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CLAUDIA BREWSTER DESIGN PORTFOLIO


ABOUT ME.... While studying 3D Design I have discovered a huge enthusiasm and passion for design. I am now well trained in design computer programs such as Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, AutoCAD and SolidWorks. I am also very confident with prototyping techniques in modeling foam and 3D printing as well as producing high quality final products in a variety of woods, metals and plastics. I have experience with both group and personal projects at university and have thrived in both situations. I have worked well in groups under time pressures during design festivals. My success in groups has lead to many positions of responsibility such as taking charge of the Charity Auction rooms and taking care of important guest speakers.

RSA Student Design Awards 2016, Highly Commended Recently finished Internship at MyBespokeRoom, London Personal Tutor for A Level Photography Experienced as Design Show staff: Design Junction (2014 and 2015) and Northern Design Festival (2015) Work Experience with the Modern Garden Furniture Company, (2014)


BOWL BASES DYSLEXIE UTENSILS ORGANISATION POT RSA PROJECTS THE DYSLEXABLES FLATWARE THE BOX LAMP 3D MODELLING

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THE DYSLEXIE KITCHEN TOOLS BRIEF

Create kitchen utensils to aid dyslexics and dyspraxics in the kitchen environment.


‘Dyslexia’ and ‘Dyspraxia’ are very common conditions, affecting as many as one in ten people worldwide (Dyslexia Action). Dyslexia, reading and writing, and Dyspraxia, motor co-ordination, can have a huge impact on a person’s life. Their effect goes well beyond sports or education, they can affect the fundamentals of everyday life. There is a proven ‘overlap between Dyslexia and Dyspraxia’ (Moody, 2010) apparent in a lack of organisation, concentration and multi-tasking. With symptoms such as poor visual processing, bad time management skills, weak motor abilities and poor concentration, the kitchen in particular can be a very hazardous and frustrating environment for a dyslexic or dyspraxic person.

‘Within Dyslexia Co-occurring difficulties may be seen in aspects of motor co-ordination, concentration and personal organisation’ (British Dyslexia Associarion)

‘People who have Dyspraxia often find the routine tasks of daily life such as driving, household chores, cooking and grooming difficult’ (Dyspraxia Foundation)

PHONOLOGY

AUDITORY

SEQUENCING

VISUAL

VISUAL

SPATIAL

MOTOR

DYSPRAXIA

DYSLEXIA MEMORY

Moody 2010

STRUCTURE TRACKING MEMORY

SKILLS

SKILLS


BOWL BASES


THE PROBLEM After research and material experiments, the Bowl Bases were developed to help the difficulties experienced with mixing bowls. Instead of totally re-creating the popular Perspex bowls, found cheaply for every home, the Bowl Bases were developed to adapt the bowls to dyspraxic users’ needs. The bases have ridges that enable bowls to be angled to accommodate mixing. The bases have been designed so that their use is inconspicuous. They look at home in any kitchen and do not appear to be ‘specialised’. When they are not being used as mixing bowl supports they could be attractive display bowls.

SPILLING


RIDGES Ridges add stability and benefit hygiene.

STACKABLE

STORAGE

(SECONDARY USE)

MARKET RESEARCH I researched a variety of utensils that store or stabalise kitchen products. I looked at different solutions to the problem of stability. This extensive research led to my harmonious solution of both an aesthetic and functional product.

MARBLE AESTHETIC


USER RESEARCH People with Dyspraxia often struggle with being ‘clumsy’ in the The majority of dyspraxics have a weak grip and find it difficult to angle tools correctly without spilling or dropping. They also have difficulty completing separate tasks with each hand (e.g. keeping a bowl steady and mixing). The Bowl Bases were developed to stabilise a mixing bowl and make stirring easier for dyspraxics.

kitchen. Feedback from Dyspraxia forums clearly showed that the design of mixing bowls is a significant hindrance to dyspraxics:

Teresa Robinson (Dyspraxia International): ‘I spill and drop things a lot!’ Victoria Bell (Dyspraxia UK): ‘I struggle with spillages and keeping a mixing bowl steady’. Lisa Klipfel (Dyslexia UK): ‘The only thing so far my son has difficulty with in cooking is keeping powder substances in the bowl’. Alice Hewson (Dyspraxia Tyne and Wear): ‘I struggle using both hands at once, for example holding a bowl steady and mixing at the same time.’


