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C L AY T O N From the Wild West to Jurassic Park...

www.ClaytonNM.org

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Welcome to Clayton! The site of Clayton has been a crossroads ever since time began. About 100 million years ago it was a dinosaur track way on the edge of an ancient sea, and dinosaur tracks and bones are found throughout the area. The most impressive collection of tracks is at Clayton Lake State Park, where over 500 tracks have been documented. This area is open to the public with an interpretive center and boardwalk around the site. Native Americans began coming through the area at least 10,000 years ago. Many traces of their passing have been found including various types of pottery, spear points, and even human remains buried in caves. The area was rife with buffalo, deer, and antelope, which made it a prime hunting ground. The twin peaks of Rabbit Ears Mountain have always been an important landmark to travelers and were particularly noted by Santa Fe Trail caravans which passed through the area from 1821 through the 1870’s. The name Rabbit Ears was given to the volcanic outcroppings in honor of the Indian Chief Orejas de Conejo who was killed in battle with Spanish colonists in the early 1700’s. In the late 1880’s talk of a railroad was heard and Stephen W. Dorsey, who had built a mansion at Mountain Spring about 60 miles west of Clayton, acquired access to the site where Clayton was laid out, named after Dorsey’s son, Clayton, the railroad came right through the town, and the community began growing in leaps and bounds. Clayton immediately became a shipping point for cattle and soon big herds were being trailed up from the southern part of the New Mexico territory. The area drew cattle and sheep ranchers and later, farmers. To this day the focus is on ranching and farming. 2

Union County is located in the northeastern corner of New Mexico, bordering Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas. Clayton is located at the intersection of US Highways 56, 412, 64, and 87. Interstate 25 is the closest interstate highway, 83 miles to the west. Interstate 40 is accessible 109 miles to the south. The closest metropolitan city is Amarillo, Texas, 131 miles away. Clayton and Union County are first and foremost cattle country. It is surely a last haven for the true Old West type cowboy. More than 100,000 head of livestock, many of them registered breeds, thrive on the grasslands of the Staked Plains. Farming operations, both irrigated and dry - land, provide mostly feed for livestock. Union County consists of 3,817 square miles or 2,422,000 acres. Most of the land use is devoted to the grazing of livestock. There are, however, 50,317 acres of irrigated crops such as corn, grain, sorghum, wheat, alfalfa and potatoes. Another 63, 350 acres are used for dry - land farming operations. The county has 800 acre feet of water. Clayton has a number of shops featuring arts, crafts, collectibles, souvenirs and other fine items. For the traveler there are six motels, several convenience stores with gas and eight eating establishments. Clayton has a planned industrial park in progress. Clayton is positioned in the Class 4 Wind Zone of the United States, making alternative wind energy production a planned future revenue source for the county. We are also located in some of the highest solar insolation terrain in the world as well, making solar power another planned future source of revenue. Another feather in Clayton’s hat is that Clayton is a spur on the 2,300 plus mile economic corridor between Texas and Canada, known as the Ports to Plains Corridor.

Dear Reader, There’s nothing like coming home, even if it’s just for a visit. The Clayton-Union County Chamber of Commerce & Tourism would like to cordially welcome you to our town and invite you to enjoy the unique home-style atmosphere you’ll find throughout our town, no matter how long you stay. We’ll open our doors for you and give you a little taste of home. If you are new to the Clayton-Union County area, we hope you’ll find a wealth of things to see and do and learn while you’re here. This visitor’s guide was designed as a perfect introduction to our historical, recreational, commercial and social aspects of our beautiful northeast corner of the Land of Enchantment. Welcome! The Clayton-Union County Chamber of Commerce & Tourism

