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The Informer www.informernews.info

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Tuesday, July 3, 2012

544-2331

www.barryschevroletbuick.com

Covering.....Adams County, Aberdeen and Buena Vista

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Man Indicted for Rape and Sexual Battery Governor Declares State of Emergency and Reguests Federal Disaster Assistance for Ohio

The Adams County Grand Jury Indicted Jeremiah Freeman, 32, of Manchester, on the charges of Rape with life specification, Rape and Sexual Battery. It is Felonies of the First and Third Degree. According to court documents the child was under the age of 13. A Felony of the First Degree is punishable by a prison term of 3 to 11 years and/or a maximum fine of $20,000. A Felony of the Third Degree is punishable by a prison term of 9 - 36 months and/or a maximum fine of $10,000. Under the United States Constitutions, all people charged with crime are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt

Freeman

The Manchester Police Department was dispatched to the Kinfolk's Landing Park on Friday, June 29, in the afternoon for a stolen vehicle. According to acting Chief Jeff Bowling, Gene Payne, of Manchester had parked his vehicle at the park to use the restroom. As Payne exited the restroom he seen his vehicle going down Front Street with an unidentified subject driving it. Payne proceeded on foot after his vehicle and the call was made to the Adams County Communications Center. Bowling responded to the area and

searched for the vehicle. On Saturday, June 30 the vehicle was spotted in the Panhandle area. As Bowling and an Adams County Deputy responded to the area, but it was gone on arrival. The vehicle is a gold 2007 Saturn Outlook SUV with Ohio Temporary plates W131980 with a Barry McFarland Dealer Group red tag on the front. If you see this vehicle please call the Manchester Police Department at 549-3330 or the Adams County Sheriff's Department at 937 544-2314.

Grand Theft Auto in Manchester

Brown County's New Commissioner The Brown County Republican Central Committee selected Tony Applegate (R) to the Brown County Commission seat that was left vacant due to the passing of the late Rick Eagan (R). Commissioner Eagan died unexpectedly May 8, at his home in Georgetown. Community and family members gathered Friday, June 29 at the Brown County Commissioners Office to witness the Applegate being swore in by State Representative Danny Bubp (R). Applegate, is a Georgetown businessman and entrepreneur. Representative Bubp said, "What a wonderful day for Brown County as I had the honor of swearing into office Georgetown son Tony Applegate as Brown County Commissioner filling the seat of my friend Rick Eagan who recently passed unexpectedly!" Applegate will have to run for the office in November and could face a democrat candidate.

� Pictured L/R: Tony Applegate and Brown

County Republican President Paul Hall.

Lundeen Appeal Denied of Doctor's License Revocation

Lundeen

The Franklin County Court's judgment affirmed last week the revocation of the state medical license of James E. Lundeen Sr. on appeal. Last December, the Ohio State Medical Board voted to permanently revoke his medical license following the recommendation of a

hearing examiner who found that Lundeen was overprescribing medication to patients at his offices in Portsmouth and Plymouth. The Attorney General's Office has been involved in the investigation and represented the Ohio State Medical Board at the license hearing and the appeal. "Ridding the state of 'pill mills' and doctors who enable them is a priority for me, the governor and law enforcement throughout Ohio," said Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine (R). "We will continue our efforts to shut down these operations." Investigators from the Attorney General's Office, Bureau of Workers Compensation, the State Highway Patrol and other agencies raided Lundeen's offices in downtown Portsmouth and Plymouth in March 2011. The State Medical Board suspended Lundeen's medical license in May 2011, based on the finding that Lundeen's continued practice presented a danger to the public. A criminal investigation of Lundeen is ongoing. In the affirmation of the license revocation, Judge Laurel Beatty concluded that "the Board's Order is supported by reliable, probative and substantial evidence and is in accordance with law."

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Presentation of Quilts to Wilson's Childrens Home

The Loose Thread Quilt group of Adams County donated 25 quilts to The Wilson Children’s Home on Tuesday, June 26. Chairman of the project Theresa Fantroy and Sharen Benner said 24 of the 25 quilts were children’s quilts, and one was a wall-hanging. “This was truly a group project”, Fantroy explained. “Most of the fabric used was donated, by friends in the community or group member.s”

Fantroy embroidered the labels herself, while the quilting itself was done by Linda Williams of Cedar Mills. “The group as a whole learned a lot about the whole process of quilting and are so pleased to give the gift of quilting to the children at the Wilson Home,” she said. The historic Wilson Children’s home opened in 1885 in West Union and continues to serves children in Adams County.

Severe Storm Knocks out Power Across 2/3 of Ohio. Power Outages for One Million Homes, Businesses and Looming Heat Wave Mandate Immediate Statewide Response Governor John R. Kasich (R) declared a state of emergency for the entire state of Ohio after severe storms and high winds knocked out power for approximately one million power company customers across two-thirds of the state. The widespread outages could take up to a week to fully restore and together with the current severe heat wave, could create crisis situations for the elderly, young children and those with sensitive medical conditions. The governor’s declaration authorizes state agencies to take any necessary actions to assist local government authorities anywhere in Ohio to help respond, cleanup and recovery efforts and coordinate activities. "I’m very concerned with the problems created by the combination of power outages and severe heat and so I’ve declared an emergency for all of Ohio so that state resources and personnel can help local governments meet the needs and challenges that they face," said Governor Kasich. Governor Kasich directed Ohio Emergency Management Agency Executive Director Nancy Dragani to open the state’s Emergency Operations Center in Columbus to coordinate state and local resources. Officials from all state agencies, volunteer organizations such as Citizen Corps and the American Red Cross are converging at the Emergency Operations Center to monitor response and recovery efforts within the affected areas. Governor Kasich asked the President for an Emergency Declaration for Direct Federal Assistance so that Ohio could begin receiving badly-needed generators and water from the federal government. The governor spoke to the President today to make the request and also spoke with Federal Emergency Management

Agency Administrator Craig Fugate. "I shared my concerns with the President that we have a serious situation and will need extra federal help. Massive power outages combined with severe heat create dangerous conditions, especially for the elderly and those with medical needs. The state has been working closely with local emergency management officials to meet immediate needs and going forward we need to make sure we have every available asset to protect Ohioans," said Governor Kasich. State agencies supporting the response efforts include the, Ohio Departments of Transportation, Natural Resources, Agriculture, Health, Public Safety, Environmental Protection Agency and the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. The governor’s request for federal assistance is in the following chronological list: * Friday, June 29, Ohio’s Emergency Operations Center in Columbus was activated to coordinate state and local storm recovery efforts. The state contacted Federal Emergency Management Agency officials to let them know federal assistance may be needed. * Friday, June 29, Severe storms and high winds during evening rush hour knocked out power for approximately one million homes and businesses across two-thirds of the state. * Saturday, June 30, Governor Kasich spoke to the President and requested federal assistance to respond to the storm. He also spoke with utility company CEOs and local elected officials to make state resources available to expedite recovery activities. * Saturday, June 30, Governor Kasich declared an emergency for the entire state of Ohio so state agencies can assist local government response and recovery efforts. The National Guard was activated to help deliver needed supplies and conduct door-to-door checks in select areas to identify vulnerable Ohioans threatened by the severe heat.

National WeatherService calls Friday's Storm Derecho Event

O D D P A G E

Photo by Troy Jolly

Pictured is Kattine's Body Shop on Vaughns Ridge Road in Tiffin Twp.

The National Weather Service announced that during the early afternoon hours of Friday, June 29, thunderstorms developed near Chicago, IIllinois and quickly intensified as they moved into northern Indiana. Producing a wind gust to 91 MPH in Fort Wayne, Indiana, the storms matured into a Derecho as they entered the NWS Wilmington, forecast area. Over the next few hours, the Derecho produced widespread significant wind damage across the majority of the NWS Wilmington, forecast area, with measured wind gusts of over 80 MPH in a few locations. The Derecho moved quickly across the area (which is typical and helps push high winds out ahead of the system), entering the northwest corner of the area around 3:15 p.m. and exiting to the southeast by 7:00 p.m., with average storm speed in excess of 60 MPH. During the event, NWS

Wilmington, issued 19 Severe Thunderstorm Warnings. Emergency crews around the area were dispatched to various locations for down trees and power lines. Teperatures drooped over 30 degrees within a short time in midst of the storm. ODOT Spokesperson Kathleen Fuller said, "ODOT crews were out due to downed trees, power lines and/or debris." A Derecho is a term used to describe a longlived, violent straight-line convective wind storm. A Derecho usually takes the form of a squall line or large bow echo, travelling hundreds of miles. Derechos produce widespread wind gusts to severe criteria (58 MPH) and wind gusts to 80 MPH (and even 100 MPH in rare cases) are possible. Derechos are not very common, as many atmospheric conditions have to come together perfectly for one to form. Sometimes,

extreme winds caused by derechos are mistaken for tornadoes, due to their violent and turbulent nature, the appearance of swirling vortices of wind that can sometimes be observed along the leading edge of the gust front and the significant amount of damage they cause. See more storm pics on page 3.

Page 2 Stories are:

Firefighters Respond to Church, CMS Awards Funding for Regional Care Transitions Program to Area Agency on Aging District 7, Serious Injury Traffic Crash and Grand Jury Indictments.

OBITUARIES

The following obituaries are on page 3 of this week’s edition: Michael Kamps, Kelly "Dean" Little and Dorothy M. Ralston.

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2 - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - The Informer

CMS Awards Funding for Regional Care Transitions Program to Area Agency on Aging District 7 CMYK

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Serious Injury Traffic Crash Local Based Company • Family Owned and Operated The Ohio State Highway Patrol is currently investigating a one vehicle serious injury traffic crash. The crash occurred on June 25, at approximately 2:55 p.m. on Martin Alexander Road in Eagle Township, Brown County. The preliminary investigation revealed that a 2006 Chevrolet Cobalt, operated by Alexis M. Eagle, 18, of West Union, was traveling northbound on Martin Alexander Road at a high rate of speed when she failed to maintain control and traveled off the left side of the roadway. Miss Eagle’s vehicle struck a ditch

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belt at the time of the crash. Neither alcohol nor drugs are suspected at this time. The crash remains under investigation by the Ohio State Highway PatrolGeorgetown Post. As always The Ohio State Highway Patrol reminds you to buckle up and not drink and drive.

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513-734-2892 Grand Jury Indictments 800-526-6864

The Adams County Grand Jury was recon- indicted on the charges of Possession of vened in response to recent www.lykinscompanies.com Felony Criminal Cocaine and Possession of heroin, Felonies of charges against people alleged to have broken the Fifth Degree. The Grand Jurors are average citizens of the law in Adams County. During the Grand Jury session, the follow- Adams County who meet regulary during a ing people were indicted for Felonies: four-month term. Chad Sheffield, 28, of Mowrystown, was Although the activities of the Grand Jury indicted on the charge of Trafficking in Heroin, are confidential under Ohio law, the indictments that they present are a matter of public record. a Felony of the Fifth Degree. Jessilyn Gilman, 23, of Winchester, was Adams CountyProsecutor David Kelley indicted on the charge of Trafficking in Heroin would like to thank the Grand Jurors for with specification, a Felony of the Fifth Degree. responding on short notie to hear these serious Christopher Arnold, 19, of West Union, cases. Under the United States and Ohio constiwas indicted on the charge of OVI with specifi- tutions, all people charged with a crime are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a cation, a Felony of the Fourth Degree. Thomas Cook, 36, of Winchester, was reasonable doubt.

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A few thoughts… Start the fireworks! Strike up the band! Throw a parade! It is hard to believe that the 4th of July is upon us. With that comes plenty of cookouts, celebrations, and fellowship. Independence Day is the national holiday of the United States of America commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. To make it official John Hancock, President of the Continental Congress, signed the Declaration of Independence. It is said that John Hancock signed his name "with a great flourish" so "King George can read that without spectacles!." The following day copies of the Declaration were distributed. The first newspaper to print the Declaration was the Pennsylvania Evening Post on July 6, 1776. On July 8 the Declaration had its first public reading in Philadelphia's Independence Square. Twice that day the Declaration was read to cheering crowds and pealing church bells. Even the bell in Independence Hall was rung. The "Province Bell" would later be renamed "Liberty Bell" after its inscription Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land Unto All the Inhabitants Thereof And although the signing of the Declaration was not completed until August, the 4th of July has been accepted as the official anniversary of United States independence. The first Independence Day celebration took place the

following year - July 4 1777. By the early 1800s the traditions of parades, picnics, and fireworks were established as the way to celebrate America's birthday. And although fireworks have been banned in most places because of Troy A. Jolly their danger, most Publisher of towns and cities The Informer – usually have big Adams County firework displays for all to see and enjoy. We have many things to celebrate this 4th of July. There are several holidays that we have each year to celebrate America. We have things like Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, and Veteran’s Day. Each has a special place in American history and on our yearly calendar. In times like these, with our economic future still unknown, the fact that we continue to fight the global war on terror, and the daily struggles we have each and every day, it sure is great to celebrate these special times in a fine community. Please check out our special 4th of July page for a listing of events that have been submitted to our office. So, from all of us at The Informer, have a great celebration. Remember to thank and pray for those in uniform that continue to serve our country and fight for our freedom. The 4th of July holiday means something special for each one of us. To me it means: America is still the land of the free and home of the brave.

The Informer

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Publication of Adams County Press, LLC P.O. Box 801 West Union, OH 45693 Phone (937) 544-6460 Fax (937) 544-6459 www.informernews.info Publisher - Troy A. Jolly tjollyinformer@gmail.com News- informer4news@gmail.com Ads- informerads@gmail.com Letters to the Editor may be written on any topic. Those deemed by the Editor and/or Publisher to be libelous or slanderous will not be published. Each letter must include the writer’s name, address, and telephone number. Name and city will be published. Address and phone number will not. Readers are reminded that the letters do not necessarily reflect the views of The Informer.

� Pictured: Seated is Randy Arnett, Chief Executive Officer of Southern Ohio Medical Center. Standing, left to right, are Teresa Bryan, LISW, Administrative Director of Social Work Services with Southern Ohio Medical Center; Connie Montgomery, RN, AAA7 Care Transitions Coach; Bonnie Dingess, MSW, LISW-S; AAA7 Director of Long-Term Care Programs; Linda Green, RN, AAA7 Care Transitions Coach; and Pamela K. Matura, MHS, LSW, Executive Director of the Area Agency on Aging District 7 (AAA7).

A unique multi-county, multi-hospital collaborative effort among five hospitals and three Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) has been awarded funding for the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). The program is designed to make the transition from the hospital to another setting as seamless as possible. Targeting a 26-county region including rural Appalachia, this program will work to further reduce unnecessary readmissions and achieve a reduction in Medicare costs. The target population for this program is Medicare Fee-for-Service patients with a primary diagnosis of Acute Myocardial Infarction, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Coronary Artery Disease, Heart Failure, or Pneumonia preparing for discharge. This program focuses directly on improved patient outcomes such as reduced readmission to hospitals; decreased emergency department visits; discharging patients to the most appropriate, cost effective setting and streamlining access to quality long-term services and support. “Care Transitions is a concept that was developed by the medical community which has proven to be effective,” commented Pamela K. Matura, Executive Director of the Area Agency on Aging District 7 (AAA7). “Through trained coaches, we are able to help individuals develop skills that will assist them in managing the preventable causes that can lead them unnecessarily back to the hospital. I have personally experienced the confusion and different understanding of post-discharge instructions and medication management within a family when a loved one leaves the hospital, resulting in a readmission very soon after discharge This new program can help to prevent this occurrence. We are excited about the opportunity to partner with the three major health systems in our region to bring this important program to our ten-county area.” She continued by saying, “Obviously, there is an underlying goal to improve the discharge process to save Medicare dollars by reducing unnecessary hospital readmissions. But more importantly, the program goal is to empower people to be an active part of their healthcare, both in the present and for the future. Care Transitions provides proven supports for individuals to help them heal and be at home – where most people say they would rather be. The Area Agencies on Aging are focused on connecting individuals to key home and community-based care resources.” The participating Area Agencies on Aging include Buckeye Hills AAA8 – Southeast Ohio (Marietta) as the lead agency, AAA6 - Central Ohio (Columbus), and AAA7 – Southern Ohio (Rio Grande). The hospital partners include Fairfield Medical Center (Lancaster), Memorial Health Systems (Marietta), Adena Regional Medical Center (Chillicothe), Holzer Medical Center (Gallipolis) and Southern Ohio Medical Center (Portsmouth). The AAA7 is working directly with three of the hospitals including Adena, Holzer and Southern Ohio Medical Center. “We appreciate the availability of this special funding, which will help to provide patients with tools to help coordinate their care,” said Mark Shuter, Adena’s President and CEO. “These funds will allow us to provide transition coaches to work with our Medicare patients following their release

to make certain they receive follow-up services after discharge. The coaches will help our patients to understand the importance of managing their care.” “Holzer Health System has just completed the integration of its hospitals, clinics and long-term care facilities so our patients will be able to move throughout our continuum of care with greater efficiency,” says T. Wayne Munro, MD, Chief Executive Officer of Holzer Health System. “Reconnecting our patients with their primary physicians after they have been discharged from the hospital will be strengthened by the opportunity to work with our local Area Agency on Aging district offices. The Community-Based Care Transitions Program provides our patients and their family members access to healthcare resources that enhance the exceptional care and professionals for which Holzer is already known.” “All of us at Southern Ohio Medical Center are honored and excited by the opportunity the CCTP (Community-Based Care Transition Program) has provided for us and our patients,” stated Randy Arnett, CEO of Southern Ohio Medical Center. “We also have great admiration for the Area Agency on Aging, so it means a lot for us to be able to work with them to provide additional assistance for patients returning home from the hospital.” AAA nurses and social workers will provide the evidence-based Care Transition Intervention (CTISM) program developed by Eric A. Coleman, MD, MPH, at the University of Colorado, Denver Health Science Center. This consumer-centered intervention tool is designed to improve quality and contain costs for individuals with complex care needs as they transition across settings specifically from the acute setting back to the home and community. The Southern Ohio initiative was one of 23 sites announced by CMS in March 2012. CCTP currently includes more than 126 acute care hospitals across 30 sites to provide care transitions services for an estimated 223,172 Medicare beneficiaries in 19 states. CTTP was created by the Affordable Care Act and will continue to grow and add sites. Your local Area Agency on Aging District 7, Inc. provides services on a non-discriminatory basis. These services are available to help older adults and those with disabilities live safely and independently in their own homes through services paid for by Medicare, Medicaid, other federal and state resources, as well as private pay. The AAA7’s Resource Center is also available to anyone in the community looking for information or assistance with long-term care options. Available Monday through Friday from 8:00 am until 4:30 pm, the Resource Center is a valuable contact for learning more about options and what programs and services are available for assistance. Those interested in learning more can call toll-free at 1-800-582-7277 (TTY: 711). Here, individuals can speak directly with a nurse or social worker who will assist them with information surrounding the programs and services that are available to best serve their needs. The Agency also offers an in-home assessment at no cost for those who are interested in learning more. Information is also available on www.aaa7.org, or the Agency can be contacted through e-mail at info@aaa7.org. The Agency also has a Facebook page located at www.facebook.com/AreaAgencyOnAgingDistrict7.

