work involved in running a household. Imagine that you have a half hour specifically slotted for housework. You’ve got four 3x5 cards with specific chores on each to direct your work (if you’re on the SHE system). There's an estimat-

ed time telling you how it and when you went to long each task will take move the mail to dust written on each card. you saw the coupon for You’re dressed for house- 25% off Christmas pajawork, so you mas at Nordstrom, won’t wreck and the sale ends your good today! So much for clothes and housecleaning, but at you’ve got least you have some sensible shoes gifts to wrap. on. If you are a According champion at getting to your math, sidetracked read on, Pam Young because there is a you can do the Getting tasks on the wonderful anti-sideOrganized tracking tool you can cards in half an hour, but use and it’s located what has happened to in your head (well actualyour good intentions ly in your throat). You when you find yourself at can read all about it at the mall buying the end of this essay. Christmas presents? If you’re tired of being You can find that out a victim of distractions by thinking backward here are ten you need to until you come to the be aware of before you point in your houseclean- start any housework ing that prompted the whether it's during the diversion. Maybe you holidays or any time. were innocently dusting 1. Cell phone the dining room table 2. Door bell with a couple weeks’ 3. Pet worth of mail stacked on 4. Refrigerator

Sunday, December 4, 2016 13

Staying on track during the holidays

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Submitted photo

From left, Linda Ralston, Angela Horvath, Judy Young, and Pat Mustard with the shoe boxes just delivered to the Collection Center and ready to be packaged and shipped.

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5. Sun 6. Mailman or UPS guy 7. Physiological interruptions: bathroom, thirst, hunger 8. Computer games/ Facebook/ Twitter 9. Child or husband 10. Your amazing mind If you’ve been sidetracked in the past by any of these distractions, here’s what you can do. When you set your timer for 15 minutes and plan to clean the refrigerator for example, promise yourself you are going to stay on task short of an emergency like a broken arm, a fire in the next room or a drone takes the top of your roof off. Once the vow is made, work fast and play with your time constraint. (Seeing how much you can get accomplished in 15 minutes will engage your inner child who loves races against time.) There's no guarantee that

one of the distractions won’t occur, in fact, most likely one or more of them will crop up especially if the job at hand starts to get boring. No worries, you’ll be ready! So, let’s say something in the fridge speaks to you, like a left-over chicken leg and the thought comes to your amazing mind, ‘I’m kinda hungry.’ Speak to the chicken part and say, “Shut up! It’s not time to eat! I’ll eat you later.” If that dialogue works, keep cleaning the refrigerator. If it starts to nag you or another food item tempts you, it's time to bring out the big gun. The ultimate and tried and true solution is the air horn (you know the sound of the horn at a basketball game). Now in the course of the 15-minute fridge clean-out you may have to use that obnoxious horn more than once, but

it’s such a brutal sound and it’s hard on your vocal chords, so your sweet soul probably won't want to hear it more than once. You can also use the air horn while at the grocery store when you’re tempted to put a package of Christmas ginger snaps in your cart for example. (If there happens to be someone in the cookie aisle when you blast the horn, just touch your throat and say, “I hate it when that happens,” and continue shopping. Happy Holidays! For more from Pam Young go to www.cluborganized.com. You’ll find many musings, videos of Pam in the kitchen preparing delicious meals, videos on how to get organized, lose weight and get your finances in order, all from a reformed SLOB’s point of view.

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WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY 7 P.M. SUNDAY 2 P.M.

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NO PERFORMANCE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15TH


Christmas trees that you can plant yourself 14 West Union People’s Defender

Many families we know have a yearly ritual of planting a live tree each Christmas, creating terrific windbreaks or landscape plantings that increase their property value. Quality evergreens are like compound interest; you can start small and they just get bigger and better with each passing year. Getting your children and grandchildren involved sets a terrific example for future generations. "Live” Christmas trees are evergreens meant to be planted after serving as Christmas decorations. These trees are sold “balled and burlapped”, meaning they are dug rather than cut. Live trees are more expensive than cut trees, and take more work, but the payoff is that they can give you pleasure for many years. It’s hard to find a better value than a living Christmas tree. Even if you prefer a fake tree inside your house for Christmas, planting a real evergreen tree somewhere on your property each year is a terrific tradition and a lasting legacy. Outdoor Christmas trees are fun to decorate, sharing your Christmas spirit with your neighbors. Evergreens popular for

live Christmas trees include Colorado Blue Spruce, Norway Spruce and dwarf Alberta Spruce. These varieties all make attractive Christmas trees and are good landscape specimens as well. Norway Spruce is very well adapted for clay soil, so it’s easy to find many mature examples in landscapes all around southern Ohio. We recommend Norway Spruce above all other evergreens for windbreak and privacy plantings all year long. If you plan to bring your live tree indoors you’ll probably want a live tree somewhat smaller than the size you’re used to. A five-foot

