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Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Covering.....Adams County, Aberdeen and Buena Vista

28 - 134

Firefighter Dies Responding to Call

Photo by Troy Jolly

The Nile Township and the New Boston Fire Departments are mourning the loss of Firefighter Rocky E. Dunkin, 24, of Nile Township. Dunkin, was a full-time firefighter for New Boston Fire Department and volunteered for Nile Township Fire Department. According to the Portsmouth Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol that around 2:30 a.m. Sunday, July 1, Dunkin, was at

the scene of an injury crash on U.S. 52 near Friendship, when he fell unconscious while he was in the process of assisting EMT's. He was discovered by fellow firefighters and transported to Southern Ohio Medical Center where he was pronounced dead at about 3:15 a.m. Dunkin was transported to the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office for an autopsy.

West Union Police Need Your Help The West Union Police are investigating an incident that injured four people and two were life threatening injuries. Chief Roy Stricklett released information that on Saturday, June 23 at approximately 10:15 p.m. Police and medics were dispatched to a fight, in which one subject was lying unconscious in the middle of the roadway. When officers arrived on the scene, three male subjects were quickly located, each badly beaten, two with severe head wounds and blood loss. A third suspect was located a short time later with only a

minor hand injury. Two of the suspects were treated and released at the scene, while two more were transported by ambulance to emergency treatment centers. One of the suspects was flown by a helicopter to UC for life threatening injuries. The identies of the suspects involved in the fight are being with held due to the ongoing investigation. Anyone with information pertaining to this case should contact the West Union Police Department at 544-2512 or the Adams County Sheriff's Office at 5442314.

The 121st Adams County Fair is Almost Here

Man Dies in Motorcycle Crash The Chillicothe Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol is investigating a one vehicle fatal motorcycle crash that occurred at 6:17 p.m. Monday, July 2, on State Route 124 in Pike County. According to the OSHP, Randy Spencer Arrasmith, 54, of Peebles, was operating a 2000 Honda VT600CD eastbound on State Route 124 when he failed to negotiate a left curve. Arrasmith traveled off the right side of the roadway striking a guardrail. He was pronounced dead at the scene by Dr. Kessler from the Pike County Coroner’s Office. Pike County EMS and Benton Township EMS provided assistance at the scene. The crash remains under investigation by the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

Photo by Troy Jolly

New Wildlife OfficerAssigned to Adams County Mark H. Schemmel, 22, of St. Mary’s, will be assigned as a new state wildlife officer in Adams County. Officer Schemmel is one of 11 new wildlife officer cadets who have been undergoing extensive training and were sworn in as commissioned state wildlife officers during ceremonies June 29 in Columbus. He began his new duties the following day. Following completion of the Ohio Peace Officer Basic Training course May 4, the cadets had eight weeks of specialized training by the Division of Wildlife. In addition to wildlife law enforcement procedures and agency policies, the cadets received training in areas of wildlife and fish management, communications, ATV and watercraft operation, hunter safety, and advanced firearms and self defense topics. As a state wildlife officer, Schemmel will have statewide jurisdiction to enforce wildlife regulations, investigate allegations of waterway pollution, protect state property and make arrests. He will also conduct educational programs, perform fish and wildlife management duties, and advise landowners on dealing with wildlife. Wildlife officers serve an important role as a point of contact with law enforcement and other agencies on topics of mutual interest, providing assistance and expertise. "I am very eager and excited to serve

Mark H. Schemmel the sportsmen and women as well as all constituents of the state,” said Schemmel, state wildlife officer. Schemmel is a 2009 graduate of Anna High School in Shelby County. In 2011, he received an associate degree in wildlife management from Hocking College.

First State Bank to Open New Branch

Please turn to pages 9-11 for information regading the Adams County Fair.

Bowling Named Chief of Police Manchester Mayor Troy A. Jolly in the July 3, Council Meeting recommended naming Acting Chief Jeff Bowling as Chief of Police. Council Members Mike Phipps, Christine Henderson, Brian Church, Cody Wagner and Roy Carpenter all voted yea. Councilman Robert Hilderbrand was absent from the meeting. Bowling was hired as an officer in February. Mayor Jolly appointed Bowling as acting police chief following the passing of Manchester Police Chief Bruce Troutman in May. Bowling, who is from Monroe, brings more than 26 years of law enforcement experience to the office. Bowling has been busy with nuisance property and abatement activity in the village, along with his daily duties of responding to calls. Over 50 Warnings have been issued. With some expiring and have been cited to court. Some has cleaned the properties to a desirable state. "I'm glad to have Bowling's experience here and to guide the other officers, how-

ever, it's an unfortunate situation that led to this appointment, because of the passing of former Chief Bruce Troutman,” Jolly said.

Ohio, various other states and the federal government have reached an agreement in principle for the largest healthcare fraud settlement in U.S. history. Under the terms of the settlement, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has agreed to pay $3 billion to resolve allegations that GSK engaged in various illegal schemes related to the marketing and pricing of drugs it manufactures. As part of the settlement, GSK will pay to the states and the federal government a total of $2 billion in damages and civil penalties to compensate

various federal healthcare programs, including Medicaid, for harm allegedly suffered as a result of the illegal conduct. "GlaxoSmithKline illegally marketed several prescription drugs for ailments the medications were not intended to treat," said Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine (R). "The medicines were then overprescribed and paid for with Ohio taxpayer dollars. Today I'm happy to say that we are getting that taxpayer money back." See MEDICAID on page 2

First State Bank Announces Plans for New Location in Hillsboro First State Bank is pleased to announce plans to open a new location in Highland County. The new location will be in Hillsboro on the corner of Harry Sauner and Careytown roads. Construction plans for the new First State Bank location are already underway and the bank plans to open its doors to the community in early 2013. The new banking center will offer customers a full range of deposit and loan products for businesses and individuals. The new location will be locally managed and staffed and will include a drive-up ATM. "Being locally controlled and managed gives us the unique ability to make decisions quickly and to provide more customized services and products that truly benefits residents of the area. Our inhouse processing is another unique quality of the First State Bank. We process each transaction and service all our loans in our operation departments at First State

Bank," said Mike Pell, President and Chief Executive Officer of First State Bank. With eight locations across Adams and Brown Counties, many people in Highland County have been First State Bank customers for years. This new location will add an additional convenience factor for these residents. "We are looking forward to making our products and services even more accessible to new and existing clients. By having a presence in the community, we are better positioned to fulfill our mission of being a true hometown bank and contribute to the community in which we serve," said Pell. First State Bank is dedicated to providing exceptional customer service and high value products and has been a trusted and respected community institution since 1884. Pell said, "First State Bank is very excited for this opportunity to serve Highland County for many years to come."

Book Appointed to Board of Governors of the Ohio State Bar Association Jeff Bowling

$40 Million Settlement for Ohio Medicaid Todd Book Former 89th District State Representative Todd Book, of Portsmouth, has been elected to serve a three-year term as District 8 representative on the Board of

Governors of the Ohio State Bar Association. District 8 includes 342 attorneys who reside or practice in Adams, Brown, Scioto, Highland, Gallia, Jackson, Lawrence, Pickaway, Pike, Ross and Vinton counties. Book, is a partner in the Portsmouth firm of Harcha, Book & Beck, LLC and a four-term member of the Ohio House of Representatives, was elected by area lawyers at an OSBA district meeting. Book, will also serve as a member of the OSBA Board of Governors’ Government Affairs Committee. The 21-member Board of Governors meets monthly to manage the association’s business affairs, set policy and review pending legisla-

tion on behalf of the 25,000 Ohio lawyers who are OSBA members.

Page 2 Stories are:

Ramblin Relics Country Run for Fun, $40 Million Settlement for Ohio Medicaid and Adams County Jail Intake and Release Report.

OBITUARIES

The following obituaries are on page 3 of this week’s edition: Jack Austin, Helen Fannin, Billy Moore, Janet Huffman, Evelyn Joyce Howell Ayres, Lawrence “Frank” Dee Adams and Terrence L. Waldroff.


2 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - The Informer

Ramblin Relics Country Run for Fun Medicaid

Best Ford Product

Best Chrysler Product

As part of this settlement, Ohio Medicaid will receive a total of $40,255,498.34 in recoveries from GSK. The federal share of that settlement amounts to $23,541,015.87, while Ohio's share is $16,714,482.47. In addition, GSK has agreed to plead guilty to federal criminal charges relating to drug labeling and FDA reporting and has agreed to pay a $1 billion criminal fine in connection with those allegations. The state and federal governments alleged that GSK engaged in a pattern of unlawfully marketing certain drugs for uses for which the drugs were not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); making false representations regarding the safety and efficacy of certain drugs; offering kickbacks to medical professionals; and underpaying rebates owed to government programs for various drugs paid for by Medicaid and other federally-funded healthcare programs. Specifically, the government alleged that GSK engaged in the following activities: • Marketing the depression drug Paxil for off-label uses, such as use by children and adolescents; • Marketing the depression drug Wellbutrin for off-label uses, such as for weight loss and treatment of sexual dysfunction, and at higher-than-approved dosages; • Marketing the asthma drug Advair for off-label uses, including first-line use for asthma; • Marketing the seizure medication Lamictal for off-label uses, including bipolar depression, neuropathic pain, and various other psychiatric conditions; • Marketing the nausea drug Zofran for off-label uses, including pregnancyrelated nausea; • Making false representations regarding the safety and efficacy of Paxil,

Cont. from page 1

Wellbutrin, Advair, Lamictal, Zofran, and the diabetes drug Avandia; • Offering kickbacks, including entertainment, cash, travel, and meals, to healthcare professionals to induce them to promote and prescribe Paxil, Wellbutrin, Advair, Lamictal, Zofran, the migraine drug Imitrex, the irritable bowel syndrome drug Lotronex, the asthma drug Flovent, and the shingles and herpes drug Valtrex; and • Submitting incorrect pricing data for various drugs, thereby underpaying rebates owed to Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs. As part of the settlement, GSK has also agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges that it violated the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ("FDCA") in connection with certain activities. The government alleges that GSK introduced Wellbutrin and Paxil into interstate commerce when the drugs were misbranded, meaning containing labels that were not in accordance with their FDA approvals, and that GSK failed to report certain clinical data regarding Avandia to the FDA. The settlement is based on four qui tam actions brought by private individuals pursuant to state and federal false claims acts and filed in or transferred to the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, as well as investigations conducted by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Massachusetts and the Civil Frauds Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. A National Association of Medicaid Fraud Control Units team participated in the investigation and analysis of the claims and conducted the settlement negotiations with GSK on behalf of the settling states. Team members included representatives from Ohio, Massachusetts, California, Colorado and New York.

Adams County Jail Intake and Release Report June 29 - July 5 Carol S. Barlow, 47, Manchester, Disorderly Conduct. Booked 6/30 Released 6/30. Tammy Lynn Bennington, 52, West Union, Theft. Booked 6/30. Aaron E. Boling, 28, Homeless, Possession of Drugs - Heroin. Booked 6/30 Released 7/2. Hubert T. Bolser, 31, Batesville, Ind., Passing Bad Checks. Booked 5/25 Released 7/2.

Best GM Product Submitted by Rick Crawford, Ramblin Relics of Southern Ohio The Ramblin Relics of Southern Ohio held their 39th annual Country Run for Fun in West Union on June 30 and July 1. Over 100 street rods, custom pick-ups, street cruisers and other specialty vehicles registered for the event. On Saturday the participants participated in cruises to the Amish Community and other points of interest in Adams County as well as a Poker Run after dinner. The final stop on the Poker Run was downtown West Union where the streets were blocked for the 4th annual Saturday Night on the Square. The participants were entertained by the “Good Time Cloggers” and a concert by “Hot Rod & The Fastlane.” On Sunday, the Ramblin Relics held their annual car show at the Adams County Fairgrounds. Jason Cooper conducted a non-denominational church service prior to the other events of the day. Participants were able to compete in several games during the afternoon including: “Lifter Toss; Push Rod Drop; Fan Belt Toss; Hay Bale Toss; Water Balloon Toss; Creeper Races and the always entertaining Adult Tricycle Race.”

The club recognized the “top 25” vehicles as well as several specialty awards. The car recognized as the best GM product was a 1963 Chevrolet Impala SS owned by Charles Hobbs of Lexington, KY. The best Chrysler product was a 1937 Plymouth Coupe owned by Wayne Cantrell of Independence, KY. The entry judged as the best Ford product was a 1953 Ford Tudor owned by Winson and Donna Pistole of West Union, OH. The vehicle picked as the Ladies Choice winner was a 1939 Ford owned by Ron Collier of Mt. Orab, OH. National Street Rod Association (NSRA) State Representative Jim Green chose a 1939 Buick owned by Wayne Hile of Mt. Orab, OH as the NSRA Pick. The Bob Chandler Memorial Award is presented each year to a person who has had a long time association with the Ramblin Relics. The 2012 honoree is Bobby (Buzz) Hampton of Crab Orchard, KY. His vehicle is a 1954 Ford Sedan. Buzz as he is better known, is a charter member of the Ramblin Relics. The Ramblin Relics of Southern Ohio wish to thank our sponsors and others who helped to make our 39th annual Run for Fun a success.

The Informer

Publication of Adams County Press, LLC P.O. Box 801 West Union, OH 45693 Phone (937) 544-6460 Fax (937) 544-6459 www.informernews.info Publisher - Troy A. Jolly tjollyinformer@gmail.com News- informer4news@gmail.com Ads- informerads@gmail.com Letters to the Editor may be written on any topic. Those deemed by the Editor and/or Publisher to be libelous or slanderous will not be published. Each letter must include the writer’s name, address, and telephone number. Name and city will be published. Address and phone number will not. Readers are reminded that the letters do not necessarily reflect the views of The Informer.

Robert Joe Brewer, 56, West Union, Improperly Handling Firearm in Motor Vehicle. Booked 6/28. Released 7/3. Paul Campbell, 43, St. Clairville, Court Hold. Booked 7/2. Paul Lace Chapman, 44, Mt. Orab, Theft. Booked 7/1. Michael Ray Cockell, 53, Peebles, Possession of Drugs. Booked 6/29. Released 7/2. Thomas Allen Cook, 36,

West Union, Failure to Appear on a Misdemeanor Charge. Booked 6/18 Released 6/30. Johnny Paul Crawford, 29, West Union, Receiving Stolen property. 7/2. Jessie Lee Creighton, 32, Winchester, Driving Under Suspension. Booked 6/25 Released 7/2. Kelly R. Daniels, 42, Peebles, Domestic Violence. Booked 7/2 Released 7/3. Continued on page 3


The Informer - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 3

Obituaries

Community News/Events

Helen Fannin

The Manchester Local Board of Education will meet Wenesday, July 11, at the Manchester High School at 6:30 p.m.

