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“Two full meals a day was a distant dream for us, but now all seven of us (in the family) have three meals a day.’’ Mrs. Mulenga, Malawi

Methodist Relief and Development Fund 25 Marylebone Road, London, NW1 5JR Tel: 020 7467 5132 Fax: 020 7467 5233 Email: mrdf@methodistchurch.org.uk VISIT OUR WEBSITE: www.mrdf.org.uk Charity number 291691 Printed on recycled paper Evolution FSC Bright

Photo credits: All images copyright MRDF/Isabelle Carboni/John Cooper/Jane East/Paul Herbert/Menka Jha/Kirsty Smith/Samantha Tuck

Small miracles

in the world’s poorest communities Annual Review 2006/7: Published November 2007


Contents Dear Supporter I am delighted to report on another very successful year for the Methodist Relief and Development Fund, due of course to the continuing commitment of our supporters, partners and staff. Our strategy of working with small, local partner organisations means that our impact is sustainable and the organisations themselves are strengthened for the future, as well as helped in the short term. Our experienced and dedicated staff team has worked closely with our partners, providing training and encouragement along the way. Happily, this year has not seen any huge humanitarian disasters, although there have been many localised problems which have often failed to grab the media headlines. And these still represent real human tragedies at the individual level and the need for humanitarian assistance always exceeds available resources.

In seeking to spread scriptural holiness throughout the land, John Wesley empowered people to change their lives in the 18th century. People living in poverty by our standards were encouraged to 'earn as much as you can, save as much as you can and give as much as you can'. MRDF affirms its Methodist roots by fostering potential at a local level with small groups dedicated to social change and by being pragmatic, economical and responsible with resources. This means: Focusing on the poorest communities.............................................................................................................................. 4-7 Working to increase opportunity...................................................................................................................................... 8-11 Stewarding our resources............................................................................................................................................. 12-15

The spectre of climate change is also an increasing concern for all of us. Although the actual short- and medium-term effects can be difficult to assess, it is very obvious that the world's poorest people, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, face the biggest dangers. In one small Ethiopian community I visited recently, more than 1,000 people had died as a direct consequence of rains falling at the wrong time of year. This may not have made the news, but it shows the extreme vulnerability of some of the world's poorest people.

Nurturing small organisations....................................................................................................................................... 16-17

So a big ‘thank you’ to everyone who has helped us towards this year’s achievements - and a big ‘please’ to continue your support in the year ahead: there is so much still to do.

Vision

Responding to emergencies......................................................................................................................................... 18-19 Encouraging positive action for change........................................................................................................................ 20-21 Thanking you!................................................................................................................................................................ 22-23

A world where the poorest people have the resources, opportunities and skills to take control of their own development, and to challenge unjust structures.

Mission

2

Revd Dr Peter Byass Chair of Trustees

MRDF exists to bring about significant and long-term change in some of the world’s most marginalised communities, and to empower people to change structures that are oppressive and unjust.

3


Contents Dear Supporter I am delighted to report on another very successful year for the Methodist Relief and Development Fund, due of course to the continuing commitment of our supporters, partners and staff. Our strategy of working with small, local partner organisations means that our impact is sustainable and the organisations themselves are strengthened for the future, as well as helped in the short term. Our experienced and dedicated staff team has worked closely with our partners, providing training and encouragement along the way. Happily, this year has not seen any huge humanitarian disasters, although there have been many localised problems which have often failed to grab the media headlines. And these still represent real human tragedies at the individual level and the need for humanitarian assistance always exceeds available resources.

In seeking to spread scriptural holiness throughout the land, John Wesley empowered people to change their lives in the 18th century. People living in poverty by our standards were encouraged to 'earn as much as you can, save as much as you can and give as much as you can'. MRDF affirms its Methodist roots by fostering potential at a local level with small groups dedicated to social change and by being pragmatic, economical and responsible with resources. This means: Focusing on the poorest communities.............................................................................................................................. 4-7 Working to increase opportunity...................................................................................................................................... 8-11 Stewarding our resources............................................................................................................................................. 12-15

The spectre of climate change is also an increasing concern for all of us. Although the actual short- and medium-term effects can be difficult to assess, it is very obvious that the world's poorest people, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, face the biggest dangers. In one small Ethiopian community I visited recently, more than 1,000 people had died as a direct consequence of rains falling at the wrong time of year. This may not have made the news, but it shows the extreme vulnerability of some of the world's poorest people.

