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2012

“This is a pullquote. It goes up to the top right of this page and it is used to call out an important idea or principle or funny thing someone said.” - Parker Snyder, Executive Director, Cleantech Poland

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s far back as the Middle Ages, Wrocław was a cosmopolitan SUBSECTION city where traders and craftsmen mixed to exchange goods. Not much has changed in its 1000 year history. The southwestern HEADING Polish city of some 600,000 inhabitants is still a multi-cultural crossroads for business. But more and more often, Wrocław is a hub coalescing around sustainability, or more broadly, a movement towards a people-friendly, low emissions economy based on renewables. Wrocław, as the regional capital of Lower Silesia, has committed to becoming a “sustainable city.” But what exactly does that mean? A sustainable city is built for people. It’s walkable, bike-able, warm to children, and friendly to the climate. It’s also a place where business, government and universities work jointly to develop an economy mindful of future generations. FIG 1. THIS IS THE TITLE OF THE CHART In business, sustainability can be defined as a holistic approach based upon: 1. low carbon production 2. energy from renewable sources and 3. innovative, dynamic new markets. These three drivers will help to focus this report. Wrocław, as a matter of public policy, aims to distinguish itself in the region. In 2010, Mayor Rafał Dutkiewicz announced formally that he’d be moving Wrocław in a sustainable direction, first in a symbolic gesture by passing out ten electric scooters to municipal police, and then by commissioning a multi-sector study to inventory Wrocław’s carbon footprint. The Mayor has proudly declared: “We would like to be the first city in this part of Europe known for being climate friendly.” Wrocław certainly has the potential. It’s citizens enjoy per-capita wealth that is 50 percent higher than the Polish average. Situated on twelve “islands” made up of the broken and braided Oder River, Wrocław is a city that is rather well integrated into the natural environment. Pedestrian walkways, four-lane roads and narrow tramways crisscross an urban environment connected by about 120 bridges. From just about anywhere in the city, you are never more than a five minute walk from the river. The environment is just one part of Wrocław’s sustainability profile. International companies, especially those in biotechnology and information technology, have sales offices and distribution centers in Wrocław.

Wrocław

PROFILE OF A SUSTAINABLE CITY

Center for International Relations (CSM)

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Dear Colleagues, Wrocław is a city with great potential. From its earliest days, it has been at the crossroads of a changing Europe. Today, more than ever, cities have the opportunity to be change agents. Embodied in the C40 initative, a global movement to get 40 of the largest cities to act to lower their carbon footprint, cities have a role to play in allowing their citizens to make responsible environmental decisions. Sustainable cities come in all sizes. Wrocław, a city of about 600,000 people, has made considerable strides towards improving its sustainable profile. The EIT+ initiative to improve the efficiency of trams is just one example. The lengthy network of bike paths in time for EURO 2012 is another. Still, there’s a lot of work yet to be done. As President of the Center for International Relations, I am proud to say we have the pleasure of cooperating with Siemens and Cleantech Poland to inventory Wrocław’s sustainabile attributes, one of many such profiles to come. Enjoy! Yours sincerely,

Janusz Reiter President of the Center for International Relations Former Ambassador to the United States

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WROCナ、W

PROFILE OF A SUSTAINABLE CITY

1

INVENTORY OF CLIMATE FRIENDLY FEATURES

2

STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVES

3 4 A

INTRODUCTION MULTIMODAL TRANSIT ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION RESEARCH HUBS VIRTUAL NETWORKS POLITICS & THE ENVIRONMENT INFRASTRUCTURE & ECONOMY REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DEVELOPMENT ECONOMIC OVERVIEW FINANCING FOR SUSTAINABILITY INVESTMENT FIGURES DOMINANT INDUSTRIES

MS. JOANNA BENSZ MR. JERZY ZURAWSKI MR. JERZY GDANIEC MR. CEZARY LEJKOWSKI MS. IWONA MAKOWIECKA MR. TOMASZ GONDEK SUMMARY OF PERSPECTIVES

SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

INTRODUCTION SOLUTION ONE: TRANSPORT SOLUTION TWO: ENERGY SOLUTION THREE: EFFICIENCY

MARKETS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

POWER PLANT TECHNOLOGY NEW HIGH EFFICIENCY TRAMS & BUSES HIGH VOLTAGE CABLING MICROTURBINES FOR SMALL-SCALE POWER PRODUCTION

APPENDIX

CHART FOR PRIMARY CONTACTS

4 7 8 10 10 11 12 13 13 14 14 16 18

21 22 23 23 24 24 25

27 27 28 30

35 36 38 38

40

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INTRODUCTION

MAYOR’S DECLARATION

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A

s far back as the Middle Ages, Wrocław was a cosmopolitan city where traders and craftsmen mixed to exchange goods. Not much has changed in its 1000 year history. The southwestern Polish city of some 600,000 inhabitants is still a multi-cultural crossroads for business. But more and more often, Wrocław is a hub coalescing around sustainability, or more broadly, a movement towards a people-friendly, low emissions economy based on renewables. Wrocław, as the regional capital of Lower Silesia, has committed to becoming a “sustainable city.” But what exactly does that mean? A sustainable city is built for people. It’s walkable, bike-able, warm to children, and friendly to the climate. It’s also a place where business, government and universities work jointly to develop an economy mindful of future generations. In business, sustainability can be defined as a holistic approach based upon: 1. low carbon production 2. energy from renewable sources and 3. innovative, dynamic new markets. These three drivers will help to focus this report. Wrocław, as a matter of public policy, aims to distinguish itself in the region. In 2010, Mayor Rafał Dutkiewicz announced formally that he’d be moving Wrocław in a sustainable direction, first in a symbolic gesture by passing out ten electric scooters to municipal police, and then by commissioning a multi-sector study to inventory Wrocław’s carbon footprint. The Mayor has proudly declared: “We would like to be the first city in this part of Europe known for being climate friendly.” Wrocław certainly has the potential. It’s citizens enjoy per-capita wealth that is 50 percent higher than the Polish average. Situated on twelve “islands” made up of the broken and braided Oder River, Wrocław is a city that is rather well integrated into the natural environment. Pedestrian walkways, four-lane roads and narrow tramways crisscross an urban environment connected by about 120 bridges. From just about anywhere in the city, you are never more than a five minute walk from the river. The environment is just one part of Wrocław’s sustainability profile. International companies, especially those in biotechnology and information technology, have sales offices and distribution centers in Wrocław.


“We would like to be the first city in this part of Europe known for being climate friendly.” - Rafał Dutkiewicz, Wrocław Mayor

Among the largest are IBM, Google, Hewlett Packard, and Nokia-Siemens. Each of these corporations has identified sustainability as a driver of change and works to improve its “environmental” bottom line. Local heat and power producers, Fortum, is planning to reduce the carbon intensity of its power production with the construction of modern, efficient facilities. While research parks, such as the city owned WTP and EIT+ help to incubate high-tech business before they are self sufficient. What follows is a report that will inventory Wrocław’s sustainability profile. First, the report will look at the city’s sustainability assets, including networks and infrastructure, then it will describe which sustainability segments the city has thus far made a priority through its various investment programs, and finally it will suggest which of these markets will likely register the strongest growth for industrial producers to target in their business development.

A PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE OVER THE ODER RIVER 5 / 42


INVENTORY OF 1 CLIMATE FRIENDLY FEATURES

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For a city to be climate friendly, people need a place to walk - not just sidewalks but fewer cars.

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his section will inventory Wrocław’s “sustainability” infrastructure: transportation networks, nature reserves, research hubs, and virtual exchanges, such as a carbon trading platform.

MULTIMODAL TRANSIT

MULTIMODAL TRANSIT Wrocław has a fairly well developed regional rail network. It is connected to other regional cities vis-a-vis two railway stations: Wrocław Główny and Wrocław Nadodrze. There are two small river ports, where boat trams transport passengers during warm months, and there’s one medium sized airport that serves cities such as Warsaw, Kraków and Łódź. Nevertheless, there is both the potential and the need to integrate these forms of transport into an eco-friendly network.

2006 2007 2008 2009 Single family 2006 2007 2008 2009 Multi-family Bike paths

FIG 1. NEW CONSTRUCTION & THE PROXIMITY OF BIKE PATHS SOURCE: WROCŁAW ENVIRONMENTAL GUIDE, 2010

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For a city to be climate friendly, people need a place to walk - not just sidewalks but fewer cars. Wrocław has a large number of pedestrian walkways, bike paths and tram lines, but the dominant form of transit in the city is the automobile. Car traffic is a problem: just five years ago, the city averaged only 938 cars per sq km (the national average for big cities is 1017 cars per sq km), but as recent as 2011, the figure had climed to 1,272 cars per sq km, a nearly 30 percent increase. Wrocław suffers in particular because of the radial character of the city, which channels traffic to the center. During both the morning commute and the afternoon rush-hour, traffic jams are frequent. Furthermore, because the tram lines run on the same roads as cars, traffic jams can restrict the movement of trams. Wrocław could reduce vehicular congestion by charging car-usage fees or increasing parking fees, but has yet to do so. Regarding bike lanes, Wrocław has constructed a network of interconnected, largely radial bike lanes that connect the periphery to the urban center. Wrocław is unique in having a bike network which can distinguish between main bike lanes and secondary bike lanes. To get out of the city by bike, one can find fairly good roads with bike lanes (or wide sidewalks) leading from the city center to surrounding communities. Ease of cycling into and out of the city is especially important, given that the vast majority of new multi-family housing in Wrocław has been built outside of the urban center in the last fifteen years, particularly to southeast and northeast. Wrocław is probably one of the easier city Polish city centers to depart on a bicycle, a fact which has been noted by at least one organization that exists to promote cycling as a form of daily transit.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION In 2011 PwC’s survey of Polish cities, Wrocław ranked first out of the eight largest cities for it’s environmental protection measures. Overall, Wroclaw has done well to preserve open areas for its citizens use. What needs to improve is how it handles waste. Although 98 percent of household sewage is treated in municipal wastewater treatment plants, 99 percent of household and commercial waste is sent to landfills. Wrocław does not separate waste and little mu-


In PwC’s survey of Polish cities, Wrocław ranked first out of the eight largest cities for it’s environmental protection measures.

nicipal waste is put to use producing energy. Business as usual will need to change; as in the rest of Poland, Wrocław will have to alter its waste disposal and recycling. A municipal waste law, passed in July 2011, requires landfills to close and tipping fees to be imposed, changes which are to be gradually integrated into the waste management landscape. On the other hand, Wrocław has done well to integrate its inhabitants daily lives with open space. Several large nature preserves can be found in proximity to the city, including Bystrzyca Valley Park, Widawa Valley, Odra Valley Forest, Odrzańskie Forest and Bystrzyca Wetlands. The large “Market Square” in the city center is one of a half dozen easily accessible urban spaces. Further, there are many parks along the medieval perimeter defense channels and situated along the river islands that frame the city to the north.

PARKS FORESTS WATERWAYS

FIG 2. GREATER WROCŁAW IN PROXIMITY TO PLACES OF RECREATION SOURCE: WROCŁAW ENVIRONMENTAL GUIDE, 2010

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RESEARCH HUBS

VIRTUAL NETWORKS 10 / 42

RESEARCH HUBS For a city to grow its sustainability profile, it needs to attract talent, capital and innovation. Research parks are therefore important parts of a sustainable city. In Wrocław, the research parks that receive city support are EIT+ and the Wrocław Technology Park (WTP). Wrocław’s EIT+ program is a corporate entity owned by local governments and universities, such as the Lower Silesian government. EIT+ functions as a research and incubation center, supported in part by corporate partners: IBM Zurich, Nokia-Siemens and REC. Along with nanotechnology, biotechnology and information technology (IT), climate is one of its four main tracks. As of 2011, the climate program supports initiatives such as energyefficient transport, energy-efficient lighting and funding for innovative “pioneer” researchers and scientists. The EIT+ concept is modeled after regional hubs such as Fraunhofer Institute, Chemie Cluster Bayern, and the Technical Research Centre (VIT). Although it’s relatively new, EIT+ is Wrocław’s best hope to integrate with broader research trends in Europe. The Wrocław Technology Park (WTP) is an initiative owned in majority by the city that seeks to incubate businesses in high tech sectors. Functional since at least 2005, WTP offers space for lease at attractive rates in three buildings: ALFA, Incubator-Centre of Technology (ICT) and Lower Silesian Incubator of Science and Technology (LSIST). The facility is about 15 minutes from the city center and served by public transit. Several years ago, WTP received EU funding for the creation of an “Innopolis Wrocław” laboratory support framework. In the last two years, nearly PLN 2 million were distributed to businesses in high tech sectors, including Advanced LED Systems, Kriosystem and Lipid Systems. WTP not only provides space for businesses, it functions as an R&D hub for incubating businesses that will be important in tomorrow’s cleantech markets. In this way, these research parks fill a gap not so easily be taken up by the private sector. VIRTUAL NETWORKS A city’s sustainable profile includes virtual networks that should be developed along with its physical infrastructure. Foremost, a sustainable


Industrial producers in Wrocław and elsewhere in Poland, from as soon as 2013, will have to pay for an increasing amount of their carbon emissions.

