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BELLEVUE COMMUNITY NEWS

Trick or Treat Hours Halloween October 31 from 6-8pm October, 2018 Volume 41, Number 7

Boo! From

Hello to all! Well summer has come to an end on the calendar and fall is here. The cooler temperatures have yet to bless us, delaying when the leaves change into their glorious fall blaze of color. Dust off those rakes and leaf blowers because soon those leaves will be falling to the ground. The leaf truck has been checked out and will be making the rounds soon. Please call the City office at 431-8888 if a pick up is needed this fall. Speaking of cleaning up, our annual fall cleanup will take place this year from October 8th thru 14 . Once again the dumpsters will be located on Van Voast Ave. at the city building parking lot. Tires will be accepted, please stack them alongside the dumpsters. We will not be able to accept paint or liquids this year. Should you

the

meet Jack Schneider

have larger items please call 859-261-0260 to have them picked up by our public service department and leave a message for pickup. So, clean out the basement, garage, or outside around the house before winter arrives. Please remember this is a residential event only. Once again the annual “Art in the Park” day occurred on the second Saturday of September . Each year this event gets better and better. This year was a bit of a challenge due to the rainy weather and a quick change in venue. This event is not possible without the tremendous sea of volunteers who make this it run smoothly and seamlessly. This is why so many artists return each year for this show. A big hats off to all who donated their time to make Bellevue shine again

Located in the hub of to making the best prod- creams. Even behind the Bellevue’s historic Fair- uct for the best price for scenes, Schneider’s Sweet field Avenue is Jack Sch- Bellevue residents and for Shop stays true to old-fashneider, crafting the sweets all of our region.” Today, ion and time-tested pracwe all know and love. In Jack serves as the primary tices by producing candies 1986, Jack took over his candy-maker, but he fondly on the original equipment, See mayor father’s candy business, reflects on working along- dating back to the 1930s. cont’d on pg 2 Schneider’s Sweet Shop, side his father in the 1970s Overall, Jack Schneider and has continued the and 1980s. Schneider’s and his team at Schneider’s longstanding reputation Sweet Shop serves many Sweet Shop are dedicated axeS ue of high-quality, delicious homemade treats, includ- to bringing quality to their after January 1,2018 the tax treats. “We never cheap- ing chocolate, caramel, ice candies for the customers. will still be in the name of en the product. Quality is cream, fudge, and Jack’s the owner of record as of key, and we are dedicated personal favorite, opera January 1, 2018, so again please contact us if you did ellevue choolS to rovide reSchool not receive your bill as it could have gone to the precreeningS For ear ldS vious owner. Property tax payments can be mailed Bellevue Independent rent school year, as well as or paid in the Office of the Schools will be screening any 3 year-olds with potenClerk-Treasurer between preschoolers for immedi- tial developmental delays. the hours of 7:30 – 4:30 ate enrollment on Octo- Developmental delays can p.m. Monday through Fri- ber 26th, December 14th, occur in any of the followday. We accept payment and January 11th. If you ing areas: social-emotional, using VISA or MasterCard live in Bellevue and have self-help, motor, speech & (in person only with a 3.5% a child that is 3 or 4 years language, and cognition. convenience fee). Again old, please call to set up a If you have any questions if you have any questions developmental screening. about your preschooler’s please give us a call at 431- Bellevue Preschool’s half- development, or would like 8888 and we will be happy day program enrolls all to reserve your screening to assist you. children who turned 4 on or slot, please call (859) 261Mary Scott before August 1 of the cur- 7577. City Clerk-Treasurer

property t The 2018 property tax bills for the City of Bellevue will be mailed October 11th and have a November 30 due date. We will forward property tax bills to mortgage companies upon request by the mortgage company or the property owner. If you have not received your bill and you should have because you no longer have an escrow account, please call our office to inquire where it was sent. The City of Bellevue uses the Campbell County PVA assessments, if you have a question regarding your assessment please contact the Campbell County PVA Office at 292-3871. If you purchased your property

mayor

859-331-7977

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code enForcement corner

by Terry Baute Code Enforcement Officer Hello friends and residents of Bellevue. Fall is probably my favorite time of the year. The leaves turning brilliant colors, (all

the fall flowers especially mums.) Before I forget speaking about fall, the city is once again having “Fall Clean-Up Bellevue” starting on October 8th through October 12th. There will be two (2) 40 yard dumpsters located at our city building on Van Voast. This is for residents only and not for commercial use. As a resident you are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity to get rid of junk lying around, basement, garage or yard cleanout or getting rid of old worn out furniture. Remember you are still required to place any furniture

Endorsed by F.O.P. 10

and mattresses in plastic. If you are renting to tenants, please advise them as well. CSI will NOT pick up furniture or mattresses not in plastic. We sell the bags at our cost at our city building for $3.00 per bag with twist ties. If you are in doubt whether you need a permit for a project please call me 859-468-1814.. I will be glad to assist you with the process. If necessary, I can conduct an onsite visit with you to discuss a project. Remember, if you hire a contractor to do the work, always check to see that they have an occupational license, insurance and please get references. I have often heard that some people did not get what they paid for. The biggest challenge for our City is our alley ways. Public works try extremely hard to keep alleys clear of garbage and debris. People continue to place trash in the alley in plastic bags. Our alleys are looking a mess in some areas. Garbage must be placed in a trash container with lids. This prevents animals/ro-

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October, 2018 8

dents and insects for getting into the garage. CSI comes by to remove the trash and it is spread all over because of this issue. They will not take the time to pick up loose garbage. Let’s be courteous to our neighbors and neighborhood and get garbage cans out of the alley after pickup. Did you know you can get rent a large totter from CSI for a few dollars a month? That is an excellent deal. To arrange for a totter, you can call CSI direct at 513-7714200. There are a lot of rear alley yards that are overgrown. The city is not responsible for these areas. We do spray for weeds on

occasion but that’s only for the right of way. Did you know? The time change is right around the corner. November 4th I believe. That is a time we really need to watch out for the little ones walking to school because it is so dark. I hope this fall brings you good health, prosperity and blessings. Be kind to one another and help your neighbor. “An individual can make a difference; but a group can change the world. Lets make this world a better place and do our part; all of us can make a difference.”

mayor From page 1

this year. Great job and see you again next year. Our last concert in the park was not able to occur due to the heavy rain that day. Thanks to Mary Scott for putting together a great line up this year and thanks to our Public Services Department, Police and Fire Departments for helping out to make these events happen. In Vue shopping events are still the talk of the shopping world. Our next shopping event will take place on November 2. This year we will be having a “Fall Fest ” block party. So come on down and shop, eat, drink and enjoy an evening of great fun on Fairfield Ave. The first block of Washington Avenue will be blocked off for this event, with booths set up for local food and beverages being served. Planning is also under way for this year Christmas walk along Fairfield coming up in November on the 23rd and 24th this year. More details to follow. Remember October is Fire Prevention Month so take time to check your smoke detectors in your home and your carbon monoxide detector for proper working order. Install new batteries or replace old units with new upgraded types. Take a few moments to do an in home safety check before the winter months set in. Also remember that daylight savings time will end on November 4th and set

those clocks back 1 hour. Once again if you are planning any last minute home repair projects around the house before winter sets in don’t hesitate to call the city staff about proper permits, COA’s, and inspections that may pertain. We are always ready to help. 859-431-8888. Have a great fall season and Happy Halloween.