Walking Tour Flow into the past of a town flowing with history. The best way to understand Clayton, short of living here, is to take a walk around historic Clayton. It’s fun and informative, and you’ll meet plenty of friendly people. That’s one thing that hasn’t changed over the last hundred or so years. The Walking Tour follows the steps of the men and women who built this city and highlights many of the original structures they gave us. Maps can be picked up at the Chamber Office. Farmers & Stockmen’s Bank Building, built in 1917. R.W. Isaacs Hardware Co., established in 1898, is the oldest business in Clayton. It is still located in the same place and is still run by two of the Isaac brothers. The Eklund Hotel is a landmark for travelers of the southwest since the 1890’s. Clayton Public Library, WPA Project, was built in 1939. Sculptured concrete fence, shelter and gateway built by a Mexican born artist who is known for his concrete sculptures which simulate the appearance of wood known as Faux Bois. Clayton High School and football stadium complex was another grand project of the WPA. 3


Museums

Community The Herzstein Memorial Museum, located at South Second and Walnut Streets in Clayton, is maintained by the Union County Historical Society. Albert Herzstein of Houston, Texas, a native of Clayton, through the Herzstein Charitable Foundation, generously provided for the refurbishment of this historic building constructed in 1920 as the Methodist Episcopal Church. Herzstein Museum lets you step back in time. Experience the rich history of Union County.

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WPA artwork, woodwork , we

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• Always FREE Admission • Handicap accessible • Dinosaurs • Santa Fe Trail • Dustbowl • WPA (Work Progress Administration)

• Black Jack Ketchum • Jewish presence in NM • Herzstein Collection • Cowboys & Saddles • Arrowhead & Guns • Military Memorabilia • Old Time Kitchen

Tim Keller Photography

Folsom Museum Folsom . . . a small village in a valley of the Dry Cimarron River is located in northeastern Doherty Mercantile New Mexico. When the Denver, Texas & Ft. Worth Railroad was finished in 1888, the construction camp of Ragtown became Folsom in honor of Frances Folsom, who married President Cleveland in the White House. The village thrived and had many businesses and residents until 1908, when a disastrous flood washed away most of the town. Sarah Rooke, the telephone operator, stayed at her switchboard warning people of the coming flood until her building was swept 4

away. She was honored as a heroine. Seventeen people lost their lives and most of the businesses were gone, never to be rebuilt. The museum is housed in the Doherty Building which was built in 1896 on the main street of Folsom. The museum was established in 1966 and has occupied the Doherty Mercantile ever since. The museum board has always been very active, hosting various events to help fund its restoration and preservation activities. In 2008, the museum sponsored the first annual Capulin Volcano Run, a Half Marathon/10K/5K race which has grown in popularity with each succeeding year. Open daily 10a-5p from Memorial weekend thru Labor Day weekend. May and September: Weekends only. Winter, by appointment only. 575 278-2122.

Clubs and Societies There are many organizations in Clayton and Union County, including Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, Little League, 4-H and FFA. Other organizations include a Veterans of Foreign Wars Post & Ladies Auxiliary, Rotary Club, Elks Club, Lariat CowBelles, Astronomy Club, Hospital Auxiliary, Clayton Arts Council, Clayton Federated Women’s Club, Daughters of the Revolution, and the Union County Historical Society. The Town also has an active Senior Citizen’s Center. All organizations welcome new members.

Clayton Municipal Schools Clayton was recognized as the “#1 Best Towns for Young Families“ in 2013. One criteria used to identify clayton was the school’s academic performance with ratings from “Greatschools.” Mission Statement: We maintain a collaborative and cohesive partnership among the home, school, and the community that promotes high standards of values, integrity, and service that motivate students to be productive members of society. Clayton schools provide education with professionals who are highly qualified in their teaching fields. Students have the opportunity to graduate from CHS with enough college credit hours to enter college as a sophomore, though dual credit courses and online classes.

