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The Informer - 50 CENTS -

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

All New!!

2013 Chevrolet Malibu 35MPG!

544-2331

www.barryschevroletbuick.com

Covering.....Adams County, Aberdeen and Buena Vista

54 - 160

MPD Cleaning the Neighborhoods

Pictured is 402 Highfield Drive. Manchester Police Chief Jeff Bowling released the following information about an incident on Monday, December 31, at approximately 4:00 a.m. the Manchester Police Department with the assistance of the Adams County Sheriff's Department, West Union Police Department and the Winchester Police Department executed a search warrant on 402 Highfield Drive, Manchester. The Manchester Police Department has been conducting an investigation into the sale of Heroin at the location. Upon entering the home the residents Verna R. Mitchell and Ralph D. Mitchel III were taken into custody without incident. Officers conducted the search of the residence and recovered several caplets of Heroin packaged for sale, drug abuse instruments and other related items. The Mitchell's were transported to the Adams County Jail where they each will be charged with several counts of Trafficking in Heroin. Mayor Troy A. Jolly said, "The Police Department is cleaning up our neighborhoods to make Manchester a safer place to raise our families. I am glad to see this drug bust take place!" Chief Bowling wants to remind everyone that if you see drug or criminal activity in your neighborhood to call 549-3330. Your call will remain anonymous. The case remains under investigation by the Manchester Police Department.

Pictured is the items recovered in the Drug Bust.

Verna Mitchell

Ralph Mitchell III

Robins No Longer a Sign of Spring For as long as people have been watching birds in North America, the American robin has served as the quintessential harbinger of spring. This distinctive thrush, with its brick red underparts and penchant for stalking suburban lawns, is familiar to nearly everyone. The arrival of robins at winter’s end heralds warmer days, and the red-breasts usher in an ever-increasing cascade of spring flora and fauna. John Maynard Wheaton, in an 1879 report on the birds of Ohio, noted that: “…the Robin arrives about the middle of February and remains until November”. While small numbers of robins have probably always overwintered in Ohio, even in Wheaton’s time, most of them fled south. The status of wintertime robins has changed a lot since the olden days, and if you think you’re seeing more of them when the snow flies, you’re right. Perhaps the best gauge of wintering bird populations is provided by Christmas Bird Counts (CBC). Overseen by the National Audubon Society, CBC’s began in 1900 and have mushroomed from 25 counts to 2,200 worldwide, mobilizing an army of 63,000 birders. Ohio has its fair share of CBC’s – about 75 at present, in all quarters of the state. As each count covers a 15-mile diameter circle and are undertaken from mid-December through early January, they do a good job of assessing Ohio’s winter bird life. The last five decades of Christmas Bird Count data illustrates that there are indeed more robins with frosty toes. Ohio counts from 1962 thru 1971 collectively tallied an average of 4,370 American robins each year. That total is peanuts by today’s standards. The number of wintertime robins has skyrocketed over the last 50 years, and the annual average of Ohio CBC’s over the last decade was a staggering 29,373. The wintering robin explosion is a widespread trend across northern North America. For instance, the province of Ontario, Canada – our neighbor to the north – has documented a similar spike in robins. The million dollar question: why the major increase in wintering robins? It would be easy to

Peewee

ODOT is Looking at Ohio's Aviation Airports The Ohio Department of Transportation's Office of Aviation is conducting the Ohio Airports Focus Study to help ODOT and the Federal Aviation Administration make informed decisions on funding for Ohio's 97 publicly owned general aviation airports. The meeting is on Thursday, January 17, at the Pike County Government Center, Conference Room, 230 Waverly Plaza in Waverly. Please join the conversation so you can learn more about the general aviation airports in your region. We want to know your thoughts on: How the local airports benefit your community. What improvements you think are needed at the airports? What concerns you may

have about the airports and the state's general aviation airport system? If you can't make it to a meeting then you can join the online public meeting and take our survey between January 8-31 at bit.ly/ODOT-Ohio-Airports-Focus-Study. The Focus Study will be used to optimize investment in Ohio's airport system with an eye toward safety, efficiency and economic growth. It will identify needed system improvements, develop a framework for prioritizing those projects, and assess the economic impact of each publicly owned airport. The Study's findings will assist ODOT and the Federal Aviation Administration in making hard decisions on proposed airport development in a period of limited funding.

Local Scouts Collect Food for Community point a finger at climate change, but warming temperatures are probably a minor factor, if a factor at all. Nonnative plants are the true culprit enticing robins to stay north. In the colder months, robins turn largely to a diet of fruit, and the abundance of ornamental crabapples, hawthorns and other berry-producing landscape plants offers an ever-increasing buffet for the birds. Even more prolific are various invasive bush honeysuckles, which jumped the garden fence and now run rampant across the land. Honeysuckles produce bumper crops of berries, which robins feast upon. The availability of a prolific new food supply is not necessarily good for the robin. In general, berries produced by these nonnative plants are the equivalent of vegetative M & M’s. They are high in sugar and low in lipids and proteins. It’s the latter two ingredients that are vital to providing long-term sustenance for birds attempting to overwinter in harsh climates. If an ice storm or heavy snowfall keeps the birds from the berries, they’ll quickly find themselves in peril. A diet dominated by nonnative fruit doesn’t provide robins with adequate energy resources to ride out prolonged bouts of bad weather.

Frosty the Snowman With the recent snowfall Frosty the Snowman seemed to make his way to several places across neighborhoods of several communities. This picture was taken on Spring Street, West Union. Pictured is Front Row (L/R): Kaitlyn Fulton, Makala Forbes and Landen Fulton. Back Row L/R: Keeghan Brewer and Zoie Brewer.

On Saturday, January 5, Officers from the Manchester Police Department conducted an investigation into Drug Trafficking that was occurring at 30 ½ Jack Roush Way. Officers arrested David “Peewee” Greene, of Manchester, after Peewee, sold eight Suboxone strips in the presence of juvenile kids. Officers entered the residence and retrieved additional Suboxone strips plus $160.00. Greene was placed under arrest without incident for Drug Trafficking and transported to the Adams County Jail. Chief Jeff Bowling wants to thank the Winchester Police Department and the Adams County Sheriffs Department for their assistance.

The West Union Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts combined their efforts again in November to do their community a service of helping collect non-perishable foods for the less fortunate. They placed grocery bags at homes within and around West Union and collected the goodies a week later, taking the supplies to the InterFaith House for distribution. November was designated as “Scouting for Food” by the

Simon Kenton Council of the Boy Scouts of America which our local Scouts are a part of. There were over 4100 pieces of non-perishable foods collected for the food bank and 38 pair of glasses collected for the West Union Lions Club. Pictured above is a representative number of the 24 Pack 260 (Cub Scouts) and 9 Troop 60 (Boy Scouts) that participated in this community service project. The Pack and Troop wish to

thank everyone who helped with this project especially all the community who donated food, the parents of the Scouts, the Inter-Faith House staff and Prather’s IGA for donating all the grocery bags.

Blue Creek Woman in Magazine

The following obituaries are on page 3 of this week’s edition:

A local Blue Creek resident was in the December 2012 Edition of the Country Living magazine. The magazine is published by the Ohio Electric Cooperative. Britney BrodtBennington, of Blue Creek, was featured in the member interactive page of Kindness of

a neighbor or friend. Bennington recalled the events of the March tornado that ripped through her families home. Leaving behind only her family. In the article she mentioned Early head Start teacher Amanda Dillow and praised her for all she did helping her family through a difficult time.

Page 2 Stories are:

Gardner Resignation Party, Worley Takes Oath of Office and Adams County Jail Intake and Release Report.

OBITUARIES

Richard Ball, Kiley Eldridge, David Alan Gilkison, Lonnie R. Grooms, Infant Jonathon Ray Groves, Terrance "Terry" Kress Howell, Bill Jones, Clyde Myers, and Patricia Sanderson.


2 - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - The Informer

Gardner Resignation Party Worley Takes Oath of Office

On Friday, December 28, Adams County Clerk of Courts Gary Gardner was held a retirement party inside the Common Pleas Courtroom. Gardner is seen presenting his retirement speech.

Adams County Jail Intake and Release Report Dec. 28 - Jan. 3 Darrell F. Baldwin, 39, Manchester, Persistent Disorderly Conduct. Booked 1/1 Rickey Lee Bohl, 33, Seaman, Illegal Manufacture of Drugs. Booked 9/16 Released 1/2 Melissa Danielle Bolender, 27, Peebles, Driving under the Influence. Booked 12/3 Released 1/2 Jacqueline Ann Brewsaugh, 56, Peebles, Illegal Manufacture of Drugs. Booked 10/25 Released 1/2 David Sidney Brodt, 53, West Union, Contempt of Court. Booked 12/28 Joseph James Connell, 51, Winchester, Failure to Appear on Misdemeanor Charge. Booked 1/1 Released 1/2 Michael Ray DeLong, 47, Winchester, Trafficking in Counterfeit Controlled Substance and Trafficking in Drugs. Booked 12/17 Released 12/29 Earl T. Musser, 28, Winchester, Trafficking in Counterfeit Controlled Substance. Booked 12/21 Released 12/30 Michael A. Eldridge, 45, West Union, Breaking and

Entering. Booked 1/2 Tony Estep, 25, West Union, Persistent Disorderly Conduct. Booked 12/28 Released 12/28 Daniel Richard Fox, 47, West union, Domestic Violence. Booked 1/2 Jeremiah David Freeman, 32, Manchester, Rape, Child Less Than 13, Rape Force and Sexual Battery. Booked 6/28 Released 1/2 Heather Dawn Grooms, 22, West Union, Theft, Forgery and possession of Drugs. Booked 12/24 Released 12/31 Charles Ray Hamblin, 26, Peebles, Failure to Appear on a Misdemeanor Charge. Booked 12/31 Adam Wade Henderson, 31, Georgetown, Burglary, Booked 11/20 Released 1/2 Donnie F. Justice, 20, Seaman, Vandalism - Property Controlled by Government Entity and Breaking and Entering. Booked 12/23 Released 12/29 Billy J. Kennedy, 35, West Union, Possession of Drugs. Booked 1/2 Ralph D. Mitchell, 49, Manchester, Trafficking in Drugs - Heroin. Booked 12/31

Verna R. Mitchell, 51, Manchester, Trafficking in Drugs - Heroin. Booked 12/31 Andrew S. Mullenix, 24, Williamsburg, Failure to Appear on a Felony Charge. Booked 12/31 Released 1/2 Lindsay Nicole Nevil, 26, Peebles, Trafficking in Drugs. Booked 12/28 Released 1/2 Cheyenne Marie Richendollar, 32, Winchester, Trafficking in Drugs. Booked 12/26 Released 1/2 Felicia D. Roe, 35, Manchester, Driving Under the Influence. 12/28 Released 1/4 Chad Allen Sheffield, 28, Georgetown, Trafficking in Drugs - Heroin. Booked 1/2 Steven Allen Sturgill, 24, West Union, Petty Theft. Booked 12/28 Steven lee Taylor, 21, West Union, Breaking and Entering. Booked 11/9 Released 1/2 Melissa K. Tumbleson, 44, Blue Creek, Driving Under the Influence. Booked 12/31 Nicholas T. Walls, 26, West Union, Failure to Appear on a Felony Charge. Booked 1/2

Pictured (L/R): Commissioner Paul worley, Linda Worley and Judge Brett Spencer. Paul Worley was recently administered the Oath of Office for the Commissioners seat. Judge Brett Spencer swore Worley in as Worley's mother Linda was holding the Bible.

The Informer

Publication of Adams County Press, LLC 204 N. Pleasant St. / P.O. Box 801 West Union, OH 45693

Hours: Mon. 10 - Noon, Closed Tues., Wed. - Fri. 10 - 4

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The Informer - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 3

Obituaries Kiley Eldridge

Kiley Eldridge, 25 years of West Union, died Thursday December 27, 2012 at the Southwest Regional Medical Center in Georgetown. Ms. Eldridge was born November 27, 1987 the daughter of Kevin Eldridge and Darlene Rowland Beale, in Maysville, Kentucky. Survivors include her father, Kevin Eldridge and wife Dee Dee of West Union, her mother, Darlene Rowland Beale and husband John of Hot Spring, Arkansas, a son Dylan Thomas, of West Union, one brother, Kriss Lacy of Peebles. Funeral services were held Sunday December 30, at the Thompson-Meeker Funeral Home in West Union. Steve Zinser officiated. Burial followed at the Cherry Fork Cemetery. Friends and Family may sign Ms. Eldridge’s online guestbook at www.meekerfuneralhomes.com

Patricia Sanderson

Patricia Sanderson, 64, of West Union, died Wednesday, January 2, at the Christ Hospital, Cincinnati. Mrs. Sanderson was born September 13, 1948 the daughter of the late Elmo and Nadine (Thompson) Jordan in Maysville, Kentucky. Besides her parents Mrs. Sanderson was preceded in death by her adoptive father Virgil Ritchie and a brother Paul Jordan. Patricia was employee of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. she retired from the Maysville Employment Office with 31 years of service. Survivors include her husband Tim Sanderson, of West Union, two sons: Rich Mitchell and Shannon of West Union, Bruce Sanderson of Niles, three daughters: Cathy Meyer and Gary of Aberdeen, Lisa Roark and Tony of Batavia, Sammi Jo Sanderson of Sabina, one sister: Beth Tuttle and Scott of Nashville, Tennessee, one brother: Clay Ritchie and Sue of Dunnellon, Florida, 11 grandchildren Jordan, Justin and Jarrod Meyer, Patrick and Randall Mitchell, Jeremy Baker, Haley and Brittany Vice, Kaytlyn Roark, Sarah and Casey Baker and eight greatgrandchildren. Funeral services were held Sunday, January 6, at the Thompson-Meeker Funeral Home, West Union. Volley Reed officiated. Burial folowed at the Kirker Cemetery. Memorials can be made to the family of Patricia Sanderson at the National Bank of Adams County. Family and friends can sign Mrs. Sanderson’s online guestbook @www.meekerfuneralhomes.com.