Dobbling, MuehlenkaMp & erschell Funeral hoMes Our families serving yOur families fOr generatiOns

Bellevue Community News The Bellevue Community News is published once a month by Community Shopper LLC, 464 Kuhrs Lane, Covington, KY 41015-1034. Rate & advertising information may be obtained by calling Mike Pendery publisher/owner @ 859-331-7977, or by E-mail to communityshopper@twc. com. Publisher is not liable for contents of any ads or any claims made by advertisers.

Next Issue Nov 15th Deadline Nov 9th


October, 2018 8

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FairField avenue chriStmaS Walk

park dedication ceremony

by Steve Brun On October 23rd at 630pm the park on Washington Ave. where it intersects with Walnut St. will be dedicated to Scoutmaster E. James Brun. E. James Brun was the Scoutmaster of Troop 66 at St. Anthony Church in Bellevue, KY. Troop 66 later merged with Troop 60 located at Sacred Heart Church in Bellevue KY becoming Troop 166 where he took over as Scoutmaster. He provided the scouts with opportunities to grow and learn.

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He was a leader who willingly and freely gave of his time and experience. This park was built as an Eagle Scout project of which he requested and received approval from the City of Bellevue and the Dan Beard Council. He worked with the Boy Scouts in some capacity from 1970 until his passing in 2015. He continues to serve as a role model for many. Please join his family at the park for the ceremony, with a small reception to follow at Charity Hall.

3rd annual giving thankS Fall FeSt Featuring a taSte

Friday, novemBer 2

oF

From

the avenue

5

pm to

10

pm

The merchants of historic Fairfield Avenue are looking forward to welcoming you to festive holiday open houses to put joy back into your holiday. There’s no need to leave Bellevue to find fantastic shopping for everyone on your list along with festive dining and primping for the holiday season. The gifts keep on giving because by shopping Bellevue’s local independent businesses you are giving back to your community. Immerse yourself in

a head start on your holiday shopping and see new featured seasonal items. November is also a time to reflect and give thanks. We hope you’ll join us in giving back as a way of expressing giving thanks. We hope you’ll round up or simply donate when you see collection jars in businesses and at A Taste of The Avenue. All the proceeds will be given to a local food pantry. We look forward to sharing an evening under the stars with you for muBy Alvena Stanfield sic, drinks, food, and shopTrick or treat. Smell my ping! Visit www.facebook. com/shopbellevueky for feet. Give me something good to eat. This chant updates! sounds out each year as children travel door to door THIS SPACE FOR SALE after dark. Though some parents have asked citAn ad this size is only $23 ies to return to the Sunday daytime event, the schedYou can reach Bellevue with our ule remains after dark for Print Edition and On-line. Please help support our community paper. Halloween. This year think safety for those costumed Please call Mike @ 859-331-7977 children as there are hazards after sunset. 1. Have them pair up with a buddy. 2. Make sure the costume won’t trip the child. 3. Add reflective strips of tape. 4. Watch out for cars. 5. Provide a flashlight, best is a headband type. 6. Warn them to never enter anyone’s house. 7. Don’t eat the goodies until they get home.

The leaves have fallen and a chill in the air replaced the warmth of the long sunlit hours of summer. In Vue marks the change of seasons with 3rd Annual Fall Festival on Friday, November 2. Fall is the time to create new memories with a pop-up event, “A Taste of The Avenue,” Washington Avenue at Fairfield Avenue as we prepare for the magic of the upcoming holiday season. You’ll find a café with specialties from local restaurants, Darkness Beer, New Riff Distilling, live music, visiting craft vendors, and even a kid’s play area. It’s a great time to get

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and 24 From the holiday magic of Fairfield Avenue where decorations sparkle, Santa and Mrs. Claus greet you, and the scent of hot cocoa and Christmas cookies will fill the air. The Avenue will be bustling with the excitement of the upcoming holidays, shop owners and their staff will be looking forward to assisting you. In addition to holiday treats, delicious food, and

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to 6 terrific shopping the merchants will sweeten the day with prizes worth a minimum of $25 inclulding an exciting grand prize. The more participating businesses you visit that day, the more chances you have to win! Be sure to keep an eye on the front window of Cleves and Lonnemann Jewelers to see the awesome prizes – one or more of them may be yours!

Kevin Wall, DMD

340 Fairfield Avenue • Bellevue KY 41073

859-291-7621

Safety for Little Beggars

Holiday Bazaar  6th Annual  Bellevue Bands

Sunday November 4th   10am – 3pm   

Ben Flora Gymnasium 1 Tiger lane Bellevue, KY   

Admission: $2.00 Adults   Kids Free 

Do your holiday shopping with us!     

● Lots of vendors and crafters to choose from   ● Free Gift Wrapping    ● Gift Basket Raffle    ● Concessions and baked goods available   


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For Info & Rates Call Mike @ 331-7977

preventing dog BiteS and attackS by Terri Baker ACO This article is NOT breed specific. Dogs are pack animals. If you own more than one dog, then you already have a pack. If you only have one dog, then your human family is the dog’s pack. A single dog is more likely to become aggressive and protective over humans in the pack and territory.