Nurturing small organisations....................................................................................................................................... 16-17

So a big ‘thank you’ to everyone who has helped us towards this year’s achievements - and a big ‘please’ to continue your support in the year ahead: there is so much still to do.

Vision

Responding to emergencies......................................................................................................................................... 18-19 Encouraging positive action for change........................................................................................................................ 20-21 Thanking you!................................................................................................................................................................ 22-23

A world where the poorest people have the resources, opportunities and skills to take control of their own development, and to challenge unjust structures.

Mission

2

Revd Dr Peter Byass Chair of Trustees

MRDF exists to bring about significant and long-term change in some of the world’s most marginalised communities, and to empower people to change structures that are oppressive and unjust.

3


Accessible health care In Mali, rates of maternal and infant mortality are among the highest in the world. MRDF’s support has increased access to basic health care for 3,000 pregnant women. In addition, over 80% of women interviewed now understand the importance of prenatal consultations.

Focusing on the poorest communities 4

“Until MRDF’s partner started working here, many still believed that malaria was caused by cats, birds, or lizards. The health workers have built such high levels of trust with the communities that the number of people now willing to seek advice and help has risen dramatically.” Kirsty Smith, MRDF Director

Safe clean water MRDF’s support to the Methodist Church in Togo paid for the construction of a well for one of the poorest and least accessible communities, where no other NGOs are operating. 5,400 villagers now have clean water to drink, with resulting dramatic improvements in people’s health. A thank you letter from Fio Noviabou Klolly I, Traditional Chief of Zouvi.

5


Accessible health care In Mali, rates of maternal and infant mortality are among the highest in the world. MRDF’s support has increased access to basic health care for 3,000 pregnant women. In addition, over 80% of women interviewed now understand the importance of prenatal consultations.

Focusing on the poorest communities 4

“Until MRDF’s partner started working here, many still believed that malaria was caused by cats, birds, or lizards. The health workers have built such high levels of trust with the communities that the number of people now willing to seek advice and help has risen dramatically.” Kirsty Smith, MRDF Director

Safe clean water MRDF’s support to the Methodist Church in Togo paid for the construction of a well for one of the poorest and least accessible communities, where no other NGOs are operating. 5,400 villagers now have clean water to drink, with resulting dramatic improvements in people’s health. A thank you letter from Fio Noviabou Klolly I, Traditional Chief of Zouvi.

5


Living with dignity MRDF’s project in Cameroon focuses on an area badly affected by HIV/AIDS and urban migration, where the elderly are often left to care for numerous grandchildren. By creating Self Help Groups, providing micro-credit and training, distributing goats, blankets and lamps, MRDF enabled 2,000 old people not only to have a better standard of living, but also to benefit from group solidarity.

"I like the unity, it is our strength - you cannot do many things alone. Sitting alone you can feel sad but at the meetings we can share our feelings. I learned how to cook nutritious food, it gives you more strength!" Miriam Njweng, Group Member

Focusing on the poorest communities 6

“The difference between being literate and illiterate is like the difference between earth and sky! Before, we were blind. We had eyes, but couldn’t see - now our eyes are opening.” Parbati Mahara

Learning to read and write In Nepal, where only 35% (UNESCO, 2006) of women can read and write, MRDF enabled 400 internally displaced women to make up for lost time by providing non-formal education and micro-credit support. The benefits of this were many and wide-ranging, from no longer being cheated at market, and being able to help with their children’s homework, to a significant increase in self-esteem.


Living with dignity MRDF’s project in Cameroon focuses on an area badly affected by HIV/AIDS and urban migration, where the elderly are often left to care for numerous grandchildren. By creating Self Help Groups, providing micro-credit and training, distributing goats, blankets and lamps, MRDF enabled 2,000 old people not only to have a better standard of living, but also to benefit from group solidarity.