Jack Austin

Jack Austin, 66, of Peebles, passed away Sunday, July 1, at the Hospice of Hope Ohio Valley Inpatient Center. He was born in Peebles, on August 12, 1945 the son of the late Arlyn and Pearl (Johnson) Austin. Besides his parents he was preceded in death by his first wife, Annabelle (Adams) Austin, who passed away on May 13, 1973 and two brothers Dale and Bobby Dean Austin. Jack attended Burns Chapel Church, he was a member of the N.R.A. and the Portsmouth IBEW Local #575. He is survived by his wife Teresa (Armstrong) Austin of Peebles, whom he married on July 7, 2007; four daughters and sons-in-law Angie and Bob Brewster of Latham, Jackie and Steve Brown of Otway, Beth and Jr. Hickey of Seaman and Amy and Josh Young of West Union, one brother and sister-in-law Kenneth and Beverly Austin of Peebles, one sister and brother-in-law Garnet and Dick Hoop of Peebles, six grandchildren Kristen, Ethan, Ashton, Lynsie, Brandon, Erin and two great grandchildren Jacelyn and Kasen. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, July 3, at theBeech Fork Church with Bill Swango, Phil Fulton and Dave Hopkins officiating. Burial followed in the Cedar Fork Cemetery. To sign our online guest book, visit us at w w w. t h o m p s o n f u n e r a l homes.com

Lawrence “Frank” Dee Adams

Lawrence “Frank” Dee Adams, 75, of Manchester and formerly of Clermont County, died Monday, July 2, at his home in Manchester. He was born November 11, 1936 in Bethel Ridge, Kentucky. He was preceded in death by parents Rufus and Adney (Vaught) Adams; son Glenn Adams; grandson Rodney Nixon and granddaughter Chrissy Willow Cullum. He is survived by two sons David Adams of Manchester and Rick (Brenda) Adams of Williamsburg, five daughters Shirlene Jordan of Seaman, Priscilla Nixon of Seaman, Lora (Eddie) Williams of Seaman, Carolyn Love of Seaman, Gwen Adams of Seaman, Jessica (Michael) Baker (granddaughter) of Seaman; three sisters Zella Caudill of Cincinnati, Juanita Pitman of Cincinnati and Tennie Hodge of Somerset, Kentucky. 17 grandchildren, 29 great grandchildren and many nephews and nieces. He was retired from Ficks-Reed Company in Cincinnati and was a supervisor for 20 years. He was the owner of the former Adams Roofing Company in Felicity for 25 years. He was a member of the F. & A.M. Memorial donations may be made to Lafferty Funeral Home, Inc., 205 South Cherry Street, West Union, OH 45693. The funeral service was Friday, July 6, at the Lafferty Funeral Home in West Union. Pastor Lawrence Lee Adams (grandson) of Springboro officiated. The interment was at the West Union Cemetery.

Please fax death notices to The Informer at 544-6459

Helen Fannin, 77 years of Winchester, passed away Wednesday, July 4, at the Villa Georgetown Nursing Home. She was born in Queens, Kentucky on February 15, 1935 the daughter of the late Jarvey J. and Beulah (Chaney) Brown. Besides her parents she was preceded in death by her husband, James Wes, who passed away on February 22, 2005, one brother Kenny Brown and one sister Carolyn Rutherford. Helen attended Winchester Church of Christ. She is survived by one son Edward Fannin and Kathy Shivener of Winchester, two daughters and sons-in-law Kathryn and Jim Henderson of Mt. Orab and Lisa and Jeff Naylor of Winchester, one brother James Brown of Bowling Green, Kentucky. Two sisters Janice Stamper of Sardinia and Janet Earles of Williamsburg, three grandchildren Sara and Craig Crawford, Jonathan and Becca Fannin and Jared Fannin, three great grandsons, several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held on Saturday, July 7, at the Winchester Church of Christ with Don Thomas officiating. Burial followed in the Cherry Fork Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Winchester Church of Christ. To sign our online guest book, visit us at www.thompsonfuneralhomes.com

Janet Huffman

Janet Huffman, 78 years of Peebles, passed away Tuesday, July 3, at her residence. She was born in Cincinnati, on July 7, 1933 the daughter of the late Leslie and Mary (McDaniel) Meister. Besides her parents she was preceded in death by four brothers and three sisters. Janet attended Evergreen Baptist Church and she was a member of the Peebles Magazine Club. She is survived by her husband George Huffman of Peebles, whom she married on August 9, 1952, one son and daughter-inlaw George and Lisa Huffman, Jr. of Pleasant Plain, two daughters and son-in-law; Debbie Domantay of Anderson Township and Karen and Steve Wolford of Anderson Township, one sister Margie England of Cincinnati, 7 grandchildren Nathaniel, Corie, Elisabeth, Christina, Danny, Andy, Devon and 13 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Friday, July 6, at the Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home in Peebles. George Huffman, Jr. officiated. Burial followed in the Evergreen Cemetery. To sign our online guest book, visit us at w w w. t h o m p s o n f u n e r a l homes.com

Terrence L. Waldroff

Terrence L. Waldroff, 53 years of West Union, died Wednesday July 4, at the Adams County Regional Medical Center. Mr. Waldroff was born July 1, 1959 the son of the late Dewey and Mildred Pauline (Childress) Waldroff in Grundy, Virginia. Survivors include two sisters Rebecca Winters of Versales, Kentucky; Edie Gillenwater of Bentonville, three brothers Dewey Waldroff Jr. of Sweet Water, Florida; John T. Quinn of Indiana; Mike Quinn of Florida; several nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at the convenience of the family following cremation. The ThompsonMeeker Funeral Home in West Union, is serving the family. Friends and Family may sign Mr. Waldroff’s online guestbook at www.meekerfuneralhomes.com

Bill Moore

Billy Moore, 74, of Manchester, died Thursday, July 5, at the Hospice of Hope Ohio Valley Inpatient Center. He was born in Orangeburg, KY on April 5, 1938 to the late Chester and Anna Marshall Moore. He was an Army veteran and a Mason. He is survived by his wife Carol Kinhalt Moore of Manchester, daughter: Glenda (Rusty) Rose of Bentonville, threegrandchildren Dustin (Tabby) Spires, Mecah Hannah and Brendan (Samantha) McKee, one great grandchild Bayleigh Spires, one brother Chester Eugene Moore of Hillsboro and one sister Ida Clark of Montgomery, AL. He was preceded in death by his daughter Teresa Hannah and a sister Wanda Howell. Funeral services will be held 1:00 pm Saturday, July 7 at Wilson Home for Funerals. Rev Dale Little will be officiating. Burial will follow at the Manchester Cemetery. Visitation will be Saturday from 11:00 am until 1:00 pm.

Evelyn Joyce Howell

Evelyn Joyce Howell Ayres, 79 departed this life on July 5, at the Hospice of Hope Ohio Valley Inpatient Center. She is survived by her children Pamela Kissick, Timothy (Sonya) Ayres and Kenneth (Tammy) Ayres of Manchester, her grandchildren Shawn (Tammy) Kay of Olive Hill, Ky., Christopher Kissick, Ryan (Vanessa) Ayres, Jilliane (Justin) Fuson and Owen Kissick of Manchester, her greatgrand daughters Halle and Tia Kay of Willard, Utah and one sister Sandra Darlene Lippert of Manchester. She was preceded in death by her husband William Ayres, her parents Alise Howell and Eva Williams, one sister Alice Wilson, one brother James Howell and her sonin-law Steve Kissick. Mrs. Ayres will be laid to rest in a graveside ceremony at her family's convenience.

Funeral Directory Lafferty

Funeral Home Inc.

John R. Lafferty, Owner & Manager Established 1848 205 S. Cherry St., West Union, Ohio

937-544-2121

Thompson Meeker Funeral Home (Formerly Beam Funeral Home) www.meekerfuneralhomes.com 216 W. Mulberry St. West Union, Ohio

937-544-2133

Wilson

Homes for Funerals, Inc. 35 W. 2nd St., Manchester, Ohio

937-549-3363

www.wilsonhomeforfunerals.com

Monuments Peebles Monument Company

172 N. Main St., Peebles, Ohio 45660

937-587-2210

236 N. Market St., West Union, Ohio 45693

937-544-2931 Holsinger Monument & Rock Engraving

937-544-4000

206 N. Pleasant St., West Union

The Adams County/Ohio Valley School District Board of Education will hold a Special Board Meeting on Thursday, July 12, at the North Adams High School beginning at 7:00 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to review and accept bids on property sale and any other business that may come before the Board.

Adams County Jail Intake and Release Report June 29 - July 5 Jack Dean, 86, Manchester, OVI, Booked 6/30 Released 7/1. Monica E. Delk, 22, Winchester, Trafficking in Counterfeit Controlled Substance - Trafficking. Booked 5/30 Released 7/3. Brandi L. Edinger, 24, West Union, Bond Revoked. Booked 6/5 Released 7/3. Derek Matthew Edinger, 25, West Union, Bond Revoked. Booked 6/4 Released 7/3. Michael A. Eldridge, 44, West Union, Breaking/Entering and Theft. Booked 3/11 Released 7/3. Shawna O. Evans, 29, West Union, Endangering Children. Booked 7/4. Edward T. Everett, 25, Peebles, Corruption of a Minor. Booked 7/3 Released 7/5. Joshua R. Foreman, 26, Peebles, Domestic Violence. Booked 7/2 Released 7/3. Cary H. Francis, 42, Manchester, Disorderly Conduct. Booked 7/1 Released 7/1. Robin J. Francis, 34, Manchester, Disorderly Conduct. Booked 6/30. Michael Paul Gibson, 46, Peebles, Failure to Appear on a Felony Charge. Booked 6/29. Jennifer Grooms, 31,

West Union, Probation Detainer. Booked 7/4 Released 7/5. David Earl Hampton, 30, Peebles, Burglary, Breaking/Entering, Grand Theft and Engaging in a Pattern of Corrupt Activity. Booked 6/25 Released 7/3. Bobby Lee Hanshaw, 27, West Union, Domestic Violence. Booked 6/29. Amanda J. Hedrick, 25, Peebles, Complicity Burglary, Breaking /Entering and Complicity to Grand Theft. Jonathon Trent Johnson, 19, West Union, Criminal Tresspass. Booked 7/1. Donnie Fayette Justice Jr., 20, Manchester, Breaking and Entering. Booked 7/3. Amanda M. Lamb, 30, Peebles, Endangering Children, Illegal Assembly of Chemicals for Manufacturing of Drugs and Hold for another department. Booked 6/21 Released 6/29. Jessica R. Lilje, 28, West Union, Probation Detainer. Booked 6/29. Matthew Ray Luithle, 27, West Union, Vehicular Assault. Booked 6/27. Released 7/3. Timothy C. May, 51, West Union, Disorderly Conduct. Booked 7/2

Released 7/3. Regina A. Ober, 41, Disorderly Conduct, Manchester, Booked 7/1 Released 7/2. Felicia D. Roe, 34, Stout, Driving Under Suspension and Operating a Vehical Intoxicated. Booked 6/30 Released 6/30. Amy M. Satterfield, 20, West Union, Trafficking in Drugs Heroin. Booked 3/19 Released 7/3. Wesley Loran Simpson, 25, Peebles, Probation Detainer. Booked 6/27 Released 6/29. Marvin Tackett, 52, Orient, Disorderly Conduct. Booked 7/2 Released 7/3. April lynn C. Wamsley, 23, Cincinnati, Carrying Concealed Weapon and Trafficking in Drugs - Heroin. Booked 7/1 Released 7/2. Christy Ann White, 23, Theft. Booked 6/29 Released 7/2. Timothy J. Williamson, 40, Bethel, OVI. Booked 6/30 Released 6/30. Michelle Dawn Williams, 28, West Union. Failure to Appear on a Felony Charge and Possession of Drugs Heroin.

Letter to the Editor To The Editor: In my opinion people should not pick berries in state parks, forests or wildlife areas. It's legal, but I don't think it's moral. Turtles, many birds, most mammals and even some insects eat berries. They need the food that grows where I live. They can't go to the grocery store. Tasting a berry or two from state land is one thing, but picking out a whole patch repeatedly is unnecessary. It shouldn't be a matter of cost. Someone who can't afford to buy berries or berry products like pies or jams in a store probably can't afford the cost of gas to drive to public places either. Living off the wild land isn't a good argument. People already use most of the land for themselves. State lands are like islands of wildness which can support a wide diversity of native plants and animals that can't survive in residential or agricultural areas. The native biosphere is our life support system. We shouldn't try to use it at all. We should leave more for other life forms we share it with. Suggestion: get domestic berries at a local farm market and support a farmer. Barbara A. Lund Lynx

Adams County Public Library Starting July 16, the Adams County Public Library will restore full library hours. Each library branch will be open Monday – Saturday, from 10 am – 5 pm, with extended evening hours on two week nights. The Peebles and Manchester Libraries will be open until 7 pm on Mondays and Wednesdays, and the West Union and North Adams Libraries will be open until 7 pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays. In 2010, state funding cuts forced the Library to reduce our weekly hours by closing each library one day per week. The Adams County Public Library is excited to reopen six days a week, to better serve the community. This service restoration was made possible by the library levy, approved by Adams County voters last March. This coming week marks the start of the Adams County Fair – and the Library plans to be there! Stop by Adams County Public Library’s booth in the Merchants Building to say hello to some of your local library staff, browse for free books and movies, and tell us what services you most value or would like to see at your Adams County Public Library. We’ll be ready to answer questions, explain the new Library Catalog, or give more information about library programs and services. On Saturday, July 14, everyone is invited to

come see the Fancy Free Cloggers perform at the Peebles Public Library at 1:00 pm. After the performance, we’ll hold the finale of the Peebles Summer Reading Program. Summer Reading participants can receive their certificates. Come celebrate with us! Summer Reading events will be offered at the Manchester Library on Wednesday, July 18, at 10:30 am for preschoolers, and at 3:00 pm for school age children. At the Peebles Public Library, teens can come help us create “Glow in the Dark Art” at 3:00 pm, on Wednesday, July 18. On Thursday, July 19, the West Union Library offers a Summer Reading pro-

Ross Gr ocer y 309 W. 4th Street Manchester 549-4580 K.B. Bologna . . . .$1.19 Lb. Kahn’s Bologna . .$2.59 Lb. Turkey Breast . . .$2.59 Lb. Ham & Cheese . .$3.39 Lb. Ham . . . . . . . . . . .$2.59 Lb.

gram at 10:30 am for preschool age children. For up-to-date information about library services and events, visit us online at http://adams co.lib.oh.us. Library Hours Starting July 16: Monday – Saturday, 10 am – 5pm Extended Evening hours: Monday – Peebles and Manchester open til 7 pm Tuesday – West Union and North Adams open til 7 pm Wednesday – Peebles and Manchester open til 7 pm Thursday – West Union and North Adams open til 7 pm

Penny Saver 308 E. Main St. West Union

544-6480

Little Debbie Snack Cakes $ .99 a box Del Monte Vegetables $ .75 a can Cereral $1.99 a box Dog Food $12.99 40 lb. bag Cat Food $9.99 lb. bag

West Union

Special 16 Inch Pizza 2 Topping

9

$ 99

544-7100 or 5443784 Manchester 549-2291 or 549-3643 Peebles 587-3308 or 587-2959 Seaman 386-2121 or 386-2713 Aberdeen 795-2523 or 795-2522 Credit/Debit Card Accepted!