Multiple dogs can become aggressive just because they’re excited and they feed off each other’s energy. Humans do the same thing. That is how riots happen. Children are more likely to be harmed by dogs. The child could be seen as an intruder to the “pack”. The child could be seen as prey, especially if the child is loud, screaming, cry-

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ing or running. The child could be seen as a lower member of the pack and the dog needs to “reprimand” or “teach” a lesson. A child can easily be killed by a single dog as it can by a pack, if that dog has the strength. Leash laws are so important because it keeps dogs home and under control. If your sweet family dog meets up with another dog while loose, they just formed a pack. If that other dog begins chasing and biting people, your dog will do it too. And your dog may like it and feel motivated to be “bigger and badder” and turn it up a notch. All dogs can bite. I do hate hearing the phrase “my dog would never bite. My dog loves kids. My dog would never kill a cat, he lives with cats.” Your dog is a dog. No matter what breed he was a wolf descendent, a predator, a pack animal and has teeth. Just because we do not understand why or how, just always know your dog can justify it in his doggie mind and will do things that you did not expect. We all cannot have Cezar Milan save our dogs, but we all can do simple things to ensure we are pack leaders. 1. Spay/neuter your

Terry

HATTON I’m asking you for 1 of your 6 votes Bellevue property owner Small Business owner 28+ years US Army Veteran Member Bellevue Vets 20 years Co-chair Vets Youth program 20 years Community driven & accessible You can email me at terryhatton@me.com

City Council PAID FOR BY TERRY HATTON

October, 2018 8

dog. Remove biological and hormonal reasons for aggression. Mating times and/or mother dogs with pups cause attacks on both strangers and family members. 2. Confine your dog. Allowing your dog to wander expands the dogs’ territory that it must protect. Also you cannot control the dog if it chooses to protect the sidewalk in front of your house, when the next jogger comes by. Keeping control of your dog puts you in the driver’s seat and the dog will respect you. 3. Do not allow or force people that are nervous about your dog/dogs to interact with them. Especially do not leave them in charge of the dogs or alone with the dogs. Dogs know when they are in charge of a situation or not. Even the calmest sweetest dog can get an ego boost by snapping at someone or bullying someone. I hear “he’s never done that to anyone before” often. Different people get a different reaction from the same dog. Most dogs hate your mailman. Two reasons: he is nervous about dogs and he comes often and the dog barks and “makes him leave”, in that doggie mind. It’s another ego boost thing. They think they saved the family from that “evil” mailman again. 4. This may be hard for some people, but DO NOT TREAT YOUR DOG LIKE A HUMAN! If your dog has the size and strength to harm someone you need to be in control. Teach basic commands, Sit, Stay, Come, Down, Leave it, release. If your dog is showing aggressive tendencies, do not let him on the furniture. You need to send a clear message that you are alpha and he is not an equal. Crate training is wonderful. This gives you a tool for housebreaking,

preventing chewing and you control the dog and he will learn self control. The crate is also a great place to put the dog if a nervous visitor comes over or if children come over. This gives your dog a safe place. 5. Know your dog and do not be in denial. Know if your dog is a resource guarder or not. If you have a large powerful dog and it gets aggressive over toys, food or space, you have a dangerous dog. I do not recommend children living in the same home. It only takes one snap to require plastic surgery or worse. Most of us have had a small dog with this problem. A small dog with this issue is not likely to kill or maim someone. If you are an alpha pack leader then remember to keep the kids safe. I do not give foster dogs toys, treats or food near my kids. They are given in their crate. That way, they have it at their leisure and do not have to “fight” for it. 6. Never leave kids alone with a dog, EVER! Kids running in grass and being loud sounds like prey. You may trigger an attack. Kids that run are caught with teeth. Dogs may feel protective of your kids, but feel outside kids are a threat and attack. If your dog perceives you as hurting the kids, he may bite you too. Pay close attention if you are horsing around and the kids start yelling. Stop any protective behavior. You do not want the dog taking over the situation. 7. Don’t try to handle a stray dog. You do not know its limits and something you do could set it in motion to bite. I really hope this helps you recognize the potential your dog has and prevents someone from getting hurt. If you have any question or concerns please call 859.635.2819


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Bellevue FootBall 2018

by Coach Swauger Coach Woody McMillen, is in his fourth season in leading the Tiger program. They opened the 2018 season on Saturday afternoon August 17, at Covington Catholic, hosting the bluejackets of Nicholas County. That’s correct, Saturday at Covington Catholic! The game was moved to Wooten Field due to heavy rain making Gilligan Field unsuitable for play. Nicholas County won

for the second consecutive year, 43-27. They rushed for 385 yards, while scoring 6 touchdowns on the ground. In week two, the Tigers traveled across 0’Fallon Avenue and visited Davis Field where they met the Dayton Greendevils for the 142nd time in the series. Led by senior running back Will Ryan, who rushed for 234 yards and 4 touchdowns, the team won 496. The squad amassed 417

the F lag goeS By Henry Holbomb Bennett (December 5, 1863-April 30, 1924)

Hats off! Along the street there comes A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums, A flash of color beneath the sky: Hats off! The flag is passing by! Blue and crimson and white it shines, Over the steel-tipped, ordered lines. Hats off! The colors before us fly; But more than the flag is passing by. Sea-fights and land-fights, grim and great, Fought to make and to save the State: Weary marches and sinking ships; Cheers of victory on dying lips; Days of plenty and years of peace; March of strong land’s swift increase; Equal justice, right and law, Stately honor and reverend awe; Sign of a nation, great and strong To ward her people from foreign wrong: Pride and glory and honor,---all Live in the colors to stand or fall. Hats off! Along the street there comes A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums; And loyal hearts are beating high: Hats off! The flag is passing by!

yards on the ground. The two neighborhood rivals will meet again in district play this Friday October 12, at the Stadium. In Week 3 the Tigers travelled to Alexandria to meet the Bishop Brossart Mustangs. The host team led 20-14 at the half. Due to lightening strikes throughout the area, officials postponed the contest. The two teams came back on Saturday morning to resume the game. The Tigers scored two unanswered touchdowns and won the game 28-20. The defense was outstanding. Will Ryan again provided the spark on offense by rushing for 211 yards and scoring 3 touchdowns, 2 on the ground and one through the air. Sophomore place kicker Lorenzo Perez continued his steady kicking by making all 4 of his extra point attempts. This after making 7 for 7 vs Dayton the week before. Week 4 saw the Tigers cross the Ohio River and meet the Titans of St. Bernard-Elmwood place at historic Bron Bacevich Stadium. In a weekend filled with heavy rain the team held on to win 7-6. Senior Quarterback Charlie Schreiber scored the lone