Adams County Sheriff Intake and Release Report June 22 - 28

Cody A. Bartlett, 26, Winchester, Failure to Appear on a Misdemeanor Charge. Booked 6/22 Released 6/25. Evelyn Lauarn Bond, 25, Manchester, Trafficking in Drugs - Heroin and Probation Detainer. Booked 3/28 Released 6/26. Benjamin T. Cannedy, 48, Cincinnati, Nonsupport of Dependents. Booked 6/23 Released 6/26. Lashea Chambers, 21, Hillsboro, Possession of Drug Abuse Instruments. Booked 6/25. Adam R. Chamblin, 22, West Union, Trafficking in Drugs - Heroin, Booked 3/27 Released 6/27. LaRhonda G. Childress, 29, West Union, Failure to Appear. Booked 6/21 Released 6/25. Glenn Allen Christman, 40, Chillicothe, Gross Sexual Imposition. Booked 6/26 Released 6/27. Angela M. Cockrell, 36, Blue Creek, NonSupport Fail to provide for aged/infirmed parent. Booked 6/22 Released 6/25. Sonya F. Couch, 32, Manchester, Probation Detainer. Booked 6/25

Released 6/26. Jessie Lee Creighton, 32, Winchester, Driving Under Suspension. Booked 6/25. Chad E. Davidson, 28,West Union, Failure to Appear on Felony Charge. Booked 6/22 Released 6/27. Nicholas E. Dawson, 23, Winchester, Disorderly Conduct. 6/23 Released 6/23. Stephen Dayle Gibson, 42, West Union, Possess Dangerous Drugs. Booked 6/24 Released 6/26. Robert Gregory, 52, Peebles, Tampering with Evidence, Possession of Drugs and Aggravated Trafficking in Drugs Methamphetamine. David Earl Hampton, 30, Peebles, Burglary, Breaking and Entering, Grand Theft and Engaging in a pattern of corrupt activety. Booked 6/25. Allen Harding, 54, Blue Creek, Trafficking in Drugs Marijuana, Illegal Cultivating of Marijuana and Possession of Drugs - Marijuana. Booked 5/30 Released 6/27. Matthew Ray Luithle, 27, West Union, Vehicular Assault. Booked 6/27. David R. McClanahan,

26, West Union, Probation Detainer. Booked 6/27. Brian A. McClanahan, 23, West Union, Burglary. Booked 4/22 Released 6/25. Tessa D. Montgomery, 33, Lynx, Probation Detainer. Booked 6/13 Released 6/26. Donna Sue Pence, 47, West Union, Domestic Violence. Booked 6/22 Released 6/25. Darian Jay Pribble, 37, Manchester, Probation Detainer. Booked 6/27. Joni Kay Sanders, 36, Manchester, Trafficking in Drugs. Booked 6/9 Released 6/27. Wesley Loran Simpson, 25, Peebles, Probation Detainer. Booked 6/27. Joshua Allen Skaggs, 30, Sardinia, Bond Revoked. Booked 6/27. Erick Robert Thomas, 29, West Union, Possession of Dangerous Drugs. Booked 6/26 Released 6/26. Dwayne Eugene Thompson, 46, West Union, Domestic Violence. Booked 6/22 Released 6/25. Ernest Andrew Walker, 30, West Union, Violating a Protection Order. Booked 6/25.

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Michael Kamps, 59 years of West Union, passed away Monday, June 25, at his residence. He was born in Dayton, on October 27, 1952 the son of the late Donald and Patricia (Murray) Kamps. Besides his parents he was preceded in death by his wife, Pamela (Burke) Kamps, who passed away on July 10, 2004. Michael was a member of the N.R.A. He is survived by one son Sam Kamps of Florida, one daughter Amanda Kamps of Newark, two brothers and sisters-in-law Don T. and Kathy Kamps of West Union and Joe and Annette Kamps of Noblesville, Indiana and one granddaughter Berlin Gordon. Memorial services were held on Saturday, June 30, at the Dunkinsville United Methodist Church. Steve Darby officiated. Gathering of friends and family were held on Saturday at the Dunkinsville United Methodist Church. A graveside service was held at 3:00 at Crossin Cemetery in Pleasant Plain. Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home in Peebles was in charge of the arrangements. To sign our online guest book, visit us at w w w. t h o m p s o n f u n e r a l homes.com

Kelly "Dean" Little, 46, of Manchester, OH died Monday, June 25, at the Meadowview Regional Medical Center. He was born in West Union, January 12, 1966 to the late Ashburn "Bill" Little and Algene "Gene" Gill Little. He worked for Wal Mart in West Union and formerly for the Welded Wire Manufacturing. He is survived by his wife Sharon Dukelow Little, son Dawson Merle Little and a daughter Katlyn Jo Anna Little. Two brothers Dale (Judy) Little and Danny (Dorothy) Little all of Manchester. Funeral services were held Thursday, June 28 at the Wilson Home for Funerals. Burial followed at the Manchester Cemetery. Rev Dale Little and Rev Owen Applegate officiated. Friends and family may sign an online guestbook at www.wilsonhomeforfunerals.com.

Dorothy M. Ralson

John R. Lafferty, Owner & Manager Established 1848 205 S. Cherry St., West Union, Ohio

Dorothy M. Ralston, 89 years of Bentonville, died Thursday, June 28, at the Meadowview Regional Medical Center. Mrs. Ralston was born May 9, 1923 the daughter of the late William Nay and Ona Ethel (Hoop) Mahaffey in Adams County. Besides her parents Mrs. Ralston was preceded in death by her husband Virgil Wesley Ralston Sr., a son Virgil Wesley Ralston Jr., son-inlaw Don Behm Sr. and two grandchildren Donna Jane Behm and Erica Behm. Mrs. Ralston was a member of the Bentonville Christian Union Church, a member of the King’s Daughter’s Class, a 4-H advisor for 25 years, a member of the Farm Bureau and past president of the Bentonville School PTO. Survivors include five daughters Dorothy Jane Behm of Cincinnati, June K. Kreitzer and husband David of Beavercreek, Ona Belle Harmon and husband Charles of Bentonville, Martha R. Bennett and husband Niles of Manchester, Mary Ann Young and husband Wendell of Bentonville, seven grandchildren and fourteen great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Saturday, June 30, at the Thompson-Meeker Funeral Home, West Union. Darrell Myers officiated. Burial followed in the West Union Cemetery. Memorials can be made to the Bentonville Christian Union Church. Family and friends can sign Mrs. Ralston’s online guestbook @www.meekerfuneralhomes.com.

Ross Gr ocer y

309 W. 4th Street Manchester 549-4580

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Kelly “Dean� Little

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The Adams County/Ohio Valley School District Board of Education will hold a Special Board Meeting on Thursday, July 12, at the North Adams High School beginning at 7:00 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to review and accept bids on property sale and any other business that may come before the Board.

All work will take place during daytime, business hours Monday through Friday unless otherwise indicated. Adams County A resurfacing project on S.R. 32 is under way, with operations at the 0.83-mile marker (just east of the Adams-Brown County line) for bridge repair. Crews will be paving the route between the county line and S.R. 247 at Seaman and throughout construction, traffic will be maintained in at least one lane in each direction. The project is anticipated to be completed by mid to late October. A sidewalk construction project is under way in

ODOT Work Schedule

Peebles. As part of the Safe Routes to School program, crews will be constructing a bike path, gate and crossing between S.R. 41 and the Peebles Elementary School. Throughout construction, there should be little impact to traffic. An intersection improvement project on S.R. 73 is under way, and crews will be upgrading the alignment and adding a leftturn lane at the route’s intersection with C.R. 18H (Jaybird Road), between S.R. 32 and the Adams-Scioto County line. Traffic will be

maintained in one lane with the use of temporary signals, and construction is anticipated to be completed by late summer. Brown County A guardrail replacement project is under way on S.R. 41, between Aberdeen and S.R. 136 in Adams County, working as weather permits. Traffic will be maintained with the use of flaggers and/or arrow boards. S.R. 221 is reduced to one lane due to a slip. Traffic is being maintained in one lane with the use of tempo-

rary traffic signals. U.S. 52 is reduced to one, 10-foot lane at T.R. 232 (Logan Gap Road), between Ripley and Aberdeen, for a slip repair project. Throughout construction, traffic will be maintained in one lane with the use of temporary signals. A resurfacing project is under way on U.S. 52 from just west of T.R. 573 (Three Mile Creek Road) to just east of S.R. 41 at Aberdeen. Throughout construction, traffic will be maintained in one lane with the aid of flaggers when crews are at work. The project is anticipated to be completed by late November.

Pictures of Friday's Derecho Event

Cont. from page 1

Funeral Directory Lafferty

Funeral Home Inc.

Photos by Troy Jolly

Pictured is the the floor of what was the Stage to the Adams County Fair. The structure is in pieces across the field.

Pictured is a jon boat that was in a a pond that was lifted out of the pond of 1191 Vaughns Ridge Road and thrown approximately 100 feet.

937-544-2121

Thompson Meeker Funeral Home (Formerly Beam Funeral Home) www.meekerfuneralhomes.com 216 W. Mulberry St. West Union, Ohio

937-544-2133

Wilson

Homes for Funerals, Inc. 35 W. 2nd St., Manchester, Ohio

937-549-3363

www.wilsonhomeforfunerals.com

Monuments Peebles Monument Company

172 N. Main St., Peebles, Ohio 45660

937-587-2210

236 N. Market St., West Union, Ohio 45693

937-544-2931 Holsinger Monument & Rock Engraving

937-544-4000

206 N. Pleasant St., West Union

Pictured is a car port on Cosby Street in West Union that collapsed.

The Summer Reading Program continues into July. Each branch of the Adams County Public Library offers weekly programs for children of all ages, from preschoolers through teens. Your child can participate in age-appropriate activities, including read-aloud stories, crafts, games, and meeting guest presenters who bring wildlife and other special programs to the library. Children can also participate in the Summer Reading Program by keeping track of the books they read, and entering to win prizes at their local library branch. This week’s activities feature visits from Coco the Skunk, a pizza and prizes party for teens, adventure-themed programs, and more. Thursday, July 5 – At 10:30 am, bring your preschooler to the West Union Library for a program themed “Outlandish Owls.� Teens participating in Summer Reading are invited to a Pizza and Prizes Party at 5:30 pm at the West Union Library. We’ll enjoy pizza, and enter to win cool prizes – teens must be present to win. Saturday, July 7 – Everyone is invited to a special Summer Reading event at the Peebles Library, at 1:00 pm. Come meet Randy Lewis, who will be bringing special guest Coco the Skunk! Tuesday, July 10 – Summer Reading programming will be held at the North Adams Library, at 3:30 pm. Night is the perfect time for adventure – stars and planets beckon, ignite our imagination, and dare us to explore! School-age children are invited to attend an adventure-themed event. Wednesday, July 11 – At the Manchester Library, preschoolers’ Summer Reading at 10:30 am will feature

A Home Is Burglarized Every 14.6 Seconds.** Don’t Let Yours Be Next!

Stars in the Sky. Summer Reading for school-age children will be at 3:30 pm, and feature Constellations. For even more information about the Summer Reading Program, or to view a full schedule of events at each branch, visit our website at http://adamsco.lib.oh.us. Library Hours: Mon thru Sat 10 am – 5 pm Except Tuesdays, when Peebles & North Adams open at 10:30 am Extended Evening Hours: Monday – Peebles till 7 pm Tuesday – North Adams till 6 pm Wednesday – Manchester till 7 pm Thursday – West Union till 7 pm

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544-7100 or 5443784 Manchester 549-2291 or 549-3643 Peebles 587-3308 or 587-2959 Seaman 386-2121 or 386-2713 Aberdeen 795-2523 or 795-2522

Pictured is a tree that was snapped on Cosby Street in West Union.

O D D

Adams County Public Library

Penny Saver

West Union

Special 16 Inch Pizza 2 Topping

The Adams County Historical Society will meet on Monday, July 9, at 7:00 p.m. at the Courthouse. Judge Spencer will present the moral in the Jury Room. The trustees will meet at 6:00 p.m. at the heritage Center before the regular meeting.

Call Today, Protect Tomorrow!

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$99.00 Customer Installation Charge. 36-Month Monitoring Agreement required at $35.99 per month ($1,295.64). Form of payment must be by credit card or electronic charge to your checking or savings account. Offer applies to homeowners only. Local permit fees may be required. Satisfactory credit history required. Certain restrictions may apply. Offer valid for new ADT Authorized Dealer customers only and not on purchases from ADT Security Services, Inc. Other rate plans available. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Licenses: AL-10-1104, AZ-ROC217517, CA-ACO6320, CT-ELC.0193944-L5, DE-07-212, FL-EC13003427, EC13003401, GA-LVA205395, IA-AC-0036, ID-39131, IL-127.001042, IN-City of Indianapolis: 93294, KY-City of Louisville: 483, LA-F1082, MA-1355C, MD-107-1375, Baltimore County: 1375, Calvert County: ABL00625, Caroline County: 1157, Cecil County: 541-L, Charles County: 804, Dorchester County: 764, Frederick County: F0424, Harford County: 3541, Montgomery County: 1276, Prince George’s County: 685, Queen Anne’s County: L156, St. Mary’s County: LV2039R, Talbot County: L674, Wicomico County: 2017, Worcester County: L1013, MI-3601205773, MN-TS01807, MO-City of St. Louis: CC354, St. Louis County: 47738, MS-15007958, MT-247, NC-25310-SP-LV, 1622-CSA, NE-14451, NJ-34BF00021800, NM-353366, NV-68518, City of Las Vegas: B14-00075-6-121756, C11-11262-L-121756, NY-Licensed by the N.Y.S. Department of State UID#12000286451, OH-53891446, City of Cincinnati: AC86, OK-1048, OR-170997, Pennsylvania Home Improvement Contractor Registration Number: PA22999, RI-3428, SC-BAC5630, TN-C1164, C1520, TX-B13734, UT-6422596-6501, VA-115120, VT-ES-2382, WA-602588694/PROTEYH934RS, WI-City of Milwaukee: 0001697, WV-042433, WY-LV-G-21499. For full list of licenses visit our website www.protectyourhome.com. Protect Your Home – 3750 Priority Way South Dr., Ste 200, Indianapolis, IN 46240. **Crime data taken from http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/gallery/posters/pdfs/Crime_Clock.pdf

Callie is a dilute calico cat in need of a loving home. My name is Callie. I'm a beautiful, friendly, just-give-mea-home-and-I'll-give-you-my-heart kind of girl. I'm a young, spayed, female cat that was living a rough life, destined to become the mom of countless litters of kittens, until the kind people of the Humane Society of Adams County took me in. Please consider adopting me. I'm already spayed and am movein ready. For more information on Callie, please call (937) 587-2581. For more information about the Humane Society of Adams County, please call us at (937) 587-2727 and leave a message, or visit our website, adamscountyanimals.org. The Humane Society is in desperate need of a reliable VAN to transport animals (think tax deduction), as well as money for gasoline and vet bills.