"I like the unity, it is our strength - you cannot do many things alone. Sitting alone you can feel sad but at the meetings we can share our feelings. I learned how to cook nutritious food, it gives you more strength!" Miriam Njweng, Group Member

Focusing on the poorest communities 6

“The difference between being literate and illiterate is like the difference between earth and sky! Before, we were blind. We had eyes, but couldn’t see - now our eyes are opening.” Parbati Mahara

Learning to read and write In Nepal, where only 35% (UNESCO, 2006) of women can read and write, MRDF enabled 400 internally displaced women to make up for lost time by providing non-formal education and micro-credit support. The benefits of this were many and wide-ranging, from no longer being cheated at market, and being able to help with their children’s homework, to a significant increase in self-esteem.


Starting again in Sierra Leone

Protection against HIV/AIDS

12 years of civil war disrupted the education of many young adults. As they return to their villages to restart their lives, services available from an overstretched government are, for the time being, severely limited.

Zambia has an HIV/AIDS prevalence rate of 21.5%. MRDF supported work in 6 villages through 30 community volunteers and Community Zonal Committees (comprising traditional leaders and people living with HIV and AIDS). These created awareness of the disease amongst young people, motivating them to practise safe sex, undergo voluntary counselling and testing and, where necessary, anti-retroviral treatment.

Thanks to MRDF’s funding, 125 people in five isolated rural communities received basic literacy training through discussion groups which focus on the issues affecting their lives, such as nutrition, basic hygiene and HIV/AIDS.

8

Working to increase opportunity

“I lost my father and mother to AIDS. [MRDF’s partner] motivated me to do something concrete – to prevent other people becoming orphans like me.” Elfaz Latson,

Community-based Volunteer

Emerging from fear MRDF’s partner in Guatemala City reached out to over a thousand women in poor slum communities, many of whom are employed in garment factories. Amid low incomes, inequality and domestic violence, MRDF support provided gynaecological, family planning and pre- and post-natal services to these women, who face severely limited state provision and unaffordable private healthcare.

9


Starting again in Sierra Leone

Protection against HIV/AIDS

12 years of civil war disrupted the education of many young adults. As they return to their villages to restart their lives, services available from an overstretched government are, for the time being, severely limited.

Zambia has an HIV/AIDS prevalence rate of 21.5%. MRDF supported work in 6 villages through 30 community volunteers and Community Zonal Committees (comprising traditional leaders and people living with HIV and AIDS). These created awareness of the disease amongst young people, motivating them to practise safe sex, undergo voluntary counselling and testing and, where necessary, anti-retroviral treatment.

Thanks to MRDF’s funding, 125 people in five isolated rural communities received basic literacy training through discussion groups which focus on the issues affecting their lives, such as nutrition, basic hygiene and HIV/AIDS.

8

Working to increase opportunity

“I lost my father and mother to AIDS. [MRDF’s partner] motivated me to do something concrete – to prevent other people becoming orphans like me.” Elfaz Latson,

Community-based Volunteer

Emerging from fear MRDF’s partner in Guatemala City reached out to over a thousand women in poor slum communities, many of whom are employed in garment factories. Amid low incomes, inequality and domestic violence, MRDF support provided gynaecological, family planning and pre- and post-natal services to these women, who face severely limited state provision and unaffordable private healthcare.

9


Improved health In 12 remote villages of western Nepal, MRDF’s local partner pioneered a new low-cost approach to agriculture, including the setting up of 96 community nurseries and the introduction of organic latrines, fuel-intensive smoke-free stoves, bee-keeping and animal husbandry. These measures have so improved the quality of life of the community that young people no longer need to migrate to the towns to seek work.

10

“Before this project, it was unheard of for any family to have a toilet. Now, when you look out, the hillside is dotted with toilets, draining racks and compost pits and I know how to store my water safely.” Gauri Kumari Daram

Working to increase opportunity

“Now I have enough to eat in the house it is the highest gift! The money I earn is used for health and to educate my children.” Mr. Mbai Clement, Loan Recipient

A route out of poverty In north-west Cameroon, smallholder farmers received training to increase yields and learn new skills such as bee-keeping and horticulture. MRDF also offered lowinterest loans, and book-keeping and business training help people to generate the income they need.

11


Improved health In 12 remote villages of western Nepal, MRDF’s local partner pioneered a new low-cost approach to agriculture, including the setting up of 96 community nurseries and the introduction of organic latrines, fuel-intensive smoke-free stoves, bee-keeping and animal husbandry. These measures have so improved the quality of life of the community that young people no longer need to migrate to the towns to seek work.