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touchdown for the offense day, September 28, the and Lorenzo Perez kicked Newport Wildcats visited the winning extra point. for Homecoming, unfortuFriday evening Sep- netly Newport came out tember 14 saw the Team on top 35-25. play their first home game Thursday October 4, of the season in the friend- district play began with a ly confines of the Bellevue visit to Ft. Mitchell and a Civic Stadium and Gilligan meeting with the defendField. The Gallatin Coun- ing State Champions, the ty Wildcats came calling Beechwood Tigers (score and the Tigers answered not available at time of the bell by winning 46-0. printing) The team will The defense again came meet Ludlow on October, up big and once again Will 19 - Senior Night. The Ryan led the offense with 3 regular season concludes at touchdowns. Walton-Verona, Friday OcBellevue High School tober 26. was also honored to induct Go Tigers!! our two newest members into the School’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni. Inducted at halftime were 1978 graduate David Fessler and 1979 graduate Debbie Bowman. These two individuals have had distinogeR haT guished careers 334 Fairfield Ave following their Bellevue, KY 41073 days at BHS and 513-324-8865 we congratulate them. The 4-1 Tigers had a bye week on SepAny Take Out tember 21. The Order following Fri-

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For Info & Rates Call Mike @ 331-7977

October, 2018 8

Beginning oF “the Bear Story,” JameS WhitcomB riley THAT ALEX “IST MAKED UP HIS-OWN-SE’F” W’y, wunst they wuz a Little Boy went out In the woods to shoot a Bear. So, he went out ‘Way in the grea’-big woods - he did. - An’ he Wuz goin’along - an’goin’along, you know, An’ purty soon he heerd somepin’ go “” Ist thataway - “” An’ he wuz , He wuz. An’ so he runned an’ clumbed a tree A grea’-big tree, he did, - a sicka- tree.

It’s First Friday! November 2nd 5 pm to 10 pm

Ê

Our father read this poem to me and my brother John, sitting on either side of him on the wide arms of his chair, and scared us to pieces. You want to keep children from going out in the woods at night, tuck them into bed. The “sicka-tree” is the

3rd Annual

FALL FEST

POP-UP PARTY!

called Buttonwood, can rise 40-80’ tall, with leaves 7-8” long and wide; fruits, 1” thick balls of feathery seed nutlets dangling from long stringy stems. . Time to think about planting trees in late fall, when leaves have fallen and roots are dormant. Let’s plan some cool shade in the town for next “global warming” summer.

Sycamore, a great tree to climb, and even better to plant in urban areas. It has “gre-big” leaves, as “Alex” described them, and thus gives a lot of cool shade. Just what we need in an urban setting, with hard surfaces--buildings, roads, sidewalks, parked cars. It Leaf is America’s largest broadleaf tree, a forest giant that adapts to urban life, and a fast grower! We have lost a number of trees in our city due to natural events and some not so natural events, and might now consider a few of these magnificent “old Fruit soldiers,” It’s as they are someFirst Friday! by Jo Anne Warren, times called because of Master Gardener, Tree nd their mottled bark. Plata- 2 November nus occidentalis, once Hugger

5 pm to 10 pm

Ê

FA

POP-

Featuring FOOD & DRINK ART & CRAFT LIVE MUSIC GIVING THANKS: Cash donations will be collected to support a local food pantry www.facebook.com/shopbellevueky

It’s First Friday! November 2nd 5 pm to 10 pm

Ê

3rd Annual

FALL FEST

POP-UP PARTY!

Featuring FOOD & DRINK ART & CRAFT Paid for by Brun for Bellevue LIVE MUSIC GIVING THANKS: Cash donations will be collected to support a local food pantry

GIVING THANKS: Cash donations will be collected to sup www.facebook.com/shopbellevueky

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happy Birthday virginia m. delaney - reSident oF Bellevue over 70 yearS

the holidayS Begin nov.10 at Behringer-craWFord muSeum

Toy Trains, Wahoo’s Winter Wonderland, Dickens’ Village, Carolers and More. The holidays are off to an early, festive start at Behringer- Crawford Museum on Saturday, November 10, when the Holiday Toy Trains launch their 27th year of delighting generations with more than 30 animated, guest-operated features and 250 feet of track rolling through busy cities and snowy countrysides. Also on display for the second year will be Wahoo’s Winter Wonderland, a kid-sized, animated ex-

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to

hibit based on the children’s book by Kenton Hills author Diana Grady, “The Holiday Adventures of Wiley Wahoo & Me!” The three-room display follows Grady’s dogs - Wiley Wahoo, a crafty Weimaraner, and Roz, a free-spirited Jack Russell terrier - as they explore holiday activities around the region, featuring miniature versions of local landmarks, including the Fountain Square ice rink, the Roebling suspension bridge, the Carroll Chimes bell tower in Mainstrasse Village and more. In addition, “Christmas in Victorian England,” an elaborate,

lighted display of Department 56 miniature scenes arranged by the Queen City Villagers, will depict characters and scenes from Charles Dickens’ books and life. On Sunday afternoons between Thanksgiving and Christmas, local children’s librarians will read aloud from Grady’s book and the

See trainS cont’d on pg 8

Contributed by Carol J. Rich

“Complete Car & Truck Repair”

GRAVETT’S GARAGE 180 Fairfield Ave Bellevue, Kentucky 41073

859-581-9469

RE-ELECT

ohio river match (from Sept)

1. What states does the Ohio River flow through? 2. How many miles in length is the Ohio River? 3. Where is the Ohio River at its widest? 4. What two rivers form the Ohio River at Pittsburg? 5. During the Ice Age what helped to form the Ohio River? 6. The Ohio River flows into what river? 7. Where is the Ohio River at its deepest? 8. During the expansion of the U.S. what important role did the Ohio River play? 9. During the Civil War what did the slaves escaping to freedom call the Ohio River? 10. What beautiful park in Bellevue faces the Ohio River? Contributed by Carol J. Rich

PA, OH, WV, KY, IN, IL 981 miles Louisville, KY Allegheny and Monongahela Glaciers and Lakes Mississippi River Louisville, KY Transportation westward “River Jordan” Bellevue Beach Park

VOTE NOVEMBER 6


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trainS

For Info & Rates Call Mike @ 331-7977 From page

Christmas classic, “Polar Express.” The readings will take place at 2 p.m. on Nov. 25 and Dec. 2, 9, 16 and 23. Holiday finery or comfy PJs are encouraged for the story hours, which include crafts, refreshments and a visit from Santa. Ac-

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tivities are included with museum admission, but space is limited, so reservations are required. Register at education@bcmuseum. org or call (859) 491-4003. Holiday activities continue throughout the season at the museum and, except