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PRODUCTION PROCESS In order to ensure that the Bowl Bases were as ‘universal’ as possible the making process had to be simple and inexpensive. The process of proto-typing the Bowl Bases was very similar to how it would be in mass production. Initially a foam model of the positive form of the bases was produced on the lathe. This model had to be extremely precise in order to make the silicone moulds. The moulds were constructed out of white high impact polystrene vacuum formed around the original foam model. In mass manufacturing these moulds would be far more robust and re-usable.


MARBLE AESTHETIC After distinguishing silicone as the best medium for the Bowl Bases there were some problems still to resolve. The clear silicone samples showed up a lot of impurities and air bubbles and the coloured experiments appeared ‘patronising’. To bring a sense of luxury and ‘design’ to silicone as a material more aesthetic experiments were needed. As an intern for ‘MyBespokeRoom’, in London, I had access to statistics of product sales and noticed a particular trend towards marble as both a material and as an aesthetic. From this observation marble seemed the most appealing solution to the aesthetic issues with silicone. The marble experiments began with two separate batches of dyed silicone (one black and one white), these were swirled together to make a marble pattern. After this proved successful more experiments were done to achieve a marble effect. The second test was achieved by swirling black dye into the premixed white silicone. This yielded much better results.


FEEDBACK THE TYNE AND WEAR DYSPRAXIA ASSOCIATION

ENABLE THERAPY ‘I love the idea of the tilting bowl to support mixing bowls’

To test my final bowl holder prototypes, I took them to a Tyne

Sarah Pascall, a physiotherapist for Dyspraxia in children,

and Wear Dyspraxia Support Group meeting. Eight people

also gave important feedback on the Bowl Bases. She

of varying ages, from 16 to late 60s, were at the meeting

explained the issues that dyspraxics of all ages have with

and each of them tested my Bowl Bases. I brought with me

‘bi-lateral tasks’ (Pascall, 2016) – using both hands corre-

a medium sized Perspex bowl and a wooden spoon for the

spondingly. Holding a bowl while mixing can be extremely

group to role-play with. Responses were overall extremely

difficult for people with poor motor skills.

positive, even resulting in three people asking to buy finished products:

Pascall’s feedback on the Bowl Bases was mostly positive. She considered them attractive and subtle responses to the

Emma Coleman (18 years old): ‘I like that they’re not kind of patronising and that I could have them at home without

problems at hand. Her only further advice was to incorporate clear prompts of where to place the bowls.

being embarrassed.’ Livvy Ramsey (25 years old): ‘The silicone is a good material to use because it’s really grippy! I also think you should keep the marble effect for the other utensils.’

‘Because dyspraxics do not receive the conventional feedback from objects to their muscles, they can struggle figuring out how to place themselves or the tools they are trying to use’


DYSLEXIE UTENSILS


THE PROBLEM The second product developed in the kitchen range for Dyspraxia were wooden utensils with larger and easier to grip handles. Through the initial findings from research with forums and a questionnaire, the majority of complaints were based around difficulty in gripping utensils. ‘lack of manual dexterity’ (Dyspraxia Foundation) is most commonly found in Dyspraxia rather than Dyslexia. Many dyspraxics have no dominant hand (ambidextrous) and have a very weak grasp. Repetitive tasks such as mixing can really tire dyspraxics and they are often unable to hold utensils correctly.


‘SPECIALISED’

SILICONE SLEEVES

MARKET RESEARCH I researched a vast variety of kitchen utensils. I began by looking at ‘specialized’ solutions specifically for disabilities. I then branched out to more aesthetic solutions to kitchen tools.

WOOD


USER RESEARCH

Many forum and questionnaire responses discussed the problems with conventional utensil handles:

Alexandra Maria: ‘Stuff that you can use with either hand rather than have it right or left-handed. Quite a few of us are ambidextrous and get tired quickly so swap hands Louise Bae: ‘Make cooking utensils and cutlery slimmer and lighter with easier to hold handles’ Paula Barnes: ‘The difficulties that present themselves to me are not in the actual cooking, it is the handling of the equipment.’ Participant 18: ‘Gripping is a big issue for me.’ (My Questionnaire)

Participant 19: ‘I would like you to design something to help with grip, something that looks good and not child-like.’