4 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - The Informer

US Senator Candidate Visits County

Cuffs and Collars Field reports from Ohio Division of Wildlife Officers

Pictured Front Row (L/R): Winchester Mayor Bill Foster, Representative Danny Bubp, Adams County Chairperson for Mandell Campaign Kaci Foster, Ohio Treasurer and US Senator Candidate Josh Mandell and Adams County Treasurer Lisa Newman. Back: Ernie McFarland, Adams County Commissioner Elect Stephen Caraway, Adams County Commissioner Republican Candidate Ty Pell and Jeff Newman. Ohio Treasurer and US Senator Republican Candidate Josh Mandell visited Adams County on Thursday, July 5. Mandell campaign stop was at the Olde Wayside Inn in West Union.

From The Kitchen Of Pat Wylie One Pot Dinner 1 lb ground beef 3/4 lb bacon diced 1 c. onion, chopped 2 can pork and beans 1 cup ketchup 1/4 cup brown sugar 3 tbsp. white vinegar 1 tsp. salt 1 can kidney beans, drained 1 can lima beans, drained pepper Combine at lunchtime and simmer until supper. Dessert Apple-Pecan Pie Unbaked 9" pie shell 1/4 c. chopped pecans 6 cups sliced peeled apples 1 c. sugar 2 tsp. flour 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/4 tsp. nutmeg Spicy Pecan Topping Sprinkle chopped pecans in bottom of pie shell. Combine apples, sugar, flour, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Turn into pie shell and spread topping over

Pat Wylie, Sandy Baker, Casey Rutledge & Stacy Kinhalt COSMETOLOGIST apple mixture. Bake 425 degrees, 40 to 45 minutes or until apples are done and top is brown. Spicy Pecan Topping Mix 1/4 cup margarine, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/3 cup flour, and 1/2 tsp. cinnamon. Stir in 1/4 cup chopped pecans. Helpful Hints Stopping Nosebleeds Nosebleeds can be frightening, but they;re usually nothing to worry about.

In most cases, simply applying direct pressure to the nose is enough to stop the bleeding. As soon as the bleeding starts, pinch the nostrils firmly - but not so firmly that you cause pain. Lean forward, continuing to apply pressure for at least five minute. Repeat the procedure if necessary. Once the bleeding has stopped, avoid vigorous activity for a few hours. If the bleeding cannot be controlled, call your doctor for further instructions.

Jookees of thee week by Georgge

Two blondes were going down the road and a one eyed dog was running ahead of them. One blonde said to the other, "Did you ever see a dog with one eye?" The other blonde put her hand over one eye and said, "Yes, I have!" A psychiatrist is a person who doesn't have to worry as long as others do! Laughter is by definition healthy! George Perry

INVITATION TO BID (Legal Notice) The Adams County Public Library Board of Trustees requests sealed bids for the site and construction work for the new North Adams Public Library, located at 2500 Moores Road, Seaman, Ohio. Separate and Combination Bids are requested for the following branches of work: 1. General Construction Work 2. Plumbing Work 3. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Work 4. Electrical Work The Adams County Public Library Board of Trustees will receive bids until 12:00 Noon EDT on Thursday, August 2, 2012 at the Peebles Public Library at 157 High St., Peebles, Ohio 45660. Bids received after this time will not be accepted. The bids will be publicly opened and read aloud immediately thereafter. All interested parties are invited to attend the Bid Opening. Award of contracts will be considered by the Board of Trustees at its next meeting, scheduled for August 8, 2012. Bids should be sealed and clearly designated as a BID FOR NORTH ADAMS PUBLIC LIBRARY with Branch of Work indicated, and addressed to: Fiscal Officer, Adams County Public Library, Board of Trustees, 157 High St., Peebles, Ohio 45660. Digital or paper copies of the Contract Documents will be available for purchase on or after July 10, 2012, from Phipps Reprographics, Inc., 6920 Plainfield Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45236; Phone: 513-793-1030, Fax: 513793-1107, Website: www.phippsrepro.com, E-mail: print@phippsrepro.com. Bidders requesting documents by mail must contact Phipps Reprographics and make arrangements for payment prior to shipping. Plans may be examined on-line at Phipps Reprographics and may be examined by members at plan rooms of Allied Construction Industries, 3 Kovac Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio 45215, (513) 221-8020 or Builders Exchange, 4350 Glendale-Milford Road, Suite 120, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242, (513) 769-4800. A Pre-Bid Conference will be conducted by the Architect on July 23, 2012, commencing at 9:30 AM EDT at the Seaman Community Center, 17806 St. Rt. 247, Seaman, Ohio 45679 and ending at the site. Bidder's attention is directed to the form of Bid Bond required within the State of Ohio and the applicable provisions of the Ohio Revised Code relative to Public Works. The Library Board of Trustees reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. Glenda Jones, Fiscal Officer Adams County Public Library Board of Trustees

Southeast Ohio While on patrol at Tycoon Lake, State Wildlife Officer Roy Rucker observed two boats approaching the boat ramp after dark without any navigation lights on. Officer Rucker made contact with the two boats as they tied off to the ramp wall, and he could see a stringer of largemouth bass attached to one of the boats. All of the bass appeared to be well under the 18-inch length limit. Officer Rucker continued to check the individuals’ fishing licenses and required boat safety equipment. Upon further investigation, Officer Rucker found more bass in a fish basket that were under the length limit as well. All three subjects were issued a citation for keeping short bass. All three were ordered to pay $130 in fines and court costs in the Gallia County Municipal Court. Central Ohio State Wildlife Officer Brad Kiger was at Hoover Reservoir in Franklin County checking fisherman where he observed several men wading, catching crappies, and placing them in a basket. Officer Kiger asked to see their fishing licenses, which they held up. The men were then asked what they were using to measure the crappies to make sure they were legal size. One man hesitated, stating that they were waiting to measure the fish when they got back to their vehicle. The officer requested the fisherman to bring the basket to shore. As he was moving toward shore, the fisherman was removing fish from the basket and releasing them. He was directed to hold the basket out of the water, by the time he reached the shore only 5 fish

remained. Three of the five fish were under the legal size of nine inches. The fisherman stated that it was too dangerous to measure the fish while wading and that he was not “keeping the fish” but just holding them. Officer Kiger explained that all fish that are not legal size need to be returned to the water immediately. The officer also pointed out that if the fisherman thought it was too dangerous to safely wade and measure fish maybe he

should not be wading. A summons was issued for the undersized crappie and they were ordered to pay $122 in fines and court costs. One late spring day, Champaign County Wildlife Officer Jeff Tipton was working sport fishing enforcement at Kiser Lake State Park. He had watched a family fish for a while and then went to check their fishing licenses. Officer Tipton was checking the husband, while the wife and little girl were down the bank. The man also had his wife's fishing license. Out of the corner his eye he could see the wife running towards him. When she got to them, she ripped her fishing license out of her husband's hand, pushed it into Officer Tipton's face and said "I am SO glad that you are checking my fishing license!" She explained that she had spent hard earned money on the license and was excited that she got to show it to someone. Officer Tipton explained to her that people aren't usually quite so

happy to see him. Northwest Ohio Last September, Ottawa County Wildlife Officer Reid Van Cleve received information from a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) officer that someone had poached a large antlered deer in Ottawa County. The USFWS officer interviewed the suspect to determine the location where the deer was harvested. He learned that the deer had been killed in early August 2011 on private property. The individual reportedly used a Ruger M77 II high-powered rifle to kill the deer. The deer was then taken to a garage where pictures were taken and the head was removed. The body was later dumped in a nearby river. The individual stored the head in his freezer until the Kentucky deer season opened in early September. The deer was then checked into the Kentucky tele-check system as if it had been killed in Kentucky. The USFWS held the rifle and deer as evidence. The deer was still in velvet and gross scored 167 inches. The case was then handed over to the Division of Wildlife. Wildlife Officer Van Cleve and Wildlife Investigator Collingwood worked on the case. Officers Collingwood and Van Cleve served the poacher a short time later with four citations. The individual was ordered to appear in the Ottawa County Municipal Court. In March 2012 the defendant pled guilty to two of the charges: hunting deer in the closed season and hunting deer with an illegal hunting implement. The defendant was ordered to pay a total of $ 8,329.81 in restitution and fines to the Division of Wildlife. The defendant was also ordered to forfeit the rifle, the deer, and given a three-year hunting license revocation.


The Informer - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 5

Politics & Government A Chance to Build Again Ohio Victims of Damaging Winds and Severe Weather Eligible for Reduced Interest Rates I've spent my whole life in Southern Ohio. Even when I was in the Army National Guard serving my tours of duty in Iraq, my home and my heart has always been here. And for as long as I can remember, there has been an atomic plant mere miles from my hometown. There is no more fitting symbol of Southern Ohio than that plant. It embodies our mindset and is a pure reflection of who we are. In 1952, we broke ground on the uranium enrichment plant. We brought in 100,000 tons of structural steel and 14,500 tons of reinforcing steel for the concrete. We installed 600 miles of process piping and over 1,000 miles of copper tubing in the three processing buildings, X326, X-330 and X-333. Those giant buildings, miles of concrete greatness, were built in three short years by a bunch of farm boys from our neck of the woods. Fast forward to present day. Those buildings still stand there— empty mausoleums long since shut down. They are a fitting metaphor for how far we've fallen as a region. And just as we've been saying for decades now that it can't keep getting any worse even though it consistently has, it seems now that our pessimism has finally run out and we're ready to be optimistic again. We've been given a lifeline, an opportunity, a chance to show what we can do again. On June 13th, the news broke that the Piketon plant is getting $280 million to accompany USEC’s $70 million to fund the research and development phase of a long

since promised loan guarantee to fund the next generation of uranium enrichment in Southern Ohio. It will lead to the employment of 200 more people in Piketon. The American Centrifuge Project can be the second coming of the enrichment we used to do here. Like in the past, it is vital to our economy and national security. It is cutting edge technology, and it is located in our backyard. We are entrusted with this responsibility because we've handled it before. We are

It has become an annual ritual. Each summer, gas prices spike – further burdening American families and causing outrage across the United States. President Obama says there is no “magic wand� that will bring oil prices down – and that we need to discuss long-term energy strategies. Instead, we usually resort to a short-term gimmick, like opening the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Summer turns to fall, and we move on to another topic. Unfortunately, this is no time to move on. Today, the national average cost of a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline is around $3.40. Some 13 million Americans are out of work. Establishing a long-term energy plan can help change all of those numbers for the better. The fact is that our nation has far more untapped oil than what is

in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. There is great potential to develop our own domestic energy sources on federal lands, but we keep getting in our own way. The federal government is making it more difficult to tap the sources

once more and provide this land with technology absolutely critical for our nation's defense. I truly believe that, like before, we will prove to be up to the challenge and give the powers that be no excuse not to follow through with the rest of that loan guarantee. I meet with a lot of people in Columbus, and I tell them about Southern Ohio. I tell them about Branch Rickey and our rich baseball history. I tell them about how Portsmouth once rivaled Cincinnati. I tell them about how we took a Guest Column handful of farm kids and State built miles of concrete Representative jungle filling it with tubTerry Johnson ing to take natural uraniR-Ohio um and purify it to the incredibly valuable and incredibly fissionable U235. I tell them how wonnow going to be able to build derful Southern Ohio is. 80 new centrifuges making They listen, they smile, they the total number 120. 120 agree, and I think they centrifuges make one cas- believe me. Then the meetcade, and with that one cas- ing ends, and we go our sepcade, we will audition for the arate ways, and they forget. chance to get 95 more. This is our chance to make Someone less optimistic them remember what we can than I might say that this is do—to remind them what only a portion of the 2 billion we've done before. This is dollars that was promised to our chance to show everyone us. They could say that it is once again what our region only 1/96 of what the plant can do when the United would need to be fully com- States of America needs us. mercialized. While they are Let's engrain in everyone's right, I respond by saying minds permanently what a that they are looking at the resource we have in Piketon. glass as half empty. I see this Right now, we are looked as a tremendous opportunity. upon by outsiders with a repJust as we were called upon utation of prescription drug once before to build some- abuse and economic tragedy. thing great and develop tech- Let us rise like a phoenix nology our nation needed, once again from our own here we are again tasked with ashes and prosper. Let us our part of the yoke that is take advantage of this Godour nation's energy crisis. We given opportunity. Let's have the chance to thrive repeat history.

House bill would spurproduction of energy – and jobs

U.S. Rep. Jean Schmidt R-Ohio

of energy. And, once those sources are available, the government throws up road blocks to bringing that energy to consumers. Last week, the House of Representatives considered a bill, the Domestic Energy and Jobs Act, that seeks to harness our domestic energy resources. It also would help put Americans back to work,

lower gas prices over the long term, and reduce our dependence on foreign sources of oil. More specifically, this bill seeks to stop the Obama administration from hindering domestic oil and natural gas production on federal lands – while cutting bureaucratic red tape and streamlining the federal permitting process. It also would require the federal government to set longer-term production goals – using an “all of the above� approach to meeting our nation’s energy needs. And, it would make the Environmental Protection Agency consider the effects of its rules and regulations on domestic energy consumers. This is a commonsense approach for the government to maintain a steady hand in promoting reliable and affordable access to energy.