10

“Before this project, it was unheard of for any family to have a toilet. Now, when you look out, the hillside is dotted with toilets, draining racks and compost pits and I know how to store my water safely.” Gauri Kumari Daram

Working to increase opportunity

“Now I have enough to eat in the house it is the highest gift! The money I earn is used for health and to educate my children.” Mr. Mbai Clement, Loan Recipient

A route out of poverty In north-west Cameroon, smallholder farmers received training to increase yields and learn new skills such as bee-keeping and horticulture. MRDF also offered lowinterest loans, and book-keeping and business training help people to generate the income they need.

11


This chart shows where MRDF funded and facilitated work through its overseas partners in the last year, including 8 out of the 12 poorest countries in the world.

12

Type of work

Country

Total Grants

Bangladesh

£65,643

Cambodia

£9,003

India

£57,348

Nepal

£72,417

Solomon Islands

SOUTHERN AFRICA

ASIA EAST AFRICA SOUTH & CENT. AMERICA

Faced with overwhelming need in so many areas of the world, MRDF focused on a limited number of countries and prioritised support to the most marginalised communities within these countries - working with those who are ‘doubly disadvantaged’ because of a combination of factors including location, gender, age, caste or status.

Country

Type of work

Total Grants

Malawi

£45,013

Malawi & Zambia

£29,700

Mozambique

£51,652

Zambia

£22,172

£5,000

Burkina Faso

£369

Sri Lanka

£105,400

Cameroon

£128,186

Ethiopia

£51,611

Gambia

£8,726

Kenya

£42,742

Ghana

£30,347

Sudan

£6,441

Liberia

£11,129

Tanzania

Ongoing work funded in 05/06

Mali

£113,807

Uganda

£134,217

Niger

£3,480

Bolivia

£25,000

Sierra Leone

£22,816

El Salvador

£66,766

Togo

£49,429

Guatemala

£26,753

United Kngdom

£155,139

Honduras

Ongoing work funded in 05/06

Nicaragua

Ongoing work funded in 05/06

WEST AFRICA

Stewarding our resources

Each symbol represents an MRDF project. Where there is more than one of the same symbol for a certain country, it indicates that MRDF is funding several similar projects.

Income Generation/Microcredit

Children

Sustainable Agriculture

Education

Capacity Building

Humanitarian Aid/Disaster Relief

Health

Water & Sanitation

Rights

Campaigning & Development Education

13


This chart shows where MRDF funded and facilitated work through its overseas partners in the last year, including 8 out of the 12 poorest countries in the world.

12

Type of work

Country

Total Grants

Bangladesh

£65,643

Cambodia

£9,003

India

£57,348

Nepal

£72,417

Solomon Islands

SOUTHERN AFRICA

ASIA EAST AFRICA SOUTH & CENT. AMERICA

Faced with overwhelming need in so many areas of the world, MRDF focused on a limited number of countries and prioritised support to the most marginalised communities within these countries - working with those who are ‘doubly disadvantaged’ because of a combination of factors including location, gender, age, caste or status.

Country

Type of work

Total Grants

Malawi

£45,013

Malawi & Zambia

£29,700

Mozambique

£51,652

Zambia

£22,172

£5,000

Burkina Faso

£369

Sri Lanka

£105,400

Cameroon

£128,186

Ethiopia

£51,611

Gambia

£8,726

Kenya

£42,742

Ghana

£30,347

Sudan

£6,441

Liberia

£11,129

Tanzania

Ongoing work funded in 05/06

Mali

£113,807

Uganda

£134,217

Niger

£3,480

Bolivia

£25,000

Sierra Leone

£22,816

El Salvador

£66,766

Togo

£49,429

Guatemala

£26,753

United Kngdom

£155,139

Honduras

Ongoing work funded in 05/06

Nicaragua

Ongoing work funded in 05/06

WEST AFRICA

Stewarding our resources

Each symbol represents an MRDF project. Where there is more than one of the same symbol for a certain country, it indicates that MRDF is funding several similar projects.

Income Generation/Microcredit

Children

Sustainable Agriculture

Education

Capacity Building

Humanitarian Aid/Disaster Relief

Health

Water & Sanitation

Rights

Campaigning & Development Education

13


Stewarding our resources MRDF is driven by a number of core values, which include being as economical, efficient and effective as possible and encouraging our partners to be the same. 2006/7 saw MRDF optimise economy to ensure that as much of our income as possible was used where it was most needed.