David Alan Gilkison

David Alan Gilkison, 57, of Fairfield, died Sunday, December 30, 2012 at his home. He was born March 5, 1955 in West Union. He was preceded in death by his father, Robert Gilkison. He is survived by his son, Aaron Gilkison and his daughter, Sara (Jeremy) Pate, both of Oxford, mother Doris J. (Chamblin) Gilkison of West Union, seven grandchildren: Garrett Gilkison, Curtis Murphy, Riley Murphy, Olivia Pate, Rebecca Pate, Isabella Pate and Samuel Pate, several uncles, aunts and cousins. He was a sales manager for M.H. Equipment Company in Fairfield, for 10 years and was a sales manager for Steam Economies Company in Springdale, for 5 years. He was a 1973 graduate of Manchester High School in Manchester and received an associate’s degree from Southern State Community College. He was an avid golfer. Memorial donations may be made to the donor’s choice. The private funeral service was Saturday, January 5, at the Lafferty Funeral Home in West Union. Reverend Owen Applegate officiated. The interment was at Manchester Cemetery in Manchester.

Richard Ball

Richard Ball, 67, of Tollesboro, Ky., passed away Tuesday, January 1, at his residence. He was born in Owensville, Ohio on September 2, 1945 the son of the late Norman and Nellie (Thatcher) Ball. Besides his parents he was preceded in death by two brothers: Norman Ball, Jr. and Hubert Ball. Richard attended the Seaman Christian Church. He is survived by his wife, Sally (Brandenburg) Ball of Tollesboro, Kentucky, whom he married on September 18, 1999, one daughter, Spring Ball of Tollesboro, one step daughter, Jennifer Pond, of Wilmington, four brothers, Rodney of Peebles, Denny of Peebles, Wayne of West Union and Paul Ball, of West Union and six sisters: Jean Greene of West Union, Kathleen Davis, of Mt. Orab, Betty Miskell, of Cincinnati, Wilma Koening of West Union, Beverly Mathias, of Seaman and Dee Roberts, of Seaman. Funeral services were held on Monday, January 7, at the Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home in Peebles. Dave Hopkins officiated. Burial followed in Evergreen Cemetery. To sign our online guest book, visit us at w w w. t h o m p s o n f u n e r a l homes.com

Jonathon Ray Groves

Infant Jonathon Ray Groves, died Wednesday, January 2, at the Southern Ohio Medical Center in Portsmouth. He is Survived by his mother, Kelly Marie Groves, of Blue Creek, maternal grandparents, John and Gayle Groves, of Blue Creek, two great maternal grandmothers Betty Groves, of Blue Creek and Ruby Stealwell, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, one uncle, Justin Groves, of Blue Creek, two great uncles: Ron Groves, of Blue Creek and Junior Groves, of Winchester, three great aunts: Ethel "Duck" Groves, of Blue Creek, Pamela Johnson, of Ripley and Shirley Lytle, of Highland County. Memorial Contributions may be made to the Lafferty Funeral Home, Inc., 205 South Cherry St., West Union, Ohio 45693. The funeral service is Wednesday, January 9, at 1:00 p.m. at the Lafferty Funeral Home in West Union. Pastor Roger Bare will officiate. The visitation is from 11:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. The interment is at Moore's Chapel Cemetery in Blue Creek.

Clyde Myers

Clyde Myers, 82, of Peebles, passed away Monday, December 31, at Adams Country Regional Medical Center. He was born in Peebles, on October 2, 1930 the son of the late Roy and Mary (Manley) Myers. Besides his parents he was preceded in death by his wife, Lizzie Collins, who passed away on September 2, 2009, three brothers: Joe, Tony and Charlie Myers and three sisters: Betty Hawes, Kathryn Myers and Vernice Myers. Clyde was a U.S. Army Veteran of the Korean Conflict and a member of the V.F.W. and American Legion. He is survived by one daughter, Julie Cromer of Peebles, two brothers: Bill Myers of Blue Creek and Roy Myers, of Portsmouth, one sister, Margaret Brock of South Charleston and two grandchildren: Thomas and Luesendie. Funeral services were held on Saturday, January 5, at the Wallace-Thompson Funeral Home in Peebles. Richard Lloyd officiated. Military Rites will be given by the Adams County Honor Guard. Burial will follow in Evergreen Cemetery. To sign our online guest book, visit us at www.thompsonfuneralhomes.com

Community News/Events Lonnie R. Grooms

Lonnie R. Grooms, 69, of West Union, died Saturday December 29, at the Hospice of Cincinnati. Mr. Grooms was born July 18, 1943 the son of Orval Grooms and the late Myrtle Grooms in Cherry Fork. Besides his mother, he was preceded in death by two sisters: Mable Moore and Delores DeMint. Mr. Grooms was a member of the ATA Trap Shooting Association. Survivors include his wife, Dona Grooms of West Union, one daughter, Carmella Grooms, three sons: Rick Grooms, Lonnie Grooms Jr. and Rocky Lewis, grandchild, Hayley Lewis and several other grandchildren, three sisters: Louise McFarland, of West Union, Nancy Purdeau and husband Jay of East Liverpool, Joyce Huntley and husband Dick, of West Union, one brother, Russ Grooms and wife Deana, of West Union. A memorial service will be held following cremation at the convenience of the family. The Thompson-Meeker Funeral Home in West Union, is serving the family. Friends and Family may sign Mr. Grooms online guestbook at w w w. m e e k e r f u n e r a l homes.com

Terrance “Terry” Kress Howell

Terrance "Terry" Kress Howell, 53, of Manchester, died Friday, December 28, at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati. He was born May 15, 1959 in West Union. He was preceded in death by his parents, Herman Kress and Agnes Marie (Ralston) Howell. He is survived by two sons, Terry "T.K." Howell, of Manchester and Brandon Lee (Amber) Back of Batavia and his former wife, Kendra Collins, of Manchester. He was a former farmer in Sprigg Twp. for 22 years. He was a supervisor for Fee Corp. at D.P.&L. Stuart Station for 15 years. He was a 1977 graduate of Manchester high School and was a member of the F.F.A. and National Honor Society. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to Lafferty Funeral Home, Inc. 205 South Cherry St., West Union, Ohio 45693. The memorial service is Wednesday, January 9, at 6:00 p.m. at the Lafferty Funeral Home in West Union. Pastor Terry Whaley will officiate. There will be no visitation. Mr. Howell was cremated.

Bill Jones

Bill Jones, 59, of Felicity, died Monday, December 31, 2012 at the Brown County General Hospital. He was born in Hamilton County, on January 8, 1953 to the late Walter and Haley Hall Jones. He was a Carpenter. He is survived by two sons: B.J. Jones, of Amelia and Billy Jones of Bethel, his daughter, Tracy Jones of Felicity, two brothers: Johnny Jones of Felicity and Wayne Jones of Mt Carmel, two sisters: Fay Couch and Fran Shilk both of Manchester, 11 grandchildren and one great grandchild. Funeral services were held Saturday, January 5, at the Wilson Home for Funerals. Rev. Dale Little officiated. Burial followed at the Manchester Cemetery. Friends and family may sign an online guestbook at www.wilsonhomeforfunerals.co m.

Funeral Directory Lafferty

Funeral Home Inc.

John R. Lafferty, Owner & Manager Established 1848 205 S. Cherry St., West Union, Ohio

937-544-2121

Thompson Meeker Funeral Home (Formerly Beam Funeral Home) www.meekerfuneralhomes.com 216 W. Mulberry St. West Union, Ohio

937-544-2133

Wilson

Homes for Funerals, Inc. 35 W. 2nd St., Manchester, Ohio

937-549-3363

www.wilsonhomeforfunerals.com

Monuments Peebles Monument Company

172 N. Main St., Peebles, Ohio 45660

937-587-2210

236 N. Market St., West Union, Ohio 45693

937-544-2931 Holsinger Monument & Rock Engraving

937-544-4000

206 N. Pleasant St., West Union

The Adams County Veterans Service Commission will hold its next regular monthly meeting on the second Tuesday in January 2013, because New Years Day falls on the first Tuesday. The meeting will be held in the Court House Annex on January 8, 2013, beginning at 9:00 a.m. A public hearing will be held on Tuesday, January 8, 2013, 4:00 P.M. to receive input on the Adams County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2013 Annual Action Plan. Copies of the plan are available by calling 544-2574, ext.25. The Adams County Children Services will be hosting the 36 hour Adams/Brown Foster/Adoptive Parent Preservice Training Classes in January and February 2013. Classes will begin on Tuesday, January 8, from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Classes will continue to be held Tuesday’s and Thursday’s on the following dates: January 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29 and 31 and February 5, 7, 12 and 14, 2013 and will be held at Adams County Children Services/Wilson Children’s Home, 300 North Wilson Drive, West Union. Anyone interested in attending is asked to please contact Dawn Grooms, Foster/Adoption Specialist at (937)544-2511 to register for training. The training is free of charge. The Adams County/Ohio Valley Local School District Board of Education will hold an Organizational Meeting on Thursday, January 10, at the Administration Office Conference Room beginning at 6:00 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is the Public Hearing and Adoption of the tax budget 5:30-6:00 p.m. and any other business that may come before the Board. The Southern Ohio Educational Service Center Governing Board Finance Committee will meet on Friday, January 18, at 8:30 a.m., at the Southern Ohio Educational Service Center, 3321 Airborne Road, Wilmington, to make administrative decisions regarding the organizations 403 (b) plan. If you need directions to this location or call 937-382-6921 Ext. #25 or email so_aunversaw@mveca.org for more information. The Southern Ohio Educational Service Center Governing Board will have its organizational meeting on Tuesday, January 22, at 6:30 p.m., at the Southern Ohio Educational Service Center, 3321 Airborne Road, Wilmington.

Tips for Preparing for Calving Season A good friend of mine use to quote someone, I think it was Jeff Foxworthy talking about rednecks, with the phrase “you can’t talk about them unless you are one and I are one”. With that, farmers often hold on to things that they have always done, that their dad did and grandfather before that. In many cases that worked well then and may still work today, but we can always learn more. Over the years I have followed that same trend of doing things that dad does, that he learned from his dad and so on, but I have also read lots of information in the position of being an OSU Extension Agent and now Educator. In addition to reading, I also hear other educators and state specialists teaching on different subjects. Even though the things that we have always done may still work, there is always room to learn something new. It may seem minor, but sometimes just a little thing here and an idea there may make the difference in that next challenge we face on the farm. In this case, the next calving season. This past week I read an article that appeared in the Beef Blog on Thursday, December 27. You can read the entire article by going to the BeefBlog.com or I can send it to you by e-mail. It is fairly lengthy and too long for the newspaper today. The title is 10 Cow-Calf Winter Preparation Tips. It is actually on the Bovine Veterinarian online website. With the hay and pasture situation some producers have discussed with me following the drought of 2012,

through the chute, deworm and vaccinate the keepers. Tip 5 is Have feed analyzed – this is important for your own feed so you know what nutrients you are providing, but even more when buying hay. The size of the bales, how they are stored, inside or out, string or net, and so on are all factors, but the available nutrients should be a major factor, too. The cost of a forage analysis is less than the cost of a “cheap” round bale. Tip 6 is Develop feeding plan/programs – DAVID DUGAN Basically avoid over feedGuest Column ing and under feeding. Extension Educator, Tip 7 is Evaluate feed ANR and Ohio inventory – the earlier you Valley EERA do this, the better plans and management decisions you will make. Tip she is lactating vs. dry, 8 is Adjust feeding rates for extending pasture that may cold weather – the energy needs are affected by the remain, and first calf heifers. Tip 2 is Preg–check weather, the better you undercows and heifers – ideally this stand this, the better job you should be common practice can do for the betterment of the but it is not. Handling facili- cows. Tip 9 is Check waterers ties make this either fairly and feeding areas – water is the easy or a nightmare. If you most important nutrient. Tip are thinking nightmare, you 10 is Reduce feed wastage – probably do not are not doing Feed is too expensive to waste this every year. Time may be it. Feeding hay on the ground a factor, too. However, if you is very wasteful, even convenare short on hay and/or pas- tional hay rings allow for too ture and already thinking you much of your valuable hay to may need to buy expensive become bedding around the hay, why are you keeping rings. This year may be the cows that are not going to pro- time to look at some of the duce a calf? Tip 3 is Assess more expensive hay feeders body condition and group that claim to save hay, and sevcows/heifers for fall/winter eral university studies back feeding – you can do this one that up. The cost of the feeder in the field, but it works out may pay for itself this year really well if you do it the same with hay prices going up. time you are doing tip 2. By Most of these feeders will last grouping cows, you can utilize for several years and even have your feed dollars better. Tip 4 warranties that cover various is Deworm and vaccinate – years, depending on the kind Why would you want to vacci- you buy. Check out several nate an open cow that you are styles and check out the results going to cull? Same trip of the university studies. coupled with the fact that some hay ground has had either corn or soybeans growing on it the past couple of years, I thought some of these tips were worth mentioning. It is food for thought if nothing else. The 10 tips start out first with: Wean based on pasture quality and quantity - this covers things like creep feeding, cows nutritional needs if

Adams County Library

The Adams County Public Library website offers access to the Learning Express Library, a powerful online testpreparation and learning resource. Learning Express Library offers access to online practice tests, training, and skill-building courses, to help you prepare to achieve success in school, at work, or in life. Learning Express can help students prepare for standardized tests from elementary through college levels, including practice tests and review information for the SAT, ACT, and GED. Students in elementary, middle school, high school, or college can brush up for tests or improve their skills on any subject by taking Skill Review courses, organized by grade level and subject. Use the site to hone your skills for an occupational practice test, including nursing and EMS, military and law

Ross Gr ocer y 309 W. 4th Street Manchester 549-4580 K.B. Bologna . . . .$1.19 Lb. Kahn’s Bologna . .$2.59 Lb. Turkey Breast . . .$2.59 Lb. Ham & Cheese . .$3.39 Lb. Ham . . . . . . . . . . .$2.59 Lb.

enforcement, teaching, CDL, cosmetology, and many more. Learning Express also offers up-to-date courses for Microsoft Office software and Adobe products, covering basic, intermediate, and advanced topics. Need to brush up on your math, writing, or public speaking skills? Take a refresher class online, for free. Learning Express offers skill-building courses for adults covering personal finance, statistics, grammar, and more. Learning Express can also help you prepare for job searching, interviewing, and resume writing; click on the Workplace Skills Improvement section to see a full list of topics. Learning Express can also help you prepare to take the U. S. Citizenship exam, and TOEFL tests. Accessing the courses and practice tests on the Learning Express Library website requires a free user account. To register, choose a username and password, provide your email address, and start learning!