Residents across Ohio impacted by damaging winds and severe weather during storms the weekend of June 30 could be eligible for emergency assistance in the form of reduced interest rates on loans under Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel's Renew Ohio & Rebuild Ohio Programs. Small businesses and homeowners who apply for bank loans for construction, restoration, or cash flow for damage and hardship resulting from the recent severe weather may be eligible to receive interest rate reductions through the Treasurer's office. "Extremely high winds and severe weather across Ohio caught many by surprise and resulted in serious damages to many homes and small businesses. Those looking to rebuild and recover from loss may be eligible for various state and federal programs, including the Renew Ohio & Rebuild Ohio linked deposit programs which can help lower interest rates on loans," said Treasurer Mandel. "These programs can be used by businesses or farmers who are victims of severe weather for con-

struction and to improve cash flow, or by individuals to finance the restoration of their homes." Treasurer Mandel has made $25 million available through the Ohio Treasury's Renew Ohio & Rebuild Ohio emergency financing programs to assist Ohioans whose small businesses, farms and homes were damaged by severe weather. The money in this linked deposit program is available and targets small business owners,

up to a three percent interest rate reduction on new or existing loans for construction or to improve cash flow. The interest rate reduction may be applied on up to $400,000 of the loan for up to four years. Rebuild Ohio will assist homeowners with an interest rate reduction on loans to finance the restoration of their homes. Homeowners who have suffered severe damage or loss as a result of severe weather will be eligible for a three percent interest rate reduction on up Guest Column to $400,000 of the loan Josh Mandel for a five or seven-year (R)-Ohio period. State Treasurer The Renew Ohio and Rebuild Ohio programs are able to be used in addition to other state and federal disaster farmers and homeowners assistance programs that affected by severe weather might be available to vicwho might be eligible to tims. For more informareceive interest rate reduc- tion on how to apply for tions on loans in order to the Renew Ohio or Rebuild rebuild and recover from Ohio programs please contact the Ohio Treasury's damage or loss. Renew Ohio will assist Department of Economic small business owners and Development by calling those in the agricultural (614) 466-6546 or toll-free community who have suf- (800) 228-1102 option 3; fered severe damage or or visit the Renew Ohio & loss as a result of severe Rebuild Ohio web page: weather. Businesses and www.OhioTreasurer.gov/R farmers can apply to obtain enewRebuild

Public Pension Reform Representative Danny Bubp (R), Chair of the House Judiciary and Ethics Committee, released the following statement today to answer inquiries from constituents regarding House Bill 69 and Senate Bills 340, 341, 342, 343 and 345, legislation that makes changes to the public pension systems in Ohio. Representative Lynn Wachtmann (RNapoleon), Chairman of the House Health and Aging Committee introduced House Bill 69, a bill that changes retirement and disability benefit eligibility criteria for members of the public pension systems. After House Bill 69 was introduced in February 2011, the Subcommittee on the Pension Systems was created to review this bill in greater detail. The House Subcommittee convened 12 committee hearings to review HB 69. However, given the complexity and importance of these issues, the members of the Ohio Retirement Study Council agreed that it was prudent to first commission an independent review of the pension systems’ accounting and data

and member of the Ohio Retirement Study Council, current Senate pension plans "rely heavily on pension surpluses to pay for healthcare benefits, which have historically been how the programs operate. This is not viable; history has also shown that GUEST COLUMN this operation will not sustain retiree healthR e p r e s e n t a t i v e care benefits in the Danny Bubp long run and we are confident that the R-Ohio pending report will demonstrate different paths forward towards long-term sustainabiliwould make changes to the ty of the systems." As a pension systems in Ohio. result, House members are Senate President Tom waiting for the completion Niehaus, R-New of the comprehensive Richmond, and Minority ORSC study to offer more Leader Eric Kearney, D- sustainable plans for penCincinnati, introduced the sion reform. The Ohio Retirement Senate bills which address pension plans for public Study Council (ORSC) employees, teachers and study on pension systems school employees as well is near completion and as fire workers and police- House members are confimen. These bills were dent that revised legislaquickly passed through the tion that includes recomfrom the Senate with overwhelming mendations ORSC report will ensure bi-partisan support. According to the effectiveness of system Representative Kirk reform and protect the solSchuring, Chairman of the vency of the retirement House Health and Aging systems. The final report is Subcommittee on expected to be released in Retirement and Pensions sometime July. before proceeding with the reform legislation. In response to an increase of public discussions regarding pension reform, the Ohio Senate decided to move forward, drafting legislation that

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6 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - The Informer

Dry Conditions Continue, Despite Storms Most of the three county area did receive some rain over the weekend. I have heard as little as a tenth of an inch to maybe an inch in some places, but it came with a price. The storms impacted much of Ohio and many states extending to the Atlantic Coast. Many people were without electric for several hours, some several days, and some still were without power when I wrote this. The wind damage took down several trees and damaged some buildings and other property. As electric is repaired and things slowly come back to normal, there are other things that are stressed in addition to us. Livestock, in some cases may have gone without water for an extended time. That is not a good thing anytime, but it is even more stressful when we experience temperatures at or near a hundred degrees. Water is the most important nutrient for us or livestock. The restriction of water will impact performance more than any other nutrient. As we provide water to livestock, one word of caution right up front. DO NOT allow free access to unlimited water if they have

watering livestock and how important water is to performance and surDAVID DUGAN vival. Guest Column From Ohio State Extension Educator, University, titled Water ANR and Ohio Effect on Livestock Valley EERA Performance http://ohioline.osu.edu/anrfact/pdf/0013.pdf been without water for an From North Dakota extended time. They don’t State University, titled know when to stop and this Livestock and Water can be fatal. http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pub s/ansci/livestoc/as954w.htm The amount of water needed From Ontario, this one is impacted by the tempera- includes pigs, poultry, rabtures, but here are some bits and some other basic amounts of water by species. Warning, this one species that is listed in an will take you to the metric OSU Extension Factsheet system. It is in liters that discusses how water instead of gallons, and impacts performance: kilograms instead of Animal Estimated pounds. A liter is just a litGallons per day tle more than a quart, so Cows, Dry & Bred 6-15 there are just shy of 4 liters Cows, Nursing 11-18 in a gallon and there are Bulls 7-19 roughly 2.2 pounds in a kg. Growing Cattle 4-15 http://www.omafra.gov.on. Dairy Cattle 15-30 ca/english/engineer/facts/0 Sheep & Goats 2-3 7-023.htm Horses 10-15 If you do not have the Those ranges are big in internet and would like a some cases. This is due to copy of these factsheets, the time of the year. The stop by the OSU Extension high sides of these ranges office in Adams, Brown, or are for months in the sum- Highland County for a free mer, like July. copy. Remember, do not The following are links give free access to unlimitto factsheets from Ohio ed water to animals that State University and other have been without water universities discussing for an extended time.

Library Changes Are on the Way Patrons of the Adams County Public Library will soon enjoy the restoration of public service hours at all locations: Manchester, North Adams, Peebles, and West Union. Effective July 16, 2012, all libraries will be open 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Evening hours will be scheduled from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday at Manchester and Peebles as well as Tuesday and Thursday at North Adams and West Union. In addition to restoring hours, the library board plans to begin construction in the fall on a new building for the North Adams Library. Architectural plans have been completed and bids for contractors will be advertised for two weeks begin-

ning July 9, 2012. Library staff are working hard to maintain as well as restore services as soon as possible. The basic service that most patrons continue to enjoy is printed books for all ages. As technology changes the way patrons get information, the library now offers DVDs, audio books on CD, computer classes, high-speed Internet, and Wi-Fi. Through the Serving Every Ohioan Consortium (SEO), patrons enjoy the ability to download ebooks, the newest book format. SEO also provides patrons with access to 5.9 million items in other Ohio libraries and a convenient way to borrow them. Interlibrary loan is one of the more popular services of the library. The library is online at www.adamsco.lib.oh.us and

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that website allows patrons to search the library catalog, request items, and monitor their accounts. Of course, patrons can still call library staff during open hours for answers to all their information questions. Both youth and adults enjoy a variety of programs held year-round at the local libraries. Children especially enjoy the weekly story hours and the excitement of the summer reading programs. Many people do not realize that the libraries also provide the convenience of public copiers, fax service, and computer print copies. All of these services are possible because the voters of Adams County supported the restoring and renewing of library services by approving a one-mill levy in March 2012. Library staff are excited about restoring services to their loyal patrons. Do stop by and visit your local library. They look forward to seeing you soon! NOTICE Resolution 2012-5 to amend the Official Certificate of Estimated Resources for Emergency Medical Service Fund. Resolution 2012-6 to approve to proceed with the planning of 3 projects: Main Street, Elevated Tank, North Area. Resolution 2012-7 to loan the West Union Fire Department $19,000.00 to purchase a fire truck. The remainder of these resolutions may be viewed or copy obtained at the Village Clerk’s Office at 33 Logans Lane, West Union, OH 45693. Tanya Johnson Village Clerk

Local Government Manchester Council June 19, 2012 The Council of the Village of Manchester met in regular session at the Community Building. Roll call showed Henderson, Phipps, Wagner, Hilderbrand, and Carpenter all present. Motion made by Phipps and seconded by Wagner to excuse Bryan Church from the meeting. Motion carried. The Mayor asked Mike Phipps to lead the Pledge to the Flag. The minutes of the May 15, 2012, were not read aloud because council received them prior to meeting. Motion was made to approve corrected minutes by Wagner and seconded by Hildebrand. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion passed. Evelyn Jones asked when street lights would be back on. Mayor Jolly stated that he has started the process with AEP and given meter numbers and locations to turn back on and it is in AEP’s hands to get that done. Several people gave their time up for Chrystal Walker to speak to council. She passed out copies and has spoken to grant writers about ideas for the old school. Councilman Hildebrand thought Walker had good ideas. Walker also wanted to know who had been appointed to the Woolard School Committee as well as the zoning committee. Hildebrand stated that the Woolard Committee is open to the public and that the next meeting is July 10, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. Councilman Wagner stated that he thought that Walker would be good on the ad-hoc committee. The committee will meet and give recommendations to council. Mayor Jolly stated that he would be appointing the zoning committee at the next council meeting. The mayor reported that he has been working with AEP to identify the street lights that the Village will be turning back on. The mayor also reported that he and Chief Bowling went to a training seminar on crisis situations. Jolly reported that he had attended the first Woolard project meeting and said that there have been a lot of good ideas and had made contacts into turning the building into a Boys and Girls Club. The Street Commissioner reported that he had three kids working for him from the summer youth program. Hildebrand agreed to help supervise if Ruark was off and Mayor Jolly had talked to David Jenkins from the water department in using them to paint water hydrants. Chief Boling reported that he had issued three citations for 30 days. One of the properties is already being worked on and painted. He has also looking through the auditor’s office to find owners of vacant properties. Officer Fletcher is resigning and he is looking for a new officer to

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fill void. Boling also reported that the tower is opened and will be open until dark each day. Rick Bowman reported that the Manchester Board of Public Affairs is working on a grant for an I & I project and would appreciate letters of recommendation from the Mayor and Council. The council and mayor can talk to Superintendent Jenkins for more information. Bowman also handed out run reports for the fire department and life squad. New squad has been down and has had to be worked on. Jolly reported that was a couple of open burns. Has to be in approved contained there is an ordinance. Bowman would like to see a copy to make sure it is done properly. Christine Henderson talked about the movies in the park. Henderson went to the songfest in the park. Movies and songfest have been well attended. Phipps reported that chief has covered about properties on the list. Street Commissioner has been trimming trees and the youth workers have started working and will have them until August. A motion was made by Phipps and seconded by Wagner to pay bills. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion carried. Wagner talked to Police Chief and he would like to bid out the old Police Cruiser for a minimum bid of $750. Wagner made a motion and was seconded by Phipps to waive three readings and bid out the 2002 Ford Crown Victoria for a minimum of $750 with the bid deadline of July 16th, 2012. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion carried. Phipps made a motion and was seconded by Wagner to put the cruiser up for bid with a minimum bid of $750 and the deadline to bid being July 16, 2012. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion passed. Wagner thanked M.A.N.A. for welcoming him to the meeting. Wagner thanked them for cleaning up Broadway without the initiative. Wagner thinks that a resolution needs to be done for the zoning committee. The sooner it is done the process can begin. He also would like to thank Blake’s for reopening in the Giovanni’s building. Support local business. Wagner also happy to see Wayne Blythe reopening business in town. Wagner is holding a committee meeting on FEMA. He would like to see a lot community involvement. Wagner would like to thank Fire Chief and Police Chief for handling an incident near his home. Walker would like to invite someone from FEMA to attend the meeting on July 10, 2012 for Woolard School meeting. Henderson would like to see Chrystal Walker put on zoning committee as well as Woolard project. Hildebrand reported on Health and Safety and said he would also like to see a zoning board in place. Hildebrand also reported that he would like to see the

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summer youth to paint at the parks. Jolly would like to use youth to do work at the tower. Carpenter reported that he thinks that zoning and planning is important and how we get long term goals figured out. Community yard Sale was very successful. Carpenter would also like to remind everyone that August 3rd and 4th is Kinfolk Landing Days. Wagner made a motion and was seconded by Hilderbrand to waive the reading the 3rd Reading of 2012-02 Bicycle Ordinance. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion carried. Motion made by Hilderbrand and seconded by Phipps to pass the 3rd Reading of Ordinance 201202 Bicycle Ordinance. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion passed. Hildebrand would like to see the survey of Woolard School. Survey has been done but the property needs to be divided up. Hildebrand stated that the school would like to be in attendance at the time of the survey. Jody Tolle spoke to council about animal control and that he has been working with other Village’s to maintain animal control. Hildebrand questioned having a dog warden when you pay for a dog license. Tolle explained about what he does and members of council asked him several questions. Jolly thanked him for his time. Jolly talked about the way other Villages do their agenda for the council meeting and wanted to discuss having people to call in if they would like to speak so they can be added on to the agenda. Discussion was had and council did not feel that anyone should have to call in for time. The solicitor advised there was no need for a vote because it was a discussion but Hilderbrand made a motion and was seconded by Carpenter to not change the agenda flow. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Bids were opened up for the Bucket truck at 8:13 p.m. Two bids were read one by Kevin Walter for $550.00 and one by Tim Peterson for $700.00. Hildebrand made a motion and was seconded by Phipps to reject both bids. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion carried. A motion was made by Wagner and seconded by Phipps to waive three readings and rebid truck with a minimum bid of $1500 and to close the bids July 16, 2012. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion passed. A motion was made by Phipps and seconded by Hildebrand to rebid the bucket truck with a minimum amount of $1500 and to close the bids July 16, 2012. Vote on the motion showed all members voting yea. Motion carried. Jolly announced that the zoning committee will be appointed at the next council meeting. Motion to adjourn made by Phipps and seconded by Hilderbrand. Next council meeting will be July 3, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.

Echo Trimmers

Allen Miller

Toro Mowers

9 3 7 -5 5 4 4 -7 7831

620 Wheat Ridge Rd. - West Union, Ohio


The Informer - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 7

Local Government

Adams County Commissioners The Board of Adams County Commissioners met in regular session on Monday, June 25, 2012 with the following members present: Brian Baldridge, Justin Cooper, and Roger Rhonemus. Clerk Diane Ward was also present. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the minutes of the previous meeting. Vote: All yeas. EMS Director Etta Sparks met with the board to discuss part-time personnel and AED equipment maintenance. Ms. Sparks recom-

mended Charles Brewer, III as a part-time EMTP at a rate of $10.00 per hour on a 6month probationary period. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the employment of Charles Brewer, III as a part-time EMTP EMS employee at a rate of $10.00 per hour on a 6-month probationary period effective 6-25-12 upon the recommendation of EMS Director Etta Sparks. Vote: All yeas. JFS Director Sue Fulton met with the board to discuss personnel and transportation.