14

Breakdown of income 2006/7 Beckett Saddler £46,000

Breakdown of income 2005/6 Beckett Saddler £31,000

Unrestricted donations £778,000 Unrestricted donations £928,000

Restricted donations £267,000 Restricted donations £793,000 Legacies £377,000 Investment income & interest £67,000 Sales £3,000

Legacies £469,000

Total incoming resources

£1,688,000

Breakdown of expenditure “You will see that MRDF’s income was £379,000 lower in 2006/7 than in 2005/6 - this is because there were fewer high-profile natural disasters in the past year, which always generate a good response from our supporters. I urge you to keep giving, even when there are no emergency appeals, so that we can help make people in the poorest communities to become less vulnerable if disaster occurs. In these circumstances prevention is always better – and cheaper – than cure.” Kirsty Smith, MRDF Director

For every £1 donated to MRDF in the last year : 61p went on grants to development projects in the world's poorest countries 15p went on humanitarian aid 8p went to UK-based campaigning or development education organisations 9p went on charitable activities in the UK including development awareness 5p went on fundraising 2p went on governance

Investment income & interest £81,000 Sales £4,000

Total incoming resources

£2,067,000

Will you become a regular giver? Please consider taking out a standing order so that MRDF can help prevent the most vulnerable people falling over the edge into poverty when disaster occurs. See fold-out flap at the back of this Annual Review.

15


Stewarding our resources MRDF is driven by a number of core values, which include being as economical, efficient and effective as possible and encouraging our partners to be the same. 2006/7 saw MRDF optimise economy to ensure that as much of our income as possible was used where it was most needed.

14

Breakdown of income 2006/7 Beckett Saddler £46,000

Breakdown of income 2005/6 Beckett Saddler £31,000

Unrestricted donations £778,000 Unrestricted donations £928,000

Restricted donations £267,000 Restricted donations £793,000 Legacies £377,000 Investment income & interest £67,000 Sales £3,000

Legacies £469,000

Total incoming resources

£1,688,000

Breakdown of expenditure “You will see that MRDF’s income was £379,000 lower in 2006/7 than in 2005/6 - this is because there were fewer high-profile natural disasters in the past year, which always generate a good response from our supporters. I urge you to keep giving, even when there are no emergency appeals, so that we can help make people in the poorest communities to become less vulnerable if disaster occurs. In these circumstances prevention is always better – and cheaper – than cure.” Kirsty Smith, MRDF Director

For every £1 donated to MRDF in the last year : 61p went on grants to development projects in the world's poorest countries 15p went on humanitarian aid 8p went to UK-based campaigning or development education organisations 9p went on charitable activities in the UK including development awareness 5p went on fundraising 2p went on governance

Investment income & interest £81,000 Sales £4,000

Total incoming resources

£2,067,000

Will you become a regular giver? Please consider taking out a standing order so that MRDF can help prevent the most vulnerable people falling over the edge into poverty when disaster occurs. See fold-out flap at the back of this Annual Review.

15


Increased effectiveness

“[MRDF’s partner] has helped me a lot. The first time I went to a monthly meeting I saw people healthier than me and I thought, ‘How can they have AIDS?’ It opened my eyes.”

This year, MRDF worked in partnership with over 70 small-scale, locally-based organisations and Methodist Churches. MRDF recognises that projects on their own are not enough. It is also essential to build the capacity and strengthen the effectiveness of local organisations. In this way, MRDF partners will continue to work with communities in a way that encourages their participation and empowerment, and increases opportunity, long after the existing project is completed.

16

Sikira Arnadou, Self Help Group member

“I’m very glad I went to the seminar because I learnt a lot about sanitation. We had a little knowledge but we benefited from additional knowledge.” This year saw organisational assessments carried out in Bangladesh, Cameroon, El Salvador, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Liberia, Mozambique, Niger, Sierra Leone, Togo, Uganda and Zambia. Active networking was taken up with NGOs and local governments to identify new grassroots organisations for partnerships and to understand national priorities. Tightening up of financial requirements has also taken place, along with a new emphasis on defining governance responsibilities.