For a full list of the online resources offered by the Adams County Public Library, visit our website at http://adamsco.lib.oh.us, click on “Reference and Research,” and browse one of the resource lists by topic. For current information about our events and programs, including children’s Story Times, computer classes, Preschool Parent meetings, Ereader Help Sessions, and more, visit the Adams County Public Library’s website, or stop by our Facebook page. We look forward to seeing you in the library! Library Hours: Monday – Saturday, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm Extended Evening Hours: Manchester – Monday and Wednesday til 7:00 pm North Adams – Tuesday and Thursday til 7:00 pm Peebles – Monday and Wednesday til 7:00 pm West Union – Tuesday and Thursday til 7:00 pm


4 - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - The Informer

This Week's Weather Forecast

Cuffs and Collars Field reports from Ohio Division of Wildlife Officers

Wednesday, January 9, High 40, Low 28, A chance of rain

Thursday, January 10, High 48, Low 38, A chance of rain

Friday, January 11, High 51, Low 27, Clouds and sun

Saturday, January 12, High 51, Low 33, Showers

Sunday, January 13, High 45, Low 28, Rain

Monday, January 14, High 40, Low 27, A mix of snow and rain

Chapparal Feed and Farm Supply Caleb M. Grooms - Owner

Purina Mills, LLC Telephone: 937 544-FARM 937 544-3276 5300 Chapparal Road West Union, Ohio 45693 Monday Thru Friday 8 to 6 - Saturday 8 to 4 Q

Q

From The Kitchen Of Pat Wylie Caramel Pie 4 eggs 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup sugar 3 cups milk, scalded 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1 pie crust, unbaked Nutmeg (optional) Caramelize sugar and add to scalded milk. Combine salt, eggs, vanilla with the milk mixture, slowly. Pour into pie crust and sprinkle top with nutmeg. bake in 450-degree

Pat Wylie, Sandy Baker, Casey Rutledge & Stacy Kinhalt COSMETOLOGIST oven, for 10 minutes. Reduce temperature to 325 degrees and bake 30

to 40 minutes or until knife inserted in center comes out clean.

Jokes of the week by George

Which is faster, gold or heat? Heat, because you can catch a cold! I have learned that only two things are necessary to keep a wife happy. Let her think she's having her own way and then let her have it! What is full of holes, but will hold water? A sponge! George Perry

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Central Ohio On the opening day of the 2012 waterfowl season, Logan County Wildlife Officer Adam Smith was on patrol at Indian Lake in the area of Lucy’s Pond. Officer Smith observed a group of hunters who had just finished their hunt and were in the process of collecting waterfowl decoys. Upon approaching them, Officer Smith observed a large amount of dead birds lying on the bow of their aluminum johnboat. Officer Smith identified multiple species of migratory birds, which included wood ducks, blue- and greenwinged teal, mallards and Canada geese. There were five other birds in the bow of the boat, and Officer Smith asked the hunters what they were. The hunters informed Smith that the birds were “Lillian mergansers.” Officer Smith later learned that three of the hunters, who were from Michigan, were the ones responsible for illegally killing the birds. The three hunters were informed that the birds they harvested were pied-billed grebes, not a legal bird to harvest in Ohio. The three hunters were each issued a summons for taking nongame birds. Fines and court costs totaled $703.29 for the trio. Northwest Ohio While checking migratory bird hunters in September at Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area, Wyandot County Wildlife Officer Brad Baaske observed a hunter wading in a marsh among his duck and goose decoys. The man appeared to be ending his hunt and began picking up his decoys and placing them in a bag he strapped on his back. The hunter picked up his shotgun and gear bag and started walking toward his truck. Officer Baaske contacted the man at the edge of the marsh and asked how his hunt had gone. The man replied that he had a great morning hunt and had shot a “big teal.” Baaske was anxious to see the “big teal” the man had shot, but asked to see his license and waterfowl stamps before looking over the rest of the hunting gear. The hunter had his required hunting license and waterfowl stamps, and his shotgun was properly plugged. As Officer Baaske checked the rest of the man’s gear, he discovered the man had been using lead shot. In addition the “big teal” was actually a hen mallard. Baaske explained to him that only approved non-toxic shot can be used to take waterfowl, and that teal and Canada geese

were the only waterfowl in season. Further investigation revealed the man did not know his ducks very well and

thought the bird was a teal. Officer Baaske showed the man a field guide with pictures of the two birds and pointed out their identifying characteristics. The hunter was issued a summons for each violation. The hen mallard was seized and held as evidence. While working Lake La Su An fishing enforcement, wildlife officers Thomas Kochert and Robert Wolfrum checked two fishermen returning to the boat ramp. Officer Wolfrum asked the men how they did. One subject replied that it was the best day they had ever had. Officer Kochert asked for the anglers’ fish in order to count them for compliance with the area’s bag and length limits. One angler then asked if the statewide limits applied to the bluegill taken on the area. Officer Kochert, as he was counting and measuring fish, asked the man to read the sign posted directly behind him. The angler read the sign, turned and replied “Oh, we’re really wrong.” And they were. The two anglers were cited for over their limit of bluegill and for taking a largemouth bass under the posted size limit. They both posted bond at the Bryan Municipal Court. Southeast Ohio On the first day of youth deer season, Jackson County Wildlife Officer Ted Witham was on patrol. Officer Witham started the morning at a location where he had received several reports of hunting deer with guns during the bow season. Officer Witham didn’t have to wait long when he heard several shots on the hillside next to his location. Officer Witham immediately started in the direction of the gunshots. As he was nearing the top of the hill, a single shotgun blast rang out at close range. Officer Witham crested the top of the hill and located two adults holding shotguns. Upon seeing the officer, one of the individuals tried to hide his shotgun under a fallen tree. Officer Witham asked the two hunters what they were hunting for. They both replied “squirrels.” When Officer Witham unloaded one of the shotguns he found that the

Roger Applegate My First Christmas In Heaven I see the countless Christmas Trees around the world below With tiny lights like Heaven's stairs, reflecting on the snow. The sight is so spectacular, please wipe away the tears For I am spending Christmas with Jesus Christ this year. I hear the many Christmas songs that people hold so dear But the sounds of music can't compare with the Christmas choir up here. I have no words to tell you, the joy their voices bring, For it is beyond description, to hear the angels sing. I know how much you miss me, I see the pain inside your heart. But I am not so far away, we really aren't apart.

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“squirrel” hunter was using deer slugs. Knowing that the other individual had tried to hide his gun, Officer Witham asked him where his gun was. The hunter said that he had laid his gun down but “forgot” where he had put it. Officer Witham was able to help him find it (the barrel and part of the stock were sticking out from under the tree). This “squirrel” hunter was also using deer slugs. Upon further investigation, both “squirrel” hunters were hunting deer with a shotgun during the youth-only shotgun season. The hunters were issued citations for hunting deer with a gun during a closed season, hunting deer without a deer permit, and hunting without a license. Both shotguns were held as evidence and a court date was set. Both individuals appeared in the Jackson County Municipal Court for arraignments. Both pleaded no contest and were found guilty of the charges. The two individuals paid fines and court costs totaling $706 and the hunter who tried to hide his gun lost his hunting privileges for one year. On the opening morning of the 2012 deer-gun season, Wildlife Officer Jared Abele checked a wooded ravine where he suspected trespassing issues. He walked to a ridge top and found a position where he could see further into the ravine. As Abele inspected the ravine, a male subject stood up approximately 30 yards away and started running toward a residence. Officer Abele yelled at the subject, “State Wildlife Officer, stop running.” Officer Abele attempted to intercept the subject before he made it to the residence. Officer Abele ran approximately 40 yards and momentarily lost sight of the subject. Officer Abele stopped to verify the subject’s direction of travel by listening for footsteps in the leaves or to hear the movement through the underbrush. However, Officer Abele heard nothing and knew the subject was close. Officer Abele began scanning the larger trees in the area where he had just seen the suspect and observed a sliver of hunter orange sticking out from behind an oak tree. Officer Abele ordered the suspect to show his hands and to step out from behind the tree. The subject cooperated with the Abele’s commands, and was escorted to the officer’s truck. The subject was initially issued multiple summonses for hunting without a license, hunting without a deer permit and hunting without permission. Other violations are being reviewed by the Vinton County Prosecutor’s Office

After all, love is a gift more precious than pure gold. It was always most important in the stories Jesus told. Please love and keep each other, as my Father said to do. For I can't count the blessing or love he has for each of you. So have a Merry Christmas and wipe away that tear. Remember, I am spending Christmas with Jesus Christ this year. -Author Unknown Sadly Missed By: Your Wife Annabelle & Roger Dale, Brande & Troy


The Informer - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 5

Politics & Government 2013 Must Be About Cutting Spending and Reforming the Tax Code The federal government has a spending problem that has led to a $16 trillion national debt that threatens our country’s future. On the day after the election, I proposed that both parties work together to avert the fiscal cliff in a manner that would ensure 2013 is the year we finally enact entitlement reform and pro-growth tax reform to begin to solve our country’s debt problem. Now the focus turns to spending. The American people re-elected a

Republican majority in the House, and we will use it in 2013 to hold the president

deeper and deeper into debt. Without meaningful reform of entitlements, real spending controls, and a fairer, cleaner tax Guest Column John A. Boehner code, our debt will conSpeaker-designate tinue to grow, and our United States economy will continue House of to stumble. Republicans stand for a stronger, Representatives more prosperous America, rich in opporaccountable for the ‘bal- tunity and free of the debt anced’ approach he prom- that threatens our children’s ised, meaning significant future. We renew our comspending cuts and reforms mitment to that vision, to the entitlement programs humbled by the opportunity that are driving our country to serve.

No on Fiscal Cliff Deal This plan is Washington kicking the can down the road Congressman Thomas Massie (R-KY) voted against the latest deal aimed at averting the so-called fiscal cliff. H.R. 8, the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, passed in the House 257-167. This plan is Washington kicking the can down the road. The modest spending cuts agreed to in the 2011 debt ceiling deal are postponed by this bill. This bill does nothing to reform our bloated tax code—in fact the bill perpetuates Obama’s failed

stimulus spending within the tax code. Finally, it fails to address entitlement reform or the solvency of Social Security and Medicare.

spending cuts. I am confident that the American people will see through this. Early Tuesday morning the Senate voted to endorse a fiscal cliff deal reached between Senate leadership and Vice President Joe Biden. The legislation, which passed in the Thomas Massie, Senate 89-8, postpones spending cuts and (R) Kentucky increases taxes. The citizens of Kentucky’s 4th District sent me to Washington Democrats and to implement real solutions. Republicans in Congress My constituents know that are once again committing only real and immediate doublespeak by labeling tax spending cuts can avert our increases as tax cuts, and nation’s impending debt spending increases as crisis.

'Dale Long Act' Supports Injured 1st Responders Enacting ‘Dale Long Act,’ Named For VT EMT, Was 3-Year Effort Capping a three-year effort by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), President Obama has signed into law legislation authored by Leahy that will remedy coverage gaps in the federal program that provides a crucial safety net for the families of first responders who are killed or permanently disabled in the line of duty. The measure is Leahy’s most recent effort to close gaps in the Public Safety Officers’ Benefits Act (PSOB) that have left some first responders without benefits when they are injured or killed in the line of duty. He first introduced the Dale Long Emergency Medical Service Providers Protection Act in June 2009, naming the bill in honor of the Bennington emergency medical technician (EMT) who was tragically killed in an ambulance accident. Leahy had added his bill to the Senate’s version of the annual defense authorization bill. Because it was not also in the House version, he convinced conferees to keep it in the final bill. The Senate Judiciary Committee, which Leahy chairs, had approved the bill in 2010, but further action on the legislation had stalled due to a single Republican senator’s objection. The President signed the defense bill, with the Dale

Long Act included, on Wednesday. The PSOB program was launched more than three decades ago to provide assistance to the surviving families of police, firefighters and medics who died or became disabled in the line of duty. Under current law, the PSOB program applies only to public safety officers employed by federal, state and local government entities. The Leahy

vivors eligible for benefits. Leahy credited the efforts of several public safety organizations for their help in building support for his bill, including the American Ambulance Association, the Fraternal Order of Police and the International Association of Firefighters. “From Bennington, Vt., to Newtown, Conn., first responders are flesh-andblood lifelines to all of us. When tragedy strikes, they lay their lives on the line S e n a t e with a sense of duty, with President Pro skill and with selflessness. Tempore Patrick All first responders should Leahy (D-Vt.) be treated as professionals, whether paid, volunteer, municipal or private nonprofits. We count on them, and they need to be able to measure will extend the PSOB count on us. This is their law.” program to cover private, nonJim Finger, president of profit emergency medical the Vermont Ambulance services (EMS) volunteers and Association, said: "Thanks to personnel. In Vermont alone Senator Leahy, over 1200 Leahy’s bill will qualify an paramedics and EMTs who estimated 1200 EMS person- are employed by or volunteer nel for the PSOB program. for non-profit EMS agencies The measure also in Vermont and thousands includes provisions to lessen more across the country will the length of a currently now have the peace of mind unwieldy appeals process for that their families will have claimants, clarify the list of eli- some financial security in the gible survivor beneficiaries, event of their death in the line and make those who have of duty. Senator Leahy has been catastrophically injured long championed efforts for eligible for peer support and first responders like paracounseling programs. It medic Dale Long of removes artificial distinctions Bennington Rescue Squad, under current law to include who died in the line of duty on vascular ruptures in the types June 15, 2009, and after of injuries that would make a whom Senator Leahy named public safety officer’s sur- this bill.”

