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‘ORGANISATION’ POT

CLAUDIA BREWSTER

3.(ORGANISATION)


In my final project, I developed kitchen tools specifically targeted at helping those with Dyslexia and Dyspraxia. These tools were designed to respond to the difficulties presented by both of these conditions in the kitchen. The design solutions have been developed to exclude the ‘stigma’ of disability. The basis of my project was to rebuild the self-confidence that is often lost when dyslexics or dyspraxics are unable to complete everyday tasks. My tools have been designed to boost confidence in kitchen routines. This improved independence and self-belief could be transferred to all other areas of life. Dyslexia and Dyspraxia are very common conditions, affecting one in ten people world-wide (British Dyslexia Association, 2010) (pg 1). My design agenda is to adapt the world to this vast potential user group (pg 9). Instead of ‘failure’ to conform to conventional ways of doing things, I intend to create tools which complement their different way of thinking. This is a design mission and genre I have coined ‘Dyslexie’ or ‘Dyspraxie’ design (pg 15).


Poor organisation is associated with both Dyspraxia and Dyslexia. There are many tasks in the kitchen that involve a strong grasp on organisation. For example cooking different things at the same time, keeping surfaces and utensils uncontaminated and clean, and knowing where things are when you need them. The time pressures and multi-tasking associated with preparing food can add to a dyspraxics or dyslexics lost feeling. The organisation pot aims to tackle organisation in the kitchen by making it easier to find the required utensil under time pressure. The pot has been designed to store only the important utensils, preventing hoarding and clutter. The pot acts as a rest for utensils while cooking. The rest also enables utensils to be found easily and prevent counter-top mess.


DYSPRAXIA USER GROUP FORUM RESEARCH RESEARCH

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lack of organisation is often present in both Dyspraxia and Dyslexia. The majority of forum and questionnaire responses mentioned the trials of organisation in the kitchen:

Lisa Klipfel: ‘I find it difficult staying focused in the kitchen’ (Dyslexia UK)

Shannon Williams: ‘I struggle organising all my utensils and knowing where things are when I need them.’ (Dyspraxia UK)

Participant 7: ‘I really struggle with organisation and tidyiness in the kitchen’. (My Questionnaire)

Participant 20: ‘I struggle organizing myself around the work surfaces and just the general tidying up around myself.’ (My Questionnaire)


INSPIRATION


The Organisation Pot was also informed by Henry Franks’ ‘Dyslexic Objects’. The ‘Coaster Plinth’, ‘Muglexia’ and the ‘Poor Memory Pen Pots’ have all been designed with wide bases to make them more stable. The ‘Poor Memory Pen Pots’ have also been designed to aid organisation. They only store three or four pens so that the user can know where their tools are at, at all times.


The Pots have also been informed by Joseph Joseph’s utensil holders, ‘Elevate Carousel’ and ‘Segment’. These products were designed on the belief that ‘a tidy kitchen is a happy kitchen’ (Joseph Joseph). The utensil holders have clear sections and spaces for the utensils to be stored which prevents overcrowding and clutter. These tool organizers enable the user to always know where the necessary utensils are.


The Pots have also been informed by the variety of products which support utensils while you cook to prevent counter-top mess. For example, Valerio Sommella’s ‘T-100 Spoon Rest’, Mustard Kitchen’s ‘Splash’ and Eno Studio’s ‘Drip and Stop’.

Concept drawings for a utensil rest


The Utensil Pot aids organisation in the kitchen, a difficulty associated with both conditions. Paired with the Bowl Bases, the pots have a broad and stable footing to keep them upright. The slant of the pot and its silicone top act as a rest for utensils while cooking, to prevent counter-top mess. The narrowly angled interior benefits organisation, limiting the number of utensils that can be stored at one time, thus preventing clutter. Stowing them at an angle also ensures that the heads of the utensils are separated, making it easier to see which tool you need.

SolidWorks render of Organisation Pot Model


To incorporate the Organisation Pot into the range of ‘Dyslexie’ and ‘Dyspraxie’ products the material experiments were in silicone, like the Bowl Bases, and beech, like the ‘Dyspraxie’ Utensils. Before experimenting with materials, a foam model was developed to ensure that the dimensions and angles were as efficient as possible. The height of the pot and the angle of its profile were designed to suit as many utensils as possible. These measurements were informed by research into the most common dimensions of kitchen implements. Once an accurate foam model of the pot had been produced, materials and aesthetics were explored. Following the concept of the ‘Golden Ratio’ (Pages 101-2) the model was cut into two sections. The larger, lower section to be re-produced in Beech and the top section to create a mould for silicone. The top section of the Organisation pot foam model was vacuum formed to create a mould, similarly to the Bowl Base process. Then pre-mixed black silicone was poured into the mould.