Living with HIV In Togo, MRDF supports the first HIV/AIDS ‘dropin’ centre in the central region, providing care and support services for people living with HIV. Thanks to MRDF’s funding and excellent referral links with the state general hospital and the local Red Cross, the programme has expanded to reach out to nearly 1,000 individuals.

Nurturing small organisations

Daniel Musoke, Bukwende Village

Lobbying successfully As well as bringing safe water, latrines and better hygiene practices to nearly 7,000 people, MRDF’s partner in Uganda provided training on lobbying and advocacy. Community leaders used a common voice to press for more and improved services from the local government and to advocate for the less privileged groups of people in their areas.

17


Increased effectiveness

“[MRDF’s partner] has helped me a lot. The first time I went to a monthly meeting I saw people healthier than me and I thought, ‘How can they have AIDS?’ It opened my eyes.”

This year, MRDF worked in partnership with over 70 small-scale, locally-based organisations and Methodist Churches. MRDF recognises that projects on their own are not enough. It is also essential to build the capacity and strengthen the effectiveness of local organisations. In this way, MRDF partners will continue to work with communities in a way that encourages their participation and empowerment, and increases opportunity, long after the existing project is completed.

16

Sikira Arnadou, Self Help Group member

“I’m very glad I went to the seminar because I learnt a lot about sanitation. We had a little knowledge but we benefited from additional knowledge.” This year saw organisational assessments carried out in Bangladesh, Cameroon, El Salvador, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Liberia, Mozambique, Niger, Sierra Leone, Togo, Uganda and Zambia. Active networking was taken up with NGOs and local governments to identify new grassroots organisations for partnerships and to understand national priorities. Tightening up of financial requirements has also taken place, along with a new emphasis on defining governance responsibilities.

Living with HIV In Togo, MRDF supports the first HIV/AIDS ‘dropin’ centre in the central region, providing care and support services for people living with HIV. Thanks to MRDF’s funding and excellent referral links with the state general hospital and the local Red Cross, the programme has expanded to reach out to nearly 1,000 individuals.

Nurturing small organisations

Daniel Musoke, Bukwende Village

Lobbying successfully As well as bringing safe water, latrines and better hygiene practices to nearly 7,000 people, MRDF’s partner in Uganda provided training on lobbying and advocacy. Community leaders used a common voice to press for more and improved services from the local government and to advocate for the less privileged groups of people in their areas.

17


Pakistan’s North-West Frontier Province was devastated by an earthquake in October 2005 that left some 85,000 dead and 3 million homeless. During the past year, MRDF has continued to support the large-scale recovery work which includes upgrading water supplies, improving health, hygiene and sanitation, supporting livelihoods and providing shelter.

18

Responding to emergencies

Aid after the floods

The world’s biggest relief operation continues to support 2.5 million displaced people in the Darfur region of Sudan. Many have been living in temporary camps for up to 3 years. MRDF contributed to the work in the camps that is providing longterm relief to over 100,000 people, including water and sanitation, education, hygiene, health, and peace and reconciliation.

Sudan

Continuing relief for Darfur

Rebuilding lives

In 2007, floods wrought devastation across much of South Asia, and in Bangladesh MRDF responded rapidly through its partner in Dhaka. The children it supports survive on the streets of the city. Flooding not only increased their vulnerability to disease, but also removed their opportunities to earn any income. MRDF assistance provided clothing, medicine and extra food, drinking water and shelter to 1,500 children.

Averting disaster

Securing water supplies

Forgotten emergencies

In April 2007, a tsunami struck the Solomon Islands, affecting around 37,000 people and causing dire shortages of drinking water in many areas. MRDF worked with the Methodist Church of Great Britain and the United Church of the Solomon Islands to provide emergency water tanks, meeting the needs of 5,000 affected people.

In 2006/7, MRDF prioritised relief to emergencies which received little or no media coverage and therefore elicited a limited financial response from the public. These included Serbia’s worst floods for 100 years, drought in Kenya and Afganistan, an earthquake in China and volcanic eruptions in the Philippines. MRDF also supported less publicised emergencies in Burundi, Southern Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo, where refugees displaced by conflict have been returning home and beginning to rebuild shattered lives and communities.