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AVictory forMiddle-Class Families and the Economy At this make or break moment for the middle class, the President achieved a bipartisan solution that keeps income taxes low for the middle class and grows the economy. For the first time in 20 years, Congress will have acted on a bipartisan basis to vote for significant new revenue. This means millionaires and billionaires will pay their fair share to reduce the deficit through a combination of permanent tax rate increases and reduced tax benefits. And this agreement ensures that we can continue to make investments in education, clean energy, and manufacturing that create jobs and strengthen the middle class. In 2011, the President cut spending. In 2012, he kept his promise of asking the wealthiest 2 percent of Americans to pay more while protecting 98 percent of families and 97 percent of small businesses from any income tax increase—raising $620 billion in revenue. As we move forward to address our ongoing fiscal challenges, both spending cuts and continuing to ask the wealthy to do a little more will be part of a balanced approach. It is critical for our economy and future generations that we reduce the deficit. We cannot keep racking up this debt on our kids. And the President looks forward to working with Republicans to reduce the deficit in a balanced and bipartisan way. Permanently extends the middleclass tax cuts and also extends credits for working families, with additional measures to protect families and promote economic growth. Permanent extension of the middle class tax cuts: This will provide certainty for 114 million households including lower tax rates, an expanded Child Tax Credit, and marriage penalty relief— steps that together will prevent the typical family of four from seeing a $2,200 tax increase next year. In addition, it includes a permanent Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) fix. Most progressive income tax code in decades: By raising income tax rates on the wealthiest and keeping taxes low for the middle class, the agreement will ensure we have the most progressive income tax code in decades. Extension of Emergency Unemployment Insurance benefits for 2 million people: The agreement will prevent 2 million people from losing UI benefits in January by extending emergency unemployment insurance benefits for one year. Extension of tax cuts for 25 million working families and students: The deal extends President Obama’s expansions of the Child Tax Credit, Earned Income Tax Credit, and the President’s new American Opportunity Tax Credit, which helps families pay for college. The President fought hard to extend these credits, overcoming Republican insistence that income taxes go up by an average of $1,000 for 25 million working families and students. The agreement would extend them for five years. Extension of renewable energy incentives, the R&E tax credit and other business incentives: The agreement extends tax relief for businesses through the end of next year. This means extending the Production Tax Credit, a key incentive for renewable energy that many Republicans had been trying to end, as well as the Research & Experimentation tax credit. In addition, the agreement extends 50 percent bonus depreciation, a cost-effective temporary measure to support investment and growth. All of these would be extended through the end of 2013. Fixes the SGR (“doc fix”) with no cuts to the Affordable Care Act or to beneficiaries: The agreement avoids a 27 percent cut to reimbursements for doctors seeing Medicare patients for 2013 by fixing the sustainable growth rate formula through the end of next year (the “doc fix”). The President stood firm against Republican proposals to pay for this fix with cuts to the Affordable Care Act or the beneficiaries. Postpones the sequester for two months, paid for with $1 of revenue for every $1 of spending, with the spending balanced between defense and domestic: The agreement saves $24 billion, half in revenue and half from spending cuts which are divided equally between defense and nondefense, in order to delay the sequester for two months. This will give Congress time to work on a balanced plan to end the sequester permanently through a combination of additional revenue and spending cuts in a balanced manner. Raises $620 billion in revenue according to Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation by achieving the President’s goal of asking the wealthiest 2 percent of Americans to pay more while protecting 98 percent of families and 97 percent of small businesses from any income tax increase. Restores the 39.6 percent rate for high-income households, as in the 1990s: The top rate would return to 39.6 percent for singles with incomes above $400,000 and married couples with incomes above $450,000.

President Barack Obama (D) Capital gains rates for high-income households return to Clinton-era levels: The capital gains rate would return to what it was under President Clinton, 20 percent. Counting the 3.8 percent surcharge from the Affordable Care Act, dividends and capital gains would be taxed at a rate of 23.8 percent for high-income households. These tax rates would apply to singles above $400,000 and couples above $450,000. Reduced tax benefits for households making over $250,000 (for singles) and $300,000 (for couples): The agreement reinstates the Clinton-era limits on highincome tax benefits, the phaseout of itemized deductions (“Pease”) and the Personal Exemption Phaseout (“PEP”), for couples with incomes over $300,000 and singles with incomes over $250,000. These two provisions reduce tax benefits for high-income households. This sets the stage for future balanced approaches to deficit reduction, which could include additional revenue through tax reforms that reduce tax benefits for Americans making over $250,000. Raises tax rates on the wealthiest estates: The agreement raises the tax rate on the wealthiest estates – worth upwards of $5 million per person – from 35 percent to 40 percent, in contrast to Republican proposals to continue the current estate tax levels. The agreement’s $620 billion in revenue is 85 percent of the amount raised by the Senate-passed bill, if that bill had been enacted and made permanent: The agreement locks in $620 billion in highincome revenue over the next ten years. In contrast, the bill passed by Democrats in the Senate achieved approximately $70 billion through one-year provisions; these same provisions could have raised a total of $715 billion over ten years if Congress acted again to extend it permanently. However, the Senate bill itself locked in only one year’s worth of savings so would have required additional extensions to achieve those savings. Part of a balanced process of deficit reduction and stronger growth. Strengthens our recovery next year by cutting taxes for the middle-class: The independent, non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated that allowing the full effect of the “fiscal cliff” would cause our economy to enter a recession and actually shrink next year primarily as a result of higher taxes on the middle class and across-the-board spending cuts. The final agreement prevents taxes from rising on the middle class and delays the across-the-board “sequester.” Temporary measures to support consumer spending and business investment: Extending unemployment insurance is one of the more effective ways to encourage consumer spending. And bonus depreciation will give companies incentives to invest. Provides greater economic certainty for families and businesses: The agreement will make it easier for families and businesses to plan and will help our economy grow. Cuts the deficit and reduces the debt as a share of the economy over the next five years: Since April last year, the President has signed into law 1.7 trillion in deficit reduction, including $700 billion in spending cuts from enacted appropriations bills in 2011 and 2012, and $1 trillion in the Budget Control Act. This tax agreement not only further reduces the deficit, but raises $620 in new revenue from high-income households. Together with a strengthening economy these steps will bring down the deficit as a share of the economy over the next five years. Establishes a foundation for additional balanced, pro-growth deficit reduction through tax and entitlement reform: The agreement leaves substantial scope for reducing tax expenditures for highincome households, reforming corporate taxes to broaden the base and cut the rate to make America more competitive, and to take further steps to reform entitlements. Extends the farm bill through the end of the fiscal year, averting a sharp rise in milk prices at the beginning of 2013.


6 - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - The Informer

Local Politics

Adams County Commissioners The Board of Adams County Commissioners met in regular session on December 27, 2012, with the following members present: Brian Baldridge, Justin Cooper, and Roger Rhonemus. Clerk Diane Ward and Commissioner-elect Paul Worley were also present. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Justin Cooper to approve the minutes of the previous meeting. Vote: All yeas. A phone conference was held with JFS Director Sue Fulton to discuss personnel.

It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the JFS Overtime Exempt Policy for management employees in pay ranges 31, 32, and 35, classified exempt employees at the Adams County Department of Job and Family Services upon the recommendation of JFS Director Sue Fulton. Vote: All yeas. Dr. Larry Best met with the board to discuss the renewal of the jail physician contract. E.C.D. Director Holly Johnson was present for the

Ronald B Lynch

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CDBG 2012 Amendment Public Meeting at 9:00 a.m. The amendment has been approved in Columbus. A reimbursement can be made for the West Union Village lift station for funds already spent and a drawdown has been submitted. Changes were discussed with no public comment and the meeting concluded at 9:07 a.m. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the Jaybird Road OPWC Drawdown in the amount of $146,521.34 upon the recommendation of E.C.D. Director Holly Johnson. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the 2013 Fair Housing Agreement with the Ohio State Legal Services Association upon the recommendation of E.C.D. Director Holly Johnson. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by

Justin Cooper to approve the transfers, additional appropriations, and reductions. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the reappointment of Brice Mikesell to the Adams County Developmental Disabilities Board for the term commencing January 1, 2013 and ending December 31, 2016. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to appoint Chief Deputy Clerk Donna Parker as the interim Adams County Clerk of Courts effective 1/1/2013 up to the time of the final appointment by the Central Committee upon the resignation of Clerk of Courts Gary Gardner as of 12/31/12 and upon the recommendation of Clerk of Courts Gary Gardner. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Brian Baldridge to approve the 2013 Annual Appropriations for fis-

cal year beginning January 1, 2013 and ending December 31, 2013. Vote: All yeas. Judge Alan Foster met with the board to express his opinion that everyone should be treated equal and fair when it comes to raises for county employees. The Energy Efficiency HVAC Mechanicals and Lighting Bid openings were conducted at 10:00 a.m. Those present were as follows: Sally Hayslip, Duff Kindt, Brian Kitchen of Kitchen’s Electric, Bob Evans of BB&E, Inc., and Ed Memory of AirTech Mechanical Services, Inc. The following bids were received: Lighting Bid Kitchen’s Electric -$ 81,300.00, Mechanical Bids BB&E, Inc. -$549,000.00, Air-Tech Mechanical Services, Inc. -$449,000.00, Wadsworth Service, Inc. $530,000.00. The bids were submitted to Facility Director Sally Hayslip to review with Palmer Consultants, Inc. It was moved by Roger

Rhonemus and seconded by Justin Cooper to enter into Executive Session at 10:05 a.m. to discuss personnel with Sally Hayslip. Commissionerelect Paul Worley and Diane Ward were also present for the session. Vote: Baldridge, yea, Cooper, yea, Rhonemus, yea. It was moved by Brian Baldridge and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to reconvene at 10:35 a.m. Vote: Baldridge, yea, Cooper, yea, Rhonemus, yea. It was moved by Justin Cooper and seconded by Roger Rhonemus to approve the 2013Salary Certification for payroll commencing 12/16/12 and payable 1/4/13, and to also approve the reclassification of Rickey Setty from Maintenance part-time to Maintenance/Janitorial Supervisor at a salaried rate of $26,000.00 per year. Vote: All yeas. It was moved by Roger Rhonemus and seconded by Brian Baldridge to adjourn at 12:30 p.m. Vote: All yeas.

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HOMES FOR SALE HOMES

R57 – MANCHESTER – Brick home built in 2007, 2286 SF plus full finished basement, 5 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. furnace, C/A, wood stove in basement, hardwood & tile floors, 2-car att. garage & 2-car det. brick/vinyl sided garage with bath. Home is located in nice neighborhood near school. $249,900.

R3 – WEST UNION – 1 ½ story frame home built in 1901, 1776 SF living area, 4 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, pantry, utility room, enclosed back porch, wrap-around front porch, new gas furnace, hardwood floors, new water heater, 16x24 2-story barn, .4 acre lot, former home of the last surviving civil war veteran from West Union, would be a great home to restore. PRICE REDUCED TO $43,500. R5 – WINCHESTER – Well maintained home with vinyl siding, 1300 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, utility room, heat pump, C/A, 2 fireplaces, hardwood floors, 2-car garage with electric & water, breezeway, swimming pool with deck, concrete driveway, front porch, 3 buildings, deck, white vinyl fence, nice landscaping. $99,900. R8 – PEEBLES – Frame home with vinyl siding, 1240 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living & family room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, full finished basement with 3 BR & TV room, hardwood floors, 30 ft. aboveground pool with deck, city utilities, heat pump, nice .6 acre lot. $129,900. R13 - CHERRY FORK AREA - Very nice DW in excellent location, vinyl siding, windows & roof all replaced 6-years ago, 1152 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances & lots of cabinets, vaulted ceilings, elec. furnace, heat pump, C/A, hardwood & vinyl flooring, nice carpeting, covered front porch, nice patio, 2-car att. garage, 24x32 finished det. garage, concrete driveway, 0.88 acre. $89,900.

HOMES WITH ACREAGE

R23 - MANCHESTER - Frame home with vinyl siding, 624 SF living area, 1 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with pantry, all appliances, elec. heat, A/C, 1car garage, front & back porches, nice starter or retirement home, very neat. PRICE REDUCED TO $29,900. R25 - WINCHESTER - Frame home with vinyl siding, 1621 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen, fuel oil furnace, elec. baseboard heat, gas wall heater, flooring is combination of tile/vinyl/carpeting, 2car garage, 2 porches, 0.226 acre lot. Nice starter or rental home. $49,900.

H23 – CHERRY FORK – 20.421 acres with beautiful Cape Cod home with vinyl siding built in 2002, 2744 SF living area plus full poured basement, 4 BR, 2.5 baths, living & family rooms, kitchen with island & pantry, dining room, sun room, utility room, elec. furnace, heat pump, C/A, gas fireplace, county water, 2year-old roof, tile floors, att. 24x24 garage, concrete driveway, front & side porches, large barn, 15x48 barn. This is a beautiful county setting. A MUST SEE! $319,000. H25 – MANCHESTER – 5.614 acres with 16x80 Century mobile home, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, gas furnace, new wood burning F/P, C/A, county water, patio, 10x12 building, 14x70 storage trailer. $49,900. H27 - WEST UNION - 2.8 wooded acres with 640 SF frame home, would make nice weekend retreat or fixer-upper, 1 BR, 1bath, living room, eat-in kitchen, cistern, septic system. $19,000. H29 – WEST UNION - 1.4 acres with 12x60 mobile home, 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with stove top oven, fuel oil furnace, county water, small barn. PRICE REDUCED TO $17,500. H33 – WEST UNION – 25.166 acres with approx. 23 acres wooded, frame home with aluminum siding, 1260 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, eat-in kitchen with appliances, utility room, elec. furnace, C/A, 2 garages, rear deck, large pole barn. $139,900.

R31 – MANCHESTER – Frame home with vinyl siding in a nice country setting with beautiful view, 1200 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, full basement, new gas furnace, C/A, new roof, 2-car garage, garden spot. $89,000. H5 – WEST UNION – 2 acres +/-with 1997 Palm Harbor DW, 1647 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, new gas furnace, C/A, county water, 2-car att. garage, 15x40 barn, beautiful setting on dead end road. $139,000. H7 - WEST UNION - 2.38 acres with 14x70 mobile home, 2 BR. 1 bath, eat-in kitchen with appliances, elec. furnace, 2 A/C, county water, septic system, 1 1/2 car garage. $55,000.

R15 – WRIGHTSVILLE – 1.316 acres with DW located in cozy Ohio River community, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, eat-in kitchen, gas furnace, C/A, wrap-around porch, 2-year-old roof, shed, 2 water taps & 2 septic tanks.. $59,900. - MAKE OFFER

H35 – MANCHESTER – Top of the line Dutch DW with vinyl siding setting on 2.5 acres, 2016 SF living area, 3 BR, 2.5 baths, living room kitchen & dining room, all appliances, elec. furnace, C/A, gas F/P, county water, hardwood floors, 2-car att. garage, 28x32 det. garage, blacktop driveway, nice front porch & rear deck overlooking the country setting, 10x12 barn, lots of new updates & features. $139,000.

H9 – WEST UNION – 1.32 acres with 14x70 mobile home in good condition, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eatin kitchen with appliances, utility room, elec. furnace, A/C, county water, nice location on private road. PRICE REDUCED TO $39,900.

