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Alarm Control System Installation & Getting Started Guide

Version 2.11.x


Contents 1.

Introduction ........................................................................................................................ 5

1.1.

Listeners .............................................................................................................................. 6

2.

System Requirements ....................................................................................................... 8

2.1.

Additional Requirements ...................................................................................................... 9

2.1.1. Power Plan Settings ............................................................................................................. 9 2.2.

Systems and Security ........................................................................................................ 10

2.2.1. Summary of Ports Usage ................................................................................................... 10 2.2.2. UAC ................................................................................................................................... 12 2.2.3. Changing File Permission .................................................................................................. 13 2.2.4. Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration ............................................................ 14 3.

Installation ........................................................................................................................ 15

4.

Configuration ................................................................................................................... 18

4.1.

Online Help ........................................................................................................................ 18

4.2.

Users ................................................................................................................................. 19

4.2.1. Administrator ...................................................................................................................... 22 4.2.2. Schedule Manager ............................................................................................................. 22 4.2.3. On-Call Staff ...................................................................................................................... 22 4.2.4. A users own details ............................................................................................................ 22 4.3.

Locations ........................................................................................................................... 24

4.4.

Schedule ............................................................................................................................ 25

4.4.1. Permanent schedule .......................................................................................................... 25 4.4.2. Time based schedule ......................................................................................................... 26 4.5.

Action Filters ...................................................................................................................... 29

4.6.

Dispatch Transports ........................................................................................................... 30

4.6.1. TETRA (TErrestrial Trunked RAdio) using a radio .............................................................. 30 4.6.2. SDR (Short Data Router) TETRA Direct Interface .............................................................. 31 4.6.3. GSM MODEM .................................................................................................................... 32 4.6.4. DMR (Digital Mobile Radio) ................................................................................................ 33

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4.6.5. Zonith WiFi......................................................................................................................... 38 4.6.6. Polycom/SpectraLink DECT ............................................................................................... 39 4.6.7. POCSAG Pager ................................................................................................................. 41 4.6.8. Swissphone Pager ............................................................................................................. 41 4.6.9. Ekahau............................................................................................................................... 41 5.

Sending Notification ........................................................................................................ 43

5.1.

Preferences ....................................................................................................................... 44

5.2.

Basic Troubleshooting........................................................................................................ 46

6.

Advanced Configuration.................................................................................................. 47

6.1.

Location Agents ................................................................................................................. 47

6.2.

Competencies .................................................................................................................... 48

6.3.

Alarm Configuration ........................................................................................................... 49

6.4.

Acknowledge Interface ....................................................................................................... 49

6.5.

Personal Safety Alarms...................................................................................................... 50

6.6.

Supporting many ZONITH Alarm Displays ......................................................................... 52

7.

License Upgrade/Update ................................................................................................. 53

7.1.

About Page ........................................................................................................................ 53

7.2.

Requesting A New License Code ....................................................................................... 53

8.

Centralized Lone Worker (CLW)...................................................................................... 54

9.

Safe Area .......................................................................................................................... 55

9.1.

Safe Area Configuration ..................................................................................................... 55

10.

Known Issues ................................................................................................................... 58

10.1. Failure to receive incoming text messages using MOTOTRBO DMR 4000 series terminals. .......................................................................................................................................... 58 10.2. Very slow network performance on Windows using DMR .................................................. 59 APPENDIX ................................................................................................................................... 60 A.

TETRA Media Programming Guide .................................................................................... 60

B.

CPS Quick Programming Guide (DMO) ............................................................................. 62

C.

DECT SERVER/Base Station Requirements for ACS ........................................................ 64

D.

Adding Ports to Windows Firewall ...................................................................................... 65

E.

How to Disable Windows Firewall? .................................................................................... 69

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1.

Introduction

ZONITH Alarm Control System (hereby denoted as ACS) is a software application used to automatically dispatch alarms in the form of text messages to devices such as mobile phones, pagers, digital radios, etc. The ACS does not need to know where alarms originate from, the only thing that is important is that the alarm can be translated into a format that the ACS can understand and interpret. A software application, called a listener – see section 1.1, is used to fetch alarms from external systems and translate them into a format the ACS understands. The ACS consists of a number of defined users. Users with the specific role “On-Call Staff” can be placed “on duty” and will receive alarms as text messages. On-Call Staff users are placed on duty in a Schedule. It is possible to modify the current schedule which affects the current day (and optionally the following day).To modify a specific week (choose from the next 20 weeks), or to create a template week which can be repeated over and over every week. On-Call Staff users can interact with the ACS through the “Acknowledge Interface” which is used by On-Call Staff to indicate that they either accept or decline an alarm, and they are also able to close the alarm once it has been dealt with. Another scenario is that it is only important to know who is handling the alarm and not when it is closed. Finally in other scenarios it is adequate simply to receive the alarm as a text message, and no further interaction is desired. The ACS can handle all of these scenarios. below illustrates how an arbitrary number of listeners can be plugged into the ACS just as well as an arbitrary number of dispatch technologies can be used to send alarms out of the system.

Figure 1

Text Message Listener . . .

Digital Radio Dispatch

OPC Listener

Pager Dispatch

. . .

. . .

. . .

Fire Alarm Listener

Output Relays Figure 1 - Alarm Control System Overview

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1.1. Listeners A Listener is a software application that provides the link between the alarm source and the dispatcher software Zonith ACS. Its main purpose is to collect the alarms in the most appropriate way from the alarm source, translate these alarms into a format the ACS understands, and then raise them as alarms so they can be sent out to the On-Call Staff users on duty. There are a number of standard listeners available today which can fetch alarms using different technologies such as serial connections, e-mails, OPC, text messages (radios and phones), digital/analogue input/outputs, etc. In case there is not a standard listener for an alarm source, a custom one can be created. Typically a listener is installed on the same PC as the ACS, however this is not a requirement. For the same reason, each listener contains a small database in which the listener stores the alarms it receives from a source until it has been successfully delivered to the ACS.

Table 1: Currently Supported Listeners NAME

Physical Interface

Command Line

TCP/IP Network

Database

TCP/IP Network

DECT WiFi

Wireless

DMR

Wireless

Email

TCP/IP Network

ESPA444

RS-232

IO

Serial RS-232

Motorola FaultNBI

TCP/IP Network

Ekahau

Wireless

MOXA (IO) OPC SNMP

TCP/IP Network TCP/IP Network TCP/IP Network

Panic Alerting

Serial RS-232

SDS (TETRA)

Wireless

Serial ASCII

Serial RS-232

SMS (GSM)

Wireless

Alarm Control System

Description This is used to capture alarm from a command line. A client may be required for this listener which is supplied along with the Listener. This listener can also be used to receive HTTP requests. This is used to collect alarms from a Database. This used to capture alarms from incoming messages in DECT networks or from Motorola TEAM phones. This is used to capture alarms from incoming DMR text messages in DMR network such as MOTOTRBO and Hytera DMR. This is used to capture alarms from devices that are capable of sending out email on an alarm event. This is used to collect alarms from a device that sends out alarm via Serial RS 232 using the ESPA444 protocol. This is used to collect alarms from the analog and digital inputs of the RTCU unit. This is used to collect alarms from a Motorola Dimetra Micro solution This is used to collect events from Ekahau Tags and convert them to alarms. This is used to collect alarms from a MOXA IO unit. This is used to collect alarms form an OPC server. This is used to collect SNMP traps and convert those to alarms This is used to capture alarms from a PC-350 Alarm Receiving Center known as the ARC. This is used to capture alarms from incoming SDS in TETRA network. This is used to capture alarm from standard RS-232 based on Serial ASCII string. This is sued to capture alarm from the incoming SMS message in GSM network.

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For more details about each listener, refer to the User’s Guide available at the Listener install directory. You may also contact your local supplier for this information.

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2.