GLENNA R. GROOMS dba

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INSURANCE AGENCY Auto - Home - Mobile Home Flood - Farm - Life Business & Specialty Lines Office: 937-544-3123 Office: 937-544-3795 Home: 937-587-3293

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Transportation Director Sally Hayslip was also present. Ms. Fulton discussed the transportation program for JFS and the coordination through a dispatch system which will now be available through Adams County Transportation. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the JFS personnel promotion of Regina Justice from Eligibility Referral Specialist 2 to Eligibility Referral Supervisor I at a rate of $20.33 per hour effective July 2, 2012 upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the JFS personnel promotion of Rita Purcell from Eligibility Referral Specialist 2 to Eligibility Referral Supervisor I at a rate of $20.33 per hour effective July 2, 2012 upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue

Fulton. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the bills. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the transfers and additional appropriations. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the FY 2011 Community Development Block Grant amendment request B-F-111AA-1. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the FY 2012 Airport Improvement Program Final Application for the Adams County Airport. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to recess at 9:30 a.m. in order for the board to attend the Adams Clermont Solid Waste meet-

ing in Clermont County. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Justin Cooper to reconvene at 3:00 p.m. Vote: All yeas. OSU Extension Educator Carolyn Belczyk met with the board to introduce the new FCS employee Amy Habig. Facilities Director Sally Hayslip met with the board to discuss the office improvements at the annex and the HVAC funding. Adams County Fire Chiefs Association Secretary/Treasurer Jerry Kirker met with the board to discuss installation fees for the new repeaters that were purchased through the EMA. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the ODOD Extension Request for S-A-09-1AA-1 Jaybird Road completion date from January 3, 2012 to July 3, 2012 upon the recommendation of E.C.D. Director

Holly Johnson. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the Moving Ohio Forward Grant Funds application through the Ohio Attorney General’s office upon the recommendation of E.C.D. Director Holly Johnson. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the OPWC Project #CU08N Poplar Grove Road Landslide Repair bid award and agreement with U.S. Bridge in the amount of $517,684.60 upon the request of Engineer David Hook. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the JFS/C.S.E.A. IV- D Child Support Administrative Hearing Officer agreement with David D. Wilson, Jr. upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote: All yeas. Continued on page 8

GUSTIN REALTY

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PAT MUSTARD . . . . . .937-728-0633 or 544-7073 BILL HOLTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-312-1043 CRYSTAL SUTTERFIELD . . . . . . .937-217-9662 ROSIE YOUNG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-403-4126 WALT YEAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .544-2434 DALE MENDENHALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . .544-5385 LUCINDA HANSGEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .544-3353 LESLIE MCCLANAHAN . . . . . . . .937-217-3716 OMAR VANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-763-6362

JESSE MCKINZIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-218-2541 LAWRENCE (LARRY) YOUNG . . . . . .544-3479 MICHAEL WILLIAMS . .937-217-1579 or 386-2484 NELSON ATKINSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .587-3728 NANCY ATKINSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .587-3728 MARK KAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-217-0397 TRACY KAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-217-0554 JANET WAGNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .373-3111 BRENDA MCCLANAHAN . . . . . . . . . . .695-0257 DANNY DICK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-779-7930 AMY SIMPSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-725-2185

HOMES FOR SALE HOMES

f/p, all new windows, large covered porch, 2-car garage. Home is in great condition. $92,900. R19 – WEST UNION – 1 ½ story frame home with vinyl siding, 1915 SF living area, 3+ BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, elec. & nat. gas heat, C/A, covered front porch. $69,900.

acres with beautiful 2010 Fleetwood DW, 1960 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. heat pump, C//A, F/P, deck with hot tub, 24x36 horse barn with 3 stalls & tack room, 2 additional barns, 12 tillable acres, 7 acres of pasture, excellent location. $169,900.

R21 – WINCHESTER – POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING - 0.918 acre with 1997 DW, 1170 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, elec. furnace, C/A, new windows, floating floor, 2car garage, covered front porch, concrete patio, extra lot with water & sewage. $89,900 – MAKE OFFER.

R1 – SEAMAN - Brick home featuring 2660 SF living area, 2+ BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, storage room, elec. heat, A/C, 2-car att. garage, front porch, large back porch, large fenced back yard, mother-in-law suite has 1 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen & dining room. $89,900.

H5 – WEST UNION – 2 acres +/-with 1997 Palm Harbor DW, 1647 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, new gas furnace, C/A, county water, 2-car att. garage, 15x40 barn, beautiful setting on dead end road. $139,000. H7 – WINCHESTER – 2 acres with 2-story vinyl sided home, 1072 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen, elec. heat, 2 A/C, county water, all new windows, 3-car garage, shed. Home has been remodeled in past 5 years, very private. $110,000. R29 - PEEBLES - Exceptionally nice 3 BR home in Peebles. 1144 SF of living space. Home sets on nice lot with a big backyard. 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, utility room. Elec. furnace with heat pump, C/A, city water/sewage. This is a must-see and priced to sell at $89,900! R31 – MANCHESTER – Frame home with vinyl siding in a nice country setting with beautiful view, 1200 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, full basement, new gas furnace, C/A, new roof, 2car garage, garden spot. $89,000.

H9 – WEST UNION – 1.32 acres with 14x70 mobile home in good condition, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, utility room, elec. furnace, A/C, county water, nice location on private road. PRICE REDUCED TO $39,900. H11 – BLUE CREEK – DW with block foundation & 2story addition, 1976 SF living area, 3 BR with porch off of upstairs BR, 2 full baths, living room, large family room with gas F/P, kitchen with appliances, dining room, elec. furnace, county water, underground 200 amp elec. service, garage. 2 acres +/-. PRICE REDUCED TO $79,900.

R35 - CHERRY FORK - Very nice DW featuring 2 BR, 2 full baths (1 with shower, 1 with Jacuzzi), living room, kitchen with appliances, elec. furnace, C/A, floating floor, 2-car garage, 2 porches, public water, .747 acre with creek. $84,000.

R9 – CYNTHIANA – Fixer upper, frame home with vinyl siding, 3 BR, living room, kitchen, metal roof, carport. PRICE REDUCED TO $8,500. R13 – WEST UNION - Well-maintained frame home with vinyl siding, 1344 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, utility room, all appliances, elec. heat, gas F/P, 2 A/C, deck, 3 storage buildings, nice location. $85,000. R17 - MANCHESTER - 1 1/2 story frame home with vinyl siding, 1225 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, elec. & gas heat, C/A, gas

H19 – MANCHESTER – 2 acres with 1120 SF farm house, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. furnace, County water, screened-in deck, 28x42 barn. PRICE REDUCED TO $54,000. H20 - NEW LISTING - BLUE CREEK - 3.756 acres with vinyl sided frame home, 2520 SF living area, 3 BR with large master suite added in 2009, 2 1/2 baths, living & family rooms, kitchen with new appliances, dining room, lots of closets, large storage area, elec. heat pump, C/A, Anderson windows, 3-car garage, large front porch. $149,900.

R23 - MANCHESTER - Frame home with vinyl siding, 624 SF living area, 1 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with pantry, all appliances, elec. heat, A/C, 1-car garage, front & back porches, nice starter or retirement home, very neat. $34,900. MAKE OFFER.

R3 – WEST UNION – 1 ½ story frame home built in 1901, 1776 SF living area, 4 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, pantry, utility room, enclosed back porch, wrap-around front porch, new gas furnace, hardwood floors, new water heater, 16x24 2-story barn, .4 acre lot, former home of the last surviving civil war veteran from West Union, would be a great home to restore. PRICE REDUCED TO $43,500. R5 – WINCHESTER – Well maintained home with vinyl siding, 1300 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, utility room, heat pump, C/A, 2 fireplaces, hardwood floors, 2-car garage with electric & water, breezeway, swimming pool with deck, concrete driveway, front porch, 3 buildings, deck, white vinyl fence, nice landscaping. $99,900.

wildlife, would make very nice weekend getaway or spot to build new home. PRICE REDUCED TO $49,900.

H1 – MANCHESTER – Frame home with vinyl siding, 2036 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, mother-in-law suite, living & family rooms, kitchen with appliances, dining room, elec. furnace, C/A, county water. Home sets on 5.434 acres with 4 acres of woods. $105,000. H3 - WEST UNION - Mini farm for horses or cattle, 20+

H25 – MANCHESTER – 5.614 acres with 16x80 Century mobile home, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, gas furnace, new wood burning F/P, C/A, county water, patio, 10x12 building, 14x70 storage trailer. $49,900. H29 – WEST UNION - 1.4 acres with 12x60 mobile home, 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with stove top oven, fuel oil furnace, county water, small barn. PRICE REDUCED TO $19,900.

R57 – MANCHESTER – Brick home built in 2007, 2286 SF plus full finished basement, 5 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. furnace, C/A, wood stove in basement, hardwood & tile floors, 2-car att. garage & 2-car det. brick/vinyl sided garage with bath. Home is located in nice neighborhood near school. $249,900. HOMES WITH ACREAGE

H21 – MANCHESTER – 25.77 acres with combination brick/vinyl sided home built in 2002, 2118 SF living area plus full finished basement, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, 2 gas furnaces, 2 C/A units, hardwood floors, 24x58 detached garage with 24x12 lean-to, blacktop driveway. Home is located in a nice, private country setting on dead-end road. $309,000.

H33 – WEST UNION – 25.166 acres with approx. 23 acres wooded, frame home with aluminum siding, 1260 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, eat-in kitchen with appliances, utility room, elec. furnace, C/A, 2 garages, rear deck, large pole barn. $139,900.

H13 - WEST UNION - Frame home with vinyl siding on 12.33 acres, 2160 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, nat. gas furnace, C/A, gas F/P, 2 garages, 48x36 barn. PRICED TO SELL AT $90,000. H17 – WEST UNION – 10.188 acres, cabin with electric & county water, outhouse, very nice location, lots of

H41 – PEEBLES – 5 acres with 2005 modular home, 2025 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living room, extralarge kitchen with bar area, lots of counter space, appliances, dining room, elec. furnace, C/A, county water, shed, security system. $99,900. H45 – LATHAM – 1.6 acres with very nice 2005 mobile home (14x60), 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, elec. furnace, A/C, 2 porches, 2 buildings, beautiful landscaping, creek, located near Longs Retreat for recreation. $42,500.

FARMS - BUILDING LOTS - VACANT LAND - BUSINESS FARMS F1 – PEEBLES - A truly magnificent retreat on 75.91 private and secluded acres bordering Brush Creek State Forest. You won't believe the peaceful and tranquil setting for this 2-story modern western cedar 3 BR home with a huge 2-story det. 3car garage and loft. The home features a master BR with full bath on the first level and 2 BR and a full bath upstairs. The living room is nearly 21 feet long with a beautiful wood floor and wood burning F/P. A large dining room opens into the living room and also features a wood floor. A full kitchen and a laundry room are on the first level with an outside entrance into a large 19' X 27' screened-in back porch. The det. garage has a concrete floor and features a 2nd story two room art and craft studio that could also be converted into an apartment. Public water and electric have been installed underground and follow the winding driveway that leads through the woods and into the rock lined yard with fire pit and unique nature inspired landscaping. There are wide trails throughout the property that are ideal for peaceful walks or 4 wheeling - you will think you are in a national park! If you love nature and privacy, you will love it here! This property can serve as a permanent home, week-end retreat or hunting lodge and borders a public blacktop road yet is less than 15 minutes from town. PRICE REDUCED TO $239,900.

F3 – MANCHESTER – 101.452 acres with approx. 20 acres tillable, 40 acres of pasture and 40 acres of woods, 40x60 barn with 30x60 lean-to, large pond, beautiful spot for new home, great for horses & ATV’s, lots of trails. $209,000. F9 – WEST UNION – Nice mini farm in good location close to town, 39.2 acres with 30.5 acres tillable, frame home with vinyl siding, 1248 SF living area, 2 BR (could be 3), 1 bath, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, gas furnace, county water, 1-car garage, 3 barns (30x50, 20x30, 20x30). PRICE REDUCED TO $149,900. F11 - PEEBLES - 14.349 acre mini farm with 2160 SF frame home with vinyl siding, partial basement, 2 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, elec. heat pump, C/A, wood stove, county water + cistern, 60x80 barn with 5 horse stalls, 80x20 implement shed, corn crib, creek, stocked pond. $189,000. F13 – WINCHESTER – 51.12 mostly tillable acres, 1 ½ story partial brick/vinyl sided home, 2432 SF living area, 4 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen & dining room, basement, fuel oil furnace, county water, 2-car detached garage, 2 big barns with sheds, concrete block barn, corn crib, silo. Property has lots of road frontage, will divide. $230,000. Seller will also sell house, barns with 25 acres for $150,000.

F15 - PEEBLES - 71.539 wooded acres with lots of big cedar trees and some timber, 2 campers, county water, septic system & electric on property. $189,900.

creeks, nice camping spot with creek & trees, great views, corn & wheat base. Great for horseback riding, ATV’s, hunting, camping. $247,900.

BUILDING LOTS

V3 – RARDEN – POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING – 13.55 wooded acres, good for hunting/recreation. $29,900.

L1 – SEAMAN - .373 acre lot with water and septic. $7500. L3 – CHERRY FORK - .28 acre corner lot located at the intersection on 2 state highways with water & septic. PRICE REDUCED TO $9,999. L5 – WEST UNION – 0.54 acre town lot, water/sewer available. $14,000. L11 - WEST UNION - Building lot conveniently located with all utilities available. $10,000. L13 - SEAMAN - 2 town lots with all utilities available. $8,995. L15 – PEEBLES – 0.165 acre lot with old home that needs tore down, all utilities available. $14,900 – MAKE OFFER. VACANT LAND V1 – PEEBLES – 100 mostly level acres (62 tillable) with 2

V7 - OTWAY - 79.778 acres with 25 acres tillable, water & electric available, large barn, great place for new home, beautiful setting. $135,000. V9 - BLUE CREEK - 40 acres of recreational property, abundant wildlife, great for hunting. $99,000. V11 – MANCHESTER – 4.004 acres with water tap, woods, electric available, lots of wildlife. $12,000. V13 – MANCHESTER – 3.028 wooded acres with some timber, water & electric available. $7,200. BUSINESS B9 – WEST UNION – INVESTMENT PROPERTY – 4 mobile homes located on town lot, each home features 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen, city water & sewage. PRICE REDUCED TO $39,900.