city needs a carbon trading platform. Poland’s national system for trading carbon emissions is known as KOBIZE (Krajowy Ośrodek Bilansowania i Zarządzania Emisjami). Industrial producers in Wrocław and elsewhere in Poland, from as soon as 2013, will have to pay for an increasing amount of their carbon emissions. Over the next decade, the ability to trade in carbon assets that are easily convertible will become an important part of doing business in Wrocław, especially in energy intensive industries such as paper, aluminum and plastics. Fortum and Kogeneracja, Wrocław based power producers, will be active in the trade of carbon credits. Lastly, Wrocław’s sustainability profile should take note of high speed data networks. Cities with fast and capable data networks are more likely to attract companies that coallesce around sustainable development, and power producers taking aim at the “smart grid” will more often operate in conjunction with information networks. Wrocław has made a healthy step in this direction by providing free internet access in locations throughout the city for mobile devices. POLITICS & THE ENVIRONMENT Formerly, environmental protection was the domain of a single city office. But since Poland became a member of the European Union in 2004, environmental regulations are important to many more entities within the central and local government structures. A fundamental change brought upon by EU membership was an influx of EU funds that gave cities like Wrocław an unprecedented boost in growth. To spend the funds in line with EU regulations, most of the important investment projects, as in transport or energy, had to undergo environmental impact assessments. In this way, the principles of sustainable development and environmental protection positioned themselves as pre-requisites to carry out investments that Wrocław has lacked for decades. Speaking about the city’s environmental protection record, deputy mayor of Wrocław, Wojciech Adamski, noted the following: “There has been an investment boom in Wrocław since the 1990s. The city’s communication system is undergoing an overhaul. Tens of important streets are being modernized. There are new residential estates, shopping malls, stadiums and technology parks; certain industrial sectors

POLITICS & THE ENVIRONMENT

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are developing as well. Such substantial investment could pose a danger to the environment. Our experiences have so far been that even in the most complicated cases, pro-environmental solutions can be found,” he concluded. In other words, growth must now be contained within an overall environmental policy paradigm originating from Brussels that has to be translated into national and local regulations. Departments in city hall, such as Agriculture and Environment, are just one of many entities that originate, coordinate and execute environmental policy or policies relevant to environment. When asked from where does the city’s sustainable policy come from, Jerzy Gdaniec, deputy director of the Department of Agriculture and Environment, is quick to note: “Right from the mayor himself.” Besides the overall supervision and leadership from the mayor - Rafał Dutkiewicz, who has been in office since 2002 - there is a specific section in the mayor’s office called the Project Management Team, responsible for key projects that the city would like to consider milestones in its sustainability profile. The projects are: Intelligent Transport System ITS Wrocław and Integrated Rail Transport System in the Wrocław Agglomeration. These projects are discussed in more detail on page 28 of this report. Apart from the mayor’s office, environmental responsibilities in the city government are distributed among three departments. These departments make sure that investment projects do not compromise key environmental protection measures.

INFRASTRUCTURE & ECONOMY

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INFRASTRUCTURE & ECONOMY One of these is the Department of Infrastructure and Economy, whose key sections with respect to environment and sustainable development are the Bureau of European Funds Management, responsible for EU funds. There is also the Cohesion Fund Bureau, who is responsible for managing projects concerning solid waste management and water quality whose budget is paid out of EU cohesion funds. Also in the Department of Infrastructure and Economy, the Department of City Engineering is responsible for coordination and monitoring the city’s energy policy and water management strategy, developing bike transport infrastructure, and authoring long term investment


When asked from where does the city’s sustainable policy come from, Jerzy Gdaniec, of the Department of Agriculture and Environment, is quick to note: “Right from the mayor himself.”

plans. Within the Department of Infrastructure and Economy, there also is a special task force that works on the development of rail transport. The team’s scope of work and the expected outcomes and environmental benefits are described in more detail in the section on Sustainable Solutions, transport. The Department of Infrastructure and Economy reports to deputy mayor Maciej Bluj. REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT The second important department is Real Estate Management, where a key section with respect to environment and sustainable development is the Agriculture and Environment section, responsible for direct issues, such as:

REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT

Environmental impact assessment procedures Protection against noise and radiation Environmental protection funds Protection of nature, water, air Geology and mining law Waste management Animals protection Forestry There also is the Transport section, responsible for shaping the city’s public transport policy in terms of, for example, analyzing passenger volumes or ticket fares. Finally, there is the Security and Crisis Management department, a section responsible for identifying and preventing natural and man-made disasters. The section works closely with the Crisis Management Service, directly involved in monitoring events such as floods. The Real Estate Management Department reports to deputy mayor Wojciech Adamski. ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DEVELOPMENT The third key department is Architecture and Development, responsible for shaping and executing the city’s urban planning policy. They plan the city’s communication and information technology systems; they draft the city’s social and economic policy. This department reports to deputy mayor Adam Grel. There are also individual sections in other departments that have

ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DEVELOPMENT

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influence on sustainable development. These are the Public Procurement section in the Department of Services and Administration and the Sports, Tourism & Recreation section in the Department of Social Affairs. Other, non-city entities, whose competences can have an impact, even if not decisive, on Wrocław’s sustainability profile include: The Marshall Office, an executive body for the entire voivodship The Voivodship Office, regional representative of government Regional Directorate of Environmental Protection The Wrocław branch of the Environmental Protection Inspectorate The Wrocław branch of the Environmental Protection Institute Environmental Information Center The Wrocław branch of the National Fund for Environmental Protection and Water Management (NFOSiGW) The main point in this discussion has been that environmental competencies do not so easily fit into one department. More often, multiple agencies will coordinate multiple projects - all of whom effect Wrocław’s sustainability profile. Although departments communicate with one another formally and informally, there is great need for a strategic policy statement on sustainable development.

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW Wrocław is one of the 11 key Polish cities, the others being Warsaw, Szczecin, the Tri-City, Bydgoszcz, Białystok, Poznań, Łódź, Katowice, Kraków, and Rzeszów. In terms of size, it is Poland’s sixth biggest metropolitan area with 632,000 inhabitants. Although depopulated after World War II, the population has not changed significantly after regaining its pre-war headcount. In terms of GDP per capita, Wrocław ranked fifth in Poland, with a GDP per capita at 154 against the the Polish average of 100. Unemployment in Wrocław, as of March arch 2011, was 6.1 percent, or just over 19,000 people, about half of the national average. These figures rank Wrocław among the strongest of all the big cities in Poland.

FINANCING FOR SUSTAINABILTY

FINANCING FOR SUSTAINABILTY In late 2009, there was a change in how environmental protection is financed in Poland. New regulations caused the local municipality (gmi-

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The main point in this discussion has been that environmental competencies do not so easily fit into one department.

na) and county (powiat) operated environmental protection and water management funds to close down. After this change, the gmina and powiats in Lower Silesia had their assets and liabilities moved off of their balance sheets. Wrocław, as an organizational structure, is both a gmina and a powiat, so these administrative assets and liabilities simply became a position of the city’s budget. Meanwhile, the city has become an important entity for crafting the region’s environmental policy. The environmental protection and water management budgets are made up of revenue from a variety of environmental fees and penalties, including costs imposed for landfilling and storing waste, as well as logging forests and shrubbery. These local budgets can also be composed of EU funds. A decade ago, EU financing for environnental protection and sustainable development took place within the Instrument for StructurTri-City 734,000