In the hurricane-prone Central American countries of Honduras and Nicaragua, disaster prevention strategies developed by MRDF partners bore fruit in the wake of Hurricane Felix in 2007, as well-prepared agencies worked collaboratively to lessen the hurricane’s impact on vulnerable communities.

19


Pakistan’s North-West Frontier Province was devastated by an earthquake in October 2005 that left some 85,000 dead and 3 million homeless. During the past year, MRDF has continued to support the large-scale recovery work which includes upgrading water supplies, improving health, hygiene and sanitation, supporting livelihoods and providing shelter.

18

Responding to emergencies

Aid after the floods

The world’s biggest relief operation continues to support 2.5 million displaced people in the Darfur region of Sudan. Many have been living in temporary camps for up to 3 years. MRDF contributed to the work in the camps that is providing longterm relief to over 100,000 people, including water and sanitation, education, hygiene, health, and peace and reconciliation.

Sudan

Continuing relief for Darfur

Rebuilding lives

In 2007, floods wrought devastation across much of South Asia, and in Bangladesh MRDF responded rapidly through its partner in Dhaka. The children it supports survive on the streets of the city. Flooding not only increased their vulnerability to disease, but also removed their opportunities to earn any income. MRDF assistance provided clothing, medicine and extra food, drinking water and shelter to 1,500 children.

Averting disaster

Securing water supplies

Forgotten emergencies

In April 2007, a tsunami struck the Solomon Islands, affecting around 37,000 people and causing dire shortages of drinking water in many areas. MRDF worked with the Methodist Church of Great Britain and the United Church of the Solomon Islands to provide emergency water tanks, meeting the needs of 5,000 affected people.

In 2006/7, MRDF prioritised relief to emergencies which received little or no media coverage and therefore elicited a limited financial response from the public. These included Serbia’s worst floods for 100 years, drought in Kenya and Afganistan, an earthquake in China and volcanic eruptions in the Philippines. MRDF also supported less publicised emergencies in Burundi, Southern Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo, where refugees displaced by conflict have been returning home and beginning to rebuild shattered lives and communities.

In the hurricane-prone Central American countries of Honduras and Nicaragua, disaster prevention strategies developed by MRDF partners bore fruit in the wake of Hurricane Felix in 2007, as well-prepared agencies worked collaboratively to lessen the hurricane’s impact on vulnerable communities.

19


Combating climate change MRDF participated in a significant step for the Methodist community - the passing of a resolution at the national Conference which recognised the disproportionate responsibility of developed nations for climate change and the impact this is already having on the poorer communities in which MRDF works. The resolution encouraged local churches to support climate change campaigning and to monitor and reduce their carbon emissions.

20

Encouraging positive action for change

MRDF partners report that the communities in which they work are already suffering the effects of climate change. In this region of Kenya it has not rained since 2005. MRDF Co-ordinators A new scheme was launched with the longterm aim of making sure MRDF has a friend and enthusiast in every Methodist District and Circuit. MRDF Co-ordinators are a vital link with the MRDF office as they encourage support in terms of fundraising, development awareness and campaigning.

Learning to be global citizens The World AIMS project, which encourages awareness of development issues in Methodist Independent Schools in the UK, was extended to include the 63 Methodist/Ecumenical State Primary schools.

Rev Martyn Atkins, President of Methodist Conference 2007/8 and Ruby Beech, VicePresident of Conference 2007/8, showing their support for the climate change resolution.

Biblical perspectives on poverty Over 3,000 copies of the ‘What Does the Bible Say About Poverty?’ Lent pack were used by house groups, youth groups and Lent groups. The six-week pack helped groups to develop their understanding of some of the causes of global poverty and encouraged discussion and action in response.

21


Combating climate change MRDF participated in a significant step for the Methodist community - the passing of a resolution at the national Conference which recognised the disproportionate responsibility of developed nations for climate change and the impact this is already having on the poorer communities in which MRDF works. The resolution encouraged local churches to support climate change campaigning and to monitor and reduce their carbon emissions.

20

Encouraging positive action for change

MRDF partners report that the communities in which they work are already suffering the effects of climate change. In this region of Kenya it has not rained since 2005. MRDF Co-ordinators A new scheme was launched with the longterm aim of making sure MRDF has a friend and enthusiast in every Methodist District and Circuit. MRDF Co-ordinators are a vital link with the MRDF office as they encourage support in terms of fundraising, development awareness and campaigning.