8 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - The Informer

CLASSIFIEDS

Local Government

Adams County Commissioners It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the JFS/Anchor Termite & Pest Control service agreement upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the JFS/fuel vendor agreements with Seaman Food Mart, Community Fuels, Peebles Food Mart, and Knauff’s Grocery upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the JFS/Back to School Supplies agreements with Dollar General Seaman, West Union Walmart, Family Dollar West Union, Family Dollar Manchester, and Family Dollar Seaman upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the JFS participation agreement regarding employment services to be performed by

TALX Corporation for usage of the program as of July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013 by and between the County Commissioners Association of Ohio Service Corporation and Adams County Department of Job & Family Services upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the Office of the Ohio Public Defender contract for provision of Indigent Defense services in the amount of $93,216.00. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the 2013 Projected Adams County Tax Budget for Fiscal Year ending December 31, 2013. Vote: All yeas. Two copies of the 2013 Adams County Tax Budget will be on file with the Adams County Auditor on July 1, 2012. The FY 2013 Tax Budget hearing will be held on July 9, 2012, at 1:00 p.m. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to adjourn at 5:00 p.m. Vote: All yeas.

Criminal and Traffic Disposition Report Justn W. Smith, Loveland, 72/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Dawn R. Young, Martinsville, 72/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $72.00. Crystal A. Jenkins, West Union, 68/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $72.00. Mary C. Hughes, West Union, 68/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $72.00. Katrina C. Crawford, Peebles, 69/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $72.00. Brent C. Mitchell, Utica, 74/55, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Scott R. Durham, Hamilton, 73/55, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $72.00. Mark D. Morgan, Louisville, KY, 75/60 Fine $42.00, Court Cost $72.00. James A. Francis, West Union, 67/55, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $72.00. Shirley S. Roberts, Lexington, KY, 66/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00. Joshua D. Lynch, Cincinnati, 79/55, Fine $100.00, Court Cost $ 69.00. Jesse Arwood, Peebles, Ill/Manuf/ Drug, Bond Over, Preliminary Hearing Waived, Bound Over To The Adams County Grand Jury. Amanda Lamb, Peebles, Ill/Manuf/Drug,

Dismissed Without Prejudice. This Matter Will Be Presented To The Adams County Grand Jury. Micheal J. Schmidt, Jensen Beach, FL, 73/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Angela R. Balthazer, Charleston, WV, 75/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Jennifer R. Asher, Decatur, 73/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Bruce L. Barga, Cincinnati, 74/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Ronald R. Applegate, Sardinia, Marked Lanes, Fine $15.00, Court Cost $ 74.00. Micheal O. Cockrell, Peebles, Agg. Poss. Drug, Dismissed Without Prejudice, This Matter Will Be Presented To The Adams County Grand Jury. Kenny Brock, Ripley, Crim. Trespass, Dismissed Per Plea Agreement. David A. Davis Jr,, Lynx, Disorderly Conduct, Fine $100.00, Court Cost $64.00. Micheal L. Steward, Batavia, SeatBelt/Dr, Fine $30.00, Court Cost $45.00. Jessica R. Lilje, West Union, Regist. Viol., Court Cost $74.00. Jessica R. Lilje, West Union, Seat Belt/ Dr, Fine

$35.00, Court Cost $22.00. Patricia J. wessel, Cincinnati, 75/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Ewell Worsham, Cincinnati, 73/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Michelle A. Cabbage, Lebanon, Tn, 73/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Brian J. Gaffin, West Union, 67/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00. David R. McClanahan Jr., West Union, 71/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Scott L. Burton, Abingdon HA, Md, 72/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Deborah L. Campbell, Cincinnati, 77/60, Fine $100.00, Court Cost $74.00. Elizabeth A. Williams, New Richmond, 74/55, Fine $42.00, Court Cosr 74.00. Mariya V. Prokosheva-Hoyle, Ft Thomas, KY, 82/60, Fine $150.00, Court Cost $74.00. Ashley A. Debord, West Union, 74/60. Rick L. Carrington, Stout, 66/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00.0, Court Cost $74.00.

Adams County Land Transfers Adams County Community Improvement Corp. to SOMC Title Holding Co., 2.518 acres, Tiffin Twp. $90,000. John R. and Nancy Smart to Charles H. Mitchell, 4.476 acres, Scott Twp. $68,000. Mary Ruth Browning to Dennis J. and Bettianna Black, 16.856 acres, Liberty Twp. $62,500. Norma J. Piper to Lawrence E. and Rosalie Young, 3.028 acres, Monroe Twp. $5,200. Kelly L. and Kimberly McIntosh to Cynthia B. Applegate, Donald L. Brown, Shawn Gill and John Sullivan, 0.18 acres, Seaman Village. $10,000. Terry G. and Teri Wilkin James to Brian R. and Anita Wells, 11.106 acres, Green Twp. $65,225. Jason and Holly Nehus to Federal Home Loan, 1.00 acres, Tiffin Twp. $48,000. Jodey A. Markwell and Catherine R. Fox to Wells Fargo Bank, 7.21 acres,

Adams County Court Of Common Pleas

MARRIAGE REPORT Richard Dale Murphy, 52 and Natalie Paige Frasher, 41, both of West Union. Christopher James Hillger, 22 and Linda Marie Whitley, 21, both of Peebles. Donald E. Sheridan, 37, and Tammy L. McKee, 51, both of West Union.

Bratton Twp. $20,000. Douglas W. and Beverly Keiter to James Krebs, 5.006 acres, Tiffin Twp. $17,900. Michael Chris Thompson to GMAC, 5.00 acres, Oliver Twp. $58,400. Douglas E. McIlwain to Lonnie and Michelle Bilyeu, Manchester Village. $3,500. Federal Home Loan to Fifth Third Mortgage Co., 7.713 acres, Jefferson Twp. $83,350. Fifth Third Mortgage Co, to Michael Hatten, 7.713 acres, Jefferson Twp. $41,000. Henry D. and Linda l.

Vehicles

Cont. from page 7

Burge to John E. Bohl, 104.09 acres, Bratton Twp. $175,000. Luella Sharon and Johnny R. Shields to DP&L, 73.726 acres, Sprigg Twp. $175,000.

McNeilan Trash Removal Commercial And Residential Service Call

937 544-4060

Plant Monitor Position Adams County Regional Water District is currently accepting applications for the position of Plant Monitor. Plant Monitor is a part time position that is scheduled during weekends and holidays or as needed. Dependable attendance is a must. Applicant must be able to pass entry drug testing and a thorough background check. The desire to further their education in the drinking water industry is not mandatory but is a plus. Starting wages will be $8.50 per hour. The successful applicant will have to complete a 1 year probationary period. Applications will only be accepted until July 20, 2012. Applications can be picked up at the Business Office from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday or by visiting our website at www.acrwd.com. Applications and/or resumes may be sent to Adams County Regional Water District, P.O. Box 427, West Union, Ohio 45693 or you can apply in person at the Business Office. For additional information contact the Business Office at 937-544-2396. ACRWD is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

For Sale

2005 Ford F-150 Reg. Cab., Long Bed, 1-Owner, 4.2 V-6, Auto., cold A/C., 2 wheel drive, 112,000 miles. Asking $4,900. Call 937 515-1880. 7/17

No Hunting or Trespassing

Yard Sale

No Hunting or Trespassing

Friday - Saturday July 13 - 14. Friday 10:00 - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 - 1:00 p.m. DVD's, XBox, Playstation 3 games and Primitive items. 7/10

Yard Sale

No Trespassing, Hunting, Fishing or 4-wheeling on property. 30 acres Franklin Twp., 77 acres Bratton Twp., Day or night. Shirley Myers.

Camping For Sale

Office Equipment

Camping on the Ohio River Full hook-ups and primitive. Twin Islands. 937 549-2701. 11/6

For Sale

Animals

Nice office desks and filing drawers. Call 937 779-9219. TFN

Yard Sale

Free Kittens to good home. Call 937 549-1905. 6/26

July 13-14 from 9-? Intersection of St Rt 41 & Logans Lane. Lots of baby clothes! Boys-NB to 5T, Girls NB-9 Months. Stroller, Car seats, Bath tubs, activity mats. Women/Men/Teen girl clothes, shoes and numerous other household items. 7/10

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

FREE KITTENS

Services Offered SERVICES OFFERED

Central Boiler Outdoor Wood Furnaces. Kelly Jones 937 725-2431. TFN

Services Offered SERVICES OFFERED

Heisler's Bakhoe and Dozer Service Stone, Creek Gravel, Dirt, Demolition and Cleanup, Septic Systems Installed. Licenced and Insured. Call 937 544-5643. TFN

SERVICES OFFERED

Need a rubber stamp? Call Southern Ohio Business Source Printing and Office Supplies! We offer a large variety of rubber stamps and self-inking stamps, all backed by our quality guarantee. 937544-1000.

STONE’S SAWMILL CUSTOM SAWING

Now Buying hard & soft wood logs. Also 3" & Up Cedar Logs. CALL FOR PRICING 937-205-4303 or 937 587-2577. TFN

SERVICES OFFERED

New Owner Low Prices. Deedy's Georgetown Drycleaner and Laundry. Pick-up and delivery. Call 937 378-6477, 678 313-3325 or after 6:00 p.m. 544-2529. 7/24

$

1.00

Master Certified Auto Technician

Competitive Wages, Immediate Opening, Must Have Own Tools

Maysville Area Send Resume to: Auto Technician PO Box 518 Maysville, KY 41056

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Auto Service Technician Competitive Wages, Immediate Opening, Must Have Own Tools Apply In Person

Maysville Auto Sales 895 US Hwy 68 EOE

Mail your Classified ad to The Informer Classifieds for the first 12 words .05 thereafter.

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Mail to: The Informer, P.O. Box 801, West Union, Oh. 45693 Please Include your money for the ad


The Informer Special - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 9

Welcome to the st 121 Adams County Fair July 15 - 21 2012

Rides Games Contests Fun for All!

Adams County Fairgrounds West Union, Ohio

Holsinger’s Monument & Rock Engraving Call 937-544-4000 for details or visit us at 206 N. Pleasant Ave. West Union, OH

Thompson Meeker Funeral Home www.meekerfuneralhomes.com 216 W. Mulberry St. West Union, Ohio

937-544-2133 Funeral Directors: Todd Calvert, Jim Meeker & Steven Thompson

W. C. Milling Co. LLC (937) 386-2282 Seaman Farm, Garden, & Pet Center (937) 386-2134

Right/Way Feeds

Eight Locations to Serve You Better


10 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - The Informer

Adams County Fair Schedules Senior Fair

Junior Fair

Rides Open Daily at 1:00 p.m. SUNDAY, JULY 15 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates Open 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open Horse Show 2:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demolition Derby sign-in 4:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parade line-up 5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parade begins 6:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demolition Derby 6:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . Opening Ceremonies and Crowning of the 2012 Queen and Court 7:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fireman’s Competition

ALL ANIMALS MAY ENTER THE FAIRGROUNDS ANYTIME ON SATURDAY, SUNDAY UNTIL 2 P.M., THEN AFTER 10 P.M. WITH ARRIVAL DEADLINE AT 8:00 A.M. MONDAY, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF LACTATING COWS

MONDAY, JULY 16 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates Open 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Floral Hall Judging 12:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weigh-in for Light Weight Tug Pull 1:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Light Weight Tug Pull 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open Feeder Calf Show 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheerleading Competition 10:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . All livestock, except lactating cows, must be in place TUESDAY, JULY 17 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates Open 12:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distance Pull Weigh-In 1:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6500# and 4500# Distance Pull 4:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration for Baby Contest 6:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baby Contest 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wrestling 7:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration for Little Miss and Mr. 8:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Little Miss and Mr. Contest WEDNESDAY, JULY 18 Senior Citizens and Armed Forces Day (Free Admission All Day for Seniors 62 and older, Veterans and Soldiers in Uniform) 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates Open 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baked Goods Judging 2:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liberty Band 6:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baked Goods Auction (to be held in administration building) 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hypnotist Mike Bishop 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . SOATPA 9:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hypnotist Mike Bishop 10:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lactating cows must be in place THURSDAY, JULY 19 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates Open 1:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open Class Beef Show 7:00 p.m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Battle of the Bluegrass Pullers 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hypnotist Mike Bishop 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gospel Entertainment The Cantrell Family Jason Cooper Daniel Patrick and Family 9:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hypnotist Mike Bishop FRIDAY, JULY 20 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates Open 1:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open Class Dairy Show 3:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farmer’s Night Weigh-In 5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farmer’s Night Tractor Pull 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hypnotist Mike Bishop 9:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hypnotist Mike Bishop SATURDAY, JULY 21 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates Open 12:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Election of Fair Board Directors 3:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pedal Tractor Pull 4:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demolition Derby Sign-in 5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Wheels Ride-On-Race 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barnyard Olympics 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demolition Derby 8:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frog Jumping Contest 8:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Free Teen Dance

It’s Fair Time Again!

Wilson

Homes for Funerals, Inc. 35 W. 2nd St., Manchester, Ohio

937-549-3363 www.wilsonhomeforfunerals.com

Enjoy The 121st Adams County Fair!

RT. 41 MARATHON 25360 St. Rt. 41 Peebles, Ohio 45660

(937) 587-3397 An American Company Serving America GOD BLESS AMERICA

SATURDAY, JULY 14 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jr. Fair Booth Set-up 2:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Exhibitor’s Meeting SUNDAY, JULY 15 8:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hog weigh-in 9:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .All booths must be in place 12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . .All Fancy and Production Chickens check-in 12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Meat pens of rabbits weigh-in 2:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jr. Fair Booth Judging 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Breeding rabbits check-in 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ducks, Waterfowl and Geese check-in 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .All Turkeys and Misc. Birds check-in 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Commercial Meat-Type Chickens check-in 5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Crop and Shop Registration 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Crowning of the 2012 Queen and Court MONDAY, JULY 16 8:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lambs, Goats, Steer and Feeder Calf weigh-in (Lambs and goats will not weigh-in before 10 a.m.) 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-H Cloverbud Interviews 11:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Food and Nutrition Activity 1:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Junior Fair Tractor Rodeo 4:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-H Style Revue 6:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Adams County Born and Raised Steer Show TUESDAY, JULY 17 8:30 a.m. . . . . . .Rabbit Showmanship followed by Breed Show and Meat Pen Show 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Junior Fair Livestock Judging Contest 2:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swine Showmanship followed by Breeding Show 6:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Market Swine Show WEDNESDAY, JULY 18 8:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Shop Judging & Crop Interviews 8:30 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Poultry Show 9:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Horse Show 12:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Crop and Shop Awards Ceremony 1:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sheep Showmanship followed by Sheep Breeding Show 3:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Market Lamb Show 5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dairy & Market Goat Showmanship 6:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . .Dairy Goat Show followed by Meat Doe Breeding Goat Show 7:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Market Goat Show 8:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jr. Fair Board Meeting 10:00 p.m. . . . . . .Lactating cows must be in place Lactating dairy goats are released THURSDAY, JULY 19 9:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Horse Show 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Beef Showmanship followed by Beef Breeding Show 11:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-H Pledge Contest 4:00 p.m. . . .Feeder Calf and Steer Show (steer show will not start before 6:00 p.m.) Deadline to report to Jr. Fair Office within one hour after Steer Show which animal you will sell on Saturday 11:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . .Market animals not going to sale or stockyards are released FRIDAY, JULY 20 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Load stockyards 9:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dairy Showmanship followed by Dairy Show 9:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jr. Fair Baking Contest 9:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Horse Show 1:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Baked Goods Awards Ceremony 5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jr. Fair Small Animal Baked Goods and Crop Sale 7:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Awards Round-up (Show Arena) 8:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sweepstakes Showmanship 10:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jr. Fair Board Meeting (Show Arena) 10:00 p.m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dairy Cows & Dairy Goats are released 11:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Breeding animals and Horses are released SATURDAY, JULY 21 6:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .All hogs not selling must be off the fairgrounds 11:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jr. Fair Livestock Sale (Order: Steers, Feeder Calves, Hogs, Goats and Sheep, Butter) 6:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Booths may be taken down (booths taken down earlier forfeit premiums)

Wilson’s Insurance Agency 401 E. 2nd St. Manchester

937-549-3659

Link Insurance Winchester, OH

695-0611

“Serving your insurance needs for over 27 years”

We Support The Adams County Fair!