Core Beliefs: • Education is the shared responsibility of the home, the school, and the community. • Prioritize our resources first and foremost on students • Uphold high expectations • Demand a safe, supportive, respectful environment for self and others • Expect honesty, integrity, pride, responsibility, and compassion • Foster Positive student, staff, family and community relationships • Appreciate, respect, and celebrate Diversity • Instill critical thinking, problem solving, and effective communication skills • Support Academic and extracurricular activites • Emphasize the connection between education and future success

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Community Medical Facilities

Union County General Hospital is a full-service, acute care hospital that is equipped with state-of-the-art technology. Union County provides funds for equipment and physical plant needs through a Mill Levy Fund. The hospital has been in existence since 1962 and enjoys a positive financial performance. The hospital’s Medical Staff is comprised of Board Certified medical and surgical physicians. The physicians live in Clayton and are committed to providing full-time medical services for the community. The hospital accepts Medicare, Medicaid (New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma) and most commercial insurances. It offers

The Mandala Center 24 hour emergency room services and is the only provider in the area that offers a Medicare certified home health agency. The following services are offered by Union County General Hospital: Inpatient and Outpatient (including orthopedic); 24-hour Emergency Services; Endoscopy Services; Non-Invasive Cardiology; Physical and Occupational Therapy; Oxygen and Respiratory Therapy; Mammography; Ultrasound; Cardiac Echoes and Vascular Ultrasonography; Intensive Care Unit; Chemotherapy, C.T. (Computer Tomography); M.R.I. (Magnetic Resonance Imaging); Home Health; DME (Durable Medical Equipment); Sleep studies; Bone Densitometry and Nuclear Medicine. The hospital also participates in the Lifeline Program, which is the transfer of patients via air transport. There are six Lifeline air evacuation units. Life Star and Apollo are out of Amarillo, Texas; Aero Care is out of Dalhart, Texas; Aero Care out of Clovis, Taos and Albuquerque, New Mexico and Access Health is out of Denver, Colorado.

Clayton Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Whether you are on a fast track to recovery or need a place you can call home, Clayton Nursing and Rehabilitation has a place for you. Services include: • 24 hour skilled nursing • 24/7 admissions • restorative nursing • IV therapy • wound care • social services • three nutritious meals/day 6

• physical therapy, occupational and speech therapy • full activity program • transportation • housekeeping and laundry • respite care • accunurse

The Mandala Center of Des Moines, New Mexico is nestled on the slopes of the Sierra Grande. The distant view of Capulin Volcano National Monument sits on the horizon.

This remote setting calls to the hearts of spiritual seekers, artists, healing professional, teachers, writers, and nature enthusiasts. It is a place for anyone who sets out on a pilgrimage to heal from life’s challenges or to learn more about themselves, the world around them, their personal spirituality, the deeper meanings in life, and how they can develop a commitment to a life of creativity and service.

Clayton Municipal Airport The Clayton Municipal Airport identifier is CAO (also KCAO) and is owned by the Town of Clayton. Based aircraft is 13 Ops 3,500/yr, 292/mo, 10/day. The airport handles small to mid-sized planes & helicopters and transient traffic. Medevacs arrive and depart in transferring patients to Amarillo or Albuquerque in extreme emergencies. The airport houses a National Weather Service reporting station. Clayton Airport Park includes a public facility for meetings, banquets, dances and conventions. A new playground, swimming pool, two Little League baseball fields and a 9-hole golf course are also located in this park complex. Clayton boasts two playgrounds and picnic areas. One is located at the Clayton Municipal Airport and the other at the Union County Fairgrounds. These facilities are enjoyed by many all year round. A small park located on the Chamber grounds has an area with picnic tables, shade trees and large dinosaurs for photo opportunities.

Airside (aircraft movement areas) • Primary Runway 2-20, 6, 307’ x 75’, parallel taxiway • Crosswind Runway 12-30, 4106’ x 60’ • Aircraft parking apron • Airfield lighting, markings, signage, navigational aids Landside & Support • Terminal building • Aircraft storage—hangars • Fuel storage—100LL, Jet A • Utilities infrastructure • Security—fencing • Auto access, parking • Courtesy vehicle for pilot and/or passengers

Financial Institutions Two financial institutions are headquartered in Clayton. The Farmers & Stockmens Bank and The First National Bank of New Mexico both offer a variety of banking services. 7