I am again seeking re-election with no “agenda” but a desire for the city to move in a more business-like, manner. I would like the opportunity to continue my effort for more open, transparent and timely discussion on all issues, after all, these are our tax dollars that we cannot afford to just throw around. This year there will be a new Mayor and I feel with my experience thus far, my knowledge of the Harbor Greene, riverfront property transfers and financing and the Marianne Theatre situation of which many on council are kept in the dark on, or snapped at when they ask a question, I can make an attempt to make changes as to how knowledge is shared both with fellow council members and with you the citizens who are footing the bill. I alone cannot make these changes but if you have been to or watched a council meeting you will see that I ask questions that make staff uneasy, but I ask them anyway. This is our City and I want to see it prosper and ensure a brighter future for generations to come, not saddle future generations with debt. I am asking for your vote. You can reach me any time at 859-240-5209 or rodneyp@twc.com paid for by the Committee To Elect J. Rodney Poynter

as noted below, are included with museum admission. For reservations, call (859) 491-4003. •Chippie’s Sensational Science Lab: Toy-Making Experiments - Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1-2 p.m. Help Santa’s elves by making your own Silly Putty, bouncy balls, and more, then listen to a story about Santa’s workshop. $3 lab fee per child. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Preregistration required. •Ornament-Making Workshop: Old Fashioned Tin-Punching -Saturday, Nov. 17, 2-3 p.m. Because glass was so

October, 2018 8

expensive, early Americans used tin to make lanterns, piercing the metal in intricate patterns to let the light shine through. Learn how to create a holiday ornament using this pioneer technique. Craft fee is $5 for BCM members and $7 plus museum admission for future members. Reservations are required by November 14. •Tot Tuesdays! Harvest Fun -Tuesday, Nov. 20, 10:30-1130 a.m. Get ready to decorate your Thanksgiving table with a turkey, pumpkin or other fall creation crafted by you and your toddler. $1 craft fee per child.

•Members-Only Holiday Room, Friday, Nov. 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. BCM members, take a relaxing break from Black Friday shopping and enjoy hot chocolate, cookies and crafts. Not a member? Join at the door! AND MUCH MORE! BCM’s regular hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Behringer-Crawford Museum is located at 1600 Montague Road-Devou Park, Covington, KY 41011. For more information call 859-491-4003 or go to www.bcmuseum.org.

congratulationS to the grandvieW elementary School StudentS oF the month honored For character at the SeptemBer 26, 2018 Board oF education meeting.

Pictured, back row: Superintendent Robb Smith, Assistant Superintendent Janis Winbigler, Olivia Hatch, Paizley Singleton, Zoey Smith, Kensley Henry, Principal Angie Young Pictured, front row: Aria Carlson, Carter Johnson, Elena Ruiz


October, 2018 8 happeningS Newport 901 E. Sixth St. Newport, KY 41011 Programs for Adults and Teens Tween Scene 4 pm Tuesdays, Oct. 16, 23 & 30 Join us Tuesday afternoons for a different activity each week. Ages 8-12. No need to register. Impromptu 3-5 pm Wednesdays Oct. 17, 24 & 31 Come unwind after school, we may play board games, we may make a craft. We could do both… impromptu the time is planned the fun is not. Ages 11-18. No need to register. Science Club: Egg Drop Experiment 3-5 pm Thursday, Oct. 11 Use any and all materials you can to keep your egg safe before we drop it off a ladder. Ages 11-19. No need to register. Euchre Tournament 6-8:30 pm Monday, Oct. 15 Join us for a night of card dealing, table talk, and fun competition From 6–6:30 pm, we’re having a tutorial for new players. At 6:30 pm, the tournament begins. We’ll draw for random partners, change up teams throughout the night, and count each individual player’s score throughout the tournament. Prizes to first, second, and third place. Ages 18 & up. No need to register.

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College and Job Help from the Brighton Center 10 am-noon Tuesday, Oct. 16 Meet with a staff member from the Brighton Center to learn about federally funded job training and college opportunities. Also, get help with resumes and job searching. Open to all — teens and adults. Walkins are welcome. No need to register. YA for Grown Adults Book Club 7 pm Tuesday, Oct. 16 Join the discussion of Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan. Ages 18 & up. New members welcome. No need to register. Teen Pumpkin Decorating 3-5 pm Thursday, Oct. 18 Break out the Sharpies, paint, and glitter: it’s time to decorate pumpkins for Halloween. Mini pumpkins will be ready and waiting for their faces: funny or ghoulish, friendly or scary – you decide. Ages 11-18. No need to register. Signature Series: Bluegrass artists Sister Sadie 7 pm Friday, Oct. 19 DaleAnn Bradley, Tina Adair, Deanie Richardson, Gena Britt, & Beth Lawrence make up the extraordinary band known as Sister Sadie. The event is free and open to the public; however, free tickets must be requested in advance. Please phone 859.781.6166, ext. 31 to request your tickets; or go online.

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Halloween Jewelry 6:30 pm Monday, Oct. 22 Get your spooky on with DIY Halloween jewelry. Ages 18 & up. Register. Friends Book Sale 9 am-noon Thursday, Oct. 25 Stop in and take advantage of great prices, from 25 cents to $2 for select titles. No need to register. Teen Halloween Party 3-5 pm Thursday, Oct. 25 Start you Halloween early at our Teen Halloween Party. There will be face painting, Halloween board games, crafts and a viewing of Monster House. Ages 11-19. No need to register. Mystery Science Theater 3000 Party 6-8 pm Monday, Oct. 29 Get ready for a night of B movie horror with Mystery Science Theater 3000. Join us as we watch our favorite narrators (human and robot alike) riff on the film Starcrash (1978) starring David Hasselhoff– the Star Wars (1977) knockoff so bad, it’s scary. Ages 18 & up. No need to register. Programs for Children and Families Ready for K Through Play 10 am Mondays, Oct. 15, 22 & 29 Each week we’ll sing silly songs, play fun games, read a great story, and explore art, all while working to develop kindergarten readiness skills. Ages 3-5. No need to register. Movers & Shakers 10 am Tuesdays, Oct. 16, 23 & 30 Join us for a fun morning full of dancing, jumping and playing. Ages 2-5. No need to register. Baby Bounce & Rhyme 10 am Wednesdays, Oct. 17, 24 & 31 Bond with baby while singing silly songs, doing fun laptime bouncy rhymes, and dancing in our bubbles.