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Michael Kamps

Community News/Events

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Obituaries

The Informer - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - 3


4 - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - The Informer

Miss Vacilya Begley of Blue Creek is pictured with green beans, wax beans, dragon beans, onions & kohl-rabi. from the family garden. She is the 3 year old daughter of Ralph and Kelli Begley, the grand daughter of Ralph Begley Sr. of Otway, Brenda Begley of Friendship, Scott and Sue Adler of Mansfield. If you have a photo that you would like to submit email to informer4news@gmail.com

Slusher and Iler to be Married The parents of Lora Lee Slusher and Robert Emerson Iler would like to announce the upcoming marriage of their children on July 7, 2012.

E V E N P A G E

Jokes of the week by George What is the best time for trampolines? Spring time! Why did the golfer wear two pairs of pants? In case he got a hole in one! My wife just quit her onion diet. She lost 12 pounds and 12 friends! Tuesday, July July 3, 3, 2012 2012 -- The The Informer Informer 22- -Tuesday, A man with a sharp tongue soon cut's his own throat!

Firefighters Respond to Church Firefighters Firefighters Respond to Church 2 2 -- Tuesday, Tuesday, July July 3, 3, 2012 2012 -- The The Informer Informer

George Perry

Photo Photo by by Troy Troy Jolly Jolly

TheWest West Union Union Fire Fire Department Department and and The Life Squad Squad was was dispatched dispatched to to the the Cedar Cedar Life GroveBaptist BaptistChurch Church in in Lynx, Lynx, for for aa possipossiGrove ble The structure fire. According to church ble structure fire. According to church West Union Union Fire Fire Department Department and and The West members the church's Vacation Bible members the church's Vacation Bible Life Squad was dispatched to the Cedar Life Squad was dispatched to the Cedar SchoolBaptist was being being held and they they heard School was held and heard a Grove Church in for possiGrove Baptist Church in Lynx, Lynx, for aaan possilightening strike and then smelled an odor lightening strike and then smelled odor ble ble structure structure fire. fire. According According to to church church members members the the church's church's Vacation Vacation Bible Bible School School was was being being held held and and they they heard heard aa lightening lightening strike strike and and then then smelled smelled an an odor odor TheOhio OhioState StateHighway Highway Patrol Patrol is is curcurThe rently investigating investigating aa one one vehicle vehicle serious serious rently injurytraffic trafficcrash. crash. The The crash crash occurred occurred on on injury JuneThe 25,Ohio approximately 2:55 p.m. on June 25, atat approximately 2:55 p.m. on State Patrol is curThe Ohio State Highway Highway Patrol isEagle curMartin Alexander Road in Eagle Martin Alexander Road in rently investigating aa one rently investigating one vehicle vehicle serious serious Township, Brown County. Township, Brown injury traffic crash.County. The crash crash occurred occurred on on injury traffic crash. The The preliminary investigation The preliminary investigation June 25, at approximately 2:55 p.m. on June 25, at approximately 2:55 p.m. on revealed Alexander that aa 2006 2006 Road Chevrolet Cobalt, revealed that Chevrolet Cobalt, Martin in Eagle Martin Alexander Road in Eagle operatedby by Alexis M. Eagle, Eagle, 18, 18, of of West West operated Alexis M. Township, Brown County. Township, Brown County. Union, was traveling northbound on Union, was traveling northbound on The preliminary investigation The preliminary Martin Alexander RoadChevrolet at aainvestigation high Cobalt, rate of Martin Alexander Road at high rate revealed that a 2006 revealed thatshe a failed 2006 to Chevrolet Cobalt, speed maintain control speedwhen when she failed to maintain control operated by Alexis M. Eagle, 18, of West operated by Alexis M. Eagle, 18, of West and traveled off the left side of the roadand traveled off the left side of the roadUnion, was traveling northbound on Union, was traveling northbound on way. ditch way. Miss Miss Eagle’s Eagle’s vehicle vehicle astruck struck aarate ditch Martin Martin Alexander Alexander Road Road at at a high high rate of of speed speed when when she she failed failed to to maintain maintain control control and and traveled traveled off off the the left left side side of of the the roadroadway. Miss Eagle’s vehicle struck aa ditch way.The Miss Eagle’s vehicle struck ditch reconTheAdams AdamsCounty CountyGrand GrandJury Jurywas was reconvened venedinin response response toto recent recent Felony Felony Criminal Criminal charges chargesagainst againstpeople people alleged alleged to to have have broken broken the inin Adams County. thelaw law Adams County. The Adams County Grand Jury was reconThe Adams CountyJury Grand Jury the wasfollowreconDuring the During theGrand Grand Jurysession, session, the followvened in response to recent Felony Criminal vened in response to recent Felony Criminal ing were indicted for ingpeople people werepeople indicted forFelonies: Felonies: charges against alleged to charges against people alleged to have have broken broken Chad Sheffield, 28, of Mowrystown, was Chad Sheffield, 28, of Mowrystown, was the law in Adams County. the law in Adams County. indicted on the charge of Trafficking in Heroin, indicted on the the Grand charge Jury of Trafficking in followHeroin, During session, the During the the Fifth GrandDegree. Jury session, the followaing aFelony Felonyofofwere the Fifth Degree. indicted for ing people people were indicted forofFelonies: Felonies: Jessilyn Gilman, 23, Winchester, Jessilyn Gilman,28, 23, of Winchester, was was Chad Sheffield, of Mowrystown, was Chad Sheffield, 28, of Mowrystown, was indicted on the charge of Trafficking in Heroin indicted on the charge of Trafficking in Heroin indicted on of in indicted on the the charge charge of Trafficking Trafficking in Heroin, Heroin, with specification, aaFelony of specification, Felony ofthe theFifth Fifth Degree. Degree. aawith Felony of the Fifth Degree. Felony of the Fifth Degree. Christopher Arnold, 19, of Christopher Arnold, 19, of West West Union, Union, Jessilyn Gilman, 23, of Winchester, was Jessilyn on Gilman, 23, of of OVI Winchester, was was indicted the charge with specifiwas indicted on the charge of OVI with specifiindicted on the charge of Trafficking in Heroin indicted on the charge of Trafficking in Heroin cation, aaFelony Degree. cation, Felonyof ofathe theFourth Fourth Degree. Degree. with specification, of with Thomas specification, a Felony Felony of the the Fifth Fifth Degree. 36, was Thomas Cook, Cook, 36, of of Winchester, Winchester, was Christopher Arnold, 19, of Christopher Arnold, 19, of West West Union, Union, was indicted on the charge of OVI with specifiwas indicted on the charge of OVI with specification, cation, aa Felony Felony of of the the Fourth Fourth Degree. Degree. Thomas Cook, 36, of Winchester, was Thomas Cook, 36, of Winchester, was Start the fireworks! Strike Start the fireworks! Strike up up the the band! band! Throw Throwaaparade! parade!ItItisis hard hard to to believe believe that that the the 4th 4thofofJuly Julyisisupon uponus. us. With With that that comes comes plenplentytyofofcookouts, celebrations, and fellowship. celebrations, Startcookouts, the fireworks! fireworks! Strikeandup upfellowship. the band! band! Start the Strike the Independence Day isis the Independence Day the Throw a parade! It is hard to believe Throw a parade! It is hard to believe that that the the

of smoke. The children children were were in in the the Shelter Shelter House during the incident. incident. Photo by Troy Jolly Photothe by church, Troy Jolly but Firefighters searched searched the church, but nothing was found. found. of smoke. smoke. The The children children were were in the the Shelter Shelter of Peebles Fire Department, Theduring Peebles Fire in Department, House the incident. House during the incident. Waynesearched and Township Fire Jefferson, and Byrd Byrdthe Township Fire Firefighters church, but Firefighters searched the church, but also responded to the scene. Departments responded to the scene. nothing was was found. found. nothing The The Peebles Peebles Fire Fire Department, Department, Jefferson, Jefferson, Wayne Wayne and and Byrd Byrd Township Township Fire Fire Departments Departments also also responded responded to to the the scene. scene. and overturned multiple multiple times times before beforecomcoming to rest on its wheels. wheels. Miss Miss Eagle Eagle was was ejected from the vehicle. vehicle. was to University Miss Eaglemultiple was flown flown tobefore University and times and overturned overturned multiple times before comcomby U.C. Air Care for treatment Hospital Air Care for treatment ing rest on its wheels. Miss Eagle was ing to to rest on its wheels. Miss Eagle was Eagle was not Miss was not wearing wearing her her safety safety ejected from the vehicle. ejected from the vehicle. time ofwas the crash. alcobelt Miss at the Eagle the flown crash. Neither Neither alcoto University Miss Eagle flownat University drugs are was suspected time. hol nor suspected attothis this time. Hospital by U.C. Air Care for treatment Hospital by U.C. Air Care for treatment crash remains under investigation The remains under investigation Miss Eagle not wearing safety Miss Eagle was was not Highway wearing her herPatrolsafety State by thetheOhio State Highway Patrolbelt at time of the crash. Neither alcobelt at the time of the crash. Neither alcoPost. Georgetown hol drugs are suspected at this time. hol nor nor drugs are suspected at this time. As The Ohio Ohio State Highway always The State Highway The crash under investigation Thereminds crash remains remains under investigation Patrol you to buckle up and not not you to buckle up and by Ohio State by the the Ohio State Highway Highway PatrolPatroldrink and drive. Georgetown Georgetown Post. Post. As As always always The The Ohio Ohio State State Highway Highway Patrol reminds you to buckle Patrol reminds you to buckle up up and and not not drink and drive. drink and drive. indicted on the charges charges of of Possession Possession of of Cocaine and Possession Possession of of heroin, heroin, Felonies Feloniesof of the Fifth Degree. The Grand Jurors are average average citizens of of Jurors are citizens indicted charges of Possession of indicted on on the thewho charges of Possession ofa Adams meet regulary during County who meet regulary during a Cocaine and Possession of heroin, Felonies of Cocaine and Possession of heroin, Felonies of four-month term. the Degree. the Fifth Fifth Degree. activities of the Grand Jury Although theJurors activities of the Grand Jury The Grand are average citizens The Grandunder JurorsOhio are law, average citizens of of are confidential theindictments indictments under Ohio law, the Adams County who meet regulary during a Adams County who meet regulary during that they present matter of of public publicrecord. record.a are aa matter four-month term. four-month term. Adams CountyProsecutor David Kelley Kelley CountyProsecutor David Although the activities of Jury Although the activities of the the Grand Grand Jury would thank the Grand Jurors for like to thank the Grand Jurors for are confidential under Ohio law, the indictments are confidential under Ohio law, the indictments responding on short notie to hear hear theserecord. serious notie to these serious that they present are a matter of public that they present United are a matter public cases. Under Statesof and Ohiorecord. constithe United States and Ohio constiAdams CountyProsecutor David Kelley Adams CountyProsecutor David Kelley tutions, charged with a crime are preall people charged with a crime are prewould like to thank the Grand Jurors for would like to thank the Grand Jurors fora sumed until proven guilty beyond innocent until proven guilty beyond a responding on short notie to hear these serious responding on short notie to hear these serious reasonable doubt. cases. Under the United States and Ohio consticases. Under the United States and Ohio constitutions, tutions, all all people people charged charged with with aa crime crime are are prepresumed sumed innocent innocent until until proven proven guilty guilty beyond beyond aa reasonable doubt. reasonable year doubt.- July following July 44 1777. 1777. By By the the early early 1800s the traditions traditions of of parades, parades, picnics, picnics, and and fireworks were established established as as the the way way to tocelcelebrate America's birthday. birthday. And And althoughfirefirefollowing year year -- July July 4 4 1777. 1777.although By the the early early following works By have been been works have 1800s 1800s the the traditions traditions of of parades, parades, picnics, picnics, and and

CMYK

Serious Injury Traffic Crash Serious Crash Serious Injury Traffic Crash

Grand Grand Jury Indictments Grand Jury Indictments

A A few few thoughts… thoughts… A few thoughts…

Southwest Ohio During the spring fishing season State Wildlife Officer Jasmine Grossnickle drove into a parking lot and started watching a group of people fish. Grossnickle was in an open area while she determined who in the group was fishing. As soon as Grossnickle became visible, one of the men walked away from a fishing pole lying on the ground. After the man walked away from the pole, he put his hands behind his back and looked back at Grossnickle. The man continued to look down and then back up at Grossnickle over and over again. Grossnickle drove out of the parking lot and setup to watch the group from a greater distance away. Fifteen minutes after Grossnickle left the parking area; the man picked up his fishing pole and began fishing. Grossnickle contacted the group, and checked for fishing licenses. Everyone in the group had a license with the exception of the one man. He was issued a citation for fishing without a license. In April, State Wildlife Officer Matt Hunt was told about some baby ducks stuck in a storm drain. Officer Hunt responded to a local shopping center and found seven ducklings trapped in the drain. He was unable to

remove the grate over the drain, so he contacted the city of Beavercreek. A worker from the street department responded and was able to remove the grate. Surprisingly, the baby ducks lined up as if they knew what was going to happen. Officer Hunt removed them one by one and placed them in a box. Near the shopping center, there is a small pond. Officer Hunt figured that was where the mother duck was heading

when she lost her followers. At the pond, he found one mallard with about nine babies and a second mallard with only three. Figuring that the second mallard was the one he was looking for, Officer Hunt released the ducklings nearby. The young immediately swam to the mallard’s side. While working at Paint Creek Wildlife Area late one night, Clinton County Wildlife Officer Matt Roberts located several individuals fishing in the creek. Officer Roberts contacted

nearby Park Officer Paul Lallier for assistance. Officer Lallier and two other park officers responded. The officers contacted the group and found numerous violations. One subject was cited for fishing without a license and underage consumption and paid a total of $175. Another individual was cited for possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana and paid a total of $470. A third individual was also cited for possession of drug paraphernalia and paid a total of $345. Northwest Ohio Wildlife Officers Cody Klima, Bob Wolfrum, and Troy Reimund were called in to assist other wildlife officers who had been observing anglers near Fort Meigs in Wood County. The observing wildlife officers detected the smell of marijuana coming from the parking lot and then observed two men smoking marijuana. Officers Klima, Wolfrum and Reimund were nearby, so they contacted the suspects. The officers found a marijuana cigarette and two partial bags of marijuana during a search of the suspects and their vehicle. The two men were issued minor misdemeanor citations for possessing marijuana. The penalty for the citations is a $230 fine and a six month driver’s license suspension.