R17 - MANCHESTER - 1 1/2 story frame home with vinyl siding, 1225 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, elec. & gas heat, C/A, gas f/p, all new windows, large covered porch, 2-car garage. Home is in great condition. $92,900.

R21 – WINCHESTER – POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING - 0.918 acre with 1997 DW, 1170 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, elec. furnace, C/A, new windows, floating floor, 2-car garage, covered front porch, concrete patio, extra lot with water & sewage. $89,900 – MAKE OFFER.

H3 - WEST UNION - Mini farm for horses or cattle, 20+ acres with beautiful 2010 Fleetwood DW, 1960 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. heat pump, C//A, F/P, deck with hot tub, 24x36 horse barn with 3 stalls & tack room, 2 additional barns, 12 tillable acres, 7 acres of pasture, excellent location. $169,900.

R29 - PEEBLES - Exceptionally nice 3 BR home in Peebles. 1144 SF of living space. Home sets on nice lot with a big backyard. 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, utility room. Elec. furnace with heat pump, C/A, city water/sewage. This is a must-see and priced to sell at $89,900!

R33 – PEEBLES – Frame home with vinyl siding, 1142 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances & new counter top & cabinets, large storage room, elec. heat, city water/sewer, new windows, hardwood & vinyl flooring, att. garage. This is a very clean home. $53,500.

R19 – WEST UNION – 1 ½ story frame home with vinyl siding, 1915 SF living area, 3+ BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, elec. & nat. gas heat, C/A, covered front porch. PRICE REDUCED TO $49,900.

H1 – MANCHESTER – Frame home with vinyl siding, 2036 SF living area, 3 BR, 2 full baths, mother-in-law suite, living & family rooms, kitchen with appliances, dining room, elec. furnace, C/A, county water. Home sets on 5.434 acres with 4 acres of woods. $105,000.

24x58 detached garage with 24x12 lean-to, blacktop driveway. Home is located in a nice, private country setting on dead-end road. PRICE REDUCED TO $279,000.

R34 – MANCHESTER – Block home with aluminum siding, 1809 SF living area, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, eat-in kitchen with appliances, mother-in-law suite with full bath & kitchenette, heat pump, 2 ventless gas wall heaters, 2-car detached garage, carport, fenced back yard. $59,500. R35 - CHERRY FORK - Very nice DW featuring 2 BR, 2 full baths (1 with shower, 1 with Jacuzzi), living room, kitchen with appliances, elec. furnace, C/A, floating floor, 2-car garage, 2 porches, public water, .747 acre with creek. $84,000.

H13 - WEST UNION - Frame home with vinyl siding on 12.33 acres, 2160 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living & family rooms, kitchen & dining room, nat. gas furnace, C/A, gas F/P, 2 garages, 48x36 barn. PRICE REDUCED TO $79,900. H19 – MANCHESTER – 2 acres with 1120 SF farm house, 3 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen with appliances, dining room, utility room, elec. furnace, County water, screened-in deck, 28x42 barn. PRICE REDUCED TO $54,000.

H41 – PEEBLES – 5 acres with 2005 modular home, 2025 SF living area, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living room, extra-large kitchen with bar area, lots of counter space, appliances, dining room, elec. furnace, C/A, county water, shed, security system. $99,900.

H21 – MANCHESTER – 25.77 acres with combination brick/vinyl sided home built in 2002, 2118 SF living area plus full finished basement, 4 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen & dining room, all appliances, 2 gas furnaces, 2 C/A units, hardwood floors,

H45 – LATHAM – 1.6 acres with very nice 2005 mobile home (14x60), 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eatin kitchen with appliances, elec. furnace, A/C, 2 porches, 2 buildings, beautiful landscaping, creek, located near Longs Retreat for recreation. $42,500.

L11 - WEST UNION - Building lot conveniently located with all utilities available. $10,000.

BUSINESS

FARMS - BUILDING LOTS - VACANT LAND - BUSINESS

FARMS F3 – MANCHESTER – 101.452 acres with approx. 20 acres tillable, 40 acres of pasture and 40 acres of woods, 40x60 barn with 30x60 lean-to, large pond, beautiful spot for new home, great for horses & ATV’s, lots of trails. $209,000. F11 - PEEBLES - 14.349 acre mini farm with 2160 SF frame home with vinyl siding, partial basement, 2 BR, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen with appliances, elec. heat pump, C/A, wood stove, county water + cistern, 60x80 barn with 5 horse stalls, 80x20 implement shed, corn crib, creek, stocked pond. $189,000. F13 – WINCHESTER – 51.12 mostly tillable acres, 1 ½ story partial brick/vinyl sided home, 2432 SF living area, 4 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen & dining room, basement, fuel oil furnace, county water, 2-car detached garage, 2 big barns with sheds, concrete block barn, corn crib, silo. Property has lots of road frontage, will divide. $230,000. Seller will also

sell house, barns with 25 acres for $150,000. F15 - PEEBLES - 71.539 wooded acres with lots of big cedar trees and some timber, 2 campers, county water, septic system & electric on property. $189,900.

L13 - SEAMAN - 2 town lots with all utilities available. $8,995.

F19 – PEEBLES – 108.49 acre farm with approve 41 tillable acres & 66 acres of woods, 1 ½ story frame home with vinyl siding built in 1978, 1411 SF living area, basement, 4 BR, 1 bath, living room, kitchen with appliances, 2 gas wall heaters, gas F/P, wood furnace. 76x40 barn. 30x20 barn, 28x20 barn, 36x26 corn crib, public water, creek, lots of wildlife. $239,000.

L15 – PEEBLES – 0.165 acre lot with old home that needs tore down, all utilities available. $14,900 – MAKE OFFER.

BUILDING LOTS L1 – SEAMAN - .373 acre lot with water and septic. $7500.

V7 - OTWAY - 79.778 acres with 25 acres tillable, water & electric available, large barn, great place for new home, beautiful setting. $135,000.

L5 – WEST UNION – 0.54 acre town lot, water/sewer available. $14,000.

V11 – MANCHESTER – 4.004 acres with water tap, woods, electric available, lots of wildlife. $12,000.

VACANT LAND V3 – RARDEN – POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING – 13.55 wooded acres, good for hunting/recreation. $29,900.

B5 - WEST UNION - 5168 SF brick commercial building in excellent location on Main St. in West Union on 0.506 acre lot with blacktop parking lot, building is currently set up as a Dr.'s office with other businesses. Building could be set up to accommodate 6 separate businesses. Call for more details. $450,000. B10 - NEW LISTING - RUSSELLVILLE - East-Bend Twin Drive-in movie theatre with 2 screens, trailer is set-up as projector room, with digital projector, fully equipped concession stand, 2 diesel generators, bucket truck, 7 septic systems for men's & women's baths which are wheel-chair accessible, frame home with 2 BR, 1 bath, living room, eatin kitchen, large barn. There is a total of 28.75 acres with approx. 15 acres of woods, Pizza Parlor is being built out front for year-round business is nearly finished, tractor & bush hog are also available. $168,000 with POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING.


The Informer - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 7

Adams County Court of Common Pleas CIVIL CASES Farm Credit Services vs. Nicole Hunter, Foreclosures. Fifth Third Mortgage Company vs. Pamela Sue Rodriguez, Foreclosures. Capital One Bank USA NA vs. Roy York, Judgment. Courtney N. Livingston vs. Autumn Porter, Personal injury. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Troy W. Young, Foreclosures. HSBC Bank USA vs. Trudy Sanders, Foreclosures. Autovest LLC vs. Donna Mitchell, Judgment. CIVIL DIVISION US Bank FKA Firstar vs. Alma Knopf, entry granting motion to vacate default judgment and dismissal filed. Ford Motor Credit Company LLC vs. George Fitzgerald, affidavit and notice of garnishment of property other than personal earnings and answer of garnishee filed. Osborne Estates LLC vs. Adams County Board of Revision, court trial order filed. Trial to the court on 6-24-12 at 9 am. Osborne Estates LLC vs. Adams County Board of Revision, scheduling order filed. Final pre-trial on 528-13 at 1 pm and trial to jury on 6-24-13 at 9 am. Bank of New York Mellon vs. Dennis J. May, confirmation entry of sale and distribution of proceeds filed. Scott Hardert vs. Jean A. Neuman, decision and entry filed. A recapitulation of the claims presented in this matter along with an order for the appropriate relief. Darrell L. Clark vs. Grange Mutual Casualty Company, faxed entry granting defendant's motion to continue hearing filed. Hearing of 1-4-13 is continued to 2-11-13 at 10 am. Citi Bank NA vs. Olyinka Aina, entry granting leave to file amended complaint filed. It is ordered that citi bank na be granted leave to file an amended complaint. Equable Ascent Financial LLC vs. Gloria C. Martish, release of garnishment filed. The bank attachment is hereby released. Fifth Third Mortgage Company vs. Jerry Wilmoth, judgment entry filed. If sums due are not paid within 3 days an order of sale shall be issued. Railroad Protective Services vs. Clayton Railroad Construction LLC, affidavit and notice of garnishment of property other than personal earnings and answer of garnishee filed. Clayton Railroad Construction LLC vs. Michael Sussman, journal entry filed. Court grants extension of 30 days for defendant. Bank of America NA vs. Randolph L. Walters Jr., journal entry confirming sale, ordering deed and distributing sale proceeds filed. Liberty Savings Bank FSB vs. Madeline L.

Farley, journal entry confirming sale, ordering deed and distributing sale proceeds filed. Sarijana Jenkins vs. Robert H. McCarty, agreed entry of dismissal filed. The parties are ordered to comply with the terms of the agreed judgment entry and this action is dismissed. Discover Bank vs. Kelly Littleton, journal entry filed. Parties agreed to set aside garnishment proceedings. Asset Acceptance LLC vs. Robert M. Seaman, journal entry filed. Final pre-trial currently set for 222-13 and pre-trial shall now be set for 2-21-13 at 12 pm. LVNV Funding LLC vs. David A. Wamsley, journal entry filed. Hearing on Barbara Moore Eitherman's motion to withdraw as counsel will be heard on 2-8-13 at 1 pm. Citi Mortgage INC vs. Kevin C. Kidder, judgment entry confirming sale and ordering distribution filed. JVDS&S Partnership vs. Unknown Heirs, Executors, judgment entry confirming sale, ordering deed and distribution filed. Fifth Third Mortgage Company vs. Crystal R. Moore, judgment entry confirming sheriff's sale and ordering distribution filed. Bank of America NA vs. Melody J. Haines, order filed. It is ordered that the order of sale be returned without further execution. JP Morgan Chase Bank NA vs. Elizabeth J. Pendell, journal entry filed. The telephone scheduling conference scheduled for 12-31-12 is rescheduled for 1-25-13 at 2 pm. First State Bank vs. Roy C. York, entry filed. It is ordered that Michael S. Pfeffer issue a PJR and title examination of real estate. DOMESTIC CASES Earl R. Sigmund vs. Norma E. Sigmund, divorce without children. DOMESTIC RELATIONS John Hagan vs. Kim Hagan, journal entry filed. Hearing on joint motion for temporary custody set for 1-25-13 at 3:30 pm. Christina M. Nehus vs. Jeffrey L. Nehus, magistrate's decision and judgment entry filed. Motion is dismissed, no further hearing set. Clista Jo Kyle vs. Eugene Cornelious Kyle, magistrate's order filed. Obligor found in contempt as second offender, hearing set for 3-7-13 at 9:30 am. Jonathan L. Tong vs. Alysia tong, magistrate's order filed. Court reserves finding, matter set for 2-2113 at 1:15 pm. Monica K. Baldwin vs. Darrell L. Baldwin, notice of hearing and order to appear filed. Hearing on failure to pay support set for 2-7-13 at 2:15 pm. Tonya Evans vs. Michael Evans, magistrate's order filed. Court appoints Julie Steddom as guardian ad litem. Final pre-trial is set for 2-19-13 at 2 pm and trial on 3-12-13 at 9 am.

West Union

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$ 99

544-7100 or 5443784 Manchester 549-2291 or 549-3643 Peebles 587-3308 or 587-2959 Seaman 386-2121 or 386-2713 Aberdeen 795-2523 or 795-2522 Credit/Debit Card Accepted!

Amy Mefford vs. Mark Mefford, magistrate's order filed. Mr Mefford must pay at least $100 before 1-1113 and remain current on monthly payments, hearing set for 2-28-13 at 9:30 am. Stephanie Stephenson vs. Charles Clayton Stephenson, magistrate's order filed. Money was paid today, court reserves finding, hearing set for 3-713 at 8:30 am. Linda Jo Arnold vs. Chad Arnold, judgment entry filed. It is ordered that the hearing scheduled for 1-8-13 is continued to 3-19-13 at 1 pm. Samuel E. Crawford vs. Ashley A. Crawford, ex parte order ( it is ordered that the mother is permitted to take the minor children on vacation during the holiday ). Tonya Sue Evans vs. Jody Lee Evans, agreed judgment entry filed. Concerning payment to plaintiff and tax issued. Joseph C. Lowe vs. Hannah Lowe, order filed. The parties reached an agreement on the parenting time of the defendant. Elizabeth Singleton vs. Richard Singleton Jr., magistrate decision filed. Divorce granted. Elizabeth Singleton vs. Richard Singleton Jr., judgment entry filed. Divorce granted. Jeffrey D. Pendell vs. Elizabeth J. Pendell, magistrate's order filed. Court hereby continues hearing set for 2-4-12 at 11 am to 28-13 at 11 am. Rick A. Jones vs. Bambi R. Jones, journal entry filed. Status hearing set for 1-15-13 at 8:30 am to advise the court they agreed entry on temporary orders has not been filed. Katy Lynn Hamilton vs. James Ira Hamilton, notice of hearing and order to appear filed. Hearing on failure to pay support set for 2-21-13 at 10:30 am. Amanda Rose Shively vs. Christopher William Shively, order of referral to mediation and notice filed. Mediation is scheduled for 2-8-13 at 1 pm. Melvin D. Gammon Jr. vs. Emily D. Gammon, magistrate's decision and judgment entry decree of divorce filed. Marriage dissolved. Stephan L. Schwering vs. Sandra S. Schwering, magistrate's order filed. The hearing scheduled for 1-2-13 is continued to 1-813 at 10 am. Richard E. Osborne vs. Thelma Louise Myers, entry filed. Hearing is set for 2-19-13 at 1:30 pm. Brenda K. Kirker vs. Rodger Kirker, magistrate order filed. Hearing on motion for temporary orders is set for 2-4-13 at 9 am. Brenda K. Kirker vs. Rodger Kirker, magistrate's order filed. Motion for temporary spousal support is set for 2-4-13 at 9 am. Earl R. Sigmund vs. Norma E. Sigmund, judgment entry for temporary restraining orders filed. Both parties are restrained. CRIMINAL DIVISION State of Ohio vs. Carrie Adams, journal entry filed. Motion for judicial release is denied. State of Ohio vs. Duane J. Proctor, journal entry filed. Motion to withdraw former plea is denied. State of Ohio vs. Cassandra Cross, journal entry filed. On the court's own motion, vacates the $500 restitution previously imposed to the Adams County Sheriff's Department all other order remain. The sheriff is not a