Geography Kiowa National Grasslands Remnant of the vast prairie that once stretched all the way into Canada, this is a land of wind and sky—and cattle, lots of cattle. Within the short grass prairie of the southern Great Plains lie the Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands. These grasslands encompass approximately 230,000 acres in six counties within New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma. The Santa Fe Trail also crosses the Kiowa National Grassland, 7 miles of McNees Crossing, before reaching Turkey Creek Camp, another Santa Fe Trail site. To the south is Rabbit Ear Mountain, the first visible western mountains in New Mexico for travelers on the Santa Fe Trail landmarks, and

the Rabbit Ear Creek Camp, are about 20 miles northwest of Clayton. These administrative units are not solid blocks of Government owned land; rather they consist of numerous small Government parcels, intermingled with privately owned tracts. Prior to settlement, this area was home to many American Indian Tribes. The abundance of buffalo and wildlife provides strong testimony to the importance of the grass resource.

Sierra Grande Sierra Grande is an extinct shield volcano in northeastern New Mexico that rises 2,200 feet above the surrounding plain. It is part of the inactive Raton-Clayton Volcanic field. Sierra Grande is the easternmost point in the United States that reaches an altitude of more than 8,000 feet above sea level.

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Northeast New Mexico is an interesting transition region where the flatlands of the Great Plains come to meet the beginnings of the hills that eventually merge in with the great mountains such as the Sangre de Cristo Range and, of course, the might Rocky Mountain cordillera. The entire northeast corner of New Mexico is within Union County.

Clayton Lake State Park Clayton Lake State Park is located 15 miles north of Clayton, close to New Mexico’s border with Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas. The landscape is characterized by rolling grasslands, volcanic rocks, and sandstone bluffs, set on the western edge of the Great Plains. In 1956, an earth dam was constructed across the Seneca Creek that resulted in the formation of Clayton Lake. A flood in 1982 that swept away a layer of silt from the spillway, uncovered an unexpected bonanza of dinosaur tracks, preserved in the Early Cretaceous sandstones of the upper Dakota Group, dated at about 100 million years old. Today, the track site with over five hundred dinosaur footprints preserved is one of the main attractions at Clayton Lake State Park and one of the best-preserved and most extensive dinosaur track sites in the United States. Access to the tracks is gained by hiking approximately ½ mile along the trail and across the dam. The most common tracks at Clayton Lake, and indeed throughout the “Dinosaur Freeway”, are broad, three-toe tracks. The largest of these tracks is about thirty centimeters in length, from the tip of the middle toe to the rear. These tracks

were made by iguanodontid dinosaurs, whose best-known representative is the Iguanodon. Definite theropod tracks are known from the Clayton Lake spillway. Another part of the spillway has yielded tracks that were originally thought to belong to a pterosaur. At Mosquero Creek, a site south of Clayton Lake, at least 55 track ways have been found that were made by larger ornithopods and that trend towards the south. Evidence like this, which confirmed by similar findings from elsewhere in the Dakota Group, shows that different dinosaur species, and probably different age groups of the same species, traveled together in groups. It may also suggest that the “Dinosaur Freeway” was exactly that---a migration route. Visitor’s today can enjoy picnicking, camping and superb fishing at the park’s 170 acre lake. Boats are allowed on the lake, but are restricted to trolling speeds. The park offers camping and picnic facilities, a group shelter and a modern comfort station. The lake is closed to fishing during the winter, when it serves as a stopover for waterfowl.

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Recreation Golf

Bird Watching Pterodactyls no longer swoop about the skies of Clayton Lake, but other winged species do. You have an excellent chance of spotting a Golden Eagle wheeling overhead almost any time of year; and between October 15 and March 30, your chance of observing migrating

bald eagles at Clayton Lake State Park is very good. November through March is the best time to observe all wildlife species at the park. Once at the lake, take the left for of the gravel road to Chicano Beach to best look for waterfowl, primarily Canada and Snow Geese, Gadwall, Northern Pintail, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Canvas back, and Redhead. Pronghorn Antelope abound in the lake area as well as mule deer and an occasional bear, bobcat or mountain lion.

Open year-round, Clayton’s nine – hole golf course is a superb place for the golf enthusiast to spend a weekend playing, or for the sportsman in us bursting to get out and play. The Clayton Golf Club hosts several tournaments throughout the year.