USER GROUP WORKSHOP To ensure that my responses to handles were well informed and truly responded to the real problems faced by dyspraxics, I held a workshop with the Tyne and Wear Dyspraxia Support Group on the 19th of March. In this workshop, I informed the 8 people in attendance of my idea and asked them for their response. I gave each person a conventional utensil and a pot of modelling clay. Each person produced a sleeve for their wooden tool out of the modelling clay as I circulated and discussed their responses with them. This was extremely informative for my designs. All of the handle covers produced at the support group were very different and gave me a wide range of ideas to work with:


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After some material experiments a new technique was developed to make the utensils. Instead of producing only the handle on the lathe, the entire form was turned. Once the tool was produced with a bulbous top it was sanded down to a flat and manoeuvrable spoon head. To produce the depressions in the heads of the utensils a sharp gouge and mallet was used. This created a smooth and accurate indentation in comparison to the crude hook knife.


FEEDBACK ENABLE THERAPY ‘The spoons are great too. I don’t know whether it may be an idea on the spoon to have some sort of markings for prompts with finger placement as they have with some cutlery ranges.’ Pascall, a therapist at Enable Therapy, gave extremely useful ideas for the continuation of the ‘Dyspraxie’ tools. She brought to light an important issue that was not yet mentioned in my research:

THE TYNE AND WEAR DYSPRAXIA ASSOCIATION A member of the Tyne and Wear Dyspraxia Association, tested the utensils. First she practiced turning the spoon in a bowl with no mixture inside to boost her confidence. This was the only time she felt comfortable enough to let me take photographs. Finally, after a few practices, she allowed me to put some mixture in the bowl. This was a great triumph, it was clear that Emma’s confidence was

‘A key problem with Dyspraxia is the ‘motor planning’ and organisation of the brain to grip an object correctly’ Pascall explained how dyspraxics need more ‘strategy’ when interacting with tools. She suggested development on the utensils to incorporate visual or tactile grip references. Sarah explained how tactile ques teach and give more feedback to muscles, making tasks much easier. Adding weight is another solution she discussed. Weighted equipment has proven to trigger a faster feedback through the muscles in her patients.

growing the more capable she felt using the utensils.


ORGANISATION POT


THE PROBLEM Poor organisation is associated with both Dyspraxia and Dyslexia. There are many tasks in the kitchen that involve a strong grasp on organisation. For example cooking different things at the same time, keeping surfaces and utensils uncontaminated and clean, and knowing where things are when you need them. The time pressures and multi-tasking associated with preparing food can add to a dyspraxics or dyslexics lost feeling. The organisation pot aims to tackle organisation in the kitchen by making it easier to find the required utensil under time pressure. The pot has been designed to store only the important utensils, preventing hoarding and clutter. The pot acts as a rest for utensils while cooking. The rest also enables utensils to be found easily and prevent counter-top mess.


MESS PREVENTING

ORGANISATION

DE-CLUTTER

MARKET RESEARCH I researched a variety of solutions to the problem of clutter in the kitchen: sectional, hanging and resting storage. Each of these soltions had their drawbacks and merits. I also researched Henry Franks, a ‘Dyslexie’ designer himself, and his organisation pots.

STABLITIY


USER RESEARCH Poor organisation is associated with both Dyspraxia and Dyslexia. There are many tasks in the kitchen that involve a strong grasp on organisation. For example cooking different things at the same time, keeping surfaces and utensils uncontaminated and clean, and knowing where things are when you need them. The time pressures and multi-tasking associated with preparing food can add to a dyspraxics or dyslexics lost feeling. The organisation pot aims to tackle organisation in the kitchen by making it easier to find the required utensil under time pressure. The pot has been designed to store only the important utensils, preventing hoarding and clutter. The pot acts as a rest for utensils while cooking. The rest also enables utensils to be found easily and prevent counter-top mess.


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THE DYSLEXABLES BRIEF

Create a fun way to teach dyslexic children mathematics. Bring enthusiasm to the subjects that appeal least to ‘Visual’ learning techniques often associated with Dyslexia.


DYSLEXIA “1 in every 10 people in the UK suffer from Dyslexia” NHS

db + -

Don’t Forget!!

Time Keeping Keeping Time Dyslexics often have trouble with organisation and time keeping. This means, especially among children that they begin to feel less independant than their peers.