Szczecin 406,000

135

129

Białystok 295,000

102

Bydgoszcz 258,000

124

Poznań 554,000

Warsaw 1,714,000

200

Wrocław 632,000

154

City Population

GDP

Poland = 100

295

Lódź 242,000

124

Lublin 349,000

111

Katowice 309,000

197

Kraków 775,000

155

FIG. 3 CITY BY CITY POPULATION AND GDP PER CAPITA COMPARISON SOURCE: PWC

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INVESTMENT FIGURES

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al Policies for Pre-Accession (ISPA). As of Poland’s 2004 accesion to the EU, the ISPA budget was transferred to the Cohesion Fund, a financing tool for EU member states. Local environmental budgets are also made up of resources from international organizations or public-private partnerships. INVESTMENT FIGURES There is a certain contrast between how Wrocław fares in terms of GDP per capita and the share of investment expenditure in the city’s overall budget. Generally, Wrocław invests more than other Polish cities. Most recently, the share of investment was 35 percent, the best ratio in Poland, ahead of second-ranking Poznań at 28 percent. Investment expenditure is generally an indicator of how dynamic GDP growth per capita will be, on the condition, however, that the city will restore balance in its balance sheets, after having relied so heavily on debt financing. Wrocław’s debt is currently at 67 percent of the city’s annual income, while Polish public financing law recommends a level of only 60 percent. Strikingly, Wrocław has the biggest debt to income ratio of the 11 most important Polish cities, according to PWC. Fitch, a global rating agency for credit worthiness, gives Wrocław a BBB+ rating, about the average that most big Polish cities receive from Fitch. When economic performance is taken into account, Wrocław outranks other cities by leaps and bounds. According to data from Poland’s Main Statistical Office, Wrocław achieved the best economic development index of all big cities in the years 2006-2010. The index was close to 40 percent; Warsaw was second at 33 percent. The economic growth index is a measure of combined average weighted GDP per capita growth (2005-2007), as well as growth in real salaries and improvements in unemployment (2006-2010). Wroclaw has also fared very well in obtaining EU funding, which has helped to sustain the city’s ambitious investment program. Wrocław is in the top three in terms of attractiveness to foreign investors, coming in third after Warsaw and Poznań. About 38 percent ratio of the city’s area is covered with master building & zoning plans, which puts Wrocław ahead of other cities. One thorn on the rose is, however, that domestic investors perceive Wrocław to be less attractive for investment than foreign investors. A 2011 PwC report on Polish cities


Wrocław achieved the best economic development index of all big cities in the years (2006-2010).

CASH FLOW IN LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL FUNDS* *AS OF 2010, THESE FUNDS WERE TRANSFERRED TO THE CITY BUDGET

PLN (x 1000)

2006

2007

2008

2009

FIG 4. GMINA ENVIRONMENTAL FUND (GFOSiGW )

PLN (x 1000)

2006

2007

2008

2009

FIG 5. POWIAT ENVIRONMENTAL FUND (PFOSiGW ) INCOME

PLANNED

ACTUAL

EXPENDITURES

PLANNED

ACTUAL

SOURCE: WROCŁAW ENVIRONMENTAL GUIDE, 2010

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DOMINANT INDUSTRIES

estimates Wrocław’s attractiveness for Polish investors at 88 points (the average for the 11 biggest Polish cities = 100), while for foreign ones it is much higher, at 135 points. DOMINANT INDUSTRIES How has the bright economic picture translated into the development of particular industry and service branches? The city has attracted renowned international companies. Apart from commercial real estate developers, Wrocław is seen as an important hub for business process offshoring (BPO), as well as research and development centers in high-tech sectors such as communications, information technology and banking. Some new development has taken place in branches traditionally associated with Wrocław, such as the manufacture of buses, trains, home appliances and chemicals. A recent trend however, which has has been in development since the early 2000s, when the first BPOs located to Wrocław, has been the blooming of research and development. Major international companies moved to Wrocław initially because of the city’s skilled but low-cost labor. Even as the salaries have risen, these industries have chosen to remain, choosing to pay higher salaries in return for productivity, creativity and competency. The following foreign companies have located in Wrocław their factories, BPO offices and/or R&D centers: Bombardier Transportation (bought out Pafawag) Bosch Credit Suisse GE Money Bank Google Hewlett-Packard IBM KPIT Cummins LG Philips & LG Electronics Nokia Siemens Networks Opera Software Siemens Toshiba UBS Volvo Whirlpool (bought out Polar)

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Wrocław is seen as an important hub for business process offshoring (BPO), as well as research and development centers in high-tech sectors such as communications.

Despite what is perceived as less favorable conditions for Polish companies, Wrocław is still the seat of such domestic giants like Nasza Klasa (social networking online), Telefonia Dialog (telecommunications), Protram (tram manufacturer), or globally important Selena (polyurethane manufacturer), and Koelner (fasteners for construction).

POLAND AVERAGE

FIG. 6 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INDEX (2006-2010) SOURCE: PWC

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STAKEHOLDER 2 PERSPECTIVES

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“The city should provide a motivator for companies to get involved towards sustainability.” - Joanna Bensz, PM Group, AmCham

J

ust like a musical band is composed of diverse instruments, the leaders of a sustainable city may have different priorities. However, for a city to develop sustainably, it’s important that city stakeholders organize collectively around environmental principles. With this in mind, this section presents the points of view of six stakeholders within the city government, regional associations, and private business - to find out what views they hold in common. JOANNA BENSZ According to Joanna Bensz, business development director for PM Group, also on the board at the American Chamber of Commerce, Wrocław is better integrated with the regional government than other cities in Poland of comparable size. This allows the city officials to target a larger population than just their own constituents and broadens the impact of city-sponsored initiatives. Ms. Bensz has been looking broadly at sustainable development as a business opportunity for more than a decade. Today, she sees more opportunities than there were just a few years ago. She points to the local power producer Fortum. “They are bringing in fresh ideas from Scandanavia because they are a Finnish company.” Ms. Bensz describes a new local coal project is about to be launched, using technology from North America which allows coal to be recovered from fines or residue that was previously unusable. “This coal mine will be up and running soon, using a combination of EU and private funding.” Ms. Bensz points to a drive towar sustainability which comes from the commercial real estate sector. A number of new buildings in Wrocław plan to be certified green buildings: Synergy Business Park, Ghelamco (BREEAM very good); Green Day, Skanska (LEED gold); Business Garden Wrocław, SwedeCentre (LEED gold); Green Towers, Skanska (LEED platinum). The Renoma shopping mall, recently renovated, was designed with a number of energy saving features, including high-efficiency heating and cooling systems. Outside of these private sector initiatives, as far as the city is concerned, Ms. Bensz believes the leadership could do more. “The city should provide a motivator for companies to get involved towards sustainability. A tax or financial incentive to invest in the region,” she adds.