Gold Credentialed International Dark Sky Park With clear skies, unobstructed views and some of the darkest skies in North America, it is no surprise that Clayton, and in particular Clayton Lake State Park, has become a hotbed for individuals and groups alike interested in stargazing. Clayton Lake State Park is one of two parks in New Mexico that has gone above and beyond the requirement housing a superb telescope which draws astronomers from all over the world. The observatory with a roll top off and a 12” Meade RCX400 computer-driven telescope was built in the summer of 2006.

Clayton Livestock Research Ranch

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The Clayton Livestock Research Center five miles east of Clayton conducts livestock studies. Here the New Mexico State University and the US Forest Service investigate problems in health, nutrition and management of cattle. Five States Livestock Auction is instrumental in buying and selling livestock each Wednesday.

Clayton Lake State Park Fishing Derby Clayton Lake is a fisherman’s paradise and is a top destination for fishermen hoping to catch trout, bass, walleye and catfish. Five state-record walleyes have been caught at Clayton Lake; the current record is 16 lb. 9 oz. Lake records for trout 7 lbs. 14 oz; bass 12 lbs; channel catfish, 29 lb. 4 oz. This beautiful lake is the venue for one of New Mexico’s largest Trout Fishing events. Two days complete with grand prizes that have included boats, golf carts and pop up campers, $1000 cash, as well as top dollar prizes for trout, bass, walleye and channel cat in children and adult categories. Over a hundred door prizes are drawn over the two day competition. A kid’s sand digs, horseshoe pitching contest, free hotdogs and coffee and donuts for all participants. This annual event takes place the second weekend of June. 11


Town Map

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Landmarks Capulin Volcano National Monument Come view a dramatic landscape—a unique place of mountains, plains, and sky. Born of fire and forces continually reshaping the earth’s surface, Capulin Volcano provides access to nature’s most awe-inspiring work. And no worries—you missed the last eruption by about 60,000 years. Although Capulin is primarily known for its volcanic geology the park boasts a rich diversity of plant and animal life. The grasslands of the Great Plains and the forests of the Rocky Mountains combine at Capulin to form a unique ecotone which provides habitat for 73 species of birds in addition to numerous other animals. Mule deer can be found in abundance both at the base of the volcano and on its slopes, while elk, black bear, coyotes, and mountain lions occasionally make appearances within park boundaries. Capulin Volcano National Monument preserves approximately 800 acres primarily the cinder cone volcano. More than 15 square miles of associated lava flows are outside the monument boundaries. The volcano has been well preserved with the greatest erosion being limited to where the cone is cut

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Black Jack Ketchum

View from inside the crater

by a 2-mile road that spirals its way to the crater rim. As the volcano rises to a height of 8128 feet, lift your eyes and see points in Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, Texas and, of course, New Mexico. Its base is 4 miles in circumference. The crater is 415 feet deep and 1450 feet in diameter. The slopes of the volcano have been partially stabilized by the formation of soils, produced by the breakdown of the volcanic material by lichens and mosses. Once these soils formed, grasses, wildflowers, shrubs and trees took root. Chokecherry trees, which are common along the crater trails, inspired the name for this cinder cone volcano; Capulin is a Mexican-Spanish word for Chokecherry.

View from the top

Wanted poster

Thomas ‘Black Jack’ Ketchum thought train robbery was the quick way to riches, but he paid the ultimate price for his ways. On the night of August 16, 1899, Black Jack singlehandedly attempted to hold up the train at Twin Mountains, southeast of Folsom, not knowing his brother had recently been fatally wounded doing the same ‘job’. He was wounded in the right arm by a blast from the conductor’s shotgun and staggered away into the night. Later, he was captured at a water hole by a Sheriff in Union County. On September 6, 1900, his trial began in Clayton on charges of felonious assault upon a railroad train, a charge that carried the death penalty. He was sentenced to death on October 5, 1900, but was granted a stay of execution. He was eventually hanged on April 26, 1901, shortly after noon. The noose was pulled down over his neck, a black hood was fitted over his head and Sheriff Garcia asked, “Are you ready?” Ketchum replied, “Ready. Let’er go.” It took two blows of the hatchet to sever the rope. With the second blow, the trap flew back and Ketchum plunged downward all