Dry Weather Continues For Most

fly control program, there can still be large numbers of adult flies present. This would dictate using an additional control method or a completely different strategy. Other control methods include insecticide ear tags, back rubs, dust bags, and hand-applied sprays, dusts, and pour-ons. The insecticide ear tags, also called fly tags, offer very effective control by killing flies present on the animal and repelling flies that may come at a later date. Fly tags should not be applied until there are approximately 200 Controlling Flies in the DAVID DUGAN flies per animal presHerd Guest Column ent and should be The flies seem to be Extension Educator, removed in the fall to earlier and in greater ANR and Ohio help prevent pesticide numbers than in recent Valley EERA resistance in the fly years. I have talked population. To further about Anaplasmosis and prevent the pesticide part of the control for resistance, producers this includes a good fly control program. If you stant irritation to the ani- should rotate tags used, by have not already done mal. There is also evidence active ingredient. Use an something about the fly that these flies help spread organophosphate tag for populations, I am confident pinkeye in the herd. All two years followed by a that you have a bunch of three of these fly species pyrethroid tag for one year. flies. In addition to tend to move from animal Most fly tags on the market Anaplasmosis, flies cause to animal, never spending offer protection for four to other economic losses to much time on any individ- five months. Back rubs and the herd. The following ual, which makes control- dust bags charged with pesticide Ohio are very effective in lingChief them more of a chalinformationSeated comes for aArnett, �� Pictured: isisRandy ofof Southern Medical Center. Pictured: Seated Randy Arnett, ChiefExecutive ExecutiveOfficer Officer Southern Ohio Medical Center. controlling flies if placed lenge. recent post in the Beef Blog Standing, left totoright, are LISW, Administrative Director of of Social Work Services Standing, right,by areTeresa TeresaBryan, Bryan, LISW,flies Administrative Work Services where Social animals will use Stable are blood Director and was left written Paul with Southern Ohio Medical Center; Connie Montgomery, RN, AAA7 Care Transitions Coach; with Southern Ohio Medical Center; Connie Montgomery, RN, AAA7 Care Transitions cattle Gonzales, Extension Agent. feeders like horn flies but them. Many older Coach; Bonnie Dingess, MSW, LISW-S; AAA7 Director ofof Long-Term Care Programs; Linda Green, RN, Bonnie Dingess, MSW, LISW-S; AAA7 Director Long-Term Care Programs; Linda Green, RN, � is Executive Officer Southern Ohio Medical will voluntarily use Center. these theirChief feeding pattern is likeof "What isSeated the best thing Arnett, � Pictured: Pictured: Seated is Randy Randy Arnett, Chief Executive Officer ofLSW, Southern OhioDirector Medical AAA7 Care Transitions Coach; and Pamela K. Matura, MHS, LSW, Executive ofCenter. thethe AAA7 Care Transitions Coach; and Pamela K. Matura, MHS, Executive Director of Standing, to right, Teresa Bryan, Administrative of Work but others must beServices forced that ofLISW, the face and house- Director for flies?"left There isn’tare really Standing, left toAging right, are Teresa Bryan, LISW, Administrative Director of Social Social Work Services Area Agency on District 7 7(AAA7). Area Agency on Aging District (AAA7). with Southern Ohio Medical Connie RN, Transitions to useCare them. PlacingCoach; them flies. TheyMontgomery, tend to move a "best thing" flies.Center; with Southern Ohiofor Medical Center; Connie Montgomery, RN, AAA7 AAA7 Care Transitions Coach; certain they receive follow-up services AAunique multi-county, collaboratomake make certain they receive follow-up unique multi-county, multi-hospital collaboraBonnie Dingess, LISW-S; Director Long-Term Care Linda RN, soPrograms; that cattle mustGreen, goservices under from animaltoof to animal What works inMSW, onemulti-hospital herd AAA7 Bonnie Dingess, MSW, LISW-S; AAA7 Director of Long-Term Care Programs; Linda Green, RN, after discharge. The coaches willwill help ourour patients tive among five and three Area after discharge. The coaches help patients tive effort effort among fivehospitals hospitals and three Area AAA7 Care Transitions Coach; and Pamela K. Matura, MHS, LSW, Executive Director of the them when accessing water feeding on each as they go. may not in another. The AAA7 Care Transitions Coach; and Pamela K. Matura, MHS, LSW, Executive Director of the to understand the importance of managing their Agencies on Aging (AAAs) has been awarded to understand the importance of managing their Agencies on Aging (AAAs) has7 Stable been awarded Area Agency on Aging District (AAA7). or minerals or from one flies have been producer with 20 cows may Area Agency on Aging District 7 (AAA7). funding care.” fundingfor forthe theMedicare MedicareCommunity-Based Community-BasedCare Care care.” pasture tojustfollow-up another can do implicated transmishave moreProgram time to (CCTP) devote to to make certain they receive services A multi-county, multi-hospital collaboraHealth System hashas completed thethe Transitions sponsored bybythethein the to“Holzer make certain they receive follow-up services A unique unique multi-county, multi-hospital collabora“Holzer Health System just completed Transitions Program (CCTP) sponsored this. The drawback topatients these sionthree of(CMS). anaplasmosis in of catthe herd than afive producer after The coaches will help our tive among hospitals and Area itsits hospitals, clinics long-term Centers for && Medicaid (CMS). after discharge. discharge. The coaches will and help our patients tive effort effort among five hospitalsServices and three Area integration integration of hospitals, clinics and long-term Centers forMedicare Medicare Medicaid Services to understand the importance of managing their Agencies (AAAs) has been awarded devices is will that they be tle. Anaplasmosis is soaso with 200.on are many care our patients will be able tomust move The program isAging to to facilities understand theour importance of be managing their Agencies onThere Aging (AAAs) has the been awarded care facilities patients able to move The program isdesigned designed tomake make thetransition transition care.” funding for the Care recharged every week or disorder in cattleour that control programs andCommunity-Based all asblood continuum of of care with greater effi-effifrom the totoanother setting asas throughout care.” funding for the Medicare Medicare Community-Based Care throughout our continuum care with greater from thehospital hospital another setting asseamless seamless Health System has just completed the Transitions Program (CCTP) says T. T.Wayne Munro, MD, Chief possible. “Holzer Health System has just completed the Transitions ProgramEach (CCTP) sponsored by the ciency,” says Wayne Munro, MD, Chief possible. two. Many times we put is on by the the riseciency,” in “Holzer southern can be effective. pro-sponsored integration of its hospitals, clinics and long-term Centers for & Services of ofHolzer Health Targeting aa 26-county region rural integration of its them hospitals, clinics andSystem. long-term Centers for Medicare Medicare & Medicaid Medicaid Services (CMS). Executive Officer Holzer Health System. Targeting 26-county region including rural Executive up and then forget to herds. (CMS). These flies canOfficer be ducer should consider the including care facilities so our patients will be able to move The program is designed to make the transition “Reconnecting our patients with their primary Appalachia, this program will work to further care facilities so our patients will be able to move The program is designed to make the transition “Reconnecting our with their primary Appalachia, this program will work to further service them during the effectively controlled by options and choose the one throughout our continuum of care with greater effifrom the hospital to readmissions another setting as seamless physicians after they have been discharged from reduce unnecessary and aas throughout our continuum ofbeen care with greater effifrom is the hospital another setting as achieve seamless asa old physicians after they have discharged from reduce unnecessary readmissions and achieveup summer. sprays, dusts, cleaning hay piles that for tohis individciency,” says T. Wayne The Munro, MD, Chief possible.best thethe hospital will beT. strengthened by by thethe opportunireduction ininMedicare costs. The target population ciency,” says Wayne Munro, MD, Chief possible. hospital will be strengthened opportunireduction Medicare costs. The target population and pour-ons work well in around feeding sites so that ual situation. Executive Officer of Holzer Health System. aa 26-county region including to towork with ourour local Area Agency on on Aging for this isis Medicare Executive Officer of Holzer Health System. Targeting 26-county regionFee-for-Service including rural rural tyty work with local Area Agency Aging forTargeting this program program Medicare Fee-for-Service most cases. The biggest they have no place to lay Horn flies are probably “Reconnecting our with Appalachia, program will work further offices. Community-Based Care patients with a a primary “Reconnecting our patients with their their primary primary Appalachia, this program will workofto to further district offices.The Thepatients Community-Based Care patients withthis primary diagnosis diagnosis ofAcute Acute district problem associated with eggs. the important ecophysicians after they have been discharged from reduce unnecessary readmissions achieve provides patients andand their Myocardial Infarction, Chronic Obstructive physiciansProgram after they haveour been discharged from reducemost unnecessary readmissions and achieve aa Transitions Transitions Program provides our patients their Myocardial Infarction, Chronicand Obstructive the hospital will be strengthened the opportunireduction in Medicare costs. The target these ishealthcare their by need to be reSo what family can do to nomic pest on(COPD), the list. members access to to healthcare resources thatthat Pulmonary Coronary Artery the we hospital will be strengthened by the opportunireductionfly inDisease Medicare costs. The target population population family members access resources Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Coronary Artery ty to with our local Area Agency on for program is Medicare applied every two to three control these pests? Two They called flies Fee-for-Service thethe exceptional care and professionals forfor ty to work work with our local Area Agency on Aging Aging Disease, Heart Failure, oror Pneumonia preparing for this thisare program ishorn Medicare Fee-for-Service enhance exceptional care and professionals Disease, Heart Failure, Pneumonia preparingfor for enhance district offices. The Community-Based Care patients primary diagnosis of district offices. Theknown.” Community-Based Care which Holzer is already patients with with primary diagnosis of Acute Acuteare discharge. which Holzer is already known.” discharge. weeks. This becomes very insecticides on the marbecause they aatend to conTransitions Program provides our patients and their Myocardial Infarction, Chronic Obstructive provides our patients and their Myocardial Infarction, Chronic “All ofto usus atProgram Southern Ohio Medical Center are “All of at Southern Ohio Medical Center are This focuses improved This program program focusesofdirectly directly onObstructive improved labor intensive. Most of the ket that can beTransitions fed the gregate at the base the on family members access to healthcare resources that Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Coronary Artery family members access to healthcare resources that Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Coronary Artery honored and excited by the opportunity the CCTP honored and excited by the opportunity the CCTP patient outcomes such as reduced readmission to patient outcomes such as reduced readmission to pour-ons on the market animals through various horns on horned cattle. In enhance the the exceptional exceptional care and professionals professionals for Disease, Heart Heart Failure, or Pneumonia Pneumonia preparing for (Community-Based enhance care and for Disease, or preparing for (Community-Based Care Transition Program) hospitals; decreased emergency department visits; Care Transition Program) hashas hospitals; emergency visits; now will provide longer carriers, the most common this areadecreased we Failure, typically finddepartment which is already known.” discharge. which Holzer Holzer isand already known.” discharge. patients provided forusus and our patients,” stated Randy discharging patientstotothe themost mostappropriate, appropriate,cost cost provided for our patients,” stated Randy discharging controlOhio but Medical still won’t last being a mineral“All supplethem on the focuses shoulders, of usofat atofSouthern Southern Center are This setting program directly ontoimproved improved “AllCEO of us Southern Ohio Medical Center are This program focuses directly on Arnett, CEO Southern Ohio Medical Center. effective settingand and streamlining access toquality quality Arnett, Ohio Center. effective streamlining access all season. One product ment, which are then down the backs, and on honored and excited by the opportunity the CCTP patient outcomes such as reduced readmission to honored excited by the opportunity CCTP patient outcomes such as reduced readmission to “We “We alsoand have great admiration the Area long-term servicesand andsupport. support. also have great admiration forforthethe Area long-term services claims tofor have nineexcreted in Agency the manure. either side of the tail head (Community-Based Transition has hospitals; decreased department visits; (Community-Based Care Transition Program) has hospitals; decreased emergency department visits; Agency Aging, so it means a lot us be to be able “CareTransitions Transitions aconcept concept that was developed onon Aging, sonow it Care means a lot for usProgram) to able “Care isisaemergency that was developed provided for us and our patients,” stated Randy discharging patients to most appropriate, cost week indiThe flies laytoeggs inwith the on cattle. As the population provided for us to and our effectiveness, patients,” stated Randy discharging patients to the thewhich mosthas appropriate, cost to work them to provide additional assistance by the medical community which has proven be work with them provide additional assistance by the medical community proven totobe Arnett, CEO of Ohio Medical effective setting and streamlining to quality cating that can Center. treat manure for the developing gets larger, they spread Arnett, CEO of Southern Southern Ohio Medical Center. effective setting andwill streamlining access toMatura, quality patients returning home from the hospital.” effective,” commented Pamelaaccess forfor patients returning home from theyou hospital.” effective,” commented Pamela K.K. Matura, “We also have great admiration for the Area long-term services and support. “We also have great admiration forprovide the Area long-term services and support. AAA nurses and social workers will the Executive Director ofthe the Area Agency Aging cattle twice during a the year larvae to feed on. The down the sidesof onto the AAA nurses and social workers will provide Executive Director Area Agency ononAging Agency on so means aa lot us to able “Care is aafeed concept that was developed Agency on Aging, Aging, so it itTransition means lot for for us to be beconable “Care Transitions is concept that insecticide was developed evidence-based Care Transition Intervention District 7Transitions (AAA7). “Through trained coaches, Care Intervention District 7Horn (AAA7). trained coaches, weweinevidence-based and have season long the manure legs. flies“Through on to with them to additional assistance by the community which has proven to be to work work with them to provide provide additional assistance by able the medical community which has proven towill be (CTISM) program developed Eric Coleman, are ablemedical help individuals develop skills that (CTISM) program developed byby Eric A. A. Coleman, are totohelp individuals skills that will trol. stops the larval developblood and tend to feeddevelop confor patients returning home from the hospital.” effective,” commented Pamela K. Matura, for patients returning home from the hospital.” effective,” commented Pamela K. Matura, MD, MPH, at the University of Colorado, Denver assist them in managing the preventable causes that MD, MPH, at the University of Colorado, Denver assist them in managing the preventable causes that Failure to implement a ment and therefore elimitinuously while on the aniAAA nurses and social workers will Executive Director of Agency on AAA nursesCenter. and social workers will provide provide the the Executive Director of the the Area Area Agency on Aging Aging Health Science Center. This consumer-centered can leadthem them unnecessarily backto tothe thehospital. hospital. I Health Science This consumer-centered can lead unnecessarily back I control program for nates theweemergence of fly mal. Five hundred horn evidence-based Care Transition Intervention District 7 (AAA7). “Through trained coaches, evidence-based Transition Intervention District 7 (AAA7). “Through trained coaches, we intervention intervention tool isCare designed to improve quality have personally experienced theconfusion confusion anddifdiftool is designed to improve quality andand have personally experienced the and your herd causes reduced flies. insectiflies will remove a post-discharge pintdevelop of adult (CTISM) program developed by Eric A. are to individuals skills that will (CTISM) program developed by Eric A. Coleman, Coleman, are able able to help help individuals develop skills that will These contain costs individuals with complex ferent understanding instructions contain costs forforindividuals with complex carecare ferent understanding ofofpost-discharge instructions and lost have effect on blood each day from the MD, at the University of Colorado, Denver assist them in the preventable causes that MD, MPH, attransition theperformance University ofsettings Colorado, Denver assist them in managing managing the within preventable causes that no needs as they across specifically and medication management withinacides afamily family when needs asMPH, they transition across settings specifically and medication management when Health Science Center. This consumer-centered can lead them unnecessarily back to the hospital. I income. It is generally adult flies. Since the adults host animal. While a cow is Health Science Center. This consumer-centered can lead them unnecessarily back to the hospital. I from the acute setting back to the home and coma loved one leaves the hospital, resulting in a rea loved one leaves the hospital, resulting in a re- from the acute setting back to the home and comintervention tool designed to and have personally experienced the and difeveryquality $1 spent only live for munity. two to three aadmission large animal with adischarge fairly intervention tool is isthought designedthat to improve improve quality and have personally experienced the confusion confusion and difmunity. verysoon soon after discharge Thisnew new proadmission very after This procontain costs for individuals with complex care ferent understanding of post-discharge instructions contain costs for individuals with complex care ferent understanding of post-discharge instructions The Southern Ohio initiative was one of 23 sites gram can help to prevent this occurrence. We are on fly control returns $5 weeks, control is achieved large blood supply, it won’t The Southern Ohio initiative was one of 23 sites to gram can help to prevent this occurrence. We are needs as transition across settings specifically and management within aa family when needs as they they transition across settings specifically and medication medication management within family when announced CMS March 2012. CCTP currentexcited aboutthe the opportunity partner with announced byby CMS in in March 2012. CCTP currentexcited about opportunity totopartner with thethe $10. Some producers think after this first generation take many days to become from the acute setting back to the home and coma loved one leaves the hospital, resulting in a refrom the acute setting back to the home and coma loved one leaves the hospital, resulting in a rely includes more than 126 acute care hospitals three major health systems in our region to bring more than 126 acute care to hospitals three majorlosing health systems in our region toHowever, bring ly includes they can’t afford control dies. if a neighanemic this much munity. admission very soon after discharge This new promunity. admission very soon after discharge This new proacross 30 sites to provide care transitions services this important program to our ten-county area.” across 30 sites to provide care transitions services this important program to our ten-county area.” flies. Truthwas is one they boringWe herd (within two to Ohio blood each In the this midThe Southern initiative of 23 23can’t sites gram can helpday. tobyby prevent occurrence. are Southern Ohio initiative was one of sites gram can help to prevent occurrence. We an estimated 223,172 Medicare beneficiaries in Shecontinued continued saying,this “Obviously, there an forfor anThe estimated 223,172 Medicare beneficiaries in She saying, there is isanare afford not 2012. to. four miles) not under dle of summer, it is“Obviously, not byaCMS in March CCTP currentexcited about the opportunity to partner with the is announced As this dry period continues, we will be looking to do some things with forages to extend the grazing for livestock producers. We will look at some summer annuals and would be interested in working with some on farm trials. If interested, please notify me at dugan.46@osu.edu or call me at (937) 371-5622. The plan would be to use these trials as part of a grazing school later in the summer/fall. More information will be available in the coming weeks in this newspaper.

uncommon to find as many as 2,000 flies on an untreated cow and 4,000 to 5,000 on untreated bulls. Horn flies remain on the host animal all the time. This fact aids in our efforts to control them. Face flies, houseflies, and lesser house flies do not feed on blood but cause problems by pestering the cattle and spreading certain diseases. These flies feed on the secretions from the eyes and nose of the host animal. Obviously, this would be a source of con-