The base of the foam model was then reproduced in beech on the lathe. To achieve the correct dimensions of the base three planks of beech were glued together with PVA glue. The interior steps were then achieved with an extendable drill bit that ranged from 50mm to 120mm.


The most challenging part of this process was attaching the two components. Gluing techniques were practiced on a selection of samples originally made to test aesthetic combinations.

Experiment One: Simple beech was attractive but lacks the durability, flexability and grip of silicone. Experiment Two: All Silicone had a synthetic appearance, only part of the pot has to be silicone. Experiment Three: Half silicone and half beech. This captures the idea of the range by using two

previously used mediums. Attached with Araldite glue unsuccessfully

Experiment Four: ‘The Golden Ratio’ was by far the most aesthetically pleasing. It also gave just the

right amount of silicone to support the leaning utensils. Glued with two-part

unsuccessfully.

Experiment Five: Only silicone on the rim. This was successful to an extent but left little room for error

when leaning the tool. Attached by mixed silicone successfully.


After experimenting with different material and colour combinations on Solid Works, the most aesthetically pleasing combination was beech (used for the ‘Dyspraxie’ Utensils) and black silicone (used for the Bowl Bases). Combining the two materials not only brought the range together but also conveyed a high-end ‘design’ aesthetic.


The Golden Ratio is a mathematical principle which, when applied to design, makes it more aesthetically pleasing. This is because, the ratios between the dimensions and the formations are considered to be perfect or ‘Golden’. It can be applied to all objects and has been used by architects such as Le Corbusier. The sum calculates the most pleasing ratio to cut a form into. This principle was applied to the Organisation Pots to appeal to consumers (Dezeen 2010).


USER GROUP FEEDBACK

Emma Coleman, a member of the Tyne and Wear Dyspraxia Support Group, was the key test subject for the Organisation Pots. Together we prepared a pasta dish with tomato sauce. She needed to use two utensils simultaneously: one to mix the pasta and one to stir the sauce. While she stirred the pasta, she rested the sauce spoon on the pot and vice-versa with the pasta utensil. This was a very efficient way of cooking because she knew where each utensil was throughout the process. She told me that she often misplaces or can not find utensils when she needs them, leading to burnt meals. Emma also really appreciated the mess-prevention of the pots. Instead of messy counter-tops covered in sauce, there was an easy-wipe silicone rest to lean the utensils on.


ENABLE THERAPY FEEDBACK

Sarah Pascall also gave important feedback on the Organisation Pot. She explained how organisation can be a huge problem for dyspraxics. Dyspraxics often have slow and complicated visual reactions, a cluttered workstop can cause confusion. As part of her therapy for Dyspraxia, Pascall attempts to minimise the number of visual objects in the way of their key task. The visual distraction clutter can cause dyspraxics really affects organisation, especially in the kitchen. To develop the Organisation Pot further Pascall recommended a colour coding system. For example if red were associated with knives, then the user would go straight to the red section. This would minimise processing time further and make the pots more efficient. However, an aesthetic and ‘Inclusive’ solution would need to be adapted.


Organisation Pot supporting utensils. A dirty utensils being leaned up against the Organisation pot. The silicone top supports the utensil preventing counter-top mess. The pot also acts as a first point of call when searching for a utensil, aiding organisation.

Counter-top mess from resting utensils while cooking.


Storing Utensils in the Organisation Pot. The pot only has capacity for a few utensils. This prevents clutter. The slope of the interior also means that utensils are stored at an angle. This means the utensil heads are much easier to distinguish.

Cluttered and dis-organised utensil holder. It is difficult to tell which utensils are in there and which you are reaching for.


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ORGANISATION POT 60

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Dimensions: 193 x 150 mm Beech and Silicone

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ORGANISATION POT (Organisation)

Dimensions: 195 x 150 mm Beech and Silicone


claudia.brewster@hotmail.co.uk Mobile: 07789960102 www.claudiarosedesigns.squarespace.com https://issuu.com/claudiabrewster ClaudiaRoseDesigns

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