Black Jack’s grave, Clayton Cemetery

the way to the ground. More information can be found about Black Jack online and at the Clayton Tourist Center

Union County Courthouse in Clayton

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Landmarks Luna Theater

A tiny prairie town of 3200 determined residents on the state line in northeastern New Mexico, Clayton welcomes many Texas snowbirds in the winters en route to the New Mexico and Colorado mountains for skiing and alpine fun. Long before, Santa Fe Trail wagon caravans rumbled westward near here and the vast buffalo plains surrounding Clayton have nurtured great herds of cattle. The stately stone Eklund Hotel was built more than 100 years ago across Main Street from the Luna Theater, and together the two landmarks have provided Clayton’s hospitality for generations. The Luna Theater operates today as one of New Mexico’s oldest movie houses and the state’s best preserved from the silent movie era. Built in a unique fusion of classical and Mission style architectural elements, the Luna’s facades survive intact. The generous recessed entry foyer boasts an ornamental ceiling laced in gold paint. In 1935, a new neon marquee bearing a winking moon was added. In 2009, the iconic marquee was restored by the Town and Clayton MainStreet Program and remains one of New Mexico’s most 16

Santa Fe Trail beloved street signs. Once the Town acquired the Luna Theater complex, the community responded with thousands of hours of volunteer support. National Honor Society students from the high school worked the concessions stand for free. The GEO Group, which operates a medium security adult detention facility, donated many inmate work crews to clean floors and realign auditorium seating to modern comfort standards. Tons of trash was removed from the basements. Union County donated a used, but still effective, boiler to the theater from its Courthouse. The State of New Mexico also provided additional capital outlay funding for essential upgrades. The final $100,000 state grant for the digital equipment and surround sound system was completed in May, 2013. In total, the State has provided $630,000 to the Luna Theater project. The Luna Theater boasts a projection system second to none. Enjoying a 3D movie in the Luna is a bit surreal but also thrilling. The adventure begins by winking back at the friendly winking moon on the marquee, entering the theater through the classical foyer, buying some popcorn at the concession stand and entering the cool, dark auditorium. Adjust the glasses that will transport you to a galaxy far, far, away, and the picture appears with such clarity and depth that you forget you are in an old nickelodeon theater on the New Mexico prairie. By Elmo Baca, NM MainStreet Program Associate

The Santa Fe Trail reflects early America on the move west. This trail was a heavily traveled international highway, bridging cultures, places and changing times. The rumble of freight wagons, the shout of the bullwhacker, the snap of the whip and the bellow of oxen are all trail sounds that evoke the enterprising pioneer spirit. After all these years, the trail still stirs the emotions. There is that flawlessly deep blue sky above a prairie that rolls on forever. Moving through them were caravans of commerce plodding to river crossings of rushing torrents and dry washes. There was the choking, blinding dust, the sudden chill of the wind, and the throaty thunder of approaching storms. There were the furtive glances for the lurking presence of Kiowa and Comanche Indians. There was the blare of bugles, flutter of guidons, and commanding crack of rifle fire. In southwest Kansas, the trail divides in two. The Mountain route arcs through Colorado and enters New Mexico over the famous Raton Pass. The Cimarron Route edges through southeast Colorado and northwest Texas and enters New Mexico in the Clayton area.

McNees Crossing, where young Missouri traders Robert This church is accross from the McNees cross. McNees and Daniel Munro were ambushed and killed by Kiowa Indians in 1828, is just one of several sites to visit near the town of Clayton. It is located 22 miles northeast of town. The monument, placed by the American Legion in the 1920’s, recalls the morning of July 4, 1831, when members of a 100-wagon caravan held the first Independence Day celebration in what is now New Mexico. Today, we can still find remnants of the trail. They await us at scores of sites, great and small, across five states. They can be followed from one historic landmark to another. With each encounter we get in touch with ourselves. This is why the Santa Fe Trail is our national treasure.