Sunday, December 4, 2016

LOCAL NEWS

Spruce with a good-sized root ball can weigh well over 100 pounds, and is bulky and hard to handle. Larger trees weigh even more. Getting a good-sized evergreen in and out of the house, keeping it watered and planting it in the dead of winter can be a lot of work. If the root ball is too small, the tree may be cheaper and lighter but will probably die. The answer is a tree in the four to five foot range, from a reputable nursery. If you decide this is for you, here are some suggestions to help you succeed. First, keep the tree inside for two weeks or less. The transition into, and later out of a

heated house should be gradual. When you take your tree home, keep it in a garage or screened porch until the week before Christmas. Keep the root ball moist. Spraying it with “Wilt-Pruf” helps reduce moisture loss. Evergreens are dormant in December, but the heat in your home can fool the tree into thinking it’s spring. Once the sap starts to rise, putting the tree right back outside can shock it. Instead, let it get used to the cold again in your garage before putting it outdoors. We suggest placing a few bags of mulch over the spot where you plan to plant your tree, to keep the ground from freezing. Make sure not to plant it too deep. This will smother it and could kill it. After planting, water the tree well and spread mulch around it to protect the roots. Good luck, and Merry Christmas! Steve Boehme and his wife Marjorie own GoodSeed Farm Landscapes, a design-build landscape/hardscape installer specializing in outdoor living spaces. More information is available at www.goodseedfarm.com or call (937) 587-7021.

AEP Ohio files to extend Electric Security Plan PRESS RELEASE

AEP Ohio, a unit of American Electric Power (NYSE: AEP), has filed a proposal with the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) to extend its current Electric Security Plan (ESP), with modifications, through May 2024. The ESP would otherwise expire in May 2018. The proposal would continue AEP Ohio’s investments to improve customer service and reliability including proactive replacement of aging equipment and aggressive tree trimming and vegetation management programs to reduce

outages. AEP Ohio also will invest in a new communications system to speed dispatching of crews and restoration of service when outages occur and security enhancements to better protect distribution substations from vandalism and physical attacks. The plan also will add new, smart technologies to AEP Ohio’s energy distribution network including microgrids to supply uninterrupted power to critical public safety infrastructure, electric vehicle charging stations and smart street lighting systems to support the Smart Columbus effort in Franklin and 10 surrounding counties.

“AEP Ohio is focusing on making investments that enhance the reliability and quality of service that we provide to our customers. This proposal will allow us to continue programs that have improved the reliability of our service in recent years and introduce new, smarter energy technologies on our

system that help the system operate more efficiently and effectively,” said Julie Sloat, AEP Ohio president and chief operating officer. “It also gives us a way to invest in renewable generation that will bring clean energy, jobs and support economic development in Ohio.” The modified ESP

includes a mechanism to support recovery of future renewable generation investments made to benefit AEP Ohio customers as well as costs associated with AEP Ohio’s 423 megawatt contractual share of Ohio Valley Electric Corporation (OVEC) generation. AEP Ohio has committed to developing 900 megawatts of new renewable generation in the state, including 500 megawatts of wind generation and 400 megawatts of solar generation, contingent on PUCO approval. These technologies initially will be implemented as part of the Smart Columbus effort in Franklin and 10 surrounding counties, and then

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extended to other parts of the AEP Ohio service territory. AEP Ohio anticipates a decision on this filing from the PUCO in April 2017. If approved, the extended Electric Security plan would increase customer bills $1.58 per month for the average residential customer using 1,000 kilowatthours each month and receiving their generation from AEP Ohio through the auction process. Overall monthly electric bills for most AEP Ohio residential customers are expected to decrease during the eight-year period of the plan due to reductions in other charges.

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West Union People’s Defender

LOCAL NEWS

Sunday, December 4, 2016 15

Patrol offers tips and WUES students perform as part of Honor Choir warnings about driving in winter weather PRESS RELEASE Winter weather can lead to dangerous driving conditions. The Georgetown Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol urges motorists to consider the following tips on how to drive cautiously, what to do in the event of a crash, and what items to keep in your trunk for your own safety. In the event of inclement weather, motorists should allow extra time to get to their destination and maintain a safe distance between their vehicle and the traffic ahead. Pay close attention to bridges and overpasses, as they are often the first to freeze over, and drive slowly, as everything including accelerating, turning and braking takes longer on snow-covered roadways. During the winter of 2015-16, there were 11,544 crashes on snow, ice or slush covered roadways on Ohio roads. This is a decrease of 54 percent from last year. These crashes resulted in nine deaths and 3,096 injuries. Speed-related factors were reported as a cause in 68 percent of these crashes. The Patrol’s 2016 bulletin on winter driving provides more statistics. “In case of a vehicle breakdown, motorists should turn on their hazard warning lights, safely position the vehicle as far off the road as possible, call #677 for assistance and remain in the vehicle until help arrives,” explained Lt. Randy

McElfresh, commander of the Georgetown Post. Troopers also suggest that if you get stuck in snow; make sure that your tail pipe is free of all snow and debris to decrease your chance of carbon monoxide poisoning. All motorists are encouraged to prepare their vehicle for winter driving by ensuring that the battery, cooling system, tires, wipers and defroster are all in working order. Drivers are also encouraged to carry the following winter car kit items in their vehicle in case of a breakdown: - Cell phone with car charger - Road flares or reflectors - Help or Call Police signs - First aid kit - Flashlight - Blanket/Sleeping bag - Small shovel - Bottled water and energy foods - Candles and matches - Tow strap/chain Up-to-the-minute road conditions are always available by logging onto the Ohio Department of Transportation's website.