CMS CMSAwards AwardsFunding Fundingfor forRegional RegionalCare CareTransitions Transitions Program ProgramtotoArea AreaAgency Agencyon onAging AgingDistrict District7 7 CMS Awards Funding for Regional Care Transitions Program to Area Agency on Aging District 7

excited about opportunity to partner with tothe underlying goalthe improve thedischarge discharge process to underlying goal totoimprove the process three major systems in region bring threeMedicare major health health systems in our our region to tohosbring save Medicare dollars reducing unnecessary hossave dollars bybyreducing unnecessary this important program to our ten-county this readmissions. important program tomore ourimportantly, ten-county area.” pital readmissions. Butmore importantly,area.” propital But thetheproShe continued by “Obviously, there is an She continued by saying, saying, “Obviously, therepart ispart an gram goal empower people active gram goal isistotoempower people totobebeananactive underlying goal to improve the discharge process underlying goal to improve the discharge process to of their healthcare, both in the present and for the of their healthcare, both in the present and for theto save dollars reducing unnecessary hossave Medicare Medicare dollars by byprovides reducing unnecessary hosfuture. CareTransitions Transitions providesproven provensupports supports future. Care pital readmissions. But more importantly, the propital readmissions. But more importantly, the profor individuals help them heal andbebeatathome home for individuals totohelp them heal and –– gram is to people to an part gram goal goal ispeople to empower empower people to be be an active active part where most people saythey they would rather The where most say would rather be.be.The of healthcare, both in the present and for of their their healthcare, bothare infocused the present and for the the Area Agencies Aging are focused connecting Area Agencies ononAging ononconnecting future. Transitions provides proven future. Care Care Transitions provides proven supports supports individuals keyhome homeand and community-based care individuals totokey community-based care

announced by CMS increated March 2012. CCTP currentstates.CTTP CTTP was created by Affordable 1919 states. was by thethe Affordable ly includes more than acute care hospitals ly Act includes more than 126 126 acute care hospitals Care Act and will continue grow sites. Care and will continue to to grow andand addadd sites. across 30 sites to provide transitions across 30 sites to provide care transitions services Your local Area Agency on Aging District 7, Inc. Your local Area Agency oncare Aging District 7,services Inc. for 223,172 Medicare in for an an estimated estimated 223,172 Medicare beneficiaries beneficiaries in provides serviceson on a non-discriminatory basis. provides services a non-discriminatory basis. 19 states. CTTP was created by the Affordable 19 states. CTTP was created by the Affordable These services are available to help older adults These services are available to help older adults Care Act and will continue to grow and add sites. Care Actwith and will continue to grow and add sites. and those with disabilities safely and independand those disabilities livelive safely and independYour local Area Agency on Aging District Your local Area Agency on Aging District 7, Inc. ently in their own homes through services paid for ently in their own homes through services paid 7, forInc. provides services on non-discriminatory basis. provides services on aa other non-discriminatory basis. Medicare, Medicaid, other federal state byby Medicare, Medicaid, federal andand state These are available to help older adults These services services are available topay. help older adults resources, well private AAA7’s resources, as aswell as as private pay. TheThe AAA7’s and with disabilities live independand those those with disabilities live safely safely and independResource Center also available to and anyone in the Resource Center is is also available to anyone in the

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Field reports from Ohio Division of Wildlife Officers

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Cuffs and Collars

Photo of the Week


The Informer - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - 5

Supports Repeal, Hopes President Will Work On Replacement that Actually Reduces Costs U.S. Senator Rob Portman issued the following statement regarding the Supreme Court’s ruling that President Obama’s health care mandate is actually multi-billion dollar tax on middle class families: "While the Court has deemed the law constitutional as a tax on the American people, it is still flawed policy that is unaffordable for our families, our small businesses and our government. The President's one-size-fits-all

health care spending law is the centerpiece of a failed agenda that has increased economic uncertainty, stalled job creation, and

Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi released the following statement today after the Supreme Court ruled the Affordable Care Act constitutional: “This decision is a victory for the American people. With this ruling, Americans will benefit from critical patient protections, lower costs for the middle class, more coverage for families, and greater accountability for the insurance industry. “The Affordable Care Act is already paying dividends for millions of Americans – with more to

come: Children can no longer be denied coverage due to pre-existing conditions. Seniors are paying less for prescription drugs.

(Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine issued the following statement after the United States Supreme Court announced its decision upholding all provisions of the Affordable Care Act: "I am disappointed by the Supreme Court's decision on the constitutionality of Obamacare. It is a matter now that will again be fought in the political arena and will be the preeminent issue of the presidential cam-

paign. "There is a victory in this case. The Supreme Court did not expand the

Washington didn't need to pass highly partisan legislation that is increasing premiums on families by $2,100 per year, increasing the deficit by billions of dollars and killing thousands of jobs U.S. Senator through billions of dolRob Portman lars in new taxes. (R) “There was, and still is, a better way to improve our health care system without the heavy hand of government and massive new deepened the spending hole taxes. I'm hopeful the that Washington has dug. President will be willing to “It's time to change work with Republicans and course and focus on grow- Democrats alike on patient ing jobs, instead of grow- centered health care that ing government. It didn't actually reduces costs and need to come to this. expands access.”

Supreme Court Decision Upholding Health Care Reform

longer a pre-existing medical condition. “In passing health reform, we made history for our nation and progress for the American people. We completed the unfinished business of our society and strengthU.S. Congress ened the character of Minority Leader our country. We ensured health care would be a (D) right for all, not a privilege for the few. Today, the Supreme Court affirmed our progress and protected that right, Students and young securing a future of health adults can stay on their par- and economic security for ents’ plans. the middle class and for Being a woman is no every American.”

Supreme Court's Health Care Ruling

pointed in Justice Roberts' decision, he was the leader in restricting the Commerce Clause, an expansion of which would have been detrimental to our country. If that would have Mike DeWine been upheld, it would mean there are no limits Attorney to what Congress could General compel Americans to purchase. "While we lost the battle over Obamacare, we did win the war on the powers under the Commerce true meaning of the Clause. While I am disap- Commerce Clause."

Contacting your government

Auditor David Gifford 544-2364

County Court Judge Alan W. Foster 544-5251

Clerk of Courts Gary Gardner 544-2344

Member of Congress Second District – Ohio Jean Schmidt 740-354-1440

County Commissioners Roger Rhonemus Brian Baldridge Justin Cooper 544-3286 Engineer David Hook 544-2943 Prosecuting Attorney David Kelley 544-3600

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Recorder Mark Tolle 544-5051 Sheriff Kimmy Ray Rogers 544-2314 Treasurer Lisa A. Newman 544-2317 Judge – Court of Common Pleas Brett Spencer 544-2921

United States Senator – Ohio Senior Senator Sherrod Brown (202) 224-2315 Junior Senator Rob Portman (202) 224-3353 Office of the Governor John R. Kasich (614) 466-3555 State Senator Tom Niehaus 614-466-8082 State Representative Danny R. Bubp 88th House District 614-644-6034 State Representative Dr. Terry Johnson 89th House District (614) 466-2124

Court ruling doesn’t mean Obamacare is good idea

The Supreme Court says the Affordable Care Act fits within the boundaries of the Constitution. That doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. The Constitution isn’t a national shield to protect us from horribly flawed thinking. The Supreme Court’s decision means every American is now on the hook to buy health insurance – whether we want it or not. We’re going to be forced to reach into our pockets to pull out money for health coverage. Some of the most creative thinking has gone into what to call that money. Already, it has carried a number of labels: the individual mandate, a premium, a fee, a “shared responsibility payment.” The labels are fog and smoke – intended to obscure, not to explain, but Chief Justice John Roberts, who wrote the court’s majority opinion, called it what it is – a tax. And it

was on that basis that the health care law was allowed to stand. “Because the Constitution permits such a tax, it is not our role to forbid it, or to pass upon its wisdom or fairness,” Roberts said. So, it can be unfair. It

Governor John R. Kasich and Lt. Governor Mary Taylor released the following statement in response to the ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States on the constitutionality of the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: "We’re very disappointed that this flawed law has been allowed to stand. The Supreme Court has confirmed what everyone knew all along— but that the White House tried to deny: this is a massive new tax on the middle class. Hopefully Congress will eventually repeal the law altogether and replace it

with improvements that actually address the most

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) issued the following statement in response to the Supreme Court’s ruling on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act: “Supreme Court Justices appointed by presidents of both parties today made an independent legal judgment to uphold the health law. I hope today’s ruling will put an end to the partisan bickering so that we can continue our focus on jobs and improving the economy” Brown said. “Today’s ruling means that more than 1.2 million Ohio seniors will continue to have access to cancer screenings and wellness exams through Medicare. Nearly 97,000 young adults in our state will continue to be able to stay on their parents’ health insurance until they’re 26. Parents of children with pre-existing conditions – like cancer, asthma, or diabetes – will no longer worry that they will be unable to buy health insurance.” More than two years ago, Congress passed and President Obama signed into law the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The law has benefitted Ohioans in the following ways: Nearly 97,000 of Ohio’s young adults are now able to stay on their parents’ health insurance

until age 26 while they finish school or start a career. More than 2,000 Ohioans with pre-existing conditions have access to

U.S. Rep. Jean Schmidt R-Ohio

can be dumb. It can be wrong. And it can still be constitutional. I’m disappointed by the Supreme Court’s ruling. And I’m not happy that some in Washington haven’t leveled with the American public. Two years ago, when the Democrats who then controlled the House passed the Affordable Care Act, they were adamant that it wasn’t a tax.

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Supreme Court Ruling President Obama's Health Care Mandate Is Billions In New Taxes On Middle Class Families

President Obama was adamant that it wasn’t a tax. Now, the Supreme Court says it’s a tax. Regardless of how it’s labeled, the law should be repealed. We have the best doctors and hospitals in the world, but I'm concerned that this law won’t ensure better care for patients. Instead, it could dictate how doctors practice medicine – and it could reduce treatment options for patients on the basis of cost. We can all agree that our health care system needs some serious reforms – reforms that actually lower costs, make coverage more affordable for families and businesses, and keep the government out of our health care decisions. Obamacare fails on those points. Just because the Supreme Court says it’s constitutional doesn’t mean it’s the right thing to do.

U.S. Supreme Court Health Care Ruling

Ohio taxpayers could be saddled with dramatically higher costs. The Administration will careGuest Column fully analyze the deciGov. John R. sion to determine the Kasich (R) Ohio appropriate next steps. We are very concerned that a sudden, dramatic increase in Medicaid spending could threaten Ohio’s ability to pursue needed reforms in other areas, such as education. GUEST Going forward, we COLUMN remain committed to Lt. Governor minimizing the law’s Mary Taylor (R) drag on the economic growth Ohio is beginning to experience, protecting the inviolate relationship between doctors and pressing needs in health patients, and preserving as care, especially the need to much free market competireduce costs in order to tion in health care as possiimprove access. Until then, ble."

O D D P A G E

Supreme Court Ruling on Affordable Care Act Senator S h e r r o Brown D-Ohio

health care through the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan. Children with preexisting conditions – like asthma or diabetes or cancer – can no longer be denied coverage – or dropped from their parents’ insurance. More than 2.1 million Ohioans with private insurance gained preventive health services with no cost-sharing. More than 4.5 million Ohioans are no longer in danger of hitting a lifetime limit on insurance coverage as the ACA bans companies from placing a monetary limit on care. This means cancer patients, individuals with Parkinson’s or MS, and children with disabilities will not face financial ruin due to medical bills. More than 1.2 million seniors on Medicare received free preventive services such as annual wellness exams and cancer screenings in 2011.

Ronald B Lynch

Financial Advisor 481 Tucker Dr P.O. Box 218 Maysville, KY 41056 Bus. 606-759-9910 Fax 877-516-3173 www.edwardjones.com Cell 937-725-0417

ronald.lynch@edwardjones.com

Ohio seniors who have reached the so-called “donut hole” have seen their prescription drug costs cut in half – saving more than $164 million. In the first five months of 2012, 36,291 people with Medicare in Ohio d saved a total of $24,417,492 – which is an average saving of $673. Up to 147,000 small businesses are eligible for tax credits so that they can attract employees by offering them health coverage. More than 5,000 Ohio construction jobs and 10,000 full-time jobs have been supported through grant funding – like the competitive award received by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to help fund OSU’s Project One. The law also ensures that the premium dollars Ohioans pay for health insurance are used for their medical care – rather than for executive bonuses and ad campaigns. The law requires that insurance companies spend at least 80 percent of the premiums they collect from consumers on medical care – or give consumers a rebate. An estimated nine million consumers could receive between $600 million to $1.4 billion in rebates from insurance companies this year. In Ohio, more than 143,000 Ohioans will benefit this year from $11.3 million in rebates. And after Ohio families have faced unchecked hikes in their health insurance costs for years, the law subjects insurance companies to new scrutiny if they raise prices by more than 10 percent. The ACA provided the State of Ohio $5.1 million to combat unjustifiable increases.

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Politics & Government


6 - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - The Informer

Osborne and Francis to Wed

Local Government

The wedding will take place on July 7, at Life Impact Church in West Union. A reception immediately following the ceremony will be held at The River Barn in Manchester. The couple would like to invite all family and friends to join them on their special day.

Lightening Ignites Structure Fire

E V E N P A G E

Photo by Troy Jolly

The Manchester Fire Department and Life Squad responded to 511 E. 5th Street for a structure fire on Sunday, July 1. Neighbors seen the lightening strike and called 911. Apparently lightening is a contributing factor due to the Sunday storm. The MFD had a quick response to the scene and extin-

guished the fire that was in the back of the home within minutes. The home was owned by Rick Polley. The Manchester Police Department assisted at the scene. No other details were available as of press time.

June 25 Sale

Canner/Cutter

$60.00

$78.00

Total Headage 483 Total Hogs 156 Total Cattle 108 Total Sheep/Lambs 90 Goats 129

Bulls Headage 7 All Bulls

$100.00

$111.00

United Producers Inc. - Hillsboro Ohio Low

Hogs Headage 85 #1 Carcass

High

$90.00

Sows Headage 9 Light Heavy

$44.50 $51.50

Boars Headage 20 Light Heavy

$52.75 $27.50

$45.50 $52.75

Feeder Pigs Headage 42 By Head CWT

$33.00 $50.00

$45.50 $77.00

Cattle Headage 5 Choice Steers Choice Heifers Cow/Calf Pairs

$110.00 $110.00 $1,000.00

$114.75 $114.75 $1,500.00

Cows Headage 32 Comm. & Utility

$78.00

$87.00

Feeder Cattle Headage 60 Yearling Steers (600-800) $95.00 Yearling Heifers (600-800) $95.00 Steer Calves (300-600) $100.00 Heifer Calves (300-600) $100.00 Holstein Steers (550 & dn) $100.00 Holstien Steers (550 & up) $100.00 Back to Farm Calves Headage 4 Heifers (75-110 lbs) Bulls (75-110 lbs) $175.00 Sheep & Lambs Choice Wools $121.00 Roasters $140.00 Feeder Lambs $135.00 Aged Slaughter Sheep $52.50 Goats Headage 129 All Goats Misc. Sales Horse

CORNERSTONE Remodeling And Construction Interior & Exterior Remodeling Room Additions - New Homes

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In business since 1980!

John Chamblin 937-544-3595

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$130.00 $120.00 $175.00 $165.00 $125.00 $105.00

$205.00 $225.00 $127.00 $160.00 $160.00 $100.00

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action was taken. Motion by Benny McCarty to close Market Street from Main Street to Bubp's driveway and Mulberry Street from Market Street to Pleasant Street on June 30, 5:00pm till 10:00pm, second by Randy Brewer, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Report from Jerry Kirker, Village Administrator/ Fire Chief 1. The Village has been approved for a 2% interest loan for the Main Street Water Improvement project (lines and water tower). 2. Tower Drive lift station went down and had some major repairs for about $3000.00. 3. Water loss for the month of May at 12%, the Water Department had some major leaks. At this time, Kirker introduced Holly Johnson, Economic Development, she spoke on a grant for sidewalks for St. Rt. 41S, a grant for the Spark Street lift station, passed a handout and spoke on the Sewer Project- Phase II, also a marketing study for the larger Villages in the County, Manchester, Peebles, Seaman, West Union and Winchester. Report from Roy Stricklett, Police Chief 1. Stricklett thanked the Water, Sewer and Street Department and the Village Administrator for their help for Summer Fest. 2. There was a letter being circulated at Summer Fest to make pot legal. 3. Stricklett brought Jody Tolle into speak to council on a problem with animals in the Village: cats, raccoons, etc.