JAMES B. HARSHA CO.

MITCHELL FAMILY INSURANCE AGENCY LLC Complete Insurance Service Residential - Farm - Commercial Auto, Fire, Life, Health, Home owners, Farm owners

103 S. Main Peebles Ohio

587-2430

KIRKER INSURANCE Tom Kirker - Agent

HOME - CAR - LIFE - HEALTH - BUSINESS - FARM

307 E. Main Street, West Union, Ohio

937-544-2346

NATIONWIDE INSURANCE “Nationwide is on your side”

Enjoy The 121st Adams County Fair! Barnhill Hardware, LLC 6893 Tri-County Road, Seaman

Paints - Plumbing Supplies - Hardware Tarps - Bolts & Fasteners - Hydraulic Hoses - Surplus

(937) 386-2353

627 Panhandle Rd., West Union, Ohio 45693

Celebrating 53 Years of Continued Service!

937-544-3013


The Informer - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 11

Sr. Citizens Day Activities Offered at the Adams County Fair

Pictured is Carol Mctosh as she sings to the senior citizens last year. Wednesday, July 18 is Sr. get immediate results and and Adams County Citizens and Armed Forces it’s ideal if you have not Regional Medical Center. Day at the Adams County eaten anything in the morn- Stations will include cornFair. In addition to free ing before the test. It’s hole games, puzzles, paper admission for those 62 & okay to have water, coffee and pencil brain teasers and older and veterans and sol- or tea as long as you don’t bone heel scans to check diers in uniform; activities add sugar or cream. for bone density. Several of are planned in the adminisThe program will begin the agencies will also hightration building beginning at 10:00 a.m. with the first light programs and services at 10:00 a.m. and conclud- session focusing on available throughout the ing with a performance by "Keeping Your Mind & year to local senior citithe Liberty Band at 2:00 Body Sharp" with a variety zens. p.m. of stations set up by local At 11:00 a.m. representaArrive early and visit the agencies including Adams tives from the Adams Appalachian Hope Van for County Sr. Citizens, Adams County Regional Medical free cholesterol and sugar County Health Department, Center will present a proscreenings which will Area Agency on Aging— gram on atypical chest pain begin at 9:00 a.m. You will District 7, OSU Extension and heart attack awareness.

Welcome To The Adams County Fair!

Mosier Furniture & Appliance 217 West. St. West Union, Ohio

544-2711 - 1-800-300-2711

r

Ove

Following each session, door prizes will be awarded to those attending the program. The noon session will be a Family Nutrition Program presented by Marsha McCormick of OSU Extension focusing on food safety. All participants in this session will receive an insulated bag ideal for keeping foods cool on the way home from the grocery store. Amy Habig, the new FCS Educator with OSU Extension in Adams, Brown and Highland Counties, will present the 1:00 program focusing on the importance of vitamin D and some tips for seniors to reduce the risk of falling. The air-conditioned administration building is a comfortable place to hang around and hear the Liberty Band perform at 2:00 p.m. to wind up the activities for the day. Although participants will likely want to try some of the tasty food available at the fair, many bring a cooler with a packed lunch so they don’t have to leave the cool building once they arrive. So don’t let the heat keep you away. Wal-Mart is also again donating bottled water which will be available to program participants throughout the day. These activities are sponsored by the Adams County Sr. Fair Board, OSU Extension of Adams County, Adams County Sr. Citizens Council, Adams County Regional Medical Center, Adams County Health Department and the Area Agency on AgingDistrict 7.

Armed Forces Day July 18

The Adams County Fair Board will be honoring veterans and soldiers on Wednesday, July 18, as Armed Forces Day. Free Admission all day for all Veterans and Soldiers in uniform.

Hope Van Fair Schedule The HOPE VAN will be at the fair to tour and will have various services offered to the public beginning Monday, July 16. Services will include free prostate specific antigen (PSA) lab test for men, Tdap and pneumonia immunizations, (in limited quantities), Women's Health Fair information, FREE Cholestech finger sticks done 2 times this week and the environmental staff will be available for questions. Prizes and treats will be available to the children if they can answer questions from our Nutrition Wheel. Monday, July 16- Men's Health PSA, Adult Immunizations and Nutrition Wheel 1:00-6:00 Tuesday, July17- Women's Health Fair/Komen Van, Adult Immunizations & Nutrition Wheel 1:00-6:00 Wednesday, July 18- Cholestech 9:00-12:00, Adult Immunizations & Nutrition Wheel 3:00-6:00 Thursday, July 19- Adult Immunizations & Nutrition Wheel 3:00-6:00 Friday, July 20- Cholestech 9:00-12:00, Environmental Health Bed Bugs 3:00-6:00 Stop by the van and the Adams County Health Department staff will be available to answer any questions about health wellness. Our missions to prevent disease, prolong life and promote health in Adams County.

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12 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - The Informer

Adams County Country Club Men’s League Standing and Results for Week10

Carolyn L. Belczyk Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development 937.544.2339 - belczyk.1@cfaes.osu.edu Get Moo-vin at the Adams County Fair is a new addition to this year’s event. It’s an opportunity to be active, learn some facts for healthy living, and win prizes, all while visiting the Adams County Fair! Get Moo-vin will be conducted by the Adams County 4-H Program, in partnership with the Ohio 4-H Foundation and OSU Extension Adams County. The activity is open to the public and will be conducted Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. through 6:00 p.m. each day. Participants will begin at the Junior Fair Office, where they will receive a map and an entry form. They will follow the map, completing a half-mile course that takes them to many of the fair’s barns and exhibit buildings. The course features 12 stops along the way. Each stop will be marked with a sign containing facts and information for healthy living. Participants will use the information on each sign to answer questions on their entry form. Upon finishing the course, they will return to the Junior Fair Office to drop their completed entry form into one of two boxes for a later prize drawing. Prizes include a child’s bicycle and helmet from Walmart and half a hog, custom processed for the freezer. In addition, the first 100

participants each day will receive a goodie bag complete with a pedometer, recipes for healthy living, MyPlate information, commodity group items such as cow erasers or coloring books, and more. The prize drawing will be held on Friday evening, July 20, during the annual Awards Roundup in the Youth Show Arena. Participants need not be present to win. Only one entry per person is permitted. The Get Moo-vin’ activity, funded in part by a grant from the Ohio 4-H Foundation, supports one of three national 4-H mission mandates: healthy living. Participating in the activity will encourage youth and adults to eat right and get active. On Tuesday, July 17, personnel from the GE Aviation Peebles Test Operation will be on hand outside the Junior Fair Office distributing portion plates to participants. In addition, the Adams County Health Department’s Hope Van will be a stop on the course. Participants can take advantage of the opportunity while there to have their Body Mass Index calculated. For more information about the Get Moo-vin’ at the Adams County Fair! activity, contact Carolyn L. Belczyk, Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development, at OSU Extension Adams County, via phone at 937.544.2339 or via email at belczyk.1@osu.edu.

Ohio State President to Visit Adams County Fair Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee will visit the Adams County Fair on Monday, July 16, at 4:30 p.m. as part of his annual summer tour across the state. President Gee will participate in a “meet and greet” session with Adams County 4-H, parents, friends and members of the community in the breezeway area of the Youth Show Arena at the Adams County Fairgrounds. As president of the Ohio State University, Gee has made a commitment to tour the state in the summer months to talk with prospective students and alumni and see first-hand some of the university's partnerships. As the state's land grant university, the university provides outreach to every county in the state to help address issues that impact the citizens of Ohio. “The state is our campus,” Gee said. “We need to be in every corner of the state— from farm and fields to major metropolitan cities—to connect our institution with the hearts and minds of Ohioans. As a landgrant university, that is our calling and responsibility.” Ohio State University is a world-class public research university and the leading comprehensive teaching and research

The Rablin Relics of Southern Ohio say thank you to many area buisnesses and individuals who sponsored the 39th Annual Country Run For Fun. The Ramblin relics extend a thank you to the Village of West Union, the Adams County Commissioners, the local musical group "Hot Rod & The Fastlane" and the Good Time Cloggers for making "Saturday night on the Square" another success. The sponsers for the 39th Annual event include: Red Barn Convention Center, Winchester;Your Local 1st Stop Market Store; West Union Flower Shop, Wst Union; Hazelbaker Insurance, West Union; National Bank of Adams County, West Union; Roy E. Gabbert, Jr., Attorney, West Union; Barry's Chevrolet, Buick, Inc., West Union & Maysville; Blake Pharmacy, West Union, Manchester & Peebles; Danny Bubp (State Rep. 88th District); Photo's Unlimited by Rachel McCann, West Union; Crossroads Dairy Bar, Seaman; Chapparal Feed and Farm Supply, West Union; Baxla Tractor Sales, Seaman; Russ & Deana Grooms Rental Properties; Crawford Farms, West Union; JD's Repair, West Union; Kenneth Armstrong, Attorney, West Union;Young & Caldwell, Attorney, West Union; Gustin Reality, West Union; Lick run Acres simmental Cattle, K. McCann, west Union; D.K. Auto Sales & Farm Supplies, Manchester;Barbara Moore-Eiterman, Attorney, West Union;Fitzgeralds Pharmacy, Seaman, Seaman; Bubby's Garage, Maysville, KY; M&L Machine, John McWain, Seaman; Sam Crawford Trucking & Escavating, West Union;WalMart of West Union; OK Auto Parts (Larry Shaw), Peebles; Snappy Tomato Pizza, West Union; Day's Auto Care (Eddie Day), Winchester; Adams County Florist, West Union; Shuperts Tire Service, West Union; Young's R&R Repair, Seaman; Adams County Building & Loan, West Union; Sunset Bowl, West Union; Rideout Muffler, West Union; Wheeler's Drywall, West Union;Miller's Bakery & Furniture, Wheat Ridge; James B. Harsha Hardware, West Union; Prathers IGA, West Union; Adams Rual Electric, West Union; Holcomb's Automotive, Cherry Fork; Bob Malcom Chrysler, Jeep Dodge, Peebles;Wylie Body Shop, Seaman;Tony Staggs, State Farm Insurance, West Union; Huntley Auto Supply, West Union; Giovanni's Pizza, West Union; As it Was Antiques, West Union; Frank's Auto Center, West Union; Auto Zone, West Union; Jim Unger Construction; West Union; John Lawler, Attorney, West Union; Community Fuels, West Union; Alan W, Foster, Attorney at Law, West Union; RHK Motors and Rod's Rent-A-Car, West Union;Truitts's Body Shop, Seaman;West Union Electric & Plumbing, West Union; Adams County Chamber of Commerce; Jolly's Auto Sales, West Union;Commac Foods, Inc. (Frisch's, Long John Silver's, Ponderosa, KFC, Taco Bell, Cruiser's Diner); Kirker's Insurance Agency (Tom Kirker), West Union; MCM Distributors (Randy Mack), West Union; First State Bank; McDonald's Resturant, West Union; Richmond Insurance Agency, West Union; Murphin Ridge Building Supplies, West Union; Adams County Glass, West Union; Roush Insurance Agency, Glenna Grooms, West Union; Vogler's Barber Shop, West Union; O' Reilly Auto Parts, West Union; AAA Sanitation, Manchester; Hometown Tan & Formal, West Union; Bob Sutterfield, Jr. Excavating, West Union; Freeland's Transport & Towing, LLC, Winchester; The Informer, West Union; C-103 Radio, West Union; West Union Mower Service, West Union; David E. Grimes, Attorney, West Union; James W. Schlueter, Magistrate, West Union; warrior Graphics (Kevin Schoonover), Peebles; Jason Cooper, I Sing Gospel Ministries, West Union; Cantrell Companies, Winchester;The Cantrell Family, Winchester; Gary Gardner, Adams County Clerk of Courts; Rothwell Law Office, West Union; AC Machining, Winchester; Mirror Image Beauty Shop, West Union; Peoples defender, west Union; AccuCut Machining, Winchester;Troy Davis Repair, West Union; Line-X of Southern Ohio, Eastgate; John's Machine Shop, Seaman; Peebles Flower Shop, Peebles.

Again, thanks to all who helped make our 39th annual event possible.

Gordon Gee institution in the state of Ohio. With more than 64,000 students enrolled across the university’s five campuses, Ohio State offers 14 colleges/schools and 175 majors. Approximately 23 students from Adams County are enrolled at the Columbus campus.

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The Informer - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 13

Quilting and Needle Arts Pattern of the Week

One of my favorite quilt blocks in the Ohio Star block. In honor of the fourth of July and the upcoming Adams County Fair, I thought the block was fitting. This block is optional for The Informer Civil War Quilt Challenge. The block is in essence a 9 patch block with 4 sqyares background color, one square of main color and 4 squares made of 2 trianges of background color and two triances of main color. This square can be set on point and with or without sashing and borders. The possibilities are endless.