JOANNA BENSZ

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JERZY ŻURAWSKI

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JERZY ŻURAWSKI Jerzy Żurawski is the co-founder and managing director of the Wrocław Agency for Environment and Energy, a private company offering technical and consulting services. Mr. Żurawski says Wrocław does have several strategies and projects that pursue sustainable development and environmental protection, but will be hard-pressed to finance them. “Anything that could move Wroclaw forward along the road to sustainable development and climate-friendly city is unlikely to happen because the city is very much in financial debt, following the need to finance investments like the ring road or the stadium for Euro 2012. Whatever the city will undertake will have a limited effectivness,” Żurawski says. A drawback, he adds, that the city suffers, is for example, when the city contracts and executes a tender to replace old windows in cityowned buildings, the contract does not have sustainability at its foundation. The contract is merely a practical solution to a practical problem: replace old windows. Similarly, investment in transport is not happening because of sustainability, but because of Euro 2012, according to Mr Żurawski. “In a sense, then, the sustainability aspect of these activities is only incidental,” he adds. According to Mr Żurawski, engaging companies in pro-sustainability projects could be problematic. For example, the city is currently running a tender for a study to address energy efficiency and energy saving measures in the city’s 244 educational facilities. “Of course, it’s good that such projects are underway but their scope will be limited, because a full-fledged program would require companies going in for a 10-year return on investment period. I don’t think that many companies will be interested,” Mr Żurawski says. If the city’s finances were in better shape, Mr Żurawski would recommend action in the following areas: improving energy efficiency of buildings, the development of new sustainable real estate projects, enabling low emission forms of city transport, promoting green spaces in the overall master-plan for the city (which he believes are on the retreat), and replacing heat and power infrastructure. The problem is, however, that the city owns neither the power generation company nor the network which the city sold to private investors a few years ago.


“Anything that could move Wroclaw forward along the road to sustainable development is unlikely to happen because the city is very much in financial debt.” - Jerzy Zurawski, Wrocław Agency for Environment & Energy

JERZY GDANIEC Even if city hall’s sustainable policies are spread through several sections and departments, Jerzy Gdaniec, deputy director of the Department of Environment and Agriculture, could be seen as one of the few people at the helm of Wroclaw’s sustainable efforts. According to Mr Gdaniec, the city has the right policies in place, but would like to avoid a situation in which the only sustainability efforts come from the city via incentives or penalties. “A real grass root effort should take place because every attempt to, say, improve energy efficiency is beneficial. It’s most important to convince people that energy efficiency goes hand in hand with reduction of CO2,” Mr. Gdaniec says. Mr. Gdaniec also points to a dynamically changing regulatory environment that makes priorities and challenges shift. A recent example is the new law on waste that requires local authorities to own municipal waste and oblige them to change their practices because of stiff tipping fees and the closure of landfills. “Waste management is our biggest problem now, as it is elsewhere in Poland,” says Mr Gdaniec. “So that’s why we’re going to educate stakeholders on waste management options, but also penalize those who burn waste illegally,” he adds. “It’s an enormous work to make Wrocław a sustainable city and it will take a long time because in some aspects we’re making up for decades of negligence. Furthermore, some projects just take decades,” says Mr. Gdaniec. CEZARY LEJKOWSKI Cezary Lejkowski is the director of climate and energy department at EIT+, a research and development organization established by the city of Wrocław, the Wrocław voivodship, and four leading academic centers: Wrocław University, Wrocław Medial University, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, and Wrocław University of Economics. According to Mr. Lejkowski, EIT+ is working on one project in cooperation with the city and universities, which hopes to reduce energy consumption for Wrocław trams by 20 percent or more. The project, soon to enter pilot stage and be tested on a Wrocław tram, aims to adapt a technology that utilizes the principle of kinetic energy recovery. “When

JERZY GDANIEC

CEZARY LEJKOWSKI

23 / 42


a tram brakes it loses energy. Our project will work on adapting a tram so that when it brakes, the energy is stored and used later to move the tram forward,” says Mr. Lejkowski. He believes that Wrocław, has to be credited with taking a proactive approach, of which EIT+ is an important part. “Here we are working to give at least some of the city’s strategies practical outcomes,” he adds, pointing to the requirements of the climate package, water and waste, transport and energy, as areas that Wrocław has most to improve.

IWONA MAKOWIECKA

TOMASZ GONDEK 24 / 42

IWONA MAKOWIECKA Iwona Makowiecka heads the Wrocław bureau of the Polish-German Chamber of Commerce. In her opinion, it makes sense for Polish-German businesses to have an organization promoting cooperation in Wroclaw, a city in close proximity to German border, which has long German business and cultural traditions. According to Ms. Makowiecka, the sustainability and environmental issues have long been embraced by German businesses. In Germany, it’s part of the business culture, much more than political slogan-eering. “Through the contacts that German firms have with Wrocław market, their sustainable approach works its way over to the Polish market,” Ms Makowiecka says. “It doesn’t matter what German companies we work with: they could be small firms doing some sort of craft, or big investors, carrying out a multi-million euro tender. Environmental technologies, sustainability, energy efficiency, renewables always come up in conversations,” Ms Makowiecka says. “They’re not asking literally about sustainable policies in the city, because they assume that today’s cities must have such policies. They’re asking about business opportunities,” Ms Makowiecka adds. “Investments in renewable energy are specifically of interest, because Germany has long-standing, transparent and fairly predictable renewable energy markets. Such a developed industry naturally seeks ways to expand to new markets and Wrocław is one of the promising markets for German firms.” TOMASZ GONDEK Tomasz Gondek is deputy managing director of Wrocław Agglomeration Development Agency (ARAW). ARAW is a company owned by the


“Through the contacts that German firms have with Wroclaw market, their sustainable approach works its way over to the Polish market.” - Iwona Makowiecka, Polish-German Chamber of Commerce

city of Wrocław and 26 local communities (gminas) around the city that is working to attract investment to the region. “I think that the city of Wrocław has been doing a good job in terms of coming up with strategies, programs, or at least workable ideas with regard to the issues of sustainable development and environmental protection. That said, the city is lacking a modus operandi, something that would effectively convert them into action,” says Mr Gondek. One example he provides is that the city is well aware of carbon emissions from transport and buildings, particularly in the city center, but there has not been a decisive action to curb it so far. “Should we monitor each and every chimney stack? Probably not, but it would be great if someone suggested an effective way to tackle low emissions,” says Mr Gondek. Apart from curbing emissions, the priority for the city and the agglomeration should be development of rail transport to connect Wroclaw to the surrounding areas. “There’s such a comprehensive rail network in the city that it begs for better organization, but there’s an obstacle in the form of PKP’s inertia,” says Mr Gondek. PKP is Poland’s rail operating group, composed of several publicly-owned companies. “I think, however, that transport is fairly obvious and even an easy problem to tackle. The real question is to think two steps ahead and come up with an idea that would result in achieving long term sustainability and drive the growth in business,” says Mr Gondek. SUMMARY OF PERSPECTIVES If there is a common thread running through these points of view, one can say that indeed Wrocław has taken several pro-active steps toward improving its sustainability profile, however, the city’s budget is limited because of investments in the Euro 2012 football championship. Furthermore, because Wrocław was selected as the 2016 European Capital of Culture, what funds were previously to be earmarked for sustainable development may be put to cultural development. However, it’s important to recognize that infrastructure investment for the coming Euro 2012 event has already brought benefit to Wrocław’s sustainability profile, including ring roads and the bike paths.