Rabbit Ear Mountain Rabbit Ear Mountain (elevation 6050 ft) is a 2 ½ million year old cinder cone volcano, north of Clayton is the landmark over the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail. From here, traffic on this major 19th century commercial route still has about 200 miles

to travel before reaching Santa Fe. The two peaks do not resemble rabbit ears but there is a connection. The black-tailed jackrabbit of the southwest has black-tipped ears. A Comanche Chief was killed in this vicinity in 1717, during a battle with the Spanish Army. His ears were also black-tipped, due to frostbite. He was known as Chief Rabbit Ears and the mountain was named for him.

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Photo Gallery

Union County Fair Viva Mexico Music Festival

Dustbowl Marathon 5 Marathons, 5 days, 5 states Clayton Lake State Park Rabbit Ear Poker Run - Fundraiser for high school scholarships by the northeast detention facility/ GEO

Old Western Dance... 80 years of tradition

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Calendar of Events January • Annual Legislative Luncheon Barbeque in January held in Santa Fe, NM. This luncheon provides a great opportunity to discuss important issues regarding our rural area and hearing views on these topics from our legislators. March • Dustbowl Marathon—5 Marathons, 5 States, 5 Days. Clayton is the last stop in this annual event that brings runners from different states and countries. April • Old Western Dance—Children Kindergarten through third grade compete in this western dance competition. Prizes are given for best costumes and dancers. Community dance is held after the competition. This event is held at the Clayton Civic Center (formerly the American Legion Hall). This event has been a part of Clayton-Union County’s history for 86 years. • Union County Health Fair—Discounts on lab tests, various exhibits with free health screenings, blood drive, and concession stand. National Guard Amory. • Annual Golf Club “Pick Up” Party fundraiser—a dinner and Calcutta is held to raise funds for the improvements at the golf course. • Annual Chamber of Commerce Banquet—a dinner and dance, inducting new board members to the organization. June • Annual Clayton Lake State Park Trout Derby—2nd full weekend of June. Two days of fun with adult and children 20

prize categories given for trout, bass, walleye, and catfish. Kids sand dig, horseshoe pitching and door prizes given throughout the two days. Grand prizes of a boat, golf cart and pop up camper as well as $1000 Cash have been given each year. Registration fee of $15 per person includes continental breakfast and hot dogs each day and a chance to win the Grand Prizes and over 100 door prizes. A weekend of family fun! • Annual Clayton High School Reunion— for all classes is held the last weekend in June. Class gatherings, food, dancing and awards presentations are a few of the activities held. • Clayton Golf Club Memorial Partnership Golf Tournament— fundraiser for the golf club held the third weekend. • GEO Scholarship Golf Tournament— fundraiser for high school scholarships (over $15,000 have been given to area students since 2007). Last Saturday in June. July • Annual Team Roping—Fairgrounds (July 3) • Free Street Dance with live music in front of Historic Eklund Hotel (July 3) • Pancake Breakfast at the Herzstein Museum 7am-9am (July 4) • Community Parade 10 am Downtown (July 4) • BBQ at the Union County Fair Building—following the parade. BBQ bottom round, cole slaw, potato salad, fresh pinto beans, pickles, jalapenos, onions, bread and a drink for $5 per person. (July 4) • Rabbit Ear Round Up Rodeo and dance—full rodeo sponsored by the

Union County Youth Supporters, with a professional stock contractor. (July 4) • Community Fireworks Extravaganza— sponsored by Clayton Fire & EMS Department and Volunteer Association immediately following the rodeo (July 4) • Lawrence Montoya Memorial Softball Co-ed 4th of July Tournament—Coed softball tournament that draws teams from around the area during the 4th of July holiday. Funds are used to provide scholarships to local high school students. • Rabbit Ear “Shoot-Out” Golf Tournament—fundraising tournament sponsored by the Clayton Golf Club, held the 2nd weekend of July. • Viva New Mexico Music Festival— concert and dance featuring some of the best New Mexican artists, held the third weekend in July in front of the historic Eklund hotel. August • Union County Fair—second week of August. 4-H and FFA livestock judging, various booths and exhibitors including photography, quilting, leather crafts, backing, etc. Held at the Union County Fair Building. • Rabbit Ear Motorcycle Poker Run—a full day and evening of fun and exciting events beginning with a scenic drive through the stunning countryside of extreme northeast