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Newborn to age 24 months. No need to register. Little Prodigies 4 pm Wednesdays,, Oct. 17, 24 & 31 Join us Wednesdays for different art and music related programs! It’s not about the destination in this program but all about the journey. Story Time for Bigs 10 am Thursdays, Oct. 18 & 25 We will sing songs, read a book, have plenty of time for play, and make a craft. Ages 2-5. No need to register. Yoga for Young Ones 11 am Saturday, Oct. 13 We will read a story,

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learn some yoga poses, and practice a mindfulness exercise for kids. Bring a yoga mat if you would like to, but they are not required. Wear comfortable clothing that you can move around in. Ages 2-7. No need to register.. Family Fun Night: Hotel Transylvania 6:30-8:30 pm Thursday, Oct. 18 Join us for a spooky move night perfect for the whole family, with a screening of Hotel Transylvania. There will also be snacks, spooky crafts, and a play

See liBrary cont’d on pg 12

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For Info & Rates Call Mike @ 331-7977

congratulationS

October, 2018 8

Bellevue middle/high School StudentS oF the month honored For character at the SeptemBer 26, 2018 Board oF education meeting. to the

Fire Board meeting

The regularly scheduled October 17 Fire Board Meeting has been changed to Tuesday, October 30, 2018 at 6 p.m. at the Bellevue Callahan Center. The public is encouraged to attend to witness the promotions of Captains Brent Schafer and Rob Duke, and Lieutenants Nick Scott and Mike Gullett. The fire department’s three new hires will also be introduced at the meeting.

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Pictured, back row: Principal John Darnell, Dillon Rylant, Logan Purnell, Superintendent Robb Smith Pictured, front row: Lea Baker, Mario League, Greer Hayes Not pictured: Arianna Lorenzo-Hernandez and Deja Joseph


THE FOLLOWING RACES WILL APPEAR ON THE VOTING MACHINES CALIFORNIA, CAMP SPRINGS, CLARYVILLE, AND PAPER BALLOTS IN THE PRECINCTS CAMPBELL COUN COLDLISTED SPRING B, D,IN E, & F, ALEXANDRIA E, F, & G, GRANTS LICK, JOHNS HILL,6, 2018. FOR THE GENERAL ELECTION, NOVEMBER CALIFORNIA, CAMP MELBOURNE, MENTOR, SPRINGS, ROSS, REQUIRED SILVER GROVE, SUN PURSUANT TO KRS 424.290, “MATTERS TOCLARYVILLE, BE PUBLISHE PURSUANT TO KRS 424.290, “MATTERS REQUIRED COLD SPRING TO B, D, BE E, & F,PUBL VALLEY, AND WILDER PURSUANT TO KRS 424.290, “MATTERS REQUIRED TOON BE PUBLISHED,” BELLEVUE A, C, & THE FOLLOWING RACES WILL APPEAR THE VOTING MACHINE GRANTS LICK, JOHNS HILL,MACH THE FOLLOWING RACES WILL APPEAR ON THE VOTING OF BELLEVUE THE FOLLOWING RACES WILL APPEAR ON THE VOTING MACHINES MELBOURNE, MENTOR, ANDAND PAPER BALLOTS IN THE PRECINCTS LISTED IN CAMPBELL PAPER BALLOTS IN THE PRECINCTS LISTED IN CAMPBELL ROSS, SILVER GROVE, SUN COU AND PAPER BALLOTS IN THE PRECINCTS LISTED IN CAMPBELL COUNTY VALLEY, AND WILDER FOR THE GENERAL ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6,CALIFORNIA, 2018. FOR FOR THE GENERAL ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 2018. THE GENERAL ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 2018. B CLARY ALL PRECINCTS

SAMPLE BALLOT

GRANTS LICK, MEN AND SUN VALL

ALL PRECINCTS

CLARYVILLE AND COLD SPRING D

CLARYVILLE AND COLD SPRING D

ALEXANDRIA E, F, & G, DAYTON A & CALIFORNIA, CALIFORNIA, CAMP CLARYVILLE, GRANTS LICK, MENTOR, PART OF DAYTON SPRINGS, CLARYVILLE, AND SUN VALLEY FT.CALIFORN THOMAS COLD SPRING B, D, E, & F, CALIFORNIA, CL GRANTS ALEXANDRIA E, F, & G, GRANTS LICK, JOHNS HILL, GRANTS LICK, AND S A, B, C, & D, CALIFORNIA,BELLEVUE CAMP MELBOURNE, MENTOR, AND SUN VP SPRINGS, CLARYVILLE, DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. ROSS, GROVE, SUN COLD SPRING B, D, E,SILVER & F, THOMAS AALEXANDRIA & J, NEWPORT A, GRANTS LICK, JOHNS HILL, VALLEY, AND WILDER E, F, & G, ALEXANDRIA F,&&K, G, C, D, E, F,CALIFORNIA, G, H,E, I, J, MELBOURNE,B, MENTOR, CAMP SOUTHGATE B BELLEVUE AND PART A, C, & D ROSS, SILVER GROVE, SUN AND SOUTHGATE A CALIFORNIA, CAMP SPRINGS, CLARYVILLE, BELLEVUE A, B, C, OF & D, VALLEY, AND WILDER OFB, SOUTHGATE A BELLEVUE COLDCLARYVILLE, SPRING E, & F, SPRINGS, DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. BELLEVUE A, C, D, & D; PART OFD, BELLEVUE LICK, JOHNS THOMAS A F, &BJ,HILL, NEWPORT A, COLDGRANTS SPRING B, E, & MELBOURNE, MENTOR, B, C, D, HILL, E, F, G, H, I, J, & K, GRANTS LICK, JOHNS ROSS, SILVER GROVE, SUN AND SOUTHGATE A MELBOURNE, MENTOR, VALLEY, AND WILDER FT. THOMAS C, E, F ROSS, SILVER GROVE, SUN BELLEVUE M, N, P, R, S, & T; P VALLEY, AND WILDER OF B BELLEVUE FT. THOMAS A, A, C, B DAYTON A & B; DAYTON A & OF BELLEV JOHNS HILL, B A PART OF DAYTON C AND FT. THOMAS B PART OF DAYTON C SOUTHGATE FT FT. THOMAS M B BELLEVUE A, B, C, & D,