SUMMARY OF PERSPECTIVES

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SUSTAINABLE 3 SOLUTIONS

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Since Wrocław is a radially oriented city, a new ring road will alleviate congestion in the center, which will in turn make Wrocław more friendly to pedestrians.

T

his section will inventory city hall’s initiatives that are helping to build Wrocław’s sustainable profile with a focus on transport, energy & efficiency. Concerning transport, the city has made the construction and expansion of a ring road a major priority. Since Wrocław is a radially oriented city, a new ring road will alleviate congestion in the center, which will in turn make Wrocław more friendly to pedestrians and less vulnerable to urban smog. As described, EIT+ is in the pilot stage of a research program aimed at improving the efficiency of the city’s tram lines. In the energy sector, Fortum, the largest provider of districting heating services, is building two new large-capacity combined heat and power (CHP) plants on greenfield sites. These projects aim to double the installed capacity in the city, while producing heat and power with less carbon intensity than the current coal-fired power plants. Related to energy efficiency, the city is the single largest owner of real estate in the greater Wrocław Agglomeration. Therefore, the city has a very large stake in the efficiency of its buildings, including housing and schools. Though the city has yet to put forward a comprehensive policy that discourages urban sprawl and rewards the construction of multifamily urban infill, it has identified areas for improvement. SOLUTION ONE: TRANSPORT Wroclaw’s car congestion record worsened between 2007 and 2011. According to PWC’s 2007 report on major Polish cities, there were 938 cars per each square kilometers of the city, compared to 1,017 cars per square kilometer on average in other cities analyzed by the report. But PWC’s report from 2011 gives the figure of 1,272 cars per square kilometer, which is above the 1,199 average of other big cities in Poland. The congestion is nothing new for a major Polish metropolitan area, owing to a combination of fast growth in car ownership and inadequate transport infrastructure. “As any old city in Poland, or even in Europe, the original street pattern in Wroclaw is radial. It’s only recently that investment got underway to move toward a ring road system,” said Jerzy Gdaniec, deputy director of the Agriculture and Environment Department in the Wrocław city hall. To that end, the recently opened Wrocław ring road (AOW), a part of the A8 highway, has contributed to reducing congestion, reducing fuel

TRANSPORT

27 / 42


use, diverting at least some traffic from the city center, and improving commuting time to and from work. The AOW ring road was not, however, the city’s deliberate effort to improve sustainability of transport. AOW’s sustainability benefits are more of a collateral benefit - but still a valid and important step toward the city’s sustainable future. In terms of transport, Wrocław is a multi-modal city: cars might be most important means of transport, but there is a considerable tram and rail infrastructure as well as a network of bike roads. Recognizing the need to divert car traffic from the city center and the environmental benefits of upgrading tram network, the city is attempting to boost the energy efficiency of trams. EIT+, Wrocław’s research and development center, is currently working to launch a pilot project to equip trams with a device to recover kinetic energy lost while braking. According to EIT+, the widespread implementation of such a device could reduce tram energy use by 20 percent or more. The project’s current budget is about €1 million. In a much more advanced stage are two other projects the city is running to improve the efficiency of its tram transportation networks. The first project is a so-called Integrated Rail Transport System (IRTS), which on completion could transform the tram network in Wrocław. The work plan for the €170 million project is to build new tram routes, modernize existing tram routes, supply new trams, introduce a traffic management system, and construct an integrated city transportation hub that will allow commuters to change means of transport. The city plans to complete the first stage of the project in time for the Euro 2012 football tournament, starting in June 2012. The IRTS project includes another effort from the city aiming at a more efficient transport: the so-called Intelligent Transport System (ITS). This program seeks to intregrate the tram network with a communications network to improve energy efficiency of the logistics of scheduling.

ENERGY

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SOLUTION TWO: ENERGY As a nation, Poland is legally obliged to produce 15.5 percent of its energy from renewable resources by 2020, but this overall goal does not mean that Polish city will be able to move quickly toward renewables. Wrocław is one such case.


EIT+, Wrocław’s research and development center, is currently working to launch a pilot project to equip trams with a device to recover kinetic energy lost while braking.

The latest available public policy document from 2010 provides an analysis on Wrocław’s potential to switch to low-carbon and renewable energy sources. The analysis comes from the city hall’s Department of Agriculture and Environment and was written as part of the Regions for Sustainable Change program aiming to promote low carbon urban solutions. The study concludes that the biggest potential lies in the conversion of the traditional heat and power sources to biomass, as in the co-firing of coal and biomass. Other renewable sources have not yet and are not expected to play a significant role in Wrocław. In terms of solar, the city is not pursuing any large scale attempts to install solar, nor have they embraced ground heat pumps. As elsewhere, solar and geothermal are generally not among fast-developing sectors in Poland. As for wind, Wrocław is not located in any of the top wind locations in Poland and the city hall has noted that there is virtually no space to develop a wind farm in the Wrocław agglomeration. It is simply already too urban an environment for wind. There are four small hydroelectric facilities in Wrocław, with a total installed capacity about 6.35 MW, nearly all of which the city owns. There are no further plans to develop hydro, nor is it likely that hydro will be given any sort of preferred status in the forthcoming national renewable energy law. Biogas is the only other renewable energy segment that can offer some potential. There are two operational biogas plants in the city, one on Janowska street with capacity of 738 kWt (thermal) and 601 kWe (electric). The other is located in the Maślice district and its capacity is 480 kWe. These are both rather small scale installations. A new biogas plant is going online in 2012 in Żerniki near Wrocław from the company Polenergia, a subsidiary of Kulczyk Investments. The plant will have an installed capacity of 1 MW, making it the biggest in Poland. It can be expanded to 2.4 MW, according to the investor. The plant is going to use agricultural waste from local farms. Where Wrocław may be able to do the most in terms of renewables is by using the existing potential and infrastructure of the local thermal power plant, owned by Kogeneracja. The company is privately-owned but remains in an operational symbiosis with the city, as Wrocław is the

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main end-user of heat and power. Kogeneracja is early in the process of replacing its coal-fired power generation capacity with biomass so as to phase out coal completely, even though Kogeneracja is not providing any expected final completion dates. At the moment, however, Kogeneracja is on course to increase the amount of renewable energy generated in its CHP plant in Wrocław by 50 percent in 2013. The company’s CHP installation’s BC-1 unit will be tailored to a 100 percent biomass-fired facility. Kogeneracja sells the power and heat it produces to network company Fortum, another former city owned company that was privatized not long ago. Fortum has revealed plans to develop its own power generation facilities to become both a power generator and distributor.