statutory victim. State of Ohio vs. Billy Kennedy, journal entry filed. By reason of a positive drug test, the defendant's bond is revoked and placed on $20,000 cash/surety bond. Hearing on 2-6-13 at 3:30 pm. State of Ohio vs. Debra Combs, journal entry filed. Court finds probable cause on alleged probation violations, court appoints Richard Campbell, bond is set at $20,000 cash/surety. Full hearing set for 1-10-13 at 10 am. State of Ohio vs. James Nichols, judgment entry filed. Count III dismissed without prejudice. State of Ohio vs. Bryan Bronner, judgment entry on revocation of community control filed. Defendant violated conditions of community control; matter is set for sentencing on 1-30-13 at 3:30 pm. State of Ohio vs. Donald Harp, journal entry filed. Motion for judicial release is denied. State of Ohio vs. Donald Harp, journal entry filed. In review of the file, it appears defendant entered a stipulated agreement wherein he would serve 1 year, consecutive to case, motion for judicial release is denied. State of Ohio vs. Michael Eldridge, journal entry filed. Defendant is permitted to change address. State of Ohio vs. Michael Eldridge, judgment entry filed. Defendant's motion to withdraw the motion to suppress is granted. State of Ohio vs. Michael Eldridge, journal entry filed. By reason of a positive drug test, the defendant's bond is revoked and placed on a $20,000 cash/surety bond. Hearing is rescheduled to 1-30-13 at 10 am. State of Ohio vs. Joni K. Sanders, journal entry filed. Defendant tested positive for methamphetamine & THC; bond is revoked and defendant is placed on a $20,000 cash/surety; matter is set for hearing on 1-14-13 & 1-15-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. William Hayslip, journal entry filed. Matter is reset for sentencing on 12-27-12 at 1:30 pm. State of Ohio vs. William Hayslip, judgment entry on sentence filed. Defendant convicted of theft, F1, sentenced to 2 years community control, 120 hours community service, $500 fine, $4800 restitution, obtain GED, no contact with the victim or his property and pay costs. State of Ohio vs. Darlene Stafford, journal entry filed. Suppression hearing set for 2-22-13 is continued until 2-26-13 at 10 am. State of Ohio vs. June Martin, journal entry filed. Defendant tested positive for percoset and benzodiazepines bond is set at $20,000 cash/surety, matter set for trial on 1-14 & 1-1513 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. June Martin, journal entry filed. Matter is set for change of plea on 1-30-13 at 12:30 pm and sentencing on 2-27-13 at 12 pm. State of Ohio vs. Joseph Francis, judgment entry filed. Motion to withdraw motion to suppress is granted. State of Ohio vs. John W. Embree, judgment entry filed. Defendant released from Adams County Jail and report for sentencing 13-13 at 9:30 am bond continued.

State of Ohio vs. John W. Embree, judgment entry on sentence filed. Defendant convicted of theft and unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, M1. Place don 2 years community control, 100 hours community service, pay restitution, obtain employment within 60 days. State of Ohio vs. Andrew S. Mullenix, journal entry filed. It is ordered that the Adams County Probation Department go to the jail and go over the terms and conditions with the defendant. Thereafter the defendant is to be released from incarceration. State of Ohio vs. Kristopher Myers, journal entry filed. The Court finds the motion to withdraw the motion to suppress and vacate the hearing well taken. State of Ohio vs. Michael Baker, journal entry filed. Defendant wished to vacate current trial date and change his plea. Matter set for plea on 1-31-13 at 1 pm and set for sentencing on 2-27-13 at 3:30 pm. State of Ohio vs. Thomas Cook, entry filed. Sentencing set for 12-19-12 is reset for 1-9-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Thomas Cook, Faxed entry filed. It is ordered that the defendant's sentencing scheduled for 12-19-12 is continued to 1-9-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Chad Sheffield, journal entry filed. Defendant tested positive for opiates (Percocet); $20,000 cash/surety; matter set for hearing on 1-31-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Jeremiah Freeman, judgment entry on sentencing filed. Defendant convicted of count II RAPE F1 and count III Sexual Battery F3, sentenced to 9 years on rape and 4 years on sexual batter, consecutive for a total of 13 years, credit for sheriff of adams county, ohio. State of Ohio vs. Jeremiah Freeman, judgment entry and notice of duties to register as an offender of a sexually oriented offense filed. Defendant to register as an offender every 90 days for the offender's lifetime. State of Ohio vs. Jesse Arwood, judgment entry filed. Court finds that there was probable cause for the defendant's arrest. State of Ohio vs. Jesse Arwood, judgment entry filed . State is permitted to duplicate originals and submit to court as exhibits in this matter. State of Ohio vs. Shawna Evans, judgment entry filed. The court finds the defendant's motion to withdraw the motion to suppress well taken and is granted. State of Ohio vs. Shawna Evans, journal entry filed. Change of plea hearing on 2-1-13 at 1 pm and sentencing on 2-28-13 at 1 pm. State of Ohio vs. Dennis May, journal entry filed. Hearing on the state's motion to revoke bond is scheduled for 1-10-13 at 1:45 pm. State of Ohio vs. Destany Jarvis, journal entry filed. Suppression hearing set for 2-22-13 is reset for 2-26-13 at 8 am. State of Ohio vs. Nicholas Walls, journal entry filed. Defendant bond reverts to $10,000 cash/surety. Final pre-trial rescheduled for 1-30-13 at 12 pm and jury trial rescheduled for 2-13-13 & 2-14-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Steven Sturgill, judgment

entry on sentence filed. Defendant convicted of theft F5. Placed on 2 years community control, 120 hours community service, restitution, attend treatment program. State of Ohio vs. Brandon Kuhn, journal entry filed. Bond modified $20,000 on each case. State of Ohio vs. Brandon Kuhn, journal entry filed. Defendant wishes to change plea, hearing set for 1-23-13 at 1:30 pm and sentencing set for 2-2013 at 1 pm. State of Ohio vs. Rickey Bohl, judgment entry on sentencing filed. Defendant convicted of illegal manufacturing of drugs F2. Sentenced to 3 years mandatory prison term. Credit for 102 days. Driving privileges suspended for 3 years commencing 9-1-15 or upon release from prison. Pay costs, submit to DNA testing. State of Ohio vs. Aaron Ramey, journal entry filed. Defendant is granted temporary furlough from 1-2613 to 1-29-13 at 3 pm to attend parole hearing in KY. State of Ohio vs. Ben Blizzard, journal entry filed. Report was received from court clinic and matter is set for hearing on 12-3112 at 11:30 am. State of Ohio vs. Ben Blizzard, entry ordering defendant undergo a separate mental retardation evaluation filed. State of Ohio vs. Brandon Kuhn, copy of journal entry filed. Bond set at $20,000 OR on each case. State of Ohio vs. Brandon Kuhn, copy of journal entry filed. Defendant wishes to change plea, hearing set for 1-2313 at 1:30 pm; sentencing set for 2-20-13 at 1 pm. State of Ohio vs. Michael King, journal entry filed. The court finds the defendant's motion for bond reduction not well taken and is denied. State of Ohio vs. Darrell Combs, journal entry filed. Defendant is granted a $50,000 OR bond due to extreme over crowding in the jail. State of Ohio vs. Christopher Abbott, entry to withdraw motion to suppress filed. State of Ohio vs. Christopher Abbott, journal entry filed. Change of plea is set for 1-24-13 at 2 pm and sentencing is set for 213-13 at 12:30 am. State of Ohio vs. Paul Bowman, pre-trial order filed. Final pre-trial on 227-13 at 10:45 am and jury trial on 3-18-13 & 3-19-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Kathy Burke, pre-trial order filed. Final pre-trial on 2-6-13 at 12:45 pm and jury trial on 2-19-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Sandra Newton, journal entry filed. Change of plea scheduled for 1-11-13 at 10 am and sentencing on 1-3113 at 11:30 am. State of Ohio vs. Jody C. Waldron, journal entry filed. Defendant tested positive for benzos, bond is revoked and set at $20,000 cash/surety/10% matter set for hearing on 1-3-13 at 11 am. State of Ohio vs. Jody C. Waldron, journal entry filed. Defendant bond is modified to $20,000 OR contingent upon payment of $240 to Adams County Sheriff. State of Ohio vs. Carl Burke, pre-trial order filed. Final pre-trial on 2-6-13 at 12:30 pm and jury trial on 2-19 & 2-20-13 at 9 am. Cont. on page 8

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INSURANCE AGENCY

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Seaman Farm, Garden, & Pet Center (937) 386-2134

Right/Way Feeds


8 - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - The Informer

Adams County Court of Common Pleas

State of Ohio vs. Carl Burke, journal entry filed. Motion to suppress will be held on 4-24-13 at 10 am. Final pre-trial on 5-8-13 at 11 am and jury trial on 5-3013 & 5-31-13 at 9 am motion to suppress tolls statutory time requirements. State of Ohio vs. Jesse Lee Tabor, pre-trial order filed. Final pre-trial on 2-613 at 12 pm and jury trial on 2-19 & 2-20-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Jesse Lee Tabor, journal entry filed. Hearing on suppression 4-24-13 at 2 pm; meeting on suppression set for 213-13 & 3-27-13 at 8 am; final pre-trial 5-8-13 at 1 pm; jury trial set for 5-30 & 5-31-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. John Patrick Conley, journal entry filed. Defendant wishes to change his plea, hearing is set for 1-15-13 at 1:30 pm. Sentencing is set for 25-13 at 1 pm. State of Ohio vs. Emanuel Mason, pre-trial order filed. Final pre-trial on 2-6-13 at 11:45 am and jury trial on 2-19 & 2-20-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Anderson Tomlin, journal entry filed. Motion to suppress will be held on 3-8-13 at 10:30 am Final pre-trial on 3-13-13 at 8:30 am and jury trial on 4-4 & 4-5-13 at 9 am motion to suppress tolls statutory time requirements. State of Ohio vs. Corey Bowens, journal entry filed. Defendant tested positive for methamphetamine & THC, bond is revoked and set for $15,000 cash or surety, hearing set for 1-8-13 at 12:45 pm. State of Ohio vs. Corey Bowens, journal entry filed. Defendant was unable to go forward with change of plea hearing. Change of plea hearing is now set for 1-8-13 at 12:45 pm and sentencing set for 2-12-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. James R. Mitchell II, judgment

entry filed. Motion to withdraw motion to suppress is granted. State of Ohio vs. Justin Parker, journal entry filed. Due to statutory time guidelines, the motion for consolidation of cases is denied. State of Ohio vs. Justin Parker, journal entry filed. Hearing on motion to suppress is set for 4-17-13 at 2:30 pm, meetings set at 8 am on 2-6-13 & 3-27-13, final pre-trial is set for 5-813 at 1:30 pm and jury trial for 5-30 & 5-31-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Jackie A. Brewsaugh, journal entry filed. Motion to consolidate is denied. State of Ohio vs. Jackie A. Brewsaugh, journal entry filed. Motion for bond modification is denied. State of Ohio vs. Jackie A. Brewsaugh, journal entry filed. Bond modified to $50,000 OR. State of Ohio vs. Jackie A. Brewsaugh, journal entry filed. Defendant wished to vacate current trial date and change his plea. Matter set for plea on 1-14-13 at 1 pm and set for sentencing on 211-13 at 10:30 am. State of Ohio vs. Dustin King, journal entry filed. Due to statutory time guidelines, the motion for consolidation of cases is denied. State of Ohio vs. Dustin King, journal entry filed. Hearing on suppression set for 3-1-13 at 10 am, meetings at 8 am on 1-23-13 & 213-13, final pre-trial set for 3-13-13 at 10 am and jury trial for 3-25 & 3-26 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Gary Lunsford II, journal entry filed. Hearing on motion to suppress is set for 3-8-13 at 8:30 am, meetings set at 8 am on 1-23-13 and 2-20-13, final pre-trial set for 3-20-13 at 9:30 am and jury trial for 4-4 & 4-5-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Ashley Jones, entry filed. Bond is modified so that the defendant can reside at different

addresses. State of Ohio vs. Ashley Jones, journal entry filed. Motion to consolidate is not well taken and hereby denied. State of Ohio vs. Christy White, journal entry filed. Motion to suppress will be held on 4-24-13 at 8:15 am. Final pre-trial on 5-8-13 at 9:15 am and jury trial on 5-30-13 & 5-31-13 at 9 am motion to suppress tolls statutory time requirements. State of Ohio vs. Steven Taylor, pre-trial order filed. Final pre-trial on 2-6-13 at 12:15 pm and jury trial on 219 & 2-20-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Hurshel Daniels, journal entry filed. Bond set at $100,000 cash/surety/10% strick house arrest; no contact with the victim or witnesses. State of Ohio vs. Jody Unger, judgment entry filed. It is ordered that said indictment shall be amended. State of Ohio vs. Michael Gehler, journal entry filed. It is ordered that C. Nicholas Ring is discharged from his duties under the public defender contract due to being retained by the defendant. State of Ohio vs. Michael Gehler, pre-trial order filed. Final pre-trial on 2-21-13 at 8:30 am and jury trial on 3-4-13 & 3-5-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Ernest Unger Jr., pre-trial order filed. Final pre-trial on 1-2313 at 12:45 pm and jury trial on 2-4 & 2-5-13 at 9 am. State of Ohio vs. Dennis Day, journal entry on arraignment filed. Bond set at $20,000 OR plus conditions, $60 IDSF due within 60 days and $25 indigent application fee due within 7 days. State of Ohio vs. Dennis Day, journal entry order assigning counsel filed. Sarah Shelton appointed as counsel.