Tolle will meet with the Solicitor and bring it back to Council next meeting. 4. Stricklett discussed Summer Fest with Council, no action was taken. Motion by Steve Rothwell to set the 2013 Tax Budget Hearing on July 10 during the regular Council meeting, second by Randy Brewer, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Council member Randy Brewer told Council Pat Mason is working very hard to raise money for new Christmas lights, Council and Mayor agreed. Motion by Benny McCarty for executive session ORC 121.22 G3, second by Steve Rothwell, roll call vote: all yea. Motion by Steve Rothwell to return to regular session, second by Neil Morrison, roll call vote: all yea. Motion by Neil Morrison for executive session ORC 121.22 G1 personnel discipline, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: all yea. Motion by Neil Morrison to return to regular session, second by Steve Rothwell, roll call vote: all yea. Lisa Rothwell Copeland, Solicitor spoke to Council on the Westminister Group LLC. Vs. West Union Water/ Sewer Department and Kimberly vs. Village of West Union. Other topics discussed were: newspaper ad for the South Street Property, street lights, bush at the corner of Randy Street and Kurt street, above ground pools. Motion by Neil Morrison to adjourn, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: all yea, meeting adjourned.

For the second year in a row, more than 100 bobcats have been shown to be living in Ohio’s southeastern counties with the confirmation of 136 sightings by state wildlife officials during 2011, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ (ODNR) Division of Wildlife. The reports show an increase from the 106 verified sightings in 2010. The bobcat is listed as an endangered species in Ohio and is protected by state law. Bobcats once roamed across Ohio during early settlement, but as more people settled within the state, their numbers diminished. By the year 1850, bobcats no longer lived in Ohio. However, a handful of unverified sightings of the bobcat in the 1960s announced the introduction of the return of the Ohio

bobcat. Since 1970, there have been 691 bobcat sightings in 38 counties verified by state wildlife biologists. The majority of wildcat-verified reports for 2011 occurred in Noble County and surrounding counties. The bobcat may be verified with photographs of the animal itself and its tracks; road kill recovery and sightings by Division of Wildlife personnel as well as encounters through incidental trappings, which are followed by the animals being released. Since bobcats are typically elusive and it is rare for people to see them in the wild, the Division of

Wildlife is using technology to clarify estimated populations of bobcats. To help them with their research, biologists use remote cameras and scent stations. Wildlife officials also use GPS radiocollars to track the location of bobcats after catching and releasing them.

Wildlife Biologists Verify More Than 100 Bobcat Sightings in Ohio

NOTICE Resolution 2012-5 to amend the Official Certificate of Estimated Resources for Emergency Medical Service Fund. Resolution 2012-6 to approve to proceed with the planning of 3 projects: Main Street, Elevated Tank, North Area. Resolution 2012-7 to loan the West Union Fire Department $19,000.00 to purchase a fire truck. The remainder of these resolutions may be viewed or copy obtained at the Village Clerk’s Office at 33 Logans Lane, West Union, OH 45693. Tanya Johnson Village Clerk

W. C. Milling Co. LLC (937) 386-2282

Seaman Farm, Garden, & Pet Center (937) 386-2134

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MILLER’S REPAIR Sales & Service of

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Echo Trimmers

Allen Miller

Toro Mowers

937-544-7831

620 Wheat Ridge Rd. - West Union, Ohio

Kris Blanton

Attorney At Law P.O. Box 849 West Union (937) 544-5019

Divorce/Custody -Wills - Real Estate By Appt. Only

Sealed Bids Being Accepted by Village of West Union for South Street Property The below described real estate shall be sold by the Village of West Union in accordance with Section721.01 of the Ohio Revised Code. The Village of West Union is accepting “Sealed Bids” on two parcels of real property located on South Street, Cherry Street and Market Street in the Village of West Union. Parcel I contains 3.763 acres, more or less. (Legal description available at the West Union Village Clerks Office or the Adams County Recorders Office.) Parcel II contains 0.87 acres as described below. (Legal description available at the West Union Village Clerks Office or the Adams County Recorders Office.) Bids must be credible and comparable to current real estate values, based on land use and purpose. Any and all bids can be rejected by the West Union Village Council without discourse. “Sealed Bids” must be received by or before noon (12:00) July 6, 2012. Bids will be opened by the Mayor and Village Council at its regularly scheduled meeting July 10, 2012. Awarded bidder will be notified in person, by telephone or by US mail in a timely fashion. Bids must be submitted in person or by US Mail to the Village of West Union Clerk, P.O. Box 395, 33 Logan’s Lane, West Union, Ohio 45693.

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Kelsey is a full time student finishing her degree in social service and works at the Villa in Georgetown. Shawn works at Everyday Homecare In Mt. Orab as the quality assurance manager and at West Union Life Squad as a EMT-B.

West Union Village Council met in regular session at 7:00 p.m. on June 12, at the Municipal building, with Mayor Ted Grooms presiding. The pledge to the flag, call to order and roll call, John Lafferty- present, Steve Rothwell- present, Benny McCarty- present, Jason Buda- absent, Randy Brewerpresent, Neil Morrison- present; also in attendance: Tanya Johnson- Clerk, Shelley Gifford- Treasurer, Jerry Kirker- Village Administrator/ Fire Chief, Roy StricklettPolice Chief, Lisa Rothwell Copeland- Solicitor. Visitors: Holly Johnson, Donna Young, Debbie Morrison, Jody Tolle. Motion by Benny McCarty to approve the Minutes of May 22 and June 5 as distributed, second by Randy Brewer, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Motion passed by Steve Rothwell to approve payment of bills submitted, second by Randy Brewer, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Motion by Neil Morrison to accept the statement of receipts for Mayor's Court for the month of May for the net amount of: $10,543.42, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Ordinance 2012-5 amending Ordinance 2008-16 Policies & Procedures HandbookBereavement, motion by Steve Rothwell, second by Neil Morrison, roll call vote: all yea; declaring an emergency, motion by Benny McCarty, second by Neil Morrison, roll call vote: all yea, ordinance passed. Discussion on a bench warrant round up and CRC, no

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West Union Council

Lisa Griffey, of Maysville, Ky., grandparents Gordan and Dorthy Polly of Hamersville and Pastor Pete and Edith Francis of West Union would like to announce the engagement of Kelsey Osborne and Shawn Francis.


The Informer - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - 7

The Board of Adams County Commissioners met in regular session on Monday, June 18, 2012 with the following members present: Brian Baldridge, Justin Cooper, and Roger Rhonemus. Clerk Diane Ward and Assistant Clerk Linda Mendenhall were also present. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the minutes of the previous meeting. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the

Adams County Commissioners

bills. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the additional appropriations, advances, advance returns, and reductions. Vote: All yeas. The board conducted the Final Viewing of Faith Road for the proposed establishment at 9:00 a.m. Those present were as follows: Engineer David Hook, Don Becker, Cheryl Becker, and Daniel G. Fannin. The Final Hearing for the proposed establishment of Faith Road was conducted at 10:00 a.m.

GLENNA R. GROOMS dba

ROUSH

INSURANCE AGENCY

Office: 937-544-3123 Office: 937-544-3795 Home: 937-587-3293

Auto - Home - Mobile Home Flood - Farm - Life Business & Specialty Lines 313 East Main Street West Union, OH 45693

Those present were as follows: Engineer David Hook, Daniel G. Fannin, Lisa Newman, Brian Jodrey, Robert Lewis, Judy Shupert, Richard DeMint, Gladden Shupert, Cheryl Becker, Don Becker, Lisa Newman, Donna Hibbeler, and Stephen Hibbeler. Engineer David Hook presented his report on the proposed establishment of Faith Road, Liberty Township, Adams County. As a result of the road survey, the existing road is found to encroach outside the inside right-of-way line and onto the property of Jeffery and Lisa Newman. This encroachment will need to be resolved prior to any acceptance of the road. The matter may be resolved by moving the roadway to within the existing right-ofway limits or by obtaining an easement from Jeffrey and Lisa Newman. The encroachment issue on the curve legally has to be rectified prior to the board taking action for establishment. The

Commissioners currently do not plan to proceed with establishment of the remainder of the roadway that is in Sprigg Township due to the Sprigg Township Trustees voting unanimously to not accept the proposed establishment of the portion of Faith Road. The following residents voiced their opinions for the proposed establishment: Brian Jodrey, Daniel Fannin, Steve Hibbeler, Don Becker, Cheryl Becker, Judy Shupert, Donna Hibbeler, and Richard DeMint. The following voiced their opinion against the proposed establishment: Robert Lewis. Assistant Prosecutor Nikki Whalen met with the board to discuss legal issues. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the JFS payroll of $42,619.20 for pay period June 3, 2012 through June 16, 2012 upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote:

All yeas. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the West Union Village Ohio Commercial Lease Agreement for housing the Adams County Title Department for a period of 5 years commencing July 1, 2012 and ending June 30, 2017 at a rate of $500.00 per month/$6,000.00 per year. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to accept the resignation of Dog Kennel employee Erica Burke, effective June 29, 2012 upon receiving Ms. Burke’s documented request on Friday, June 15, 2012. Vote: All yeas. BAIRD, Inc. representative David Conley and Emily Cannon was present to discuss a proposal for the Energy Efficiency Improvements financial perspective and the proper way to proceed. Facilities

Director Sally Hayslip was also present. The board attended the War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration conducted on the front lawn of the courthouse at 11:30 a.m. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to participate in the Ohio Cooperative Purchasing Program and submit the $170.00 administrative fee. Vote: All yeas. Adams Brown Recycling representatives Dan Wickerham and Sam Perrin, and Adams Clermont Solid Waste District Director Paul Braasch were present to discuss recyclable material brought into Adams Brown Recycling over 30 years of operation. The combined total amount paid to customers to date through the buy-back operation is $15,280,000.00. During this same time frame, 58,350 tons of recyclable materials were diverted from landfills. Continued on page 8

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Local Government

GUSTIN REALTY

R. GUSTIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .544-2224 Craig Harover - Broker JOE EARL JONES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .544-3684

202 N. Pleasant Street, West Union, Ohio

Business Phone 544-2400 Home Phone 544-6925 Bill Holton - Auctioneer - 513-312-1043

www.gustinrealty.com

PAT MUSTARD . . . . . .937-728-0633 or 544-7073 BILL HOLTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-312-1043 CRYSTAL SUTTERFIELD . . . . . . .937-217-9662 ROSIE YOUNG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-403-4126 WALT YEAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .544-2434 DALE MENDENHALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . .544-5385 LUCINDA HANSGEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .544-3353 LESLIE MCCLANAHAN . . . . . . . .937-217-3716 OMAR VANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-763-6362

JESSE MCKINZIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-218-2541 LAWRENCE (LARRY) YOUNG . . . . . .544-3479 MICHAEL WILLIAMS . .937-217-1579 or 386-2484 NELSON ATKINSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .587-3728 NANCY ATKINSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .587-3728 MARK KAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-217-0397 TRACY KAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-217-0554 JANET WAGNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .373-3111 BRENDA MCCLANAHAN . . . . . . . . . . .695-0257 DANNY DICK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-779-7930 AMY SIMPSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .937-725-2185

HOMES FOR SALE HOMES

f/p, all new windows, large covered porch, 2-car garage. Home is in great condition. $92,900. R19 – WEST UNION – 1 ½ story frame home with vinyl siding, 1915 SF living area, 3+ BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, elec. & nat. gas heat, C/A, covered front porch. $69,900.

acres with beautiful 2010 Fleetwood DW, 1960 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. heat pump, C//A, F/P, deck with hot tub, 24x36 horse barn with 3 stalls & tack room, 2 additional barns, 12 tillable acres, 7 acres of pasture, excellent location. $169,900.

R21 – WINCHESTER – POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING - 0.918 acre with 1997 DW, 1170 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, elec. furnace, C/A, new windows, floating floor, 2car garage, covered front porch, concrete patio, extra lot with water & sewage. $89,900 – MAKE OFFER.

R1 – SEAMAN - Brick home featuring 2660 SF living area, 2+ BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, storage room, elec. heat, A/C, 2-car att. garage, front porch, large back porch, large fenced back yard, mother-in-law suite has 1 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen & dining room. $89,900.

H7 – WINCHESTER – 2 acres with 2-story vinyl sided home, 1072 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen, elec. heat, 2 A/C, county water, all new windows, 3-car garage, shed. Home has been remodeled in past 5 years, very private. $110,000. R29 - PEEBLES - Exceptionally nice 3 BR home in Peebles. 1144 SF of living space. Home sets on nice lot with a big backyard. 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, utility room. Elec. furnace with heat pump, C/A, city water/sewage. This is a must-see and priced to sell at $89,900!

H9 – WEST UNION – 1.32 acres with 14x70 mobile home in good condition, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, utility room, elec. furnace, A/C, county water, nice location on private road. PRICE REDUCED TO $39,900. H11 – BLUE CREEK – DW with block foundation & 2story addition, 1976 SF living area, 3 BR with porch off of upstairs BR, 2 full baths, living room, large family room with gas F/P, kitchen with appliances, dining room, elec. furnace, county water, underground 200 amp elec. service, garage. 2 acres +/-. PRICE REDUCED TO $79,900.

R35 - CHERRY FORK - Very nice DW featuring 2 BR, 2 full baths (1 with shower, 1 with Jacuzzi), living room, kitchen with appliances, elec. furnace, C/A, floating floor, 2-car garage, 2 porches, public water, .747 acre with creek. $84,000.

R13 – WEST UNION - Well-maintained frame home with vinyl siding, 1344 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, utility room, all appliances, elec. heat, gas F/P, 2 A/C, deck, 3 storage buildings, nice location. $85,000. R17 - MANCHESTER - 1 1/2 story frame home with vinyl siding, 1225 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, elec. & gas heat, C/A, gas

P A G E

H5 – WEST UNION – 2 acres +/-with 1997 Palm Harbor DW, 1647 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, new gas furnace, C/A, county water, 2-car att. garage, 15x40 barn, beautiful setting on dead end road. $139,000.

R31 – MANCHESTER – Frame home with vinyl siding in a nice country setting with beautiful view, 1200 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, full basement, new gas furnace, C/A, new roof, 2car garage, garden spot. $89,000.

R9 – CYNTHIANA – Fixer upper, frame home with vinyl siding, 3 BR, living room, kitchen, metal roof, carport. PRICE REDUCED TO $8,500.

H19 – MANCHESTER – 2 acres with 1120 SF farm house, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. furnace, County water, screened-in deck, 28x42 barn. PRICE REDUCED TO $54,000. H20 - NEW LISTING - BLUE CREEK - 3.756 acres with vinyl sided frame home, 2520 SF living area, 3 BR with large master suite added in 2009, 2 1/2 baths, living & family rooms, kitchen with new appliances, dining room, lots of closets, large storage area, elec. heat pump, C/A, Anderson windows, 3-car garage, large front porch. $149,900.

R23 - MANCHESTER - Frame home with vinyl siding, 624 SF living area, 1 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with pantry, all appliances, elec. heat, A/C, 1-car garage, front & back porches, nice starter or retirement home, very neat. $34,900. MAKE OFFER.

R3 – WEST UNION – 1 ½ story frame home built in 1901, 1776 SF living area, 4 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, pantry, utility room, enclosed back porch, wrap-around front porch, new gas furnace, hardwood floors, new water heater, 16x24 2-story barn, .4 acre lot, former home of the last surviving civil war veteran from West Union, would be a great home to restore. PRICE REDUCED TO $43,500. R5 – WINCHESTER – Well maintained home with vinyl siding, 1300 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, utility room, heat pump, C/A, 2 fireplaces, hardwood floors, 2-car garage with electric & water, breezeway, swimming pool with deck, concrete driveway, front porch, 3 buildings, deck, white vinyl fence, nice landscaping. $99,900.

wildlife, would make very nice weekend getaway or spot to build new home. PRICE REDUCED TO $49,900.

O D D

H1 – MANCHESTER – Frame home with vinyl siding, 2036 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, mother-in-law suite, living & family rooms, kitchen with appliances, dining room, elec. furnace, C/A, county water. Home sets on 5.434 acres with 4 acres of woods. $105,000. H3 - WEST UNION - Mini farm for horses or cattle, 20+

H25 – MANCHESTER – 5.614 acres with 16x80 Century mobile home, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, gas furnace, new wood burning F/P, C/A, county water, patio, 10x12 building, 14x70 storage trailer. $49,900. H29 – WEST UNION - 1.4 acres with 12x60 mobile home, 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with stove top oven, fuel oil furnace, county water, small barn. PRICE REDUCED TO $19,900. H33 – WEST UNION – 25.166 acres with approx. 23 acres wooded, frame home with aluminum siding, 1260 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, eat-in kitchen with appliances, utility room, elec. furnace, C/A, 2 garages, rear deck, large pole barn. $139,900.

R57 – MANCHESTER – Brick home built in 2007, 2286 SF plus full finished basement, 5 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. furnace, C/A, wood stove in basement, hardwood & tile floors, 2-car att. garage & 2-car det. brick/vinyl sided garage with bath. Home is located in nice neighborhood near school. $249,900. HOMES WITH ACREAGE

H21 – MANCHESTER – 25.77 acres with combination brick/vinyl sided home built in 2002, 2118 SF living area plus full finished basement, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, 2 gas furnaces, 2 C/A units, hardwood floors, 24x58 detached garage with 24x12 lean-to, blacktop driveway. Home is located in a nice, private country setting on dead-end road. $309,000.