System Requirements

A PC running the ACS software should at least comply with these requirements. These requirements are minimum and more often higher as compared to the hardware requirements of the operating system. •

Processor: Minimum 2.4 GHz (dual core highly recommended)

Memory: Minimum 4GB (x86) or 8GB (x64) of RAM

Fast Ethernet

-

Required for network access.

-

Gigabit Ethernet is recommended, when using listeners that communicate via TCP/IP or when the Indoor Positioning System is part of the solution.

Physical COM PORT (RS-232) availability. Note: -

The number of physical COM PORT available on the PC depends upon the dispatch media(s) and listeners that will be used in the solution.

-

For stable operations the use of USB-TO-SERIAL is not recommended. In a case where more physical COM PORTs are needed to support both the dispatch media(s) and Listener(s) it is recommended that a PCI Expansion card shall be installed in the PC to support the number of COM PORT required.

-

For embedded/micro PC, select a model that has physical COM PORT available. Zonith application software such as the alarm display and listeners connected serially to the external devices can be installed on a Micro-PC.

-

USB-TO-SERIAL converter shall be used only on a Demo-Kit.

Operating System: Zonith ACS and Listener(s) is 32-Bit server application software. It will install and run as a 32-Bit application in a 64-Bit operating system. The application was tested for stability on the following: -

Windows Server 2008 R2 Foundation (Recommended)

-

Windows Server 2003

-

Windows 8 Pro

-

Windows 7 Ultimate/Professional

-

Windows XP Professional

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2.1. Additional Requirements Ensure that the following configuration shall be applied to the Operating System.

2.1.1.

Power Plan Settings

For Windows 7 / Windows 8, The Power Plan settings shall be configured for High Performance settings preventing the PC going to sleep mode. In addition to this configuration the USB Selective Suspend Settings as well shall be disabled as well as well as the disable hard disk option. The image below shows this configuration: On Windows 7 or Windows 8, the power options can be found in the following directory:

Control Panel\Hardware and Sound\Power Options

Figure 2: Power Options Configuration Window

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2.2. Systems and Security 2.2.1.

Summary of Ports Usage

When Microsoft Windows firewall is enabled or a third party security application software is in use, it is recommended that the following ports are open for Inbound and outbound traffic. Table 2: Summary of Port Numbers commonly used with Zonith ACS APPLICATION NAME

PROTOCOL

Zonith ACS

TCP

Listener(s)

TCP

IPS Indoor Positioning System

TCP

UDP

DMR (Mototrbo)

UDP

DMR (Hytera USB connected radio)

UDP

DMR (Hytera Repeater)

UDP

Zonith WiFi Pager (POCSAG)

TCP TCP

DEFAULT PORT USAGE 80,8242 8232 8888 49155 2525 9000 8084 8244 10001 8550 8660 162 23 2001 61000 61001 62000

ACS HTTP web interface. (can be one of the port specified) SMS Gateway (SOAP access) HTTP Proxy. Use only when http proxy enabled. Default Listener service port. Recommended service port when using Email Listener MOXA Listener service port. Panic Alerting (PC 350-JAGA application service port) ACS alarm service port. (Very Important!) ESPA2IP Port. Valid only when using the ESPA 444 listener. Ekahau RTLS Port. Ekahau Vision Default SNMP trap receiver port Bluetooth Positioning Beacon (BPB) Telnet port for BPB configuration. BPB console management port interface to BPC. Bluetooth Positioner Collector (BPC) client interface port. ACS XML service port Bluetooth Positioner Server (BPS) client interface port.

2362

BPB device discovery

4005 4007 4008 4065 3002 3003 3004 30001 - 30002 30003 - 30004 30005 - 30006 30007 - 30008 50000 49123 6000

Automatic Registration Service (ARS) port. (Mototrbo) Text Messaging Server (TMS) port (Mototrbo) Telemetry port (Mototrbo) Generic Optional Board (GOB) port. (Support for the Man Down Notifier) Radio Registration Ports Radio GPS Ports Radio Text Messaging Ports (TMS) Radio Registration Ports Radio GPS Ports Radio Telemetry Ports Radio Text Messaging Ports (TMS) IP Multi-site Networking UDP Port Zonith WiFi application service port. POCSAG Pager service port

DESCRIPTION

Please note that the actual port numbers listed above maybe different than the actual ports used in the deployment. These values however are default to the application. You may need to contact your local Network Administrator for setting up your firewall. You can use Appendix D: Adding Ports to Windows Firewall as references for configuring your Firewall.

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Note 1: Firewall configuration is not necessary when it is disabled. Note 2: The port numbers maybe different depending on the actual configuration of the solution and the port availability on the network.

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2.2.2.

UAC

UAC stands for User Account Control Settings. It is a built in feature in most Microsoft operating system such as Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 which is by default enabled. See figure below: Important Note: UAC default settings enables the operating system to prompts the User with notifications message that pops up on the window asking for User permission to allow/not allow the program to make the changes in the computer. Most of the Zonith Applications such as ACS and Listeners do not have problems with its default settings as shown on Figure 3. However, some software like the Bluetooth Positioner Interface, and Alarm Demo Tool had restricted access. The effect is that changes or writing new configuration values (configuration property file) will not be allowed.

Figure 3: The UAC Configuration Window

When this happens and you’re not allowed to disable this function you will need to change permissions to the folder specific to the Zonith Application. Refer to 2.2.3 Changing File Permission.

Recommendations: If possible disable UAC by sliding the bar at the very bottom where it says Never notify. See Figure

4.

Figure 4: UAC Recommended Configuration

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2.2.3.

Changing File Permission

When Windows UAC is in use and is not allowed to be disabled, ensure that the Install Directory related to Zonith application have the appropriate security settings. 1. Navigate to install directory for Zonith application. Example: C:\Program Files (x86)\Zonith 2. Select and Right click the application folder. Then from the available option select properties. This will open a new window and in that select Users of the host PC and click the Edit Button.

Figure 5: Security Configuration

Figure 6: Security Configuration

3. Select users applied to the host PC and check the box corresponding to Full Control. See above. Click Apply or OK button when done. 4. The figure below shows the new security settings applied to file permissions after making some changes.

In the event when a problem writing to configuration file of other Zonith application is encountered you may need to apply this type of settings following the same steps to the application directory. In some occasions you may need to apply this setting to the entire Zonith directory.

Figure 7: Full Control Applied to this Folder

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2.2.4.

Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration

Windows Server 2008 includes Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration. This feature is by default enabled. In some occasions this prevents the web browser from displaying the page correctly. You can disable this function whenever necessary. The steps below shall guide you to disable the function. 1.

Navigate to Control Panel.

2.

Under Programs Menu, select “Turn Windows Features on or off”. This will open the Server Manager window as shown below. You will need to maximize the window to see the whole menus.

Figure 8 Server Manager

3.

Look for the item called “Configure IE ESC” and click the item. This will open a new window as shown below.

Figure 9 Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration 4.

Turn OFF the feature by ticking the OFF as shown in the figure above. Click OK button when finished.

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3.

Installation

This section guides you through the process of installing Zonith Alarm Control System (ACS).

Run the executable installer file provided by your ACS reseller. Once you run the installer you will be prompted with the following dialog. Simply Click Next.

Figure 10: Installation – Welcome

Read the license agreement carefully and place a check in the “I accept…” checkbox when done reading it and you accept the terms therein. Click Next to continue.

Figure 11: Installation - License Agreement

Change the installation path if desired. Click Next to continue.

Figure 12: Installation - Installation path

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Fill in the name and account details for the initial administrator user. Click Next to continue. Fill in first and last name of the administrator account.

Fill in email address of the administrator account.

Fill in Username and Password for the administrator account.

Figure 13: Installation - Initial Administrator Account

Fill in the port number on which the user interface must run. 80 is the standard HTTP port for web applications. Choose another one if port 80 is already in use. The installer wizard will pop up a window if port 80 is used by another application otherwise it will suggest port 80 usage on the field provided for the GUI HTTP port.