ALL PRECINCTS ALL PRECINCTS BELLEVUE A, B, C, & D, DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. THOMAS T, HIGHLAND HEIGHTS A, B, D, & E, JOHNS HILL, MELBOURNE, BELLEVUE A, B, C, & D, ALL PRECINCTS NEWPORT A, B, C, D, E, F, G, DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. CLARYVILLE AND COLD H, I, J, & K, SILVER GROVE, THOMAS T, HIGHLAND SPRING D DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. ALL PRECINCTS CLARYVILLE SOUTHGATEAND A,HEIGHTS B,COLD & D A, B, D, & E, THOMAS A & J, NEWPORT A, BELLEVUE A, B, C, & D, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, & K, SPRING D AND WILDER JOHNS HILL, MELBOURNE, DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. AND SOUTHGATE A NEWPORT A, B, C, D, E,ALL F, G,PRECINCTS THOMAS A & J, NEWPORT A, DAY H, I, J, & K, SILVER GROVE, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, & K, PART OF SOUTHGATE A, B, & D FT.A AND SOUTHGATE A DAYTON BELLEVUE A, B, C,AND & D, WILDER FT. THOMAS C, E, F, H, K, L, PART OF DAYT DAYTON A, B, & C,AND FT. COLD CLARYVILLE M, N, P, R, A, S, &B, T; C, PART BELLEVUE & OF D, THOMAS T, HIGHLAND FT. THOM FT. THOMAS A, B, I, & J, ALL PRECINCTS D HEIGHTSSPRING A, B, D, & E, DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. JOHNS HILL, AND PAR JOHNS HILL, MELBOURNE, THOMAS A SOUTHGATE & J, NEWPORT A, A CLARYVILLE AND COLD ALEXANDRIA A, B, C, D, E, F, BELLEVUE A, B, C, & D, NEWPORT A, B, C, D, E, F, G, BELLEVUE A, B,DC, &GROVE, D, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, &FT. K, NEWPORT H,SPRING I, J, & K, SILVER THOMASA, C,B, E,C, F,D &DAYTON G, CALIFORNIA, CAMP DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. A, B, & C, FT. AND SOUTHGATE A I, & J; PART OF FT. SOUTHGATE A, B, & D SPRINGS, SPRING A, THOMAS A & J, NEWPORT A, M, N, P, R, S, & T; PA WILDER THOMASCOLD T,AND HIGHLAND J AND NEWPORT FT. THOMAS A, B, B, C, E, & F, FT. THOMAS B, C, D, PRECINCTS E, F, G, H, I, J, & K, HEIGHTS A, B, D, & E, A, ALL PRECINCTS ALL JOHNS HILL, AN B, C, E,HILL, F, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, A, B, C, D, E, F, AND SOUTHGATE A ALEXANDRIA JOHNS MELBOURNE, SOUTHGATENE A P, R, & S,A, GRANTS & D, G,LICK, CALIFORNIA, CAMP NEWPORT B, C, E, F, G, I, & BELLEVUE A, C, B, COLD C, & D,SPRING HEIGHTS ALEXANDRIA A, B, C, & D, PART OF ALEXANDRIA A,FT. B, THOMA SPRINGS, A, H, HIGHLAND I, J, & K, SILVER GROVE, DAYTON A, B, & C, FT. COLD SPRING A & C, FT. MENTOR, ROSS, C, D, E, F, & G B, C, E,C, & F, FT. THOMAS A, M, N, P, R, SOUTHGATE A,A, B, D ALEXANDRIA B, & D, E, F, ALL PRECINCTS THOMAS T, HIGHLAND SOUTHGATE C, AND SUN NEWPORT A, B, C, D,E, F, G, FT. THOM B, C, E,CAMP F, H, I, J, THOMAS K, L, M, N,B, C, E, F, H, I, K, L, AND & G, WILDER CALIFORNIA, HEIGHTS A, B,D,D, & E, I, & J; PART OF FT. THOMAS BELLEVUE A,COLD B, C, & VALLEY SPRINGS, SPRING A, M, N, P, R, S, & T, JOHN P, R,MELBOURNE, & S, GRANTS LICK, FT. THOMAS C, E J AND NEWPORT H & K JOHNS HILL, B, C, E, F, FT. THOMAS A, ALL PRECINCTS DAYTON A,& B, & C, FT. ALL PRECINCTS SOU HIGHLAND HEIGHTS A, B, C, HEIGHTS C, ALEXANDRIA A, B, C, & D, M, N, P, R, S, & T B, C, E, F, H, HIGHLAND I,A, J, K, M, D, N, E, NEWPORT B,L,C, F, G, THOMAS HIGHLAND D, & E, AND SOUTHGATE B, P, R,T, & S, GRANTS LICK, MENTOR, ROSS, COLD SPRING A & C, FT. FT. THOMAS A H, HIGHLAND I, J, & K,HEIGHTS SILVER HEIGHTS A, B, D, & E,C, GROVE, ALEXANDRIA A,C, B, C, & D, & D SOUTHGATE C, AND SUN HIGHLAND HEIGHTS B & E, B, C, E, F, H, I, K, L, JOHNS HIL SOUTHGATE MENTOR, ROSS,A, B, & D COLD SPRING A & C, THOMAS FT. JOHNS HILL, MELBOURNE, CALIFORNIA, CLARYVILLE, VALLEY SOUTHGATE C & D, WILDER SOUTHGATE C, AND SUN M, N, P, R, S, & T, AND WILDER THOMAS B, C, E, F, H, I, K, L, SOUTHGA NEWPORT A, B,VALLEY C, D, E, F, G, GRANTS LICK, MENTOR, M, N, P, R, S, & T, HIGHLAND ANDA, PART HEIGHTS B, C,OF JOHNS HILL ALL PRECINCTS A, B, SUN C, H, I, J, & K, SILVER GROVE, HIGHLAND HEIGHTSAND D,B,& E, VALLEY AND SOUTHGATE B, ALEXANDRIA A, B, C, D, E, F, D, & E, AND SOUTHGATE SOUTHGATE A, B, & D NEWPORT A, B, C, D C, & D C, &HEIGHTS D HIGHLAND B & E, HIGHLAND HEIGHTS B & E, & G, CALIFORNIA, CAMP AND WILDER I,&&D,J;WILDER PART OF FT.PA T SOUTHGATE C & D, WILDER ALEXANDRIA E, F, SOUTHGATE C SPRINGS, COLD SPRING A,& G, AND PART OF JOHNS HILL J AND NEWPORT H CAMP AND PART OF JOHNS HILL B, C, E, & CALIFORNIA, F, FT. THOMAS A, ALL PRECINCTS ALL PRECINCTS CLARYVILLE, B, C, E,SPRINGS, F, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, ALEXANDRIA A, E, F, P, R,COLD & S, GRANTS SPRINGLICK, B,B, D,C, E,D, & F, NEWPORT ALEXANDRIA B, C, D, E, & G, CALIFORNIA, HIGHLAND HEIGHTS C, CAMP GRANTS LICK, JOHNS HILL,ALEXANDRIA A, B, C, & D, & J; PART SILVERI,GROVE; P F, & G SPRINGS, COLD SPRING A, MENTOR, ROSS, MELBOURNE, MENTOR, COLD SPRING A & C, FT. J AND N ALEXANDRIA B, C, D, E, COLD SPRING E B, C, E, & AND F, FT. THOMAS A, SOUTHGATE C, SUN ROSS, SILVER GROVE, SUN THOMAS B, C, E, F, H, I, K, L, F, & G SILVER GROVE; PART OF ALL PRECINCTS MELBOURN B, C, E, H,C,I, D, J, K, F, L, M, N, COLD SPRING E AND VALLEY M, N, P, R, S, & T, VALLEY, WILDER ALEXANDRIA A,F,B,AND E, MELBOURNE P, R, & S, GRANTS LICK, NEWPORT A, B, BELLEVUE HIGHLAND HEIGHTSA, A,C, B,&C,D; PART ALEXANDRIA B, C, D, E, & G, CALIFORNIA, CAMP HIGHLAND HEIGHTS C, I, & J; PART OF F ALL PRECINCTS ALEXANDRIA A, B, B, C, OF BELLEVUE B & D, ON N S ALL PRECINCTS D, & E, AND SOUTHGATE F, & PAGE G CONTINUED SPRINGS, COLD SPRING A, CONTINUED ON NEXT MENTOR, ROSS, COLD SPRING A & C, FT. J AND NEWPO C,in & the D election booth B, C, E,These & F, FT. A,that HIGHLAND B & E, areTHOMAS the races you willTHOMAS see on ALLHEIGHTS SOUTHGATE C, AND SUN PRECINCTS B, C, E, F, H, I, K, L, B, C, E, F, H, I, J,VALLEY K, L, M, N,November 6th, 2018 M, N, P, R, S, & T, SOUTHGATE C & D, WILDER AND P, R, & S, GRANTS LICK, ballot created HIGHLAND HEIGHTS A, B, C, PART OF JOHNS HILL This is a sample for our readers’ benefit. ALL PRECINCTS HIGHLAND HEIGHTS C, A,ability. B,SOUTHGATE C, & D, D, &of E,our AND B, It is accurate toALEXANDRIA the best MENTOR, ROSS, COLD SPRING A & C, FT. C, & D HIGHLAND HEIGHTS B & E, It is not exactly how it will appear in the voting booth, SOUTHGATE C, AND SUN THOMAS B, C, E, F, H, I, K, L, SOUTHGATE C & D, WILDER BELLEVUE A, B, C, & D but was created with information from the County Clerk’s office. VALLEY AND PART OF JOHNS HILL M, N, P,DAYTON R, S, & T,A & B; HIGHLAND HEIGHTS A, B, C, PART OF DAYTON C AND D, & E, AND SOUTHGATE B, FT. THOMAS B ALEXANDRIA B, C, D, E, C, & D HIGHLAND HEIGHTS B & E, SILVER GROVE; PA F, & G