Submitted photo

On Saturday, Nov. 19, West Union Elementary sixth grade students joined students from the surrounding area in the Ohio Music Association District 16 Honor Choir. The concert was held at Chillicothe High School's auditorium for a packed house. The choir was directed by Mrs. Sandra Thornton, Assistant Artistic Director of the Cincinnati Childrens' Choir, Director of the St. James Satellite Choir, and teacher of Vocal Pedagogy for the annual CCC Summer Festival. The students performed "Barn Dance," "Granny," "The Fox," and "Kusimama."

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Photo of The Week

Commissioners hold Nov. 21 meeting SUBMITTED BY BECKY BRODT The Board of Adams County Commissioners met in regular session on Nov. 21, 2016, in the Government Center, with the following members present: Brian Baldridge, Paul Worley, and Ty Pell. The meeting was opened with prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance led by Brian Baldridge. It was moved by Ty Pell and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the minutes of the previous regular meeting. Roll call vote: all yeas. It was moved by Paul Worley and seconded by Ty Pell to recess the meeting at 9:06 a.m. to attend a meeting at the USDA Office in Hillsboro. Roll call vote: all yeas The Board Chairman reconvened the meeting at 1 p.m. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Ty Pell to approve work sessions for Nov. 30, 2016 and Dec. 1, 2016, in the Government Center, starting at 9 a.m. until work is complete. Roll call vote: all yeas. It was moved by Ty Pell and seconded by Paul Worley to approve the service contract for Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance between the Adams County Board of Commissioners through Adams County Job and Family Services and All Ways Green Lawn and Turf LLC, upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Roll call vote: all yeas. It was moved by Paul Worley and seconded by Ty Pell to approve the Limited English Proficiency Plan County Agency or One Stop Name, upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Roll call vote: all yeas. Auditor David Gifford met with the Board to discuss the 2017 budget. Adams County Soil and Water Conservation met with the Board to discuss the 2017 budget. Those present for the meeting were: William Wickerham; District Administrator; Anita Conaway, Administrative Assistant; Jack Hazelbaker, Board Chairman, and Mark Ross, Board Secretary. Adams County EMS Chief Matthew Carey met with the Board to discuss and submit job description for the EMS Chief, Assistant Chief,

Mark Carpenter | People’s Defender

Jolly Old St. Nicholas made an early visit to West Union last Saturday evening as part of the festivities surrounding an Adams County Christmas and the annual tree lighting ceremony at the courthouse. Better get the chimney cleaned out and stock up on milk and cookies for his return trip!

Lieutenants, and Administrative Assistant. Mr. Carey also discussed the hiring of volunteer employees. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Ty Pell to approve the change to salary wages based on 32 hours a week for Adams County EMS Assistant Chief Josh Chaney. This action is effective Nov. 26, 2016 upon the recommendation of Adams County EMS Chief Matthew Carey. Roll call vote: all yeas. It was moved by Ty Pell and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the change to salary wages based on 40 hours a week for Adams County EMS Assistant Chief John Campton. This action is effective Nov. 26, 2016, upon the recommendation of Adams County EMS Chief Matthew Carey. Roll call vote: all yeas. Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Dana Whalen met with the Board to discuss current projects and contracts. Robert Cantrell Sr. met with the Board to discuss the property at the intersection of St. Rt. 125 and St. Rt. 41 in West Union, previously the old Barr Gas Station. Mr. Cantrell was inquiring if the county or the village had any interest

in the property. Marilee Stephenson, Attorney; Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Dana Whalen and Jerry Kirker, West Union Village Administrator were also present for the meeting. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Paul Worley to approve the travel request for Treasurer Lisa Newman to attend the Southwest County Treasurer’s Association Winter Conference 2016. Roll call vote: all yeas. The Board Chairman signed a letter regarding a lien on an Adams County Property due to participation in a Federal Community Housing Impact and Preservation Program, upon the recommendation of ECD Director Holly Johnson. It was moved by Paul Worley and seconded by Ty Pell to approve the remaining amount collected for the Adams County Senior Citizens Contract. The remainder amount will be given to ABCAP Meals on Wheels. Roll call vote: all yeas. It was moved by Ty Pell and seconded by Paul Worley to adjourn. For more information on County Government, visit adamscountyoh.com or call the Board of Commissioners at (937) 544-3286.


LOCAL NEWS

16 West Union People’s Defender

Sunday, December 4, 2016

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