Fill in the port which listener must use to raise alarms in ACS. 8244 is the default port number. Choose another one if port 8244 is already in use. Select the port numbers which you want ACS to occupy. Click Install to continue. Figure 14: Installation – Port Numbers

Check the Box to open the ACS web user interface after the installer closes. Alternatively you can manually start the ACS web user interface using the shortcut placed on the desktop. Once the installation is done, you can choose to open the ACS web interface immediately or simply open it via the shortcut placed on the desktop.

Figure 15: Installation - Complete

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Log in using the credentials provided in the installer.

Figure 16: Initial log in

Fill in the license key provided by your ACS reseller. Place the cursor in the first box and press CTRL+V to paste it in.

Figure 17: License Key Fill in the name of your company. The name will be stored in the settings and will be used when reporting errors from the ACS to the support team via web interface.

The first time you log in, you must enter the license key provided by your ACS reseller. You must also enter the name of your company. This name is only used in debugging issues so the support team can see where the errors originate from. Once the license key is entered, you will be prompted with a series of initialization pages depending on the modules available in your license. Read the instructions on each of the pages for more information.

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4.

Configuration

This section will briefly go through the basic configuration settings in the ACS. Important: When making configuration changes always click the save button before leaving the page to save and apply current changes in the configuration.

4.1. Online Help The online help is built into the application and is a good reference to use. The online help can be opened by clicking the “Help� link in the top right hand corner of the page. The link is available on all pages that have online help available (i.e. most pages). Figure 18 shows the link to open the online help. Figure 19 shows an example of the online help. The example is taken from the centralized Lone

Worker page.

Figure 18: The Online Help Link Click the Help link for a window with context sensitive help to pop out.

Figure 19: Example Online Help Content

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4.2. Users A user in ACS must have one or more roles. The available roles are: •

Administrator

Schedule Manager

On-Call Staff

The following section will give a brief description of each of these. All users are required to have valid contact information (i.e. an e-mail address) as well as a login account which allows him/her to access the web interface of ACS. Note that users can have multiple roles allowing them to access different parts of the system. Figure 20 shows what the add/edit users page can look like (It depends on the actual license key) and also gives an indication of what the different elements are used for.

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Figure 20 : Add/Edit User Fill in First Name and Last Name of the user. This is the name that will be used throughout ACS when referring to the user.

Fill in the Contact Information of the user. This information is used when dispatching (alarm) messages to the user.

The “Send test…” button can be used to submit a standard text message to radio or device to test if the entered contact information is correct.

Here it is possible to choose advanced messaging types for this user. Each communication technology has different means.

The Track with GPS is visible when the license key contains either Personal Safety Alarms or SafeArea. Selecting this flag marks the radio for GPS tracking in ZONITH Positioning Server.

Using this option requires license support for Safe Area/IPS. The Auto detect button can be used to register a portable radio (with Bluetooth) in IPS. Used for TETRA and DMR where the Group messaging can be enabled. Consult ACS Online Help for details. Use this to enable other receivers of an alarm to be notified when this user accepts an alarm.

Fill in account details which the user can use to log in to ACS. Select the Login Page that shall be displayed upon user log in.

Select desired role(s). It is possible to select more than one role. Note: Only user with On-Call Staff Role can be put on schedule and entitled to receive alarm message(s).

The advanced messaging functionality differs per communication technology. Below are listed the options per technology: •

GSM – Flash SMS: If this is selected all alarm messages dispatched to this user via GSM are sent out as GSM Flash SMS messages. This means that the message is displayed immediately on the screen. The actual behavior of GSM Flash messages depends on the vendor of the mobile phones.

TETRA – Flash SDS: If this is selected all alarm messages dispatched to this user via TETRA are sent out as TETRA Immediate Message. Please consult your TETRA radio supplier to figure out if TETRA Immediate Messaging is supported in your handsets before trying to use this feature.

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DMR – Job Tickets: This is a special Motorola MOTOTRBO feature to enable a kind of task handling menus in the radios. If using Hytera DMR such a feature is not supported yet.

Ekahau – Instant Messaging: If this is selected all alarm messages dispatched to this user via Ekahau are sent out as Instant Messages. An instant message is displayed immediately in the display of the Ekahau Tag. Please note that additional instant messages to same tag will override the previous instant message and the previous instant message will be lost.

DECT/WIFI – Advanced SMS: If this feature is selected then all alarm messages dispatched to this user via DECT are sent out as SpectraLink advanced messages which enable a menu for responding back to the incoming messages using a menu selection in the DECT phone

DECT/WIFI – Zonith WIFI Client: If this feature is selected all alarm messages dispatched to this user for DECT/WIFI is dispatched via WIFI to dedicated ZONITH App inside the WIFI phone. Use this feature for Motorola TEAM support.

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4.2.1.

Administrator

The administrator role is, as the name suggests, used for administrators who can also be referred to as “super users� of ACS. An administrator has access to the configuration settings of the ACS. This allows the user to setup the dispatch media(s), control the content of the alarm messages being sent, configure the acknowledge interface and much more.

4.2.2.

Schedule Manager

The schedule manager role is, as the name suggests, used for users that are intended to maintain the schedule (who is on duty and when) in ACS. A schedule manager has the right to modify the current schedule. Basically anything that has to do with the schedule requires the schedule manager role. In addition the Schedule Manager can edit other users profile data except changing the role of the users.

4.2.3.

On-Call Staff

The on-call staff role is used for users who can be placed on duty. Often users with the on-call staff role are referred to as watchmen. A watchman can receive alarms and interact with the ACS to modify the state of the alarms he/she is assigned through either the web interface or the acknowledge interface (text messages). An On-Call Staff user can also change own user settings to change contact information. In addition if the Permanent Schedule model is used the On-Call Staff user is also able to go on duty and off duty.

4.2.4.

A users own details

In Figure 21 is shown how a user can maintain own details.

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Use this menu item to edit your own user details

Use these buttons to save the settings and go on or off duty at the same time. This is only present for users with role “OnCall Staff�. Figure 21 A users own details.

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4.3. Locations A location in ACS is an entity on which alarms can be raised. In some cases a location corresponds to a physical location and in other cases it can correspond to a special type of alarm. Take a boiler room for example. If a number of alarms originate from elements located inside the boiler room, it might be useful to create a location called “Boiler Room”. This will give a quick indication of where the alarm occurred. An example of when a location does not correspond to a physical location could be when dealing with lone-worker/emergency alarms. Since this type of alarm potentially could happen anywhere, it is hard to map it to a physical location, and thus might be useful to simply create a location named “Emergency Alarms” which is used for these types of alarms. There can be other scenarios where something completely different is desired, but the important thing to remember is that all alarms must be raised against a location. Whether this location maps to a physical location, a special type of alarm or something completely different is all up to the people configuring the ACS and the listeners. Figure 22 shows what the add/edit location page looks like and also gives an indication of what the different elements are used for. The elements which are not commented on are used in more complex setups. For more detail on these you should contact your local ACS reseller. Fill in logical name for the location. This is the name that will be used throughout ACS. Provide a Location ID for this location. This key is used in the listener configurations when setting up which locations the alarms should be raised on. Select the Location Agent used to set alarm priorities on alarms raised on this location. This mostly used in advanced configurations.

(Optional) Fill in address information for the location. This is basically a free text which can be dynamically inserted in the alarm text if desired.

Figure 22: Add/Edit Location

Note: Check ACS Online Help for more details about location configuration.

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4.4. Schedule As of release 2.9.3 ACS comes with two different schedule models: •

Permanent schedule: Using this schedule an On-Call Staff user is put on duty and resides on duty until the On-Call Staff user is taken off duty again. In fact it is a whole watch-chain that is specified (Primary watchman and two backup watchmen)

Time based schedule: Using this schedule watch chains consist of a time interval, in which the chain is active, a primary watchman (On-Call Staff) and two optional backup watchmen. The schedule works in two different modes: o Calendar mode o Repeat Template mode When running in calendar mode, the schedule manager needs to continuously maintain the schedule such that there is On-Call staff on duty to handle incoming alarms. The schedule allows the schedule manager to configure the schedule for the current week and 19 weeks into the future (20 weeks in total). When running in repeat template mode, a defined template (which defines a complete week of watch-chains) will be repeated each week.