New Mexico. There’s also authentic poker: a Texas Hold ‘Em tournament and dance. This is also a fundraiser for scholarships for area high school students sponsored by the Northeast New Mexico Detention Facility. September • Annual Mud Bog—hosted by the Union County Youth Supporters to help fund the 4th of July events. October • Clayton Arts Festival—sponsored by the Clayton Arts Council, the first full weekend in October. This show has offered 97 purchase prize awards amounting to $21,515. Outstanding artists from a five state area are attracted to the Clayton Arts Festival because of the awards. This assures the investors of quality artwork for their selections. November • Christmas Bazaar—crafts, homemade, items (2nd weekend) December • Christmas Open House by participating businesses. • Christmas Tree lighting and caroling. • Christmas Light Parade with float entries from the community and “Candlelight” shopping afterwards

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Clayton Directory Local Government Numbers: •Town of Clayton .....................................................................575 374-8331 •Union County .........................................................................575 374-8896 •Albert P. Thompson Library ................................................. 575 374-9423 •Senior Citizen’s Center ........................................................575 374-9840 •Housing Authority ................................................................. 575 374-9580 •Clayton Police Department ...................................... 575 374-2504 (911) •Clayton Fire Deparmtent ...........................................575 374-2435 (911) •Union County Sheriff’s Office ................................... 575 374-2583 (911) •Union County General Hospital .......................................... 575 374-2585 •City Drug Store .....................................................................575 374-9121 •Longevity Chiropractic.......................................................... 575 374-9888

Churches: •Amistad United Methodist Church ...................................(575) 633-9100 •Assembly of God ................................................................ (575) 374-9440 •Church of Christ ................................................................. (575) 374-2722 •Clayton Gospel Center....................................................... (575) 374-9642 •Clayton Trinity Fellowship .................................................. (575) 374-2132 •First Baptist Church .......................................................... (575) 374-9285 •First Baptist Church of Des Moines ................................. (575) 278-2421 •First United Methodist Church .......................................... (575) 374-9385 •Harvest Baptist Church ......................................................(575) 374-5101 •Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses ............................. (575) 374-2436 •Seventh Day Adventist Church ......................................... (575) 374-9455 •St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church .................................. (575) 374-9500

Lodging in Clayton: •Best Western Kokopelli Lodge............. 800-392-6691 or 575 374-2589 •Clayton Motel ........................................................................575 374-2544 •Days Inn & Suites ..................................800-329-7466 or 575 374-0133 •Hotel Eklund ............................................ 877-eklund1 or 575 374-2551 •Holiday Motel.........................................................................575 374-2558 •Super 8 Motel........................................................................ 575 374-8127 Dining in Clayton: •Crossroads Coffee................................................................. 575 374-5282 •Dairy Queen........................................................................... 575 374-2887 •Hotel Eklund ..............................................877-eklund1 or 575 374-2551 •Mary’s Back Porch Deli ........................................................ 575 374-8353 •Pizza Hut ................................................................................575 374-2171 •Rabbit Ear Café .................................................................... 575 374-3277 •Si Senor Tacos....................................................................... 575 207-6101 •Subway................................................................................... 575 374-9600 •WildhorseRestaurant............................................................ 575 374-8220

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Ports-to-Plains is a nine-state, 2300-plus mile economic development corridor between Texas and Alberta, Canada. Over the past decade, Ports-to-Plains alliance members have raised over $1 Billion in federal funding for road improvements in the nine-state Ports-to-Plains region. Today, we collaborate with our federal and state leaders, partners in Canada and Mexico and industry partners to deliver the infrastructure, food and fuel to secure the quality of life of America’s great cities. At the same time, we embrace America’s new energy economy and are capitalizing upon wind power, biofuels and other innovation sectors to renew one of America’s greatest legacies, the rural heartland.

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Clayton visitors guide  
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