“MATTERS REQUIRED TO BE PUBLISHED,” WILL APPEAR ON THE VOTING MACHINES PRECINCTS LISTED IN CAMPBELL COUNTY L ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 2018.


PAGE 12

For Info & Rates Call Mike @ 331-7977

liBrary

cont From pg

area for little ones. Families. No need to register. Sensory Science Story Time 11:30 am Saturday, Oct. 20 Children are invited to use all of their senses to explore stories, songs and hands-on STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) activities. This program is designed for children with sensory integration challenges but is open to children of all abilities. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Children’s Librarian Nina Frondorf: nfrondorf@cc-pl.org OR 859.572.5035 ext. 18.

From

9

All ages. No need to register. Halloween Hullabaloo 1:30-4:30 pm Saturday, Oct. 27 Costumes are encouraged as we will be enjoying Halloween shenanigans in the form of snacks, crafts, and a viewing of Halloweentown. All ages. No need to register. The Newport Branch is located at 901 E. Sixth St. in Newport, phone 859572-5035. Hours are 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.7 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. The website address is www.cc-pl.org.

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I began my ministry in 1981 in a small congregation in southwest Ohio. When that congregation started talking about what it meant to be a welcoming congregation the discussion was primarily about proper signage so visitors could know where to enter the building, find the office, nursery, worship space, and most importantly, where the restrooms were. In those days welcoming included things like, “the coffee hour.” To this day I still do not drink coffee. In those days the mention of tea was such an inconvenience, unless it was that gross instant tea they were making back then. Sometimes the coffee hour included donuts. Thirtyseven years later and donuts still remind me of the thousands of Church meetings (I’m exaggerating) I’ve sat through discussing why people go to Church. We would sit in a circle with long-time Church attendees “welcoming” new people by asking them, so what made you come to Church? I’ll never forget when someone finally got honest and said, “the food!” Some thought it was almost sacrilegious to admit that, and yet most congregations will brag about how good their potluck dinners are. That would be a “pitchin” dinner if you live in Indiana. Either way it’s a gamble on how good it

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October, 2018 8

might be. As I reflect my years in ministry it’s sad to admit how unwelcoming we’ve been to so many people without even noticing. Most Church buildings (my current congregation included) have signs that include words that say something like, “Everybody is Welcome Here” or “All are Welcome.” Truth be told, those Church meetings were more about welcoming people “just like us.” Over time we began to ask a different question: what does it mean to be an INCLUSIVE congregation? That raised some neck hair because inclusive meant that we wanted the people we were welcoming to stay, people with different skin color, ethnicities, cultures, and sexual orientations. To be inclusive required us to name who and what we meant when we said “ALL” on our Church signs. The longer the conversations went the slower we began to admit that it was and is about race, and so much more. When exploring being inclusive goes deeper we began to realize that tea can be an option. And, when we do have donuts, a gluten free choice is possible. When we sing spirituals in worship like, “I Want Jesus to Walk with Me,” not only does it remind us of slavery and racism in our own country and hearts but it challenges us to a wider inclusion. So, how about singing, I want Jesus to “Go” with me or “Roll” with me, for those who are

mobile in ways different than walking? Maybe God “receives” our prayers as well as hears our prayers. If we have stage lighting, screens, ramps, and large print bulletins, might we dare have some braille Bibles and hymnals and assistive listening devices? How will/do we respond to a teenager with tourette syndrome who blurts out in the middle of the sermon? What will our attitude be toward this child of God and her family? Welcoming people is good, but, including people of all abilities is better. St. John United Church of Christ is beginning a process to help us learn how to be even more inclusive through how we think, our attitudes, our welcome, our willingness, our budget, and our love for all our neighbors near and far. No matter who you are or where you are on life’s journey you are welcome and included here.

From the Corner is written by the Rev. Keith M. Haithcock, Pastor & Teacher of St. John United Church of Christ on the corner of Fairfield and Ward Avenues in Bellevue, Kentucky. Pastor@StJohnChurch.net www.StJohnChurch.net

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Bellevue Community News - October, 2018  

Bellevue Community News - October, 2018