Figure 23: Schedule Group

Figure 23 shows what the schedule menu group looks like. The “Current Schedule” will display the schedule for the current day. “Edit Week” will allow the scheduling manager to edit one of the 20 weeks defined. “Add New Week” will allow the scheduling manager to create a new week either apply it to existing weeks or save it as a template. “Copy from Template” will allow the schedule manager to apply an existing template to one of the 20 weeks defined. “List Templates” will list all the templates that have previously been defined in ACS.

The Permanent schedule is selected as default. If the Time based schedule is to be used then change configuration under Preferences – System Configuration:

Figure 24 Use this checkbox to decide which type of schedule to be used

4.4.1.

Permanent schedule

The Permanent schedule is basically a set of watch chains.

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This list the current schedule

Here additional watch chains can be added.

Figure 25 The Permanent schedule

If there are many watch chains active the user can filter the list on competence. In Figure 26 is illustrated how the current schedule only list those watch-chains where the Primary Watchman has the competence “zonith1�. Select the competencies on left (multiple ones can be selected by holding the ctrl button while selecting) and then hit the Apply button.

Figure 26 Filtering the current schedule on competence.

4.4.2.

Time based schedule

Current Schedule The current schedule displays the schedule as it looks today (and an overview of who are on duty the following day as well – if any). Figure 27 shows what the current schedule page looks like and gives an indication of which actions the schedule manager can perform on the page.

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Select appropriate scheduling mode that best apply to your requirements. In calendar mode each week are defined independently while in repeat mode a single template week is repeated overtime.

This part displays the schedule for the current day. Time schedules that are currently active are displayed with an arrow in the first column. The remaining column shows the time schedule period and which on-call staff on duty.

This part allows the scheduling manager to modify the current schedule by adding a new watch chain to the current schedule.

Figure 27: Current Schedule

Add/Edit Week When clicking edit week (or add new week; no selection in this case), the schedule manager must select a week (from the 20 defined weeks) which he/she wants to edit. Once a selection is made, a page is shown where the schedule manager can view current watch-chains, add new ones and/or delete existing ones. Once completed, the schedule manager must either save the week (if existing) or add it to the calendar (if new). Figure 28 shows what the edit week page looks like and gives an indication of which actions the schedule manager can perform on the page. The figure also illustrates that only current and future watches can be modified (i.e. Monday through Thursday are “read only�).

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Display the watch chain for the given day.

This allows the scheduling manager to add watch chains to the selected day of the week.

Allows the scheduling manager to select future watch chain and delete it using the Delete Selected button.

Figure 28: Add/Edit Week

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Templates Figure 29 shows the options available to the schedule manager when done editing the new week. Templates are created the same way as adding a new week. Click “Add New Week”, but instead of adding the week to the calendar, the schedule manager must click “Add to Templates” to store the week as a template which can be used for the schedule when running “Repeat Template” mode. Figure 29: Add New Week Option

This allows the scheduling manager to import a previously exported template. Useful if some watch chains must be used in all the templates. This allows the scheduling manager to save the currently configured week as template. This button allows the scheduling manager to apply the currently configured week (in the Add Week page) on one or more of the next 20 weeks in the calendar.

4.5. Action Filters Action filters are used to define which actions take place once an alarm is raised. The schedule must at all times be associated with one, and only one, action filter. The selected filter can change from day to day based on the schedule week or the schedule manager can change it “on the fly”. Figure 30 shows the options available when configuring an action filter. It is possible to add as many lines as desired thus making the alarm dispatching very dependent on the time of day.

Fill in Filter name and an optional description that briefly describes its actions. Used when alarms should be closed in ACS either immediately after alarm was raised or after it was accepted.

Select the time interval and the priority filter for the specific set of actions.

Select action(s) to perform when an alarm is raised.

Figure 30: Action Filter

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4.6. Dispatch Transports Transports are used to enable the transmission of alarms via a specific dispatch media. For example, In order to send out GSM SMS messages to mobile phones a GSM Transport is needed, for SDS messages a TETRA Transport is needed and so forth. A dispatch media is a hardware (modem, radio or other external system) that shall be connected to the PC-SERVER running Zonith ACS. In most cases as for TETRA and DMR radios, it shall be configured and programmed accordingly before it can be used as dispatch media. Transport management pages are located in the Systems section of the menu structure. The structure of each page is the same. It contains a list of all the defined transports (of the given type) and provides options to add new ones or edit existing ones. Each type of transport has its own special set of properties which need to be configured based on the desired functionality. Transport management is only accessible to users with the administrator role. Below are examples that can be used as a reference for dispatcher transport definition:

4.6.1.

TETRA (TErrestrial Trunked RAdio) using a radio

1. On the System Menu navigate to Manage TETRA transport. 2. Enter Transport Name (space not allowed) on the field provided. 3. Select a Type of transport driver using the drop down selection box. 4. Click the Add button. This will show additional transport Property Fields. 5. Fill in Baud Rate. (Recommended 38400 which shall be set as default to the radio. Refer to Appendix A: TETRA Media Programming Guide for quick instructions related to Radio Programming.) 6. Max SDS Length: Use default 120 7. Using the Drop down box. Select the COM PORT where the dispatch radio is connected (Refer to Appendix 2 to identify the correct COM PORT USAGE). 8. Click the Save Button. Watch Out for any ERROR messages on top of the page. Ensure that you have a Running status before leaving the page. Use send notifications to ensure that you have a working transport.

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4.6.2.

SDR (Short Data Router) TETRA Direct Interface

ACS supports direct interface to the Motorola Dimetra TETRA systems for SDS messages. The entity inside the Dimetra system dealing with SDS messages is called Short Data Router (SDR). The physical interface between the SDR and the PC running Zonith ACS is TCP/IP network. Thus a physical COM PORT is not required. This configuration requires the IP address of the SDR.

Logical name for this transport.

The ISSI number that is defined for ACS inside the SDR.

Time period between each keep alive check message.

Access code to the Short data Router IP address of the Short Data Router on the Network.

Port number to communicate with the SDR.

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4.6.3.

GSM MODEM

ZONITH ACS currently supports the following GSM modem: Cinterion MC35i/MC55i with RS232 DB9F connector. 1. On the System Menu navigate to Manage GSM transport. 2. Enter a Transport Name (space not allowed) on the field provided. 3. Select Type of the GSM modem using the drop down selection box. 4. Click the Add button. This will show additional transport Property Fields. See example image below:

0000 is used only when the PIN CODE is disabled in the SIM CARD. Select the correct Serial COM Port from the drop down llist. Figure 31: Example GSM transport

5. Fill in Baud rate: Use 115200 bps 6. Fill in Max SMS Length: 440 chars (default) Note: ACS supports concatenated SMS text messaging, which means that SMS message length longer than 160 characters will be concatenated. 7. Enter PIN CODE. In cases where this is not used or disabled put in 0000 in the field. 8. Using the Drop down box. Select the COM PORT where the dispatch modem is connected (Refer to Appendix 2 to identify the correct COM PORT USAGE). 9. Click the Save Button. Watch Out for any ERROR messages on top of the page. Ensure that you have a Running status before leaving the page. Use send notifications to ensure that you have a working transport.

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4.6.4.

DMR (Digital Mobile Radio)

DMR transport(s) are based on TCP/IP communication protocol. Firewall and 3rd party security software may cause communication failure when not configured properly. There are also some guidelines the hardware supplier provides that shall be considered. A. Mototrbo DMR -

Motorola recommends these guidelines when using Mototrbo Radio as Control Station for an application. Please refer to the CPS online help “Setting Up the MOTOTRBO Local Area Network (LAN)� following this guideline.