H13 - WEST UNION - Frame home with vinyl siding on 12.33 acres, 2160 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, nat. gas furnace, C/A, gas F/P, 2 garages, 48x36 barn. PRICED TO SELL AT $90,000. H17 – WEST UNION – 10.188 acres, cabin with electric & county water, outhouse, very nice location, lots of

H41 – PEEBLES – 5 acres with 2005 modular home, 2025 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living room, extralarge kitchen with bar area, lots of counter space, appliances, dining room, elec. furnace, C/A, county water, shed, security system. $99,900. H45 – LATHAM – 1.6 acres with very nice 2005 mobile home (14x60), 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, elec. furnace, A/C, 2 porches, 2 buildings, beautiful landscaping, creek, located near Longs Retreat for recreation. $42,500.

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FARMS F1 – PEEBLES - A truly magnificent retreat on 75.91 private and secluded acres bordering Brush Creek State Forest. You won't believe the peaceful and tranquil setting for this 2-story modern western cedar 3 BR home with a huge 2-story det. 3car garage and loft. The home features a master BR with full bath on the first level and 2 BR and a full bath upstairs. The living room is nearly 21 feet long with a beautiful wood floor and wood burning F/P. A large dining room opens into the living room and also features a wood floor. A full kitchen and a laundry room are on the first level with an outside entrance into a large 19' X 27' screened-in back porch. The det. garage has a concrete floor and features a 2nd story two room art and craft studio that could also be converted into an apartment. Public water and electric have been installed underground and follow the winding driveway that leads through the woods and into the rock lined yard with fire pit and unique nature inspired landscaping. There are wide trails throughout the property that are ideal for peaceful walks or 4 wheeling - you will think you are in a national park! If you love nature and privacy, you will love it here! This property can serve as a permanent home, week-end retreat or hunting lodge and borders a public blacktop road yet is less than 15 minutes from town. PRICE REDUCED TO $239,900.

F3 – MANCHESTER – 101.452 acres with approx. 20 acres tillable, 40 acres of pasture and 40 acres of woods, 40x60 barn with 30x60 lean-to, large pond, beautiful spot for new home, great for horses & ATV’s, lots of trails. $209,000. F9 – WEST UNION – Nice mini farm in good location close to town, 39.2 acres with 30.5 acres tillable, frame home with vinyl siding, 1248 SF living area, 2 BR (could be 3), 1 bath, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, gas furnace, county water, 1-car garage, 3 barns (30x50, 20x30, 20x30). PRICE REDUCED TO $149,900. F11 - PEEBLES - 14.349 acre mini farm with 2160 SF frame home with vinyl siding, partial basement, 2 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, elec. heat pump, C/A, wood stove, county water + cistern, 60x80 barn with 5 horse stalls, 80x20 implement shed, corn crib, creek, stocked pond. $189,000. F13 – WINCHESTER – 51.12 mostly tillable acres, 1 ½ story partial brick/vinyl sided home, 2432 SF living area, 4 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen & dining room, basement, fuel oil furnace, county water, 2-car detached garage, 2 big barns with sheds, concrete block barn, corn crib, silo. Property has lots of road frontage, will divide. $230,000. Seller will also sell house, barns with 25 acres for $150,000.

F15 - PEEBLES - 71.539 wooded acres with lots of big cedar trees and some timber, 2 campers, county water, septic system & electric on property. $189,900.

creeks, nice camping spot with creek & trees, great views, corn & wheat base. Great for horseback riding, ATV’s, hunting, camping. $247,900.

BUILDING LOTS

V3 – RARDEN – POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING – 13.55 wooded acres, good for hunting/recreation. $29,900.

L1 – SEAMAN - .373 acre lot with water and septic. $7500. L3 – CHERRY FORK - .28 acre corner lot located at the intersection on 2 state highways with water & septic. PRICE REDUCED TO $9,999. L5 – WEST UNION – 0.54 acre town lot, water/sewer available. $14,000. L11 - WEST UNION - Building lot conveniently located with all utilities available. $10,000. L13 - SEAMAN - 2 town lots with all utilities available. $8,995. L15 – PEEBLES – 0.165 acre lot with old home that needs tore down, all utilities available. $14,900 – MAKE OFFER. VACANT LAND V1 – PEEBLES – 100 mostly level acres (62 tillable) with 2

V7 - OTWAY - 79.778 acres with 25 acres tillable, water & electric available, large barn, great place for new home, beautiful setting. $135,000. V9 - BLUE CREEK - 40 acres of recreational property, abundant wildlife, great for hunting. $99,000. V11 – MANCHESTER – 4.004 acres with water tap, woods, electric available, lots of wildlife. $12,000. V13 – MANCHESTER – 3.028 wooded acres with some timber, water & electric available. $7,200. BUSINESS B9 – WEST UNION – INVESTMENT PROPERTY – 4 mobile homes located on town lot, each home features 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen, city water & sewage. PRICE REDUCED TO $39,900.

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FARMS - BUILDING LOTS - VACANT LAND - BUSINESS


8 - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - The Informer

CLASSIFIEDS

Cont. from page 7

Commissioner Justin Cooper attended a Board of Revision meeting at 1:30 p.m. Adams Clermont Solid Waste Director Paul Braasch met with the board to discuss the next meeting scheduled in Clermont County for June 25, 2012. Barnes Sewer Phase II residents and concerned citizens addressed the board at a 2:00 p.m. meeting pertaining to the history of the project, construction, estimates, fees, and debt. The meeting was conducted at the Annex conference room to accommodate those in attendance. Those present were as follows: Lora Abernathy of the Peoples Defender SW Group Online Edition, Carleta Weyrich of the Peoples Defender, URS representative Brian Benedict, E.C.D. Director Holly Johnson, West Union Mayer Ted Grooms, Jerry Kirker of West Union Village, Jason Work of the Adams County Health Department, Assistant Prosecutor Dana Whalen, Roger Whaley, Kaye Whaley, Randy Mack, Sharon Chenoweth, John Mullenix, Chase Prather, Brande Applegate, Raymond Applegate, Sande Staggs, Gary Miller, Ronald Salisbury, Dawn Dryden, Emilee McNeilan, Silas Mills, Ann Becker, Jim Cooper, Dana Holbrook, Cecil Shelton, Martha Clinger, Frank Hiatt, Gordon Mayo, Tina Fenton, Wendell Swearingen, Kathleen Salisbury, Edward Harmon, and Ken

Hilderbrand. JFS Director Sue Fulton and Transportation Director Sally Hayslip met with the board to discuss personnel and transportation. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the supplemental wage increase of $.50 to the base pay rate for each pay scale for management and JFS confidential employees effective July 1, 2012 and a one-time wage increase of 3%, based on the final salary as of June 30, 2012, to be disbursed over seven pay periods, no later than September 28, 2012. This wage increase will not continue or remain part of the management or confidential employee’s base salary after disbursement. And further, to approve the same for the unclassified position of director. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the contract reopener for Article 34 Hospitalization and Article 35 - Wages upon the request of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote: All yeas. Facilities Director Sally Hayslip discussed personnel and vehicle purchases. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Justin Cooper to adjourn at 5:25 p.m. Vote: All yeas.

Adams County Court Judge Alan Foster Howard Cecil Murphy, Manchester, Fail/Tag/Dog, Fine $25.00, Court Cost $64.00. Eric S. Atkins, South Lebanon, 72/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Bobby J. Hicks, Hammersville, 65/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00. Jennifer M. McCabe, Winchester, 75/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Roger J. Ward, Seaman, Pass/Bad/Check, Dismissed Without Prejudice, The Defendant has paid the check and Court Cost. Robert E. Helton Jr., Liberty, IN, 67/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00. Daniel L. Jarvis, Wheelersburg, Park/ Public Hwy, Fine $55.00, Court Cost $45.00. Meagan H. Hawkins, Cincinnati, 74/60, Fine $5.00, Court Cost $74.00. Anthony D. Herbert, Lawrenceburg, IN, 67/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00. Varna E. Harrison, Hamilton, 73/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Stephen R. Lee, Cincinnati, 74/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Kevin L. Fannin, Lucasville, 80/55, Fine $100.00, Court Cost $74.00. Jeremy E. Ziegelmeier, Aberdeen, Improper Pass, Fine $15.00, Court Cost $74.00. Christopher A. Ainsworth, West Chester, 72/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Bonnie S. Steward, Peebles, 75/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Lisa T. Bishop, Huntington, WV, 74/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Jacueline S. Rudisell, Okeana, OH, 75/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. James L Wilkins II, Maysville, KY, Fail Stop Sign, No Contest. Leonard Angel, Thomasville, GA,

75/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Adam Stephens, Peebles, Disorder/Intoxi, Fine $150.00, Court Cost $64.00. Christopher E. Arnold, West Union, Drive/Under/Inf, Dismissed Without Prejudice, This matter has been Presented to the Grand Jury. Stacey Raye Jennings, West Union, Fail/Tag/Dog. Bruce L. Meyer, Manchester, Disorderly Conduct, Fine $100.00, Court Cost $64.00. Eugene Sapp, Cincinnati, 70/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00. Ashley M. Tolle, Peebles, Fail Control, Fine $15.00, Court Cost $74.00. Marc E. Verhoef, Loveland, 66/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00. Tracy Wilkerson, Brooksville, IN, 70/55, Fine $22.00, Court Cost $74.00. Chad M. Bruffey, Davidson, NC, 75/60 Fine $42.00, $74.00. Thomas M. Campbell Jr., Loveland, 74/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Matthew T. Earls, Cincinnati, 73/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Anthony G. Kiniyalocts, Wilder, KY, 73/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. David M. Lowe, Peebles, Viol Being Pass, Fine $15.00, Court Cost $74.00. David M. Lowe, Peebles, Seat Belt/Dr, Fine $30.00, Court Cost $45.00. Wayne P. Colley, Peebles, A.C.D.A., Fine $15.00, Court Cost $74.00. Richard Abitz, Cincinnati, 75/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Stephen A. Weyant, Venice, FL, 71/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Thomas W. Hook, West Union, 75/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Robert D. Faulkner, Peebles, 73/60, Fine $42.00, Court Cost $74.00. Angelina M. Marus, Kettering, Traffic Control, Fine $15.00, Court Cost $74.00.

Criminal and Traffic Disposition Report

E V E N P A G E

Adams County Land Transfers

Farm Credit to Joshua and Julia Iler, 4.438 acres, Winchester Twp., $95,000. John and Paulette Condon to Ronnie S. and Diane V. Dinsmore, 37.0371 acres, Liberty Twp., $350,000. Gayle C. Smith to Charles M. and Cora L. Clark, 28.855 acres, Bratton Twp., $57,000. Charles J. and Julie P. Schubert to Douglas R. and Barbara Y. Smucker to Four Sisters Tree, LLC, 34.261 acres, Jefferson Twp., $105,000. Misty and William L.

Lots 43 and 44, Meigs Twp., Jacksonville, $12,000. Theo Grubb to Rick C. and Ginger Martin, 6.056 acres, Tiffin Twp., $18,000.

Yard Sale

For Sale

For Sale

Camping on the Ohio River Full hook-ups and primitive. Twin Islands. 937 549-2701. 11/6

Animals 2005 Ford F-150 Reg. Cab., Long Bed, 1-Owner, 4.2 V-6, Auto., cold A/C., 2 wheel drive, 112,000 miles. Asking $5,500. Call 937 515-1880. 7/17

Office Equipment For Sale

Nice office desks and filing drawers. Call 937 779-9219. TFN

Services Offered SERVICES OFFERED

Central Boiler Outdoor Wood Furnaces. Kelly Jones 937 725-2431. TFN

Services Offered SERVICES OFFERED

Heisler's Bakhoe and Dozer Service Stone, Creek Gravel, Dirt, Demolition and Cleanup, Septic Systems Installed. Licenced and Insured. Call 937 544-5643. TFN

SERVICES OFFERED

Need a rubber stamp? Call Southern Ohio Business Source Printing and Office Supplies! We offer a large variety of rubber stamps and self-inking stamps, all backed by our quality guarantee. 937544-1000.

STONE’S SAWMILL CUSTOM SAWING

Now Buying hard & soft wood logs. Also 3" & Up Cedar Logs. CALL FOR PRICING 937-205-4303 or 937 587-2577. TFN

No Hunting or Trespassing No Hunting or Trespassing

1.00

Yard Sale Garage Sale

Manchester, Don't miss this huge dollar sale. Everything is a dollar. That's right! Unbelievable what you will be able to buy for a dollar. Lots of toys, large selection of household, collectibles, box lots and much, much more. In large building. Friday and Saturday July 6 and 7, 9:00 4:00 p.m., 304 W. 2nd St. (Rt. 52) rain or shine, Wendell Rivers. 7/3

Yard Sale

6 Family Yard Sale 25 West Hickory St. Behind 8th St. Manchester, Saturday, June 29 - Wednesday, July 4, 9:00 a.m. - ? Baby stroller with car seat used 1 week, walker and more. Summer/winter clothes (boys 0-7), teen - adult scrubbs and motherhood (up to 3X), Household items, kids books, old comic books, milk glass - other, 3 wooden benches, Halloween and Christmas decorations (Some new) and lots of misc. It all has to go! Some free items!

Yard Sale

Large Yard Sale July 4 - 7 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 197 Jee Rd. Winchester. Furniture, Mens, womens and childrens clothes all sizes some brand new. Boyd Bears, Toys, tools, Nic Nacs, Beautiful Queen Size bedroom suite, Antique Piano,1996 Lincoln Continental Fully Loaded, All leather interior no rips, sun roof, heated mirrors, Minor damage on the passanger door. Runs Great! Fire Place insert and many other items to numerous to mention. Were located in Winchester on Jee Rd. Located off of Russelville road. Just follow Signs.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Master Certified Auto Technician

Competitive Wages, Immediate Opening, Must Have Own Tools

Maysville Area

Send Resume to: Auto Technician PO Box 518 Maysville, KY 41056

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Auto Service Technician Competitive Wages, Immediate Opening, Must Have Own Tools Apply In Person

No Trespassing, Hunting, Fishing or 4-wheeling on property. 30 acres Franklin Twp., 77 acres Bratton Twp., Day or night. Shirley Myers.

$

FREE KITTENS

Free Kittens to good home. Call 937 549-1905. 6/26

Yard Sale

Friday, July 6, at 9:00 - 3:00 p.m. Lots of infant clothes size 0 - 6 months (girl) new baby swing, deluxe Jumparoo etc. Womens clothing, household decor, Misc. items. Robinson residence 5231 St. Rt. 125 next to RHK Motors West Union. 7/3

Maysville Auto Sales 895 US Hwy 68 EOE

Mail your Classified ad to The Informer Classifieds for the first 12 words .05 thereafter.

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Mail to: The Informer, P.O. Box 801, West Union, Oh. 45693 Please Include your money for the ad

ODNR Urges Caution Due to Dry Conditions McNeilan Trash Removal Wildfire threat heightened due to dry conditions and fuels Commercial And Residential Service Call

937 544-4060

Adams County Court Of Common Pleas

Plant Monitor Position

Walter Johnson III, 22, of Peebles and Ayla June Spicer, 20, of Manchester. Todd Jacob Brown, 31 and Sarah Elizabeth Downs, 25, both of West Union. Mark Aaron Evans, 33 and DeeAnn M. Williams, 30, both of West Union. Thomas Wade Hook, 25 and Frances Margaret Gantose, 24, both of West Union. Dwight Eugene Horsley, 40 and Deanna Lynn Sweet, 33, both of West Union. Richard Shawn Francis, 32, of West Union and Kelsey Paige Osborne, 19, of Hamersville. Richard Dale Murphy, 52 and Natalie Paige Frasher, 41, both of West Union.