EFFICIENCY

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SOLUTION THREE: EFFICIENCY Wrocław is a city whose urban planning and architecture bears the imprint of history, both the old and the recent. Although these days, commercial properties tend to be certified for their “green features,” or undergo an audit for energy performance features, the city has a long way to go to tackle energy efficiency in older buildings. The buildings are mostly owned by the city, but involve privately held properties as well. An important project the city is rolling out just now will result in improving energy use in as many as 244 city-owned educational facilities (mostly schools). In December of 2011, the city launched a tender for the project for a financial analysis to be done, which is a prerequisite to the tender which will allow a company or companies to carry out energy improvements. The project is a good example of Wrocław’s need to renovate its buildings. All 244 education facilities will have to undergo a detailed audit for their use of electricity, heat, water, and gas. The audit will include an analysis of the current state of infrastructure, the current cost of maintenance and the current cost of energy use. After certain proposed changes, the model will predict what the savings will be. It’s likely that the results of the audit will serve the city as a benchmark to roll out similar programs for other types of buildings, such as residential estates and public institutions. It’s important to note, as elsewhere in Poland, an added layer of styrofoam or mineral-fiber insulation added to the outside of buildings,


While recent commercial properties tend to be certified for their “green features,” or in the very least undergo an energy audit, the city has a long way to go to tackle efficiency in old buildings.

once coated with concrete plaster to protect from weather, can improve the efficiency of buildings that are more than ten years old. The energy savings alone can pay for the cost of renovation. Such solutions are not possible, however, in buildings of historic value. Another program that has been producing some positive outcomes in terms of energy efficiency in buildings is the Local Revitalization Program. The program is quite broad in scope, as it entails not only thermal modernization of buildings, but also adapting them to new functions, or upgrading infrastructure like sidewalks or parking lots to improve quality of life. Although the city of Wrocław might not yet have embraced a comprehensive program to improve energy performance in buildings, it’s one of

A PALACE OUTSIDE WROCŁAW HOUSING THE EIT+ CLIMATE PROGRAM 31 / 42


the most robust markets for commercial real estate: the third largest for office properties, after Warsaw and Kraków. Developers have been active in the push for green buildings: Skanska, Ghelamco and SwedeCenter having committed to develop only certified green buildings. These buildings are qualified under either the UK standard, Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), or the US standard, Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED). The city of Wrocław can be given credit for its pro-development attitude, which is acknowledged especially among property developers. Wrocław’s total stock of modern office space is currently at 369,200 square meters. By 2014 this number is expected to have grown by at least 170,000 square meters, a 50 percent increase. Below is a list of the largest green building projects coming online in Wrocław. Energy efficiency, while having much to do with energy use in buildings, can have other aspects. A prominent example is a program run by the city of Wrocław, via its research hub EIT+, called LED Lighting which aims to cut energy use in several areas, namely road illumination, public gardens, bicycle and pedestrian paths, and lighting on common public infrastructure such as bridges, museums, statues, public buildings and road intersections. Project Named

Gross Lettable Area

Developer

Current Status

Planned Completion

Probable Certification

Synergy Business Park

40,000

Ghelamco

Planned

2012

BREEAM (grade not disclosed)

Green Day

n/a

Skanska Property Poland

Planned

n/a

LEED Gold

Business Garden Wroclaw

120,000

Swede Center

Planned

2014

LEED Gold

Skanska Property Poland

Under Construction

2012

LEED Platinum

Green Towers 10,640

GREEN BUILDINGS COMING ONLINE IN WROCŁAW SOURCE: CUSHMAN WAKEFIELD

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Developers have been active in the push for green buildings: Skanska, Ghelamco and SwedeCenter having committed to develop only certified green buildings.

Traffic light updating is an initiative that comes with multiple benefits. Improving energy use in such vital areas introduces smoother traffic in a that is growing its reputation for smog and congestion. In more detail, the LED Lighting program in its traffic lights will: regulate light intensity by adjusting it to current conditions control remotely light signal timing to induce green waves introduce night mode, where illumination intensity decreases The main point in this discussion has been that while energy efficiency is most prominent in a discussion of buildings, the city has several areas it is working on - traffic lights, street lighting, bridge lighting, even the braking systems on tram cars.

WROCナ、W IS A CITY RATHER WELL INTEGRATED WITH NATURE 33 / 42


MARKETS FOR 4 SUSTAINABILITY

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Fortum has initiated the tendering process for several large power plants to be constructed in the vicinity of Wrocław and Zabrze.

T

his report has discussed transport, energy and efficiency as three of the city’s priority areas for sustainable development. What follows are recommendations for areas for investment should an industrial producer wish to target Wrocław for its products and services. POWER PLANT TECHNOLOGY Fortum has initiated the tendering process for several large power plants to be constructed in the vicinity of Wrocław and Zabrze. The one in Wrocław is planned to be a Gas Turbine Heat Recovery Steam Generator, Steam Turbine (CCGT) CHP plant. The facility in Zabrze is planned to be Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Boiler plant with the following parameters: 355 MW fuel input capacity, 530 °C live steam temperature and 90 bar live steam pressure. The parties currently on the tender list for the CHP plant in Wrocław are:

POWER PLANT TECHNOLOGY

1. Abener Energia S.A. 2. Alstom Power Sp z o.o. 3. Ansaldo Energie S.p.A. 4. Consortium Budimex S.A. and CMI S.A. 5. General Electric 6. Consortium Iberdrola Sp. z o.o. and Iberdrola S.a.U. 7. J&P AVAX S.A. 8 Consortium PBG SA Energia Sp. z oo & Mitsubishi Power Systems. 9. Rafako S.A. 10. Consortium Siemens Sp. z o.o. and Siemens Aktiengesellschaft The parties bidding for the tender for the CFB project in Zabrze have not been announced. All details for the tender, including attachments for the design and construction of these two large power plants are given at the links: http://www.fortum.pl/o_fortum/projekty_inwestycyjne/chp_wroclaw/przetargi/

TENDER WEBSITES

http://www.fortum.pl/o_fortum/projekty_inwestycyjne/chp_ zabrze/przetargi_tenders/

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TRAMS & BUSES

TRAMS

BUSES

36 / 42

NEW HIGH EFFICIENCY TRAMS & BUSES Currently, the city of Wrocław is initiating the start of a pilot project aimed at rehabilitating its current tram cars to make them more energy efficient, discussed on page 28. Likely, with time, Wrocław’s public transit operator MPK will replace a subset of its tram and bus inventory. Therefore, an industrial producer could develop a product line well suited for the city’s tram fleet. The most recent tender in 2005 for the purchase of new trams was won by Skoda for the provision of 9 low-floor wagons. The current inventory of the city’s transport system include: Tramway rolling stock: 48 Wagon-type 102Na 282 wagons type 105N 4 wagons type 105N 2-type wagons 105NaAdtranz 60 wagons type 105NWr 2-type wagons 105NWrAs 2-type wagons 204WrAs 2 more this year Bus fleet: 1 bus-type PR 110 Jelcz 14 buses Jelcz M11 31 buses Jelcz 120MM 57 buses Jelcz M 121M 6 buses Jelcz M 121MB 3 buses Jelcz M 181m 4 buses Jelcz M 101 27 buses Volvo B10M 18 buses Volvo B10BLE 90 buses Volvo 7700 14 buses Volvo 7000 52 buses Ikarus 280 1 bus Ikarus 417 1 bus MAN NG 313 Four buses to transport disabled, Stick VW Transporter


The city of Wrocław is initiating the start of a pilot project aimed at rehabilitating its current tram cars to make them more energy efficient.