-

When using the control Station on a W7, configure the control station to be part of the Home Network instead of public this way it will be easier to manage firewall settings on control stations.

-

Program Control Stations according to the recommendations specified on Appendix 2. Please note the IP address, CAI number, the port number used for TMS, ARS and Telemetry as these are the parameters required in DMR transport definition.

After programming the radio, configure a DMR transport following the steps below: 1. On the System Menu navigate to Manage DMR transport. 2. Enter a Transport Name (space not allowed) on the field provided. 3. Select Type of DMR using the drop down selection box. 4. Click the Add button. This will show additional transport Property Fields. The image below shows the additional fields that shall be configured according to the parameters that had been programmed with to the dispatcher (control station). These values are default to the application.

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Enable/disable TMS to group ID. This is related to the CAI settings above. This is the number of seconds between each check of the control station(s) being available

Enable/disable Generic Optional Board TMS support for the Man Down Notifier functionality. Enable/disable ACS to listen for incoming Telemetry TMS from Mototrbo radios. Enable/disable Automatic Registration Service. This shall be disabled in Demo-Kit.

Figure 32: Example DMR (Mototrbo) Transport

Note 1: Ensure that the port numbers used are the same as the port numbers programmed in the control stations. In addition, these ports shall be opened in the firewall settings. Note 2: When multiple control station is required, you will need to add the IP address of the additional control station in the DMR transport configuration. The figure below shows this example:

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Define the IP addresses of the control stations separated by a comma. When ARS is enabled the control stations shall be programmed with the same Radio ID Follow the guidelines recommended by Motorola that can be found on Mototrbo CPS Online Help “Radio IP� concerning IP address definition for multiple control station. Click the save transport button to apply any changes in the current configuration.

Figure 33: Example Multiple DMR (Mototrbo) Transport

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B. Hytera DMR ZONITH ACS release version 2.9 and onwards support a Hytera radio as dispatch media. The guidelines for transport configuration are described below: After programming the radio, configure a DMR transport following the steps below: 1. On the System Menu navigate to Manage DMR transport. 2. Enter a Transport Name (space not allowed) on the field provided. 3. Select Type of DMR using the drop down selection box. In this case Hytera TMS. 4. Click the Add button. This will show additional transport Property Fields. The image below shows the additional fields that shall be configured according to the parameters that had been programmed with to the dispatcher (control station). These values are default to the application. Transport Name. This is usually the model number or name of the connected radio.

Define the IP address and radio ID of the dispatch radio in the following format: IP=<IPADDRESS>+RID<RadioID> See Note 1 for MULTIPLE Control Sation Defintion.

Radio to Radio Network Subnet Check when using group messaging. This is the number of seconds between each check of the control station(s) being available Default text messaging port configured to the dispatch radio.

Note 1: Multiple control stations can be defined in case needed. The following example can be applied when both time slots will be used in text messaging. Define the IP address and radio ID of the dispatch radio in the following format:

Format: IP=<IPADDRESS1>+RID<RadioID>;IP=<IPADDRESS2>+RID<RadioID> Example: IP=192.168.10.1+RID=1;IP=192.168.11.1+RID=1

In the above example the 2 radios were defined to have different IP address. The radio ID shall be the same. This example is typical in repeater mode where both time slots are used for the ZONITH ACS alarm dispatch.

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C. Hytera DMR Direct Repeater Interface ZONITH ACS release version 2.9.2 and onwards supports direct interface to Hytera DMR repeater. The guidelines for transport configuration are described below: Below are recommendations for configuration of the repeater: 1. Make sure that the repeater is running at least the following Firmware Version:

A5.00.09.000 2. When the repeater is connected to the IP network. Ensure that the repeater has static IP address assignment. 3. The SERVER PC running Zonith ACS that communicates directly to the repeater shall also be assigned static IP Address. 4. Ensure that the service ports are open under firewall settings. Additional configuration is related to the CPS settings. Below is an example of a typical single site configuration.

Basic settings showing static IP address assignment of the repeater.

Network Settings defines the configuration for the application interface.

Ensure that the Forward to PC is check. The Third Party Server IP shall be the IP address of the SERVER PC running Zonith ACS.

Basic Settings under DMR services shows the configuration for the Radio ID. This value is important for the portable radio to identify the identity of the Repeater or application sending the Alarm Text Messages.

Note: Port Number shown here are defaults.

Zonith ACS DMR Transport Configuration

Define the IP Address of the repeater that the application needs to communicate. This example definition shows interface to repeater with IP address 192.168.1.149 using TMS port numbers 30007 and 30008 TMS ports and is enabled for Group Messaging.

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If there are multiple repeaters involved then simply add more fields of the type: <ipaddress>:tms=<port> For example: 192.168.1.249:tms=30007;192.168.1.249:tms=30008;192.168.1.250:tms=30027;192.168.1.250:tms=30028

Please note that for the second repeater the two TMS ports are changed. This also needs to programmed into the second repeater.

DMR TRANSPORT STATUS The DMR transport is monitored by the application. The application regularly checks whether the control stations is/are connected to the PC or not. If there are multiple control stations then the system will continue using the remaining control stations if possible. The consequence of this is that receivers on certain channels will not be able to receive the alarms, but on the channels where there are still control stations available users can continue to receive and handle alarms. The DMR transport can have the following statuses: •

Running: Everything is fine

Running (Not Connected): The driver is running, but has no connection to any control stations. It is automatically trying to connect to the configured control stations

Running (Partially): Some control stations have been lost, but at least one control station is still connected.

Error: The transport could not start up at all.

4.6.5.

Zonith WiFi

Starting from ZONITH ACS release 2.9 Zonith WiFi for windows mobile is supported. The following device has been tested to work well with the application: Motorola Team Phone It works in a way that the mobile phone runs a client application subscribed to the ZONITH ACS SERVER. Interface via Wireless LAN, users of windows mobile phone receives and accepts alarm on their WiFi phone utilizing the user friendly interface provided along with the client application. For more details please contact your local supplier or write mail to sales@zonith.com. Logical name for this transport

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IP address of the SERVER PC running Zonith ACS. Port number for the client application running on windows mobile phone Time period for mobile phone discovery.

No. or tries the message shall be sent to the client in case of failure.

Transport definitions are easily done following the property file shown above. These parameters are default values and shall be change accordingly.

4.6.6.

Polycom/SpectraLink DECT

ACS supports the XML-RPC interface of SpectraLink (Polycom) DECT. Zonith is certified for the following Polycom servers: â&#x20AC;˘

KWS6000

â&#x20AC;˘

KWS300

Follow the guidelines below to configure ACS interface to Polycom DECT Server/Base Station. 1. Navigate to Manage DECT/WiFi transport. 2. Typed in logical transport name on the field provided. 3. Select Polycom DECT from drop down list. 4. Click the Add button. This will show additional transport property field that shall be configured according to the current configuration of the DECT Base Station/Server.

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Base station Host and Port is the IP address and port number of the DECT server ACS needs to communicate. RPC Username and Password is the access code required to connect to the DECT server using the XMLRPC protocol. Application ID shall be a unique name that identifies ACS from the system. Enable/disable events from the user handsets.

Alarm Settings related to the user handsets receiving the alarm.

Additional Event Settings that shall be configured when only when the event related to it is enabled.

Figure 34 Example Polycom DECT Transport

Note: Refer to Appendix 3 for additional details about the DECT Server/Base Station configuration requirements for ACS.

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4.6.7.

POCSAG Pager

The image below shows an example transport configuration for POCSAG paging. Configure logical name for the POCSAG base station.

Specify the IP address and port number of the POCSAG base station. Please ensure that the firewall is open for the configured port number. Figure 35: Example Pager Transport Select language support from the drop down list. The current version supports Danish and English.

4.6.8.

Swissphone Pager

The image below shows an example transport configuration for Swissphone paging. Configure logical name for the Swissphone base station.