Criminal Traffic/Disposition Report

Cameron Ray Abbott, Lynx, Carrying a concealed weapon, dismissed. Cameron Ray Abbott, Lynx, Drug paraphernalia, dismissed. Heather R. Mingee, West Union, Seat Belt / DR, Fine $30, Court Costs $45. Mildred S. Morgan, West Union, Failure to control, Fine $15, Court Costs $74. David J. Rutherford, Williamsburg, Failure to control, Fine $15, Court Costs $74. Justin A. Daniels, Winchester, 67/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Andre Tudor, Cincinnati, 84/60, Fine $150, Court Costs $74. Jeremy S. Swayne, Peebles, Failure to control, dismissed. John C. Hendrix, West Union, 68/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Winston R. Delk, Seaman, Disorderly while intoxicated, dismissed. Joshua Hall, West Union, Disorderly conduct, Fine $100, Court Costs $66, Pay by 2-1-13. Michael R. Delong, Winchester, Trafficking drugs, Bound over to the grand jury, bond: $25,000 cash/surety. Steven Kemper, Blue Creek, Theft, Bound over to the grand jury, bond: $50,000 cash/surety. Luis A. Salcedo, Piketon, No operator's license, Fine $250, Court Costs $74. Luis A. Salcedo, Piketon, Failure to control, dismissed. Laura D. Meyer, Manchester, 51/40, Fine $15, Court Costs $74. Ethan Matheney, Sinking Springs, 74/60, Fine $42, Court Costs $74. John C. Smith, Milford, MEETING CHANGE West Union Village Council will be changing their 2nd regular schedule meeting in January. The meeting will be Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the the West union Municipal Building. Tanya Johnson Village Clerk

79/60, Fine $100, Court Costs $74. Donald R. Radabaugh Jr., Lucasville, Driving under suspension/FRA, dismissed. Donald R. Radabaugh Jr., Lucasville, Turn signals, dismissed. Brandon Blythe, Manchester, Domestic violence, dismissed. Heather D. Grooms, West Union, Forgery, dismissed. Donald A. Ullery, Hamilton, 70/60, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Tonya K. Kinhalt, Manchester, 67/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Waynette Mingus, West Union, 65/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Paresh V. Lakhani, Charleston WV, 71/60, Fine $42, Court Costs $74. Bradley D. Helton, West Union, Failure to stop at stop sign, Fine $15, Court Costs $74. Dena L. Ralston, Manchester, 65/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Jimmy F. Griffis III, Amelia, Failure to control, Fine $15, Court Costs $74. Lester P. Fegley, Portsmouth, 67/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Kathy B. Fannin, West Union, Failure to control, Fine $15, Court Costs $74. Cameron R. Abbott, NOTICE Resolution 2013-1 authorizing the village clerk to record supplemental appropriations in 2013. The remainder of this resolution may be viewed or copy obtained at the village clerk's office at 33 Logans Lane, West Union, Oh. 45693. Tanya Johnson Village Clerk 1/8, 1/15

Lynx, Carry concealed weapon, bound over to the grand jury, bond: $100,000 cash/surety. Treber S. Grooms, West Union, Driving under suspension, dismissed. Treber S. Grooms, West Union, Right side of road way, dismissed. Kevin W. Shermach, Chicago IL, 70/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Jesse R. Meyers, West Union, 65/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. William Gray, Williamsburg, 74/60, Fine $42, Court Costs $74. Kristen L. Morgan, Manchester, 51/35, Fine $15, Court Costs $74. Danette M. Windle, Dayton, 72/60, Fine $42, Court Costs $74. Damon A. King, Manchester, Left of center, Fine $15, Court Costs $74. Levi E. Ralston, Peebles, 70/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Donna S. Chamblin, West Union, 66/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74. Benjamin D. Batey, McArthur, 67/55, Fine $22, Court Costs $74.

Adams County Court Of Common Pleas

MARRIAGE REPORT

Nicholas Allen Justice, 32 and Miranda Crabtree, 29, both of West Union. Stacey Blevins, 33 and Susann Simmons, 44, both of Peebles. Danny R. Bayless Jr. and Jaimie L. Murphy, 24, both of West Union.

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No phone calls EOE MEETING NOTICE The Franklin Township Board of Trustees will hold the 2013 regular monthly meetings at 7:00 p.m. at the Fire House located in Locust Grove on the following dates: February 5, March 5, April 2, May 7, June 4, July 2, July 30, September 3, October 1, November 4, and December 3. The public is encouraged to attend. Diane Ward, Fiscal Officer 1/8

STONE BIDS The Franklin Township Board of Trustees will be accepting sealed bids for all grades of stone. Bids will be accepted until 7:00 p.m. on February 5, 2013. Please mail bids to Franklin Township, 989 Poplar Grove Road, Peebles, Ohio 45660. The board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Diane Ward, Fiscal Officer 1/8, 1/15

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The Informer - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 9

Senior Living Winter Has Arrived Weekly Quilt Challenge Melody Stapleton, Director Adams County Senior Citizens Winter has arrived and with it, all the beauty of snow fall and the hazards that it may bring at home and while travelling. Being prepared is more than just a good idea, it could save a life. Do you have emergency supplies such as canned food, a manual can opener, crackers, cheese, peanut butter, nuts or other foods that don’t require cooking? Remember to be sure to have enough prescription medicine to last a couple of days and a flashlight with extra batteries in case the electric would go off. Listen to the radio and do not drive when there is a traveler’s advisory or warning out unless it is absolutely necessary. If you do have to go out, be sure to have the following articles in your car: a blanket, an extra sweater or jacket, boots, a warm cap (as you lose a lot of body heat through your head), candles and matches, non-perishable food items, and flares. If your car should stall or leave the road – don’t panic! Put out your flares and do not wander away from your vehicle. Run the motor only a few minutes at a time for warmth. Put on your extra sweater, cap and even wrap your blanket around you, or light a candle as it may provide a little bit of extra warmth. Our road crews work around the clock in bad weather so hang in there and stay put! Help will come! The Senior Citizens office and Senior Center will be open for business on Monday, January 21st for your convenience. West Union Senior Citizens Club. The West Union Senior Citizens Club has cancelled their meeting on January 11th due to the uncertainty of the weather and also due to Flu Season. Due to this cancellation, Genesis will not be here to check blood pressure and sugar levels.

We look forward to both being here next month. Remember: Deadline for switching from paper checks to electronic payments for Social Security or Supplemental Security Income is March 1, 2013. Please contact our office for more information. Legal Aid will be here on Tuesday, January 22nd beginning at 1:00pm. Please contact our office to schedule an appointment. Come on out and get involved in some of the activities and services we have going on every month here at the Senior Center. On the 1st Monday & Friday each month the Adams County Veterans Services are here. On the 3rd Monday we have Knitting Class from 1-4 pm. Each Tuesday & Thursday from 10-11 am is Gentle Chair Yoga Class. With the exception of January 8th, as P.E.R.I. will be here at 10am, Yoga will be moved to Monday Jan 7th. On Tuesday afternoons at 1 pm we have Movie & Popcorn time. The Scrappy Quilters Club meets on the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month from 10 am – 3 pm. Marsha McCormick from OSU will be here on Wednesday, January 13 at Noon with Nutrition and Meal tips with tasty samples. Each Thursday from 12:30-3:30 pm we play card games. We welcome anyone who would like to volunteer to help with any activities you might be interested in doing. Your involvement and input helps us to serve you better. Services and activities are FREE. It’s YOUR Senior Center. We want YOU to enjoy it. For more info: 544-3979. Office hours are Mon.-Fri. 8:00a.m. – 4:30p.m. Movie/Popcorn Feature. On Tuesday, January 15th at 1:00pm our Movie & Popcorn feature will be the 1952 film “Singin’ in the Rain” starring Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and Donald O’Connor who combine their talents in one of the

greatest big-screen musicals ever made. Come on out and enjoy this movie with us, everyone is welcome! Have you gotten your dog tag yet? You have until January 31st to get one without paying the penalty. Remember, starting February 1st, the Adams County Dog Warden will be conducting door-to-door license checks. Whether you live in the village or in the country, whether the dog is kept inside or out, every dog over three months of age is required to be licensed. Tags are $10.00 per single tag and $50.00 for kennel license. After Jan. 31st, the price doubles. HEAP (Home Energy Assistance Program) is a federally funded program designed to help eligible Ohioans meet the cost of home heating. Bring a current heating bill, electric bill, proof of income, social security numbers, birth dates of everyone living in household and proof of US citizenship for primary applicant (birth certificate, Ohio driver’s license, passport, baptismal record, voter’s registration or a signed verification from another US citizen). At Senior Citizens our emphasis is placed on reaching the elderly, 60+, homebound and/or disabled. Guidelines must be met to qualify. We have applications at the Senior Center and an Out-Reach Aide available on Tuesday, 8 am–4 pm and Thursday from 12 – 4 pm to assist you. For more info and/or to make an appointment, call Teresa at 544-3979. Teresa Carr, PR/Social Service Asst. JUST A THOUGHT: Every morning, when we wake up, we have twentyfour brand-new hours to live. What a precious gift! We have the capacity to live in a way that these twenty-four hours will bring peace, joy, and happiness to ourselves and others.

Be Prepared for Winter Power Outages The snow that hit parts of the country pretty hard in the last few weeks helps remind us to be prepared to keep our food safe if the winter weather leads to power outages. Although the power at my house only flickered on and off momentarily, it prompted me to pull out my resources regarding food safety during severe storms so I would have them on-hand for a winter weather emergency. They are now stuck to the front of my fridge so they’ll be handy at any time. During power outages, many people wonder whether or not their food is still safe to eat. There are some steps that can be taken before, during, and after power outages to minimize the potential loss of food and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The main goal is to keep foods at safe storage temperatures in order to minimize the growth of bacteria and other pathogens that can make people sick. One line of defense is to keep an appliance thermometer in the refrigerator and in the freezer. Having thermometers in these appliances will help you determine the temperature inside the fridge and freezer to better determine the safety of the food. In the same respect, before

age is over, be sure to check the temperatures inside your refrigerator and freezer. Once again, this is where appliance thermometers come in handy. Get rid of any perishable foods which have been kept above forty degrees Fahrenheit for two or more hours. Foods kept above forty Amy L. Habig degrees Fahrenheit Extension Educator, for more than two Family and hours have been in Consumer Sciences the “danger zone” too Ohio State long and can potenUniversity Extension tially lead to food- Adams, Brown and borne illness if eaten. Highland Counties And if you are ever uncertain of the tional ice cubes and place safety of your food after a them in a bag, or you can power outage, follow the freeze water in a contain- old saying: “When in er. If an outage occurs, doubt, throw it out!” It’s you can then place the much better to be safe that bags ice cubes or ice con- sick. For more information, tainers in the refrigerator i s i t or in a cooler to keep food v from the refrigerator cold. http://ohioline.osu.edu/ho When the power goes me/freezer.html to downout, it can be very tempt- load the Ohio State ing to open the refrigera- University Extension Fact tor or freezer to “check Sheet entitled “Attention on” the food. Try to resist Freezer Owners: In case the temptation because of power outage DO NOT each time you open the OPEN!” You can also fridge or freezer door, you visit the United States of are letting cold air out! Department This then increases the Agriculture’s Food Safety temperature inside the and Inspection Service fridge or freezer. If w e b s i t e unopened, the fridge will (http://www.fsis.usda.gov maintain its temperature /FACTSheets/index.asp). for about 4 hours and the (Scroll down to the secon Emergency freezer will maintain its tion temperature for about 48 Preparedness and click on hours if full (or 24 hours “A Consumer's Guide to Food Safety: Severe if half full). After the power out- Storms and Hurricanes.”) any outages occur, you want to make sure your fridge is at forty degrees Fahrenheit or below, and that the freezer is at zero degrees Fahrenheit or below. Before outages, you can purchase or make ice and keep it in the freezer. You can make the tradi-

This week I am featuring a quilt block that is great for kids quilts and wall hangings that use fussy cutting. It is also great for beginners as there are not points that have to line perfectly. The quilt shown uses 2 blocks, a 4 patch and a snowball block. The white in this quilt is like lightening. I have also seen this quilt pattern with chicken print and the plain being grey to represent chicken wire. Happy quilting. We will be back to the civil war challenge next week.

ABCAP Senior Menu Wednesday, January 9, Bean Soup, Ham Sandwich, ColeSlaw and Applesauce. Thursday, January 10, Turkey w/Dressing, Harvard Beets, Peas, Roll and Orange.

Friday, January 11, Pizza Casserole, Buttered Carrots, Mixed Green Salad/Dressing, Garlic Bread Stick and Banana. Monday, January 14, Pork, Seasoned Cabbage, Lima Beans, Whole Grain

Bread and mixed Fruit Blend. Tuesday, January 15, Salisbury Steak, Mashed potatoes w/Gravy, California Blend Vegetables, Roll and Pears.

Dear Miss Needles Dear Miss Needles - I recently watched a TV show about making lace. Some was made using bobins wound with thread and then weaving the threads and one showed people making lace with needles and thread only. Are there special needles needed to make lace? Signed Lacy Dear Lacy - It depends. It has been a few years but I remember attending a demonstration once where a darning thread and darning needle were used to make lace. The lace looked similiar to tatted lace. I like to say that Tatting is similiar to macrame with thread. Many of the stitches you use in macrame, you use when you make lace either tatting or with a needle around thread. Think of doing a blanket stitch with

needle and thread where instead on doind the stitch along the edge of a blanket, you are doing the same stitch arond a string or couching thread. You get the same nice tight look. A regular needle will do. Hand made needle lace is supposed to be the best in the world so buy a spool and a packet of needles and have some fun! (The needle just needs to be big enough to hold the size of thread you want to use.) Dear Miss Needles - The tips of my knitting needles are getting worn and one pair had a dent and a scratch. Is there anything you can suggest to repair them? I love my needles. Signed - Inita Repair Dear Inita Unfortunately, there is not a lot you can do. Sometimes a

little steel wool will take off a jaged edge, but many times the abbrasive you use to take off the damages makes more of the surface rough or damaged. I have an old unbrella stand full of knitting needles that are bent, worn, damaged or separated from their partner. They all have memories of family members and I am reluctant to pitch them. Someday I will figure out a craft that I can recycle them into. Readers, any suggestions? Owls are coming back, perhaps we can use them as perches for our owl wall hangings. Do you have a question you would like Miss Needles to answer? If so, please write to her in care of The Informer or e-mail her to dearmissneedles@yahoo.com

Fawn Haven Apartments 507 W. 6th Street, Manchester, Ohio 937-549-3374

Providing 1 bedroom affordable rental housing units designed for those 62 or older or handicapped / disabled regardless of age. On site manager / maintenance. Appliances furnished. Water, sewer, trash included. No steps. Laundry / community room - air conditioner - porches - off street parking. Possible rental assistance. Handicap accessible. Equal housing opportunity. TDD#419-526-0466 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.