Adams County Regional Water District is currently accepting applications for the position of Plant Monitor. Plant Monitor is a part time position that is scheduled during weekends and holidays or as needed. Dependable attendance is a must. Applicant must be able to pass entry drug testing and a thorough background check. The desire to further their education in the drinking water industry is not mandatory but is a plus. Starting wages will be $8.50 per hour. The successful applicant will have to complete a 1 year probationary period. Applications will only be accepted until July 20, 2012. Applications can be picked up at the Business Office from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday or by visiting our website at www.acrwd.com. Applications and/or resumes may be sent to Adams County Regional Water District, P.O. Box 427, West Union, Ohio 45693 or you can apply in person at the Business Office. For additional information contact the Business Office at 937-544-2396. ACRWD is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

MARRIAGE REPORT CMYK

Evans to Gary and Kelly Lawson, 1.364 acres, Franklin Twp., $2,600. Towler Family LLC to Larry David Napier, Manchester Village, $47,000. HEJC Land, LLC to Lonnie and Diane Ward, 101.965 acres, Franklin Twp., $80,000. Estate of Geneva M. Slusher to Melissa D. Sponcil, 1.037 acres, Oliver Twp., $5,000. Ronald Alvin Johnson Sr. to Pilgrim Holiness Church of Peebles and Pilgrim Holiness Church, Pt

Camping

Vehicles

Photo by Troy Jolly Pictured is a brush fire on StateRoute 136 in Sprigg Twp. The Manchester Fire Department, West Union Fire Department and Life Squad responded to a brush fire on State Route 136 near the 4 mile marker in Sprigg Township, Thursday, June 28. The cause of the fire is unknown. Ohio residents are urged to take special precautions during the unusually dry summer weather, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ (ODNR) Division of Forestry. Dried grasses, weeds, leaves and crops are providing fuel for wildfires.“Homeowners, farmers and woodland owners should be especially cautious during this dry period,” said Gregg Maxfield, northern region supervisor for the ODNR Division of Forestry. “Much of the small fuels that carry wildfire are tinder dry and will stay this way through the summer unless

we have moisture for new growth. High temperatures, low humidity and wind are not in our favor.”Residents can take measures to prevent accidental wildfires. These include avoiding burning trash and debris, keeping grass trimmed, not discarding cigarettes and other smoking materials outside, postponing fireworks and not having open cooking fires or campfires. The National Weather Service in Wilmington issued a Red Flag Warning for wind and low relative humidity last week. A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions are either occuring now....or will shortly. A combination of strong winds...low relative humidity and warm temperatures will create explosive fire growth potential.

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Adams County Commissioners

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Local Government


EDUCATION

Featured Artist

Area college students inducted into PTK honorsociety

Needlework Project

Pictured: The membership of one of higher education’s most recognized honor societies, Phi Theta Kappa (PTK), was enhanced by the induction of several new members at a June 15 ceremony on the Central Campus of Southern State Community College. Founded in 1918, PTK honors academic achievement in two-year colleges. To be considered for membership, a student needs to maintain a minimum 3.5 cumulative grade point average as a full-time student. Honorees include (first row, L/R) Destiny Vanderpool of West Union, Stephanie McKinney of Sabina, PTK Advisor Angel Souther of Washington C.H., PTK President Marilyn Chaffin of Washington C.H., PTK Vice President Marcie Hamilton of Washington C.H., PTK Secretary Mindy Pendergraft of Washington C.H., Lauren Heath of Maysville, Ky., Jeff Music of Russellville; (second row, L/R) Jordan Lauritzen of Washington C.H., Jean Meyers of Leesburg, Lori Blackburn of New Vienna, Robin Hopper of Hillsboro, Terra Kincaid-Roler of Mowrystown, Heather Burkenmeier of Georgetown, Rebecca Worley of Winchester, Lori Bentz of Wilmington; (third row, L/R) Christy Shoemaker of Sabina, Caitlin Schafer of Hillsboro, Tracey Grayson of Leesburg, Norwood Druck of Clarksville, Mike Kelch of Sardinia, Jacob Ellison of Hillsboro, Daniel Jean Claude of Port-auPrince, Haiti; (fourth row, L/R) Steffani Robins of Greenfield, Brooke Stingley of Waynesville, Kristy Collins of Mt. Orab, John Allen of Washington C.H., Ranger Humphrey of Greenfield; (fifth row, L/R) Nichole Francis of Greenfield and Jennie Soale of Wilmington.

This week’s featured artist is Theresa Fantroy, from Winchester. Theresa’s main focus is anything fabric/craft related: sewing, heirloom sewing, needle tat, crochet, beading, and silk embroidery. She is a member of the Loose Thread Quilters group in Peebles. “Like so many others I started young” Fantroy explains. “In our age group one had to if they wanted clothes to wear.” When she was twelve, her father bought her an electric sewing machine, and, according to her, “I’ve had

at least one sewing machine in my life ever since, sometimes more.” For a time she made and sold clothing for Barbie, American Doll and Magic Attic Club dolls. After her husband passed, she worked for Hancock Fabrics in Cincinnati. There she made window displays for block-of-themonth quilts and display garments. She also taught owner’s lessons at a sewing center at this time. In 2010 she moved to Winchester to help her ailing mother. It was here that she finished a project

dressing dolls for the Salvation Army. Some of her ribbon-winning examples are shown with this article. Fantroy is humble about her work. “I wouldn’t call myself an artist, “ she says “But I enjoy what I do and I do enjoy a challenge.” She is currently working on three quilts that will be displayed with the Loose Thread Quilters group, and a christening dress. She sells and gives away her work. If you’d like to contact our Featured Artist, please write this publication.

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Quilting and Needle Arts

The Informer - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - 9

Manchester Girls Sub D Champions

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Dear Miss Needles

Dear Miss Needles Follow-up Answer to Tied in Knots: This week Miss Needles was in the West Union Post Office and ran into Betsy Miskell of the Adams County Arts Council who had a great suggestion for the tangled thread question. Betsy says to roll your needle every three or 4 stitches to keep the thread from knotting. Dear Miss Needles: I am looking for a pattern for a bonnet. Signed - The Sun is Brutle Dear Sun: I have a pattern for a bonnet from Sunbonnet Sue and I have one for an apron that buttons into a bonnet. What

type of bonnet do you need, a quilt pattern or a pattern to make a bonnet to wear? Readers, if you have a pattern to share with Sun, please send it in care of this paper or e-mail it to me at dearmissneedles@yahoo.c om so I can forward it on. Dear Miss Needles: I have been saving the hair from my dog every time that I brush him. I want to spin it into yarn and knit a sweater. Any ideas? Sign: Dog Lover Dear Dog Lover: It really depends on the type of hair. Long hair is easier than really short hair. Years ago my oldest stepdaughter worked at the Ohio State Fair in the sheep

barn. She would card and spin wool as a demonstration and then show how the wool thread could be woven into mats and coverlets. I still have two of the mats. I would suggest contacting someone who is an experienced spinner who can point you in the right direction of where to get started, how to clean the hair and dye it if desired, etc. I was always fascinated by hair receivers and the old jewelry made from hair. Good luck and happy spinning. If you have a question you would like answered, please contact Miss Needles in care of this paper or e-mail her.

Photo by Troy Jolly

Pictured is Makenna Roush-Gaffin, Bella Hamm, Grace Hackney, Emilee Applegate, Zoey Fuchs, Maggie Roberts, Joelle Jolly, Emma Farley, Adel Stephenson, Maya Purdin, Harley Rideout and Kendall Barlow. Coached by Mathias Applegate and Nick Roberts. The Manchester Girls Sub D Softball won the Championship Game Monday, June 25 over Lynchburg Girls. The team would like to thank the Ayres Eat n Treat for sponsoring them.

P A G E

Senior Living

Adams County Senior Citizens

MARK YOUR CALENDAR: Tuesday, July 3rd at 12 noon the Peebles Senior Citizens meet at the Peebles Church of Christ on Steam Furnace Rd. and that same evening at 6 pm the North Adams Seniors get together at their community building. These are all covered dish, carry-in, meals so whip up some goodies and go join them. It’s always a fun time! Come on out and get involved in some of the activities we have every week here at the Senior Center. The 3rd Monday each month from 1-4 pm we have a Knitting Class, each Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. is Gentle Chair Yogi Class. Tuesday afternoon at 1:00 p.m. is "Movie & Popcorn" time. The Scrappy Quilters Club meets the 2nd & 4th Wednesdays from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Thursday from 12:30 – 3:30 p.m. we have card games. On the 2nd Friday at 11:00 a.m. GENESIS comes to check blood pressures/blood sugars. We welcome volunteers to help with any activities you might be interested in doing. Your involvement and input helps us to serve you better. Call 544-3979 or drop by the Senior Center and visit with us. Services and activities are FREE. It’s YOUR Senior Center. We want YOU to enjoy it! We have a trip to the "National Quartet Convention" in Louisville, KY. scheduled for September 14-16! Come and enjoy hours of great gospel music and meet and talk with many of

your favorite Gospel Groups, plus visit the Louisville Science Center, shop at St. Matthews Mall and Florence Mall and attend Sunday morning service at Graceland Baptist Church. Cost: $399.00 per person/double occ. For more info, call 937-544-3979. Summertime brings back memories of hot afternoons spent down by the creek with a jug of cold ice tea – either jumping in to cool off or leaning against a tree with a fishin’ pole in hand. I doubt if we thought even once about ultraviolet rays, heat indexes or dehydration. It’s a wonder we lived through it! But, today spending a summer day outside requires a little forethought. Hot weather can overwhelm your body and can cause serious harm. Heatstroke can occur if we’re not careful, so here are some suggestions to reduce your risk: wear lightweight, loosefitting, light-colored clothing. Exercise or do any vigorous activity in the cool morning hours. Drink plenty of water to keep you hydrated. Forget the alcohol, it’s not good for you. Find out if any medications you are taking could interfere with your body’s ability to regulate your temperature. The summer can be fun and safe and if you take care of yourself, you’ll enjoy it that much more! The ABCAP Summer Crisis Program runs through August 31st. This program can provide assistance on

your electric bill up to $250.00. To apply for an air conditioner, the household must not have received one in 2009, 10 or 11. For eligibility requirements, more information or to schedule an appointment, call ABCAP at 1-800-233-7891. HOW OLD IS TOO OLD TO DRIVE? No one wants to give up driving an automobile! No one wants to lose that independence. It’s a sad day when you have to hang up your keys. Motor vehicle accidents are the most common cause of accidental deaths among the 65-75 age group and the second most common cause among older people in general. A person’s ability to drive may be impaired by such age-related changes such as: increased sensitive to glare, poor night vision, slower reaction time, flexibility and strength and overall health factors. There is no magic age at which we are no longer able to drive, but we need to be true to ourselves and take into account our own mental and physical changes, as we get older. We’re all different with different capabilities. Even though we don’t want to give it up – we also don’t want to hurt or kill someone because we wanted to prove to ourselves we could still drive safely. You know when it’s time…. Just a thought: Real strength is the ability to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands – and then, eat just one of the pieces.

ABCAP Senior Nutrician Menu

Wednesday, June 27 Cheeseburger, Lettuce and Tomato Slice, Tater Tots, Squash and Banana. Thursday, June 28 Barbequed Chicken, Parslied Buttered Potatoes,

Broccoli, Pears, Vanilla Pudding and Roll. Friday, June 29 Country Steak w/Gravy, Whipped Potatoes, Mixed Vegetables, Carrifruit Salad and Roll.

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Fantroy project for The Salvation Army Christmas Doll dressing project 2010. The doll won First Place in her category then she won best of show. band passed) I found I needed less seasonal income so I started working for a fabric store (Hancock Fabrics) in Cincinnati Ohio. While I was there I made for display the block of the month quilts, as well as display garments, but I was not able to teach beginner sewing so I begin working at a sewing center where I taught owners lessons as well as beginner and other sewing classes. I was given the opportunity to dress dolls for The Salvation Army, I enjoyed that very much and have many ribbons. In 2010 my Mother fell, we did not want her to go a rest home so I quit my job and moved to Pictured are some of the dressed dolls that Salvation Army gives Winchester to care for her. I away. All of the prize winning dolls are actioned off and the finished the dolls I was money is used to buy more naked dolls for the next year. If a per- dressing that year and son wants their doll to be in the running for a ribbon the doll enclosed are pictures. needs to be dressed completely, socks, stockings, shoes, underI don’t know if I would wear, slips and anything else that finishes the outfit. call myself an artist, but I By Theresa Tomlin we needed. I was twelve do enjoy what I do, and I Fantroy when my dad came home do enjoy a challenge. There I work with fabrics, with a used electric sewing is so much satisfaction in needle and thread I can also machine to encourage me to seeing a project come needle tat, crochet, bead, continue my sewing, my together the way you enviheirloom sewing, silk rib- Mother used the faithful sioned it or even better bon embroidery and right treadle Singer (I wish I still because you figured out a now I am a member in good had it). I have had at least way to manipulated somestanding of The Loose one sewing machine in my thing into exactly what you Thread Quilters from life ever since sometime needed. Peebles. many more. After my husI am currently working Like so many others I band retired I made extra on three quilts, a project started young, in our age money by making Barbie that I will be demonstrating group one had to if they clothes and taking them to at The Loose Thread wanted clothes to wear. My sale at craft shows. Then I Quilter’s group and a chrisMother would save the feed included American Girl tening dress. I would like sacks just like everyone Doll and Magic Attic Club to make soft sculpture else of that era and turn Doll clothes. Then after dolls. Yes, I do sell my them into whatever it was awhile (because my hus- work and give it away too.


10 - Tuesday, JuLY 3, 2012 - The Informer

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Wednesday, July 4 Activities around the area West Union The West Union Lion's Club 4th of July Parade. Line-up is at 9:00 a.m. and the parade will begin at 10:00 a.m. The Liberty Cornet Band will be performing at the West Union United Methodist Church in the annual "Old-Fashioned 4th of July Picnic" right after the parade in West Union. It will be held in the side yard of the church on the corner of Pleasant and Maple Streets. The menu will consist of hot dogs, baked beans, chips, cookies and ice cream. The Liberty Cornet Band will play an hour of traditional "concert in the park" music. Aberdeen Celebration in the Park starts at 10:00 a.m. The Huntington Hotshots 4-H Club Baby Show, Little Mr./Miss and Jr. Miss Contest. Registration at 10:00 and shows start at 11:00 a.m. For more information call 937 549-2941 or 606 759-0421. Cornhole sign up begins at 12:30 p.m. and starts at 2:00 p.m. Line up for the ATV and bike parade starts at 5:00 p.m. with the parade at 5:30 p.m. Activities also include children's carnival games starting at 6:00 p.m. and a cruise-in from 5:00 p.m. until the fireworks display. The annual fireworks display over the Ohio River begins at 10:00 p.m.

E V E N P A G E

Lion's 4th of July Parade: An Adams County tradition The West Union Lion’s Club is pleased to announce that it has selected West Union resident and military veteran and former POW Grover Swearingen to serve as Grand Marshall during the annual Independence Day Parade in West Union. If you have questions, please call Past President Don Sommers at 937-544-3484.

RT. 41 MARATHON 25360 St. Rt. 41 Peebles, Ohio 45660

(937) 587-3397

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217 North West St. West Unon, OH 45693

10% OFF June 7 - 9 FREE T-Shirt w/purchase of Monument

937-544-2711 800-300-2711

Fitzgerald’s Seaman Pharmacy 17860 St. Rt. 247 Seaman

386-0701

Pharmacist: Randy Mack

WEST UNION ELECTRIC COMPETITIVE AND PRICES! PLUMBING PH. 937-544-2043

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An American Company Serving America GOD BLESS AMERICA


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The Informer - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - 11

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P A G E


99 DOWN! $

For qualified buyers on select vehicles.

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12 - Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - The Informer

The MELTDOWN event starts Thurs., June 21 and ends Tues., June 26

10 MINUTE CREDIT CHECK If you have had credit

problems in the past, we have bank sources seeking new accounts. Call our credit hotline: 606-564-9800

2.74%

**

COMPLIMENTARY OIL CHANGES

FINANCING UP TO 75 MO! On seclect vehicles

with purchase of vehicle 2007 or newer. 3 YEARS/40,000 MILES & 23 POINT SAFTEY INSPECTION

BIGGEST REBATES & DISCOUNTS EVER!

PRE-OWNED VEHICLE

DISPOSAL SALE Vehicles to the public for $ * 99 DOWN and $ * 99/month! VEHICLE INFORMATION

E V E N P A G E

All vehicles have been inspected and their titles have been cleared for transfer to prospective new owners immediately. Many vehicles still under factory warranties.

PRICING INFORMATION TRADE-IN'S WILL BE ALLOWED

Pay the $99 down payment* then start making payments as low as $99 per month*. First come, first served. Payments will be clearly marked. Vehicles sell to the first buyer where purchase offer is approved.

UP TO 50%

5

DISCOUNT OFF ORIGINAL MSRP

DAYS ONLY!

THURS, JUNE 28 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. FRI, JUNE 29 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. SAT, JUNE 30 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. MON, JULY 2 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. TUES, JULY 3 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

We're Paying Top $$$ For USED Vehicles 895 US Hwy 68 • Maysville, KY 41056 606-564-9800 or 1-800-364-7049 www.maysvilleautosales.com *Example: 03 Pontiac Sunfire $99 down and $99 a month for 54 months @ 5.54%APR. on approved credit of 750 or above credit score. See Sales Agent for details. Subject to credit approval. Subject to lender's final approval. Photos for illustration purposes only. **2.74% based on purchase of 2011/2012 models WAC.

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Credit Issues? Bankruptcy? We Can Help! Even if You’ve Been Turned Down By Others!

The Informer, July 3, 2012  

The Informer, Adams County

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