Specify the Baud Rate for the Swissphone base station. Default is 9600. Specify the transmit speed which the Swissphone base station should use for sending messages to pagers. Allowed transmit speeds are 1200 or 2400.

Figure 36: Example Pager Transport

Select the correct COM port from the drop down list where the base station is connected.

4.6.9.

Ekahau

The image below shows an example transport configuration for Ekahau.

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Configure logical name for the Ekahau RTLS controller.

Specify the IP address for the server holding the Ekahau RTLS controller Specify the port number that Ekahau RTLS controller listens on Specify the username and password that is configured for Ekahau RTLS Controller Specify a max time interval for waiting for message delivery reports Specify a the interval between each keep alive check of the connection to the RTLS controller Figure 37 Example Ekahau transport

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5.

Sending Notification

The send notification page is very useful component of the application. This page is recommended to be used to verify that the configured dispatch media is working properly. The steps below can be used as guides for sending notifications.

Select recipient from the list or type in message recipient number on the field provided below.

Add selected recipient or recipient number by clicking this button. The other button can be used to remove already selected recipient(s).

Type in text message you want to send to the recipient(s).

Select media and click the send button to dispatch the message.

More details about this configuration are available on the Online Help (See 4.1). Refer to this page anytime while on the Send Notification page.

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5.1. Preferences The system preferences are only accessible to administrators. This is where the inner workings of ACS can be configured. This section will give a quick overview of the most important settings to know about. In the “System Configuration” section, there are 2 things which can be of importance. A clean installation of ACS will insert the DNS hostname (at installation time!) of the machine into the URL of this section. If the PC is moved into another subnet/LAN and its host name is changed, these must be changed as well. In most cases it is recommended to simply replace the hostname with “localhost”, but be aware that in some rare occasions the configuration of the PC does not allow the name “localhost”. The other important setting in this section is the outgoing SMTP server. This is used if ACS needs to send e-mails (either as alarm dispatching, notifications, or escalation e-mails). This must point to the IP address of an existing SMTP server reachable from the ACS PC. In case the SMTP does not allow anonymous access, there is a special syntax used to enter in the credentials – See the online help (top right corner of the page). In the “Alarm Configuration” section, there are also 2 things which are of importance. The time before auto-decline can be set, which is used if you have backup On-Call staff on duty. If a primary On-Call staff member does not react (accept/decline) to an alarm within the specified amount of time, the alarm will automatically be declined on his/her behalf and be escalated to the backup OnCall staff instead (Please note that it will not auto decline for the last On-Call staff on duty). Delivery confirmations, when enabled, require the destination device (phone/radio) to reply back with a delivery report indicating that the message was successfully received. This is an automatic feature in the phone/radio and not something the user will see. In case delivery confirmations are enabled, and a delivery cannot be confirmed within the specified maximum wait time, the alarm will be declined on behalf of the On-Call staff. In the “Alarm Notification” section, there are a number of important settings. Basically this section configures the content of the messages being sent out to On-Call staff members when alarms are raised or change state. The content of the messages can be static text, or tokens that are dynamically replaced can be inserted. See the online help (top right corner of the page) for more details. Figure 38 shows what the above section of the preferences page look like, and gives an indication of what the most important settings are.

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Fill in general system configuration. The SMTP server is only relevant if email is used as dispatch media.

This configuration is only related when using IPS/Safe Area. See Section 9 Safe Area on page 55 for more details. Configure settings regarding how long time must pass before an alarm is auto declined for a primary on-call staff and send out to the backup personnel instead. Enable delivery confirmation to user media by checking this box. Check this box to enable resetting alarms with the same label.

Configure the contents of the alarm messages being dispatched. The content can also contain â&#x20AC;&#x153;tokensâ&#x20AC;? which are dynamically replaced with values taken from the alarm location or location agent.

Figure 38: Preferences

Note: For more details related to the description of this configuration please refer to the Online Help. See section 18 Online Help for guidelines.

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5.2. Basic Troubleshooting The administration page, available in the System section of the menu, is the page to use when troubleshooting the configuration of ACS. It contains an option for temporarily suspending alarms and shows a list of messages of things that are potential configuration errors in the system. It also allows forwarding of some of these messages to a (comma-separated) list of e-mail addresses based on a priority filter. The administration page is only accessible to administrators. Figure 39 shows what the administration page looks like and gives an indication of the options available on the page.

This button can be used by an administrator to suspend all incoming alarms temporarily. Suspended alarms will be moved to unassigned queue immediately.

Figure 39: Administration Page

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6.

Advanced Configuration

This section will briefly touch on some of the more advanced configuration settings available in ACS.

6.1. Location Agents Location agents are used to apply priorities and optional (additional) message texts to incoming alarms. In many cases the external alarm system has some proprietary priority scheme which does not match the priorities available in ACS. To overcome this, location agents are able to map an arbitrary code (from the external alarm system) to an internal priority and an optional (additional) message text. If for example an alarm source can raise fire alarms and these are always tagged with some specific code, say “fire”, the location agent could be set so that all alarms raised with the code “fire” become high priority alarms. Each location in ACS is associated with one, and only one, location agent. Location agents can be reused across several locations if desired. Figure 40 shows the options available when configuring a location agent, and gives an indication of which information to fill in and where. Fill in the name of the Location Agent. This is the name that will be used throughout ACS. Add alarm codes matching some alarm codes from the external alarm source, mapping them to an internal priority and an (optional) additional text. List the current mappings. Ensure that a default (empty alarm code) mapping is created. This will be used in cases where the defined alarm code does not match any of the other defined mappings.

Figure 40: Location Agent

Note: For more details related to the description of this configuration please refer to the Online Help. See section 18 Online Help for guidelines.

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6.2. Competencies Competencies are used to ensure that alarms are delivered to On-Call staff members that know how to deal with the given alarm. On-Call staff can be assigned competencies e.g. that reflect their technical skills. This can then be used when raising alarms, to filter On-Call staff who are capable of dealing with the specific alarm. When alarms are raised and competencies are assigned to the alarm, only those On-Call staff that are on duty and have the required competency (one or more) will receive the alarm. Figure 41 shows how competencies are created in a competency group. The logical name of the competency group can be customized. There are 2 competency groups available. In case the default names of these groups do not suffice, simply modify them to fit your needs.

This is the List of existing competencies in the group. You can remove/edit these by highlighting on (or more) row(s) and pressing the “<<”button. Remember to press the save button to save the configuration.

Add new competency by entering the name and code for it and pressing the “>>” button.

Figure 41: Defining Competencies

Once the competencies are defined, they can be applied in various places in the system. When assigning competencies to alarms, they are most often applied by listeners (by inspecting details from the alarm source), however they can also be applied by location agents or the location which the alarms are raised against. This means that any alarm raised can have competencies based on the location and/or the location agent the given location uses. On-Call staff members also need to be assigned competencies in order to receive alarms which require a given competency. Figure 42 shows what the competency assignment section looks like. A section like this is found in many places in the system. Basically it allows the user to choose a competency group, and then to assign competencies from that group to the element in question (location agent, location, On-Call staff, etc.). Competencies are added/removed by pressing the “>>”/”<<” buttons respectively. This part lists all defined and available competencies in the selected competency group.

Lists selected competencies for the given element.

Select which of the 2 competency groups to choose competencies from. Figure 42: Assigning Competencies

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6.3. Alarm Configuration ZONITH Alarm Control Systems allows various configurations to define how alarms are handled. If the watch schedule will not include any backup watches then select this flag to avoid that resources are used to check for alarms that need to be escalated.

If this flag is checked then you can decline (or the system can auto decline) an alarm assigned to a user as long as just one more user across all chains have not declined yet.

In general an alarm shall not be left open in ACS. To assist in automatically cleaning up alarms this parameter can be used to reset (close) alarms based on age. 0 means no auto reset based on age. Figure 43: Alarm Configuration Section For some dispatch medias it is possible to dispatch alarms in parallel while others (like radio systems) do not support huge load. Use this parameter to setup a threadpool in ACS to handle outgoing alarms in parallel.