10 - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - The Informer

Education

SSCC’s Nursing Program Graduates 32

Pictured: 32 students join 945 before them as graduates of the Associate Degree Nursing program at Southern State Community College during a December 14, pinning ceremony celebrating. Front Row (L/R): Mike Locke, Rosalee Morris, Danielle Snavely, Shaina McCarty, Amanda Austin, Ruby Legg, Samantha Baldwin, Mandy Waters, Angel Wu, Marcosa Otey, Lisa Fox, Kristin Andrews and Art Thomas. Center Row (L/R): Brandi Culp, Anne Kovach, April Tucker, Alicia Shaffer, Leslie Molen, Liz Terrell, Crystal Mounts and Angie Roush. Back Row (L/R): Andrew Martin, Don See, Crystal Wait, Michelle Ludwick, Ragene Kitchen, Heath Tira, Paula Hurlburt, Karen Hill, Donita Dunn and Brian Cadwallader. Absent from the photo was Brandi Polley. Thirty-two graduates of Southern State Community College’s Associate Degree Nursing program were recognized Dec. 14 during a pinning ceremony at the college’s Central Campus in Hillsboro. Graduate Mandy Waters opened the evening ceremony with a recitation of the nurse’s prayer, followed by the welcome and introductions by graduate Amanda Austin. “Not only are we proud of you, we’re indeed grateful for your career choice,” said Dr. Kevin Boys, SSCC President, who welcomed the guests and congratulated the students on their accomplishments in the nursing program. “Our last ADN class of graduates all passed their state licensure test on their first try. That’s a tough act to follow, but I see competitiveness in all of you! Plus you’ve been taught, mentored and supported by truly outstanding faculty.” Dr. Julianne Krebs, director of Southern State’s nursing program, introduced the college’s nursing faculty and staff, and joined in honoring retiring instructor Teresa Grooms who has served the college for 30 years. “Thank you for sharing your hard-earned time with me,” Grooms said to the graduating class. “And always consider nursing a privilege. As an educator, I was lucky because every day I got to talk about something I loved.” Graduates Art Thomas and Paula Hurlburt served as the evening’s guest speakers. During the pinning of graduates, friends and family members of nursing students were welcome to join their loved one on stage and pin the graduate with the Associate Degree Nursing graduate pin. Graduate Angie Roush led the lighting of the candle

while the ADN graduates recited the Florence Nightingale Pledge. Closing remarks were delivered by graduate Samantha Baldwin. The December 2012 graduating class includes, from Adams County, Amanda Austin+ of Peebles and Brandi Polley of Winchester; from Brown County, Samantha Dawn Baldwin+ of Mt. Orab, Karen Lynn Hill+ of Mt. Orab, Ragene Kitchen+# of Winchester, Crystal G. Mounts+* of Mt. Orab and Arthur R. Thomas+# of Russellville; from Clinton County, Kristin Renee Andrews+ of Wilmington, Donita Dawn Dunn+* of New Vienna, Michael W. Locke+ of Clarksville, Michelle Lynn Ludwick+# of Sabina, Andrew Pearce Martin of Wilmington, Angela K. Roush* of Wilmington, Danielle Louise Snavely+# of Martinsville and April Tucker+ of Wilmington; from Fayette County, Brandi Culp of Washington C.H., Anne Marie Kovach of New Holland, Rosalee Morris of Washington C.H., Heath Thomas Tira+ of Washington C.H. and Amanda D. Waters of Washington C.H.; from Highland County, Brian Cadwallader+*# of Hillsboro, Lisa Fox of Hillsboro, Paula Kelley Hurlburt+* of Hillsboro, Shaina D. McCarty of Lynchburg, Leslie Anne Molen of Hillsboro, Marcosa Oliveros Otey of Leesburg, Don A. See+# of Hillsboro, Alicia J. Shaffer of Hillsboro, Elizabeth V. Terrell of Hillsboro, Crystal Dawn Wait+# of Leesburg and Meng Ting “Angel” Wu+ of Hillsboro; and from Ross County, Ruby Lyn M. Legg+ of Chillicothe (+ denotes college honors, * denotes LPN to RN students, and # denotes Phi Theta Kappa honor society members).

January is School Board Recognition Month The Ohio School Boards Association is celebrating School Board Recognition Month in January 2013 to build awareness and understanding of the vital function an elected board of education plays in our society. School Board Recognition Month honors the members of Ohio’s 718 city, exempted village, local and joint vocational boards of education and educational service centers governing boards for their commitment to providing quality public education to Ohio’s school children. The Adams County/Ohio Valley School District is joining with other districts throughout the state to recognize the important contributions school board members make to their communities. Ohioans benefit every day from the dedicated energies and countless hours devoted by a group of more than 3,400 men and women across the state. These public ser-

vants are elected to serve by local citizens and receive little compensation for their tireless efforts. These men and women are the local school board members of Ohio. These people unselfishly contribute their time and talents toward the advancement of public education. They represent a continuing commitment to local citizen control and decision-making in education. Even though we are making a special effort during January to show appreciation to our school board members, we recognize their contributions reflect a year-round commitment on their part. They are dedicated individuals who are committed to the continuing success of our schools and students. The men and women serving the Adams County/Ohio Valley School District are: Kent Bauman, Charlie Bess, Judy Campbell, Mike Hughes, and David Richey. A thank you goes

Rodney Wallace Superintendent of Adams County/Ohio Valley School District out to these people who serve our students with their dedication and commitment to public education.

After Christmas Subsription Special

West Union Village Council West Union Village Council met in regular session at 7 pm, at the Municipal Building, with Mayor Ted Grooms presiding. Call to order, pledge to the flag and roll call: John Lafferty - present, Steve Rothwell - present, Benny McCarty - present, Jason Buda - present, Randy Brewer - present, Neil Morrison - present; also in attendance: Tanya Johnson - Clerk, Jerry Kirker Village Administrator / Fire Chief, Roy Stricklett Police Chief, Lisa Rothwell Copeland Solicitor. Visitor: Steve Ogg. Motion by Neil Morrison to approve the Minutes of 11-27-12 with the addition: the material for the gun case was purchased by Summer Fest, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Motion by Randy Brewer to approve payment of bills submitted, second by Steve Rothwell, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. The Clerk requested that the Finance Committee approve the final payment of bills before the end of the year; they will be called when checks are written. Motion by Neil Morrison to approve the statement of receipts for Mayor's Court for the month of November for the net amount of $9,067.31, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Motion by Randy Brewer to change the travel reimbursement to $.56.5 effective 1-1-13, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Motion by Neil Morrison to reinvest the CD from the K-9 Unit Fund - $10,000.00 on a 5 year rate and the remainder at the 11 months, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Ordinance 2012-8 to set appropriations for expenses for 2013, motion by Randy Brewer for 3rd reading, second by Steve Rothwell, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Report from Jerry Kirker, Village Administrator / Fire Chief 1. Water usage is back down, only 13% loss and purchasing 8.7 million gallons this month. 2. Final plans on the Main Street Project were done on Thursday. 3. Had some problems with a couple of lift stations and a cell went down in the sand filter at the wastewater plant, due to the rain. 4. Christmas Dinner will be at the fire house, December 16th at 6 pm and the Life Squad dinner will be December 15th at 6 pm. Motion by Steve Rothwell to accept the Mayor recommendation of Randy

Brewer and Benny McCarty to the Volunteer Fire Fighter's Dependant's Fund Board, second by Neil Morrison, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. Steve Ogg, Tax Administrator, passed out some post cards that will be mailed out showing the PDF form on the Village web site. Also, the laptop the Tax Administrator has been using has gone down and will be purchasing a new one. Report from Roy Stricklett, Police Chief 1. The Chief told Council that Officer Reed was in an accident and was at fault; after some discussion, Council member Steve Rothwell suggested tabling this until next meeting, Council agreed. Lisa Rothwell Copeland, Solicitor, spoke to Council on the Mayor's Court cases that were transferred to County Court, on community service hours and a program for these hours to be worked off. Also, the Solicitor is still working on the Zoning Ordinance, Independent Contractor Agreement, press release form and Mutual Aid Agreement. Motion by Jason Buda for executive session ORC 121.22 G1 compensation, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: all yea. Motion by Neil Morrison to return to regular session, second by Steve Rothwell, roll call vote: all yea. Council member John Lafferty spoke to Council on zoning and a copy of Mt Orab and Hillsboro zoning to the Solicitor and President of the Zoning Board. Council member Jason Buda told Council, he would be resigning from the Adams Clermont Recycle Board, because of lack of time and cannot make the meetings. After some discussion, the Mayor will have a candidate at the next meeting. Also, the Council had given some money for some turn out gear, not all of the money was used for the gear. Buda is requesting the excess money of $5,900.00 be used for equipment. Motion by Steve Rothwell to let the Fire Department have this money for equipment, second by Benny McCarty, roll call vote: 5 yea, Buda no vote, motion passed. Motion by Benny McCarty to have the Mayor and Solicitor Issue a memo to the employees about their vacation, second by Jason Buda, roll call vote: all yea, motion passed. At this time, the Mayor wished everyone a Merry Christmas, Council agreed. Motion by Randy Brewer to adjourn, second by Neil Morrison, roll call vote: all yea, meeting adjourned.

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The Informer - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 11

HEALTH MATTERS “Working With You For A Healthy New Year�

"Bleed for a Cause"Adams County Medical Center Seeks New Blood Community Blood Drive January 2, 2013 The following local charities have been adopted to The Adams County Regional Medical Center is calling on the commuparticipate in this competition: nity to start the new year off right with a donation to save a life at their blood drive. The hospital blood drive is Wednesday, Jan. 2 from 10 am to Freestore Food Bank 8 pm at The Adams County Regional Medical Center, 230 Medical United Way Center Drive, Seaman, Ohio. Give Back Cincinnati All blood donors will receive a long-sleeved winter t-shirt from St. Joseph Orphanage Hoxworth Blood Center, University of Cincinnati. Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Hoxworth Blood Center, University of Cincinnati "The Adams County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Regional Medical Center has been an exemplary blood drive host," said American Cancer Society Jim Tinker, division director of donor recruitment and community relaSickle Cell Association tions for Hoxworth. "They have exhibited outstanding recruitment in their American Diabetes Association blood drives through an energetic push for donors. However, the hospital Make-A-Wish Foundation employees are not satisfied with the status quo and want to redouble their Shriners for Children efforts and bring new donors into their drive," he added. American Heart Association Blood donors are especially important before and after major holiLife Center days when donations decline, but the demand for blood can suddenly Ronald McDonald House spike due to traumas that require significant amounts of blood. The Crayons to Computers hospital blood drive has been strategically positioned to help ensure the American Red Cross community need is met. Blood donations at this drive may benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Adams County Medical Center or patients at 30 other area hospitals supported by Hoxworth blood Donors can visit www.hoxdonors. worth.org/ groups/cause or call (513) Blood donors save lives. Who 451-0910 to schedule an appointment. Will You Save? Please call now to to schedule an appointment to How to Donate: donate at this blood drive, those Donating blood is safe and easy. interested should call Adams You Donors must be at least 17County Regional Medical Center years- old (16 with a signed parental Lab at 937-386-3670 or Hoxworth consent) and in good health. There is Blood Center at (800) 830-1091. no upper age limit. You Donors must The Business Courier's Forty weigh at least 110 pounds and bring Under 40 classes have partnered identification with them to when with seventeen Cincinnati nonprofits to promote "Bleed for a Cause." This donatingdonate. It is recommended that donors eat a good meal and drink plenpromotion is a great way to help local patients and earn money for your ty of water within four hours before prior to donating. favorite charity. The contest will be held from now until Saturday, December 31. About Hoxworth: Hoxworth Blood Center, University of Cincinnati, founded in 1938, we Here's how it works: serves 31 hospitals in 17 counties in Southwestern Ohio, Northern Kentucky and Donate at a blood drive or one of our eight Neighborhood Donor Southeastern Indiana. Annually, Hoxworth collects over 90,000 units of blood Centers. You can even host a drive at work, place of worship, or in your from local donors to help save the lives of patients in our area hospitals. community. Just make sure when you donate, to mention one of the adopt- Hoxworth Blood Center. Our Donors Save Lives. Who Will You Save? ed charities. The charity which has the most blood donations on their Remember one unit of donated blood that you give reaches three lives! behalf between now and December 31st will receive up to $2,500. Give the gift of LIFE!

Influenza VisitorRestrictions Implemntation Hospitals this week report they are beginning to see an increase in the number of flu virus cases. Many hospitals in southwest Ohio, Northern Kentucky and southeast Indiana have already implemented limited visitation policies to minimize the spread of respiratory diseases to hospital patients. Adams County Regional Medical Center will implement limited visitation starting on Monday December 17th. The goal of limited visitation is to minimize the spread of respiratory diseases to hospital patients. The following restrictions will be implemented: * No visitation by anyone who is ill with any respiratory symptoms including coughing, sneezing, runny nose, fever, etc. * No visitation by anyone under age 14 In addition, any employee who has not received the flu vaccine shall be required to adhere to the following requirements: a. A surgical/iso-

lation mask is to be worn during the influenza season timeframe, as determined by the Infection Control Committee each year. Masks will be made available by individual departments. b. Employees are to wear a mask upon entering the facility, prior to the beginning of their shift, until exiting the facility, after their shift has ended. It is therefore necessary for employees to take a mask at the end of a shift in order to have a mask available upon entering the facility for the next shift. c. The mask must be applied correctly to cover the nose and mouth. The mask is to be changed every 3 to 4 hours or when it becomes damp, whichever occurs first. d. The mask may be removed while eating and drinking during approved meal and break periods. e. Failure to adhere to these requirements will result in corrective counseling, up to and including discharge.

230 Medical Center Drive Seaman, OH 45679


12 - Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - The Informer


The Informer, January 8, 2013