Learning to be global citizens The World AIMS project, which encourages awareness of development issues in Methodist Independent Schools in the UK, was extended to include the 63 Methodist/Ecumenical State Primary schools.

Rev Martyn Atkins, President of Methodist Conference 2007/8 and Ruby Beech, VicePresident of Conference 2007/8, showing their support for the climate change resolution.

Biblical perspectives on poverty Over 3,000 copies of the ‘What Does the Bible Say About Poverty?’ Lent pack were used by house groups, youth groups and Lent groups. The six-week pack helped groups to develop their understanding of some of the causes of global poverty and encouraged discussion and action in response.

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Our committed supporters Individual supporters Churches

Paul Rowley, Head of Insurance Operations, Methodist Insurance presents MRDF Director, Kirsty Smith, with a donation at the supporters’ party in November 2006.

Circuits Districts Methodist organisations

Thanking you!

“As I open the post at MRDF, I am privileged to see some of the very best examples of human nature as old and young, rich and poor, give beyond their means to the people in greatest need.” Debby Wakeham, Office Administrator

Office volunteers Hugh Colyer Susanna Ebiasah Mandie Jones Lisa Marchal Ricardo Navarro Iona Stirling Punam Vaja

Dudley Coates (VicePresident of Methodist Conference 2006/7) who walked the Jurassic Coast for MRDF.

Pro bono experts The Board of Trustees Paul Naish, Partner, Kissmann Langford Richard Parry, Managing Director, Autograph Design Limited Rev Prof Frances Young, Theological Advisor

We couldn’t do all this without you!

22

Jim Parrish (70) ran the London Marathon for MRDF - his tenth marathon.

Funders Big Lottery Fund Comic Relief World Development and Relief Committee, Methodist Church in Ireland Isle of Man Overseas Aid Committee Guernsey Overseas Aid Committee

“People ask me who they can give money to and know it will be well-used. Now I know they can give it to MRDF.” Moira Sleight,

Managing Editor, The Methodist Recorder

23


Our committed supporters Individual supporters Churches

Paul Rowley, Head of Insurance Operations, Methodist Insurance presents MRDF Director, Kirsty Smith, with a donation at the supporters’ party in November 2006.

Circuits Districts Methodist organisations

Thanking you!

“As I open the post at MRDF, I am privileged to see some of the very best examples of human nature as old and young, rich and poor, give beyond their means to the people in greatest need.” Debby Wakeham, Office Administrator

Office volunteers Hugh Colyer Susanna Ebiasah Mandie Jones Lisa Marchal Ricardo Navarro Iona Stirling Punam Vaja

Dudley Coates (VicePresident of Methodist Conference 2006/7) who walked the Jurassic Coast for MRDF.

Pro bono experts The Board of Trustees Paul Naish, Partner, Kissmann Langford Richard Parry, Managing Director, Autograph Design Limited Rev Prof Frances Young, Theological Advisor

We couldn’t do all this without you!

22

Jim Parrish (70) ran the London Marathon for MRDF - his tenth marathon.

Funders Big Lottery Fund Comic Relief World Development and Relief Committee, Methodist Church in Ireland Isle of Man Overseas Aid Committee Guernsey Overseas Aid Committee

“People ask me who they can give money to and know it will be well-used. Now I know they can give it to MRDF.” Moira Sleight,

Managing Editor, The Methodist Recorder

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“Two full meals a day was a distant dream for us, but now all seven of us (in the family) have three meals a day.’’ Mrs. Mulenga, Malawi

Methodist Relief and Development Fund 25 Marylebone Road, London, NW1 5JR Tel: 020 7467 5132 Fax: 020 7467 5233 Email: mrdf@methodistchurch.org.uk VISIT OUR WEBSITE: www.mrdf.org.uk Charity number 291691 Printed on recycled paper Evolution FSC Bright

Photo credits: All images copyright MRDF/Isabelle Carboni/John Cooper/Jane East/Paul Herbert/Menka Jha/Kirsty Smith/Samantha Tuck

Small miracles

in the world’s poorest communities Annual Review 2006/7: Published November 2007

MRDF Annual Review  

Annual Review for MRDF