Examples of dispatch medias supporting parallel submission are: •

WiFi

Ekahau

Direct Short Data Router connection for TETRA

6.4. Acknowledge Interface The acknowledge interface is used when On-Call staff members need to interact with ACS from a mobile device capable of sending text messages (e.g. GSM phone or digital radio). In order for a device to be able to communicate with ACS, it is required that the id of the device (e.g. phone number or radio id) is present on an active user from ACS who has the On-Call staff role. The On-Call staff that is assigned the given device has the option of changing the state of alarms assigned to him/her (accept, decline, on-location, closed, and cancel keywords) or receive information about alarms that concern him/her (info and list keywords). Figure 44 shows what the acknowledge interface section of the preferences page looks like, and gives an indication of what each of the elements are used for.

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Comma separated list of keywords which are accepted for the various actions. Ensure that you do not reuse the exact same keywords in more than one place as this will cause unpredictable behavior. Used in rare case to allow any message (from a valid user in ACS with one and only one associated alarm) to be interpreted as either accept or close depending on the state of the alarm. Mostly use if the device makes it hard for the user to type in text. Enable/Disable ACS by checking/unchecking these boxes to send response messages to devices (User media) that interact with the Acknowledge Interface.

Figure 44: Acknowledge Interface

6.5. Personal Safety Alarms Personal Safety Alarms is special type of alarms that are supposed to be used for emergency alarms from users. For instance if the user presses the Emergency Button present on radios like TETRA, DMR and on some DECT phones then these should be raised as Personal Safety Alarms. A Personal Safety Alarm will ensure that the name of the person is taken from the list of users in ACS and also allows for integration with the location system like ZONITH IPS and Ekahau to obtain the location of the person in distress. The Centralized Lone Worker feature also uses Personal Safety Alarms when a user fails to respond to the lone worker keep alive messages. The Personal Safety Alarms are managed at the normal Preferences page under the section named Personal Safety Alarms Configuration. Specify the timestamp format in the personal alarm message

Figure 45: Personal Safety Configuration Section Specify a prefix here for a location id which all incoming personal safety alarms will be raised on. The intended purpose of this is to enable a test function of panic button before assigning the radio/phone to the user in ACS.

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Most of the configuration settings for Personal Safety Alarms are related to formatting the @LOCATION@ key that can be applied to the alarm text for Personal Safety Alarms. Personal Safety Alarms can be used in various solutions with location solutions: •

ZONITH Bluetooth Positioning for indoor positioning using Bluetooth

ZONITH GPS Positioning for outdoor positioning using GPS based devices (like DMR)

Ekahau RTLS for WIFI based positioning

The two ZONITH based positioning solutions can also be combined so that it is possible to track people both indoor and outdoor in the same system and get qualified information about the actual location of a person in distress. The format can be built of the following keywords •

@SECTION_NAME@ will be substituted to the logical name of the zone, section or GPS area that the person is located at.

@TIMESTAMP@ will be substituted with the timestamp of the time where the location was determined.

@EVENT_TYPE@ will be substituted with either Enter or Leave to indicate whether the section was entered or left (e.g. went out of coverage). This EVENT_TYPE is only supported by the ZONITH systems.

If the positioning is based on a combined indoor and outdoor solution then it is possible to format the output of the @LOCATION@ keyword to include both the indoor location and the outdoor location. This is important as the two independent technologies can both apply a valid position. However, the system allows a configuration where any indoor based location will overrule GPS positions. A reason for turning this feature on is that an indoor location is obtained in a few seconds while many GPS based positing over radio systems are fare slower and hence the indoor position is in general more accurate. On the other hand, the indoor location can also be obtained while the user is outside, so ZONITH recommends that this feature is not turned on. Another mechanism to avoid presenting invalid locations is to specify a maximum age in minutes for locations. It is possible to specify an age for both indoor and outdoor.

Testing a device before using it When dealing with personal safety solutions it is in general a good practise to test a device that a user grabs when going on duty can raise panic alerts. The approach for this in ZONITH ACS is to say that if a personal safety alarm is raised and there is no user or contact person having this device id then we re-raise the alarm on a new location which has a prefix text plus the original location id. At this alternate location we can ensure that the alarm is not dispatched to other people on duty so they don’t get interrupted with test alarms.

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It is possible here at the configuration page to specify such a prefix. If the field is left blank this feature is not enabled. For this test facility to work, it is a requirement that users logs into ACS user interface to assign the device id at the My Self page. In addition when done with the device the user shall ensure to clear this field. Even in cases where it is not possible to let the users log in and assign a device id, ZONITH strongly recommend that a device is tested before we start using it. If the device is permanently assigned to a user in the system then the rest of the users will just have to receive this alarm.

6.6. Supporting many ZONITH Alarm Displays In a system setup where there are many ZONITH Alarm Displays running against the same ZONITH Alarm Control System it highly recommended to setup a cache in ACS to avoid too much load on the system. The active cache in ACS is added to avoid multiple requests from ZONITH Alarm Display instances to retrieve basically the same type of data from the database. Instead the cache ensures that it is automatically updated at given interval and thereby reducing the load on the ACS server.

Activate and deactivate the alarm cache in ACS

Specify the refresh interval of the active alarm cache. This is specified in seconds.

Figure 46: WebService Configuration Section If the ZONITH Alarm Display settings do not include information about who has received the alarm, then ensure that this flag is checked as well. This reduces the load on the database significantly if the query for outgoing alarms can be avoided.

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7.

License Upgrade/Update

In some occasions you will need to upgrade the existing license code such as when the existing license code is about to expire or in most cases additional functionality such as CLW Lone Worker, Alive Checker or Safe Area needs be supported. In addition license upgrade is also needed when additional users is required. To update/upgrade the license code, navigate to the System menu and select the Upgrade item. This will open the license key page. An example of this page is shown below:

Figure 47: License Upgrade Page

Enter the new license code on the field provided and click the upgrade button. After successful upgrade you can verify the system update and maybe the new supported feature by navigating to the about page. An example image is shown below:

7.1. About Page

Figure 48: The About Page

7.2. Requesting A New License Code To obtain software license code you will need to contact support@zonith.com or your local supplier. Send your request via mail with a copy of the existing License Code.

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8.

Centralized Lone Worker (CLW)

Zonith ACS implements Centralized Lone Worker (CLW) based on text messaging. Please note that this is not related to the built in feature of any TETRA or DMR radio. The whole functionality is based on text messaging that can be configured in general mode or individually to support multiple media and customized Lone Worker messages. For more details about this feature navigate, consult the Online Help (4.1) of Zonith ACS available on the Centralized Lone worker Settings page.

Part of the General configuration settings is shown below in order to show additional property settings that will be available on the User Page when an individual CLW configuration is allowed.

Checking the box will enable individual settings. When this is enabled additional configuration field will be available on the Users page related to individual CLW configuration. Figure 49: CLW general settings enabling individual configuration.

Media custom settings allows the user to select which media the CLW shall be enabled. This can be applies only when the application supports different 2 or more media types.

Customized Activation and Alive check settings is also possible when individual configuration is enabled.

Figure 50: User configuration page showing the additional parameters for individual CLW configuration.

More details about this configuration are available on the Online Help (4.1). Refer to this page anytime while on the user page.

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9.

Safe Area

SAFE AREA enhances alarm handling functionality and centralized Lone Worker feature of the application. With Indoor Positioning System the location of users can be monitored. In the event of emergency such as panic alarm, location information is combined with the alarm information reducing the time required for the response team to assist a person who needs assistance. Before making any configuration verify that your existing set up meet the requirements: 1. Working Zonith Indoor Positioning System 5. For more information about this system, navigate to our website at www.zonith.com following the product link for Indoor Positioning System or contact your local supplier. 2. License Code supports Safe Area and CLW functionality 6. Verify your license code using the About Page (7). This page will clearly show if your current license supports the feature.