As an example of tenders for city-owned transporation systems, here are a few of the most recent ones announced last year: Repair calipers manufactured by Meritor and Knorr Bremse, Replace Holset turbochargers and water cooling systems in Jelcz, Volvo and Mercedes buses Supply abrasives, including welding, locks and hardware, as well as dry primary batteries and air tools for trams Upgrading and maintaining the tram lines in four of Wrocław’s depots The city keeps an updated list of its current tenders at this link: http://www.mpk.wroc.pl/index.php?option=com_content&task=bl ogsection&id=6&Itemid=64

TENDER WEBSITE

THESE TRAMS MAY NEED REPLACED SOON 37 / 42


HIGH VOLTAGE CABLING

MICRO-TURBINES

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HIGH VOLTAGE CABLING As Wrocław and its surrounding communities increase its production of renewable energy, particularly from small scale biogas, and possibly from wind energy outside of Wrocław agglomeration, the need for transmission cables to handle distributed power generation will grow. High efficiency cabling that can transport power at high voltage will likely be in demand. The current power transmissions system relies on 400/100kV lines coming from the power plant, which is stepped down to 220/110kV lines. Wrocław is a natural fit for the development of an interconnector to markets abroad. Because of its high per capita income, customers will be less sensitive to price increases; furthermore, the electricity markets in Slovakia, Germany and the Czech Republic are in proximity. MICROTURBINES FOR SMALL-SCALE POWER Microturbines can be situated just about anywhere there’s a source of natural gas or biogas. They may be well suited for replacing old coal boilers in city-owned buildings and industrial facilities. A manufacturer with a product in a power range of 30 kW to about 4 mW could be well positioned to take advantage of the co-generation and renewable power production goals in Poland. A microturbine CHP facility acts almost like an IT company, in that each individual turbine gets connected together, monitored from afar, and controlled independently to optimally produce power. A network of these assets could be an attractive offer to a city looking to improve the efficiency of its energy generation network.


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APPENDIX Prefix Name

Email

Title/Office

Mr.

Cezary Lejkowski

cezary.lejkowski@eitplus.pl

Mr.

Jacek Wardaszko

jacek.wardaszko@kogeneracja.com.pl

Director, Climate and Energy Department Press Spokesman

Ms.

Joanna Bensz

joanna.bensz@pmg.pl

Business Development

Ms.

Iwona Makowiecka

wroclaw@ahk.pl

Head of Regional Office

Mr.

Adam Mostowski

adam.mostowski@siemens.com

Senior Sales Representative

Mr.

Tomasz Gondek

tomasz.gondek@araw.pl

Deputy CEO

Ms.

Agnieszka Cena-Soroko agcena@cieplej.pl

Managing Director

Mr.

Jerzy Zurawski

jurek@cieplej.pl

Founder and CEO

Mr.

Marcin Haremza

m.haremza@wctt.pl

Mr.

Anna Pytel

Ms.

Dorota Wilusz

Ms.

Aleksandra Wojciechowska Bogdan Lukaszewicz

Mr.

Ryszard Szpadt

Mr.

Tomasz Sołowiej

Ms.

Paulina Tyniec

Wrocław Academy of Technology Transfer a.pytel@wctt.pl Wrocław Academy of Technology Transfer dorotawilusz@wp.pl Regions for Sustainable Change aleksandra.wojciechowska@um.wroc.pl Regions for Sustainable Change bogdan.lukaszewicz@um.wroc.pl Regions for Sustainable Change andrzej.wasik@um.wroc.pl Departament of Agriculture and Environment jerzy.gdaniec@um.wroc.pl Departament of Agriculture and Environment ryszard.szpadt@pwr.wroc.pl Environmental Protection Expert tomasz.solowiej@um.wroc.pl Head of EU Funds Mngmnt Dept paulina.tyniec@um.wroc.pl Head of Rail Transport Devpt Team

Mr.

Wojciech Kaczkowski

wojciech.kaczkowski@um.wroc.pl

Head of Urban Engineering Dept

Mr.

Paweł Czuma

pawel.czuma@um.wroc.pl

Head of Communications

Mr.

Adam Grehl

ww4@um.wroc.pl

Deputy Mayor

Mr.

Wojciech Adamski

ww1@um.wroc.pl

Deputy Mayor

Mr.

Maciej Bluj

ww3@um.wroc.pl

Deputy Mayor

Mr.

Director Andrzej Wąsik Director Jerzy Gdaniec

40 / 42


Company/Deptartment Sector

Telephone

Address

PO Code, City

EIT+ Sp z o.o.

(+48) 71 71 281 72

Kogeneracja

Institutional Private

PM Group

Private

(+48) 71 354 89 00

Polish-German Chamber of Commerce Siemens

Private

(+48) 71 79 48 335

Private

(+48) 32 208 41 56

ul. Gawronów 22

40-527, Katowice

Wrocław Agglomeration Development Agency Agency for Energy and Environment Agency for Energy and Environment Intelligent Energy Sector Group Intelligent Energy Sector Group Wrocław City Hall

Private

Pl. Solny 14

50-063, Wroclaw

Public

(+48) 602 398 501, (+48) 71 783 53 14 (+48) 71 326 13 43

Public

(+48) 71 326 13 43

ul. Pełczynska 11

Public

(+48) 71 320 4194

50-372, Wrocław

Public

(+48) 71 320 4194

50-372, Wrocław

Public

(+48) 717 779 117

50-031, Wrocław

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 717 779 102  

50-031, Wrocław

Wrocław City Hall

Public

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 717 779 100

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 717 779 100

50-031, Wrocław

Wrocław Agglomeration Development Agency Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 71 320 40 88

Public

(+48) 717 77 85 55

pl. Grunwaldzki 9, 50-377, Wrocław bud. D-2, pokój 213 50-031, Wrocław

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 717 77 87 01

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 717 77 71 12

50-032, Wrocław

Poland

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 728 489 960

Sukiennice 9

50-107 Wrocław

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 71 777 70 54

50-141 Wrocław

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 71 777 75 91

Wrocław City Hall

Public

(+48) 71 777 74 83

pl. Nowy Targ 1/8, pokój 130 pl. Nowy Targ 1/8, pokój 155 ul. Sukiennice 9, pokój 114

54-076, Wrocław

(+48) 695 286 015 ul. Klecinska 125

54-424 Wrocław 50-063, Wrocław

51-180, Wrocław

ul. W. Boguslawskiego 8-10

51-180, Wrocław

50-031, Wrocław 50-031, Wrocław

50-141 Wrocław 50-107 Wrocław

APPENDIX 1: SUSTAINABILITY STAKEHOLDERS IN WROCŁAW 41 / 42


This report was financed by Siemens SIEMENS.PL@SIEMENS.COM

This report was published by the Center for International Relations INFO@CSM.ORG.PL

This report was produced by Cleantech Poland INFO@CLEANTECHPOLAND.COM

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With the support of EUS Communication Consulting EWA.STEPAN@GMAIL.COM


Wrocław - Profile of a Sustainable City