Featured Artist of the Week

Senior Living

Senior Citizens Council HAPPY BIRTHDAY AMERICA! Land of the free - because of the brave! The Adams County Senior Citizens office/Senior Center will be closed Wednesday, July 4th in observance of Independence Day. It’s a great day to be off work, for family picnics, fireworks, parades and celebrations. But let’s not forget our founding fathers and the many sacrifices they endured to make USA the greatest country in the world. It may not be perfect, but where else would you rather live? Have a safe and happy holiday! MAY GOD BLESS AMERICA! KEEP IN MIND: The West Union Senior Citizens will be having their monthly meal/meeting next Friday, July 13th at 12 noon at the Senior Center (old hosp. bldg). Special entertainment is planned. It’s a covered dish, carry-in and YOU are invited to join in the fun! THEY DID IT AGAIN! At the Area Agency on Aging Senior Art Show, Essay/Poetry & Photography Contest held at Rio Grande, Adams County brought back some BIG winners! They include: ESSAYS: 1st – Juanita Martin with “Grandma’s Apron”, 2nd – Fran Purdin with “Remembering Past Seasons”. POETRY: 1st – Elaine Lafferty with “The Beach”, 2nd – Juanita Martin with “A Day at the Farm”, 3rd – Burton Young with “Country Boy”. 4th – Billy Satterfield with “The Old Lighthouse”, 5th – Alice M. Smith with “The Special Christmas Tree”. PAINTING: OIL PORTRAITS: Professional: 1st place, plus The Mary Peck Friend of Animals Award went to Pat Thompson with “Uncle Charlie, Blacksmith”. MIXED MEDIA: Animals/Birds: 2nd – Jo Ann White with “The Line Up”, 3rd – Alice M. Smith with “The Hunter”. OIL/FLORAL: Professional: 2nd – Pat

Thompson with “Mama’s Rose, Mama’s Tear”. PASTELS–Landscape: 1st – Jo Ann White with “Surprise!”. PENCILPORTRAITS: Professional 1st – Pat Thompson with “Children Look Up to Us”. PHOTOGRAPHY – Floral: 1st – Caroline Boyd with “Trillium”, 4th – Caroline Boyd with “Buckeye Flower”. PHOTOGRAPHY–Portraits: 2nd – Sharon Bell with “Dancing in the Rain”, 3rd – Caroline Boyd with “Crystal Zahn”. PHOTOGRAPHY – Seascape: 1st – Elaine Lafferty with “Three Minutes of a Gulf Sunset”. PHOTOGRAPHY–Other: 1st – Sharon Bell with “Mother’s Bible, Oh How Dear”, 2nd Sharon Bell with “Summer Reflections”. WATERCOLOR-Animals/Birds: 3rd – Betty Jo Hitchcock with “Spring Frolic”. WATERCOLOR-Floral: 1st Alice M. Smith with “Cosmos”, 4th – Alice Smith with “Tulips”. WATERCOLORStill Life: 1st - Jo Ann White with “Read…”. O T H E R - F r a m e d Artwork:Wood: 1st – JR Bradley with “Hummingbirds”, Professional:Gouache: 1st Elaine Lafferty with “Landscape (In the Manner of Andrew Wyeth)”. Thanks to everyone who entered the contests and congratulations to all the winners! You have made Adams County proud! How long has it been since you’ve visited the Senior Center? We invite you to come on out and get involved in some of the activities we have every week here at the Senior Center. You might just be surprised at how much you will enjoy the fellowship. The 3rd Monday each month from 1-4 pm we have a Knitting Class, each Tues. & Thurs. 10-11 am is Gentle Chair Yogi Class. Tuesday afternoon at 1:00 pm is “Movie & Popcorn” time. The Scrappy Quilters Club meets the 2nd & 4th Wednesdays from 10 am – 3 pm. Thursday from 12:30

– 3:30 we have card games. On the 2nd Friday at 11 am GENESIS comes to check blood pressures/blood sugars. We welcome volunteers to help with any activities you might be interested in doing. Your involvement and input helps us to serve you better. Call 5443979 or drop by the Senior Center and visit with us. Services and activities are FREE. It’s YOUR Senior Center. We want YOU to enjoy it! We have a trip to the “National Quartet Convention” in Louisville, KY. scheduled for September 14-16! Come and enjoy hours of great gospel music and meet and talk with many of your favorite Gospel Groups, plus visit the Louisville Science Center, shop at St. Matthews Mall and Florence Mall and attend Sunday morning service at Graceland Baptist Church. Cost: $399.00 per person/double occ. For more info, call 937-5443979. GET MORE FIBER IN YOUR DIET: * Eat high-fiber cereal for breakfast. Top your bowl with some blueberries. * Make fruits & nuts your fast food. When your stomach starts to growl – grab an apple or munch on a handful of nuts to hold you over till dinner. * Switch your bread. Make your sandwiches with whole-grain bread instead of white. Eat a pear or an orange for dessert. The ABCAP Summer Crisis Program runs through August 31st. This program can provide assistance on your electric bill up to $250.00. To apply for an air conditioner, the household must not have received one in 2009, 10 or 11. For eligibility requirements, more information or to schedule an appointment, call ABCAP at 1-800-2337891. JUST A THOUGHT: Life does not have a remote control. Get up and change it yourself.

Extreme Heat – Stay Cool, Hydrated and Informed

The featured artist of the week is Norma Bowman. She lives in the West Union Area and is a quilter, having been an artist for 60 years. In additional to quilting she likes to do decopauge, glass etching and crochet. Currently she is making quilts for her sisters great grandchildren. Her next project is a carolina lilly. She gives all of her art to family and friends. Next week we will feature Norma's daighter. The three quilts are all work of this weeks quilter/fiber artist Norma Bowman.

Dear Miss Needles I am attempting to crochet a rug out of fabric scraps. It is really tight and not laying flat. Help please! Signed, Ruffled Rug-Maker. Resonse Dear Ruffled Rug-Maker - As with all crochet,there are times you need to use a bigger needle if your yarn or what ever you are crocheting is really tight. Using a bigger needle or else adding a few stitches can sometimes solve the problem. Be careful if you are adding stitches as you want to ensure you add the same number evenly on all sides or else you end up

with a lop-sided or strange porportioned rug. The best rag rugs I ever made were from double knit. The rug never raveled, I could throw it inthe washer and dry, it always laid flat and was pretty tough. Good luck! Dear Miss Needles: My cat has snagged my sweater in several areas. Is there anything I can do about the loops and snags or do I need to pitch the sweater? Signed, Cat Lover Dear Cat Lover: It depends on the type and thickness of the yarn. There are times when a

snag can be pulled to the inside of the sweater with a small crochet hook. Other times, worhing with the stich and yarn with a needle, you can sometimes work it back in. If there are a lot of them, you might want to save that sweater for around the house when you are with teh cat, and use a different sweater when you leave home. Good luck! If you have a question you would like Miss Needles to answer, please e-mail her at dearmissneedles@yahoo.com or write to her in care of The Informer.

It sure has been a hot summer so far, and with the aftermath of the recent storm felt across our entire ten-county district, it’s important to know how to stay cool and healthy while your power is out during the extreme heat. As with our situation locally, dealing with extreme heat and no power can linger for days or even weeks. It’s important to take care of yourself, as well as checking on elderly family, friends and neighbors who may not have the opportunity to venture out to a cooler location or have the opportunity to have access to a good meal. We recently received some very valuable information from our friends at the Ohio Department of Aging and Ohio Department of Health concerning this very topic. Please remember, when it is hot: · Drink more fluids (non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated), regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. · Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. Call your local Emergency Management Agency to see if there are any heat-relief shelters (cooling centers) in your area. · Do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling

device during an extreme heat event. · Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you. · Don’t use the stove or oven to cook - it will make you and your house hotter. · Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing. · Take cool showers or

dizziness; nausea; confusion; unconsciousness; and gray skin color. Food from the refrigerator should be thrown out if the power is out more than four hours. Never taste food to determine its safety; appearance and odor are not indicators of food safety. Keep the door closed as much as possible. If the power is out for longer than two hours, follow the guidelines Pamela K. Matura, below: Executive Director · Throw away any perMonthly Column ishable food (such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs and leftovers) that has been above 40 °F for over two (2) hours. · For the refrigerator: baths to cool down. · Check the local news pack milk, other dairy for health and safety products, meat, fish, eggs, gravy and spoilable leftupdates. · Seek medical care overs into a cooler surby ice. immediately if you have, rounded styrofoam or someone you know has, Inexpensive symptoms of heat-related coolers are fine for this illness like muscle cramps, purpose. · A freezer that is half headaches, nausea or vomfull will hold food safely iting. Look for signs of heat- for up to 24 hours. A full related illnesses and call freezer will hold food safe911 if you experience any ly for 48 hours. Do not open the freezer door if of them: · Symptoms of heat you can avoid it. During this extreme exhaustion are: heavy sweating, paleness, muscle heat, please check on your cramps, tiredness, weak- elderly family, friends and ness, dizziness, headache, neighbors. You might be nausea or fainting. People their only contact and can experiencing these symp- identify whether they are toms should be moved to a in danger during high temcool, shady or air-condi- peratures. If our Agency tioned area, and provided can be of assistance to you cool, non-alcoholic bever- when identifying needs that an individual might ages. · Heat stroke is a have for beyond the storm potentially life-threatening aftermath, please call our condition. Symptoms Agency and we can schedinclude: a body tempera- ule an in-home assessment ture of 103 degrees or at no-cost to identify what higher; red, hot and dry resources are available in skin with no sweating; the community to best rapid pulse; headache; serve their needs.


14 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - The Informer

Huntington Hotshots 4-H Baby Show The Huntington Hotshots 4-H held a Baby Show, Little Mr and Miss and Jr. Miss Contest on Wednesday, July 4, at the Aberdeen park in Aberdeen.

Newborn - 6 Month Girls Pictured (L/R): 1st Place Jammy Conn Henderson, 2nd Place Addison Ray and 3rd Place Story Reed.

Newborn - 6 Month Boys Pictured (L/R): 1st Place Gage Fultz, 2nd Place Dalyn Tallott and 3rd Place Cullen Gallaghn.

7 - 12 Months Girls Pictured (L/R): 1st Place Myra Bluford, 2nd Place Brylee Bradford, Tie for 3rd Place Lelola Workman and Anna Grace Woods.

7 - 12 Months Boys Pictured (L/R): 1st Place Cory Blaine Chaperlaine, 2nd Place Mason Bennington and 3d Place Gavin Ellis.

Ohioans can Register for Blue Alerts Ohioans can now get Blue Alert information sent directly to their cell phone, email or fax machine. The Ohio Blue Alert system went into effect earlier this month. Similar to an AMBER Alert, which notifies the public of a kidnapped child, a Blue Alert will rapidly broadcast information to the public advising them of an at-large suspect who has killed, seriously injured or kidnapped an Ohio peace officer. A Blue Alert will be issued when there is sufficient descriptive information about the suspect or the circumstances surrounding a law enforcement officer's injury, death or disappearance. Residents can also choose to receive Blue Alerts sent as a text message, email or fax by signing up on the Ohio Attorney General's Website . Updates through social media are also available. Ohio Blue Alert on Facebook or Ohio Blue Alert on Twitter Once a Blue Alert is activated, authorities throughout the state will also relay the information through television, radio and newspaper, on highway signs and through truckers' alerts. Those with information on a Blue Alert can contact authorities by calling 1-877-262-3764. The Blue Alert program is operated by Ohio's AMBER Alert Steering Committee which is made up of the Ohio Attorney General's Missing Person's Unit; Ohio Highway Patrol; Buckeye State Sheriff's Association; Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police; Ohio Emergency Management Agency; Ohio Department of Transportation; Ohio Association of Broadcasters; State Emergency Communications Committee and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Other states that already use the Blue Alert system include Alabama, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and Virginia.

State Veterinarian urges farmers to check for heat stress 1 Year Old Girls Pictured (L/R): 1st Place Kahghan Henson, 2nd Place Addison Horble and 3rd Place Ella Grace Jones.

1 Year Old Boys Pictured (L/R): 1st Place Kade Leist, 2nd Place Cole Lewis and 3rd Place Bentley Saunders.

2 Year Old Girls Pictured (L/R): 1st Place Raylee Kirk, 2nd Place Kaylee Walzer and 3rd Place Lane Bennington.

2 Year Old Boys Pictured (L/R): 1st Palce Colt Williams, Tie 2nd Place Boston Champion and Dilan Mitchell, 3rd Place Braxton Wagner.

3 Year Old Girls Pictured (L/R): 1st Place Chloe Martin, Aleigha Leist and 3rd Place Jacilya Begley.

4 Year Old Girls Pictured (L/R): 1st Place McKenna Shelton and 2nd Place Addison Jones

Little Mr and Miss Little Mr. Marco Barriss Jr., Little Miss Lauren Gregory, 1st Runner Up Ashlynne Leist and 2nd Runner Up Lilly Stoogs.

Jr. Miss Jr. Miss Shalia Jordan, 1st Runner Up Alexis Dearing and 2nd Runner Up Katelyn Collins.

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Livestock, poultry should be monitored in extreme heat State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey is urging farmers to closely monitor livestock herds and poultry flocks for signs of heat stress as Ohio’s record heat wave continues. “Extreme heat like we have been experiencing in Ohio, and like the forecast continues to predict, can be very hazardous for livestock and poultry,” said Forshey. “If not monitored closely, livestock and poultry can experience reduced production, heat-related illness, or even death. “ Cool, clean water and shade are the most effective ways to keep animals cool. In extreme heat, animals should be fed later in the day and should not be worked, because the activity can increase body temperature. If animals must be handled, it is best to work them early in the morning (before 8 a.m.) and, if possible, in a shaded facility or area. Animals should be sprayed after exercise to help them cool down. “We’re not just talking about monitoring livestock and poultry on the farm,” Dr. Forshey said. “This heat wave is hitting the state right as fair season is kicking into high gear. I also want to make sure the young people showing their animals at the fair are keeping a close eye as temperatures continue to creep up.” Animals should be monitored to look for signs of heat stress such as increased panting and open mouth breathing. If any of these signs are observed, a veterinarian should be contacted and the animal should be moved to shade immediately and given cool, clean water. Spraying animals with cool water, especially on the legs or hooves, can also help to reduce heat stress, as can increasing air movement around the animal.

Satterfield Chapel Ladies Aid The Satterfield Chapel Ladies Aid met at the Fellowship Hall with Fannie Grooms as hostess. Helena Grooms prepared the program with the topic: Father. Song were "Sheltered In The Arms of God" and "Faith of Our Father." Louise Fields read Ecclisoctes 6:1-4. Prayer Requests were held and United Prayer Roll Call was a Bible verse with "Father." Marcella Norris read the minutes and they were approved. Program was 'Memories told about our Fathers.' The Lord's Prayer was recited. Fannie Grooms served refreshments. Those present were: Louise Fields, Penny Ling, Marcella Norris, Dorthy Grooms, Janice McCarty, Christy Cooper, Barb Howell and Ruth Ann Moore. The next meeting will be in July with Penny Dixon as hostess.

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The Informer, July 10, 2012