9.1. Safe Area Configuration 1. Under Preferences>System Configuration, define the IP address of the Bluetooth Positioner Host as well as the port number used. See figure below: Figure 51: Example System Configuration Showing Indoor Positioning Support

Port Number used by the Bluetooth Positioner UI

Port Number used by the Bluetooth Positioner Server.

Port Number used by the Bluetooth Positioner UI.

2. Under System Menu, an item called Safe Area shall be available if the current license supports the functionality.

Click this item to open the configuration page for the Safe Area Settings.

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3. Select/Add Safe Area from the drop down list. Click the Create button and proceed to the next step.

Select an Area available from the Bluetooth Positioner Host. These areas are visible and configurable on the Bluetooth Positioner User Interface (BPUI).

4. Define Rules following the examples shown in the figure below: Click the Edit Icon to open the configuration field and define the Rules that shall be applied to this location.

Click this button to define safe Area Rules for the chosen location.

Select a person (user) where the rule shall be applied. Select Zone Action, choose between Enter or Leave. Select CLW Action related to the Zone Action defined above. Click the save button to save.

5. Repeat the process above to define additional rules that shall be applied to the chosen location. An example below shows the CLW automatic activation deactivation when the user (Radio 16 Security) Enter and Leave the location (Control Room).

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More information about Zonith Safe Area and Indoor Positioning System are available at www.zonith.com. You may also contact your local supplier for more details.

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10.

Known Issues

10.1. Failure to receive incoming text messages using MOTOTRBO DMR 4000 series terminals. MOTOTRBO 4000 series radios support Over The Air Programming. Along with this functionality part of the configuration of the under Network settings is required. For control stations used as dispatch media for the ZONITH ACS, it is recommended to leave this value blank. See image below for references:

Set value to blank as recommended by the CPS when this feature is not in use.

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10.2. Very slow network performance on Windows using DMR In some cases, when using DMR radio as dispatch media, network connection becomes very slow. This issue becomes obvious when after the DMR radio connected via USB cable to the PC has been turned on and the user starts to make some changes to the network adapter settings or opening web page and it takes longer time than normal to load it. Consider the following windows configurations when this happens. Please note that the images below were taken from Windows7 operating system. Note 1: You may need to coordinate with your IT Network administrator before making this configuration. Note 2: Remote Differential Compression on Windows is related to data compression before transfer across network. Note 3: Windows Autotuning is related to DNS lookup and network discovery.

1. Disable Remote Differential Compression. Navigate to Control Panel>Programs>Programs and Features and select the Turn Windows features on or off. See figures below: Click Turn Windows features on or off. This will open the window shown on the right side.

Uncheck the box for Remote Differential Compression to disable the function and click OK button.

2. Open the command prompt as an administrator. 3. Disable Windows Autotuning from the command line using the following command: netsh interface tcp set global autotuning=disabled 4. Verify new configuration settings using the following command: netsh interface tcp show global 5. Exit command line when done. See figure below for references: The TCP global parameter shall show that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Receive Window Auto-Tuning Level=disabledâ&#x20AC;?.

6. Disable IPV6 on adapter settings when not in use.

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APPENDIX A. TETRA Media Programming Guide ACS supports and is tested for stability using the following dispatch media. In most cases a portable handset radio can be used but it shall only be used for Demo Kits. On actual deployment it is recommended the use of a mobile radio. The radio Model presented defined/enumerated below are radios that was tested with Zonith ACS 1. Motorola Model: MTM800E The PEI interface of the terminal needs to be programmed with the following parameters: See figure below:

The recommended Baud Rate shall be set to 38400. The SDS/Status format can be chosen arbitrarily. ACS supports both the ETSI and Motorola standard commands set.

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2. Sepura Models: 7. Mobile: SRG3500W, SRG3900 8. Portable: STP8000, SRH3500W, STP2000 Software Versions: The terminal needs to be programmed to route the SDS messages into its PEI port. The recommended Baud Rate shall be set to 38400.

The general PEI Parameter setting as shown on the right side needs to be configured accordingly. 

The SDS and Data needs to be routed on the PEI Port.



The Baud Rate shall be set to 38400.



Direct Mode Services is optional and shall be used only for Demo Kits.

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B. CPS Quick Programming Guide (DMO) The CPS guide below is based on the DP3600/3601 radios. Either a portable or a mobile type radio can be used as a control/dispatch radio for the Zonith application. Using portable radio as dispatcher media shall only be used for Demo Kits on actual deployment it is recommended to use a mobile radio. 1. Programming Dispatch Radio (DM3600/3400/SL4000/4010) 9. General Settings: Radio Name: Dispatcher Radio ID: 16448250 10. Network: Radio IP: 192.168.100.1 CAI Network: 12 CAI Group Network: 225 Max TX PDU Size: 1500 Forward to PC: check ARS UDP Port: 4005 TMS Radio Port: 4007 Forward To PC: Via USB Route

Remember to route all traffic to the USB port.

11. Channels:Zone (Create/Modify 1 Digital Channel) Compressed UDP Data Header: check RX Frequency: <TX Freq.> TX Frequency: <RX Freq.> Note: (TX = RX Frequency in Direct Mode)

2. Programming Portable Watchman Radio (DP3600/3601/SL4000/4010) 12. General Settings: Radio Name: Radio 3 Radio ID: 3 GPS: uncheck (shall be check only when required) 13. Quick Text Messages: (Define the Following for Quick Text Messaging Use) CLW YES CLW NO CLW OK CLW ON CLW OFF #STATUS EMERGENCY# #ALARM# Fire alarm in pump room. Location 54A. #ALARM# Alarm Water pressure high TANK 54C. #ALARM# Burglar alarm entrance door section 2A. #HB# HBKEEP ALIVE CHECK 30 accept all close all

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cancel all 2 accept 2 decline info list onlocation Hello World 14. Buttons: (assigned for sending out quick text messages)

15. Network: Radio IP: 192.168.10.3 CAI Network: 12 CAI Group Network: 225 Max TX PDU Size: 1500 Forward to PC: uncheck ARS Radio ID: 16448250 ARS UDP Port: 4005 TMS Radio ID: 16448250 TMS Radio Port: 4007 16. Channels:Zone (create/modify 1 digital channel) ARS: check (as required) Compressed UDP Data Header: check RX Frequency: <TX Freq.> TX Frequency: <RX Freq.> Note: (TX = RX Frequency in Direct Mode)

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C. DECT SERVER/Base Station Requirements for ACS

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D. Adding Ports to Windows Firewall This example applies to Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7 Operating System. 1. Navigate to Control Panel\System and Security\Windows Firewall. 2. Select Advance Settings. See figure below.

Figure 52 Windows Firewall

3. Right Click inbound Rules then select New Rule

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4. On the Next Window, select port and click the next button.

5. Select port type (TCP/UDP) and click next. Refer to Table 2 for references. 6. On Specific Local Ports field enter the port numbers that shall be used. Refer to Table 2 for references.

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7. On the next window, select allow the connection as shown on the figure below.

8. Enter Logical name and description for this rule. See example figure below:

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9. Repeat the steps for adding UDP Ports. The figure below shows the new rules that has been configured. Additional ports can be configured by selecting the rulesright click and edit the properties. Additional Rules that has been added.

10. Repeat the steps for adding outbound Rules. In summary you need to have Rules defined for the Outbound and Inbound traffic as shown in the figure above.

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E. How to Disable Windows Firewall? Windows Firewall can be disabled following the steps below: The example below is based on a Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2 operating system. This example applies to Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7 Operating System. 1. Navigate to Control Panel\System and Security\Windows Firewall. 2. Select Turn Windows Firewall On or OFF. See figure below.

3. On the next window Click the Windows Firewall Properties. This will open a new window.

4. On the Firewall state select OFF to disable it. Click OK when done.

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