Short Term Term Short Memory Memory Dyslexics also struggle with short-term memory loss. They often find it more difficult than others to memorise facts or dates or learn skills.

Chronic Distraction Many Dyslexics, especially as children, suffer from Chronic Distraction. They find it particularly difficult to stay focused and interested in tasks they find confusing or difficukt. This can seriously hinder a childs learning in the more academic subjects such as

Picture Thinking

Inversion

Dyscalculia

The majority of Dyslexics are visual or ‘Picture’ thinkers. They work better in more creative subjects and find learning easier if it is given a creative twist.

Many Dyslexcis also suffer from Inversion. This occurs in letters such as b and d and numbers such as 6 and 9. Dyslexics often misinterperate these ‘twin’ digits and letters upside down or back to front.

Dyscalculia is a learning disability related to maths which is often a symptom of Dyslexia. 25% of the UK struggle with maths and processing numerical magnitude.


MARKET RESEARCH

A New York 3rd Grade School teacher, Alycia Simmerman started using lego to descirbe maths to her pupils. She used them as visual toold to explain sums, fractions and multiplication


USER RESEARCH Dyslexia is a learning disability that inhibits education and everyday living skills even when dyslexics are given the same opportunities as their peers:

‘Dyslexia is a condition where there is a problem with learning and processing despite appropriate education opportunities’ (Riddick, Lumsdon and Wolfe, 2002, p.10).

Dyslexia affects as much as ‘One in every ten people’ (NHS Choices, 2015) around the UK and stretches across the globe, making it by far the most common learning disability. It is often wrongly considered a sign of stupidity but, in fact, dyslexics just learn in different ways. Specifically designed products have proved useful in a wide range of specialist areas such as disability, old age and childcare (Boys, 2014, p.). So why not design products to help dyslexics?


USER TESTING: 1 2 3 4 5

25 people of varying ages drew an object or animal which best respresents each digit to them.

6 7 8 9 0


FEEDBACK KEITH BRENTNALL

JILL DUNCAN

PRIMARY EDUCATION MATHS SPECIALIST

Keith was an extremely useful source because he had worked with many dyslexic dhildren in the past. He said that they key thins was to ‘try and identify their needs and then move forward strategies which as a class and whole school can support them. He confirmed that these toys would be useful in a Key Stage One enviroment, having been a primary school head teacher in the past.He discussed Dyslexia being a problem for the children socially too! He told me how the children with Dyslexia often had extremely poor self esteem! He said he if very careful not to put the children on the spot so as to embarass them or knock their confidence further! He confirmed my ideas that the dyslexic children learnt much better in a visual or creative way. He told me about some competition being held by the British Dyslexia Association (BDA) which he encouraged his students to apply for. These competition briefs were about displaying a topic of their choice or subject in a creative and clear way.

PRIMARY EDUCATION SPECIALIST Target audience is Key Stage One What do they learn?

1. Understanding the world 2. Physical development 3. Literacy 4. Art and design 5. Maths (digits 0-10) 6. Communication 7. Personal and Social

The Dyslexables can be for more than just the times tables. Me and Jill discovered a variety of ways the children would benefit from the Dyslexables! Testing with Jill and a few of her students led to the redesign of the butterfly (no.3). The initial butterfly could trap a childs small fingers.

We also discussed materials. Jill told me that I must use a durable yet not heavy or toxic material for my toys. She suggestes, instead of wood, using a recyclable plastic as it is less heavy. She also gave me the idea of designing a container for the toys. To ensure they don’t get lost or taken.


3D PRINTING

Once I had established that I would use plastics I began to consider processes. Initially I thought about Vacuum Forming. However, after researching this, I found that it was extrmely difficult to make accurate, especially if you wanted to print two parts to fit together exactly. I then began some practises on the 3D printers. Teaching myself how to set up the machines and programmes I discovered how accurate they were at producing models. I have produced my prototypes out of 3D printed plastic and have done some research into the processes I could use with unlimited resources or in mass manufacturing.


INJECTION MOULDING

When researching mass manufactring that could be done based on my 3D printed prototypes I foudn that the most popular form was Injection Molding. Injection Molding is the most common form of mass manafacturing plastics. On a large scale it is much cheaper than 3D printing each figurine seperately. I designed molds of my own for the duck to be used in Injection Molding on Solid Works . This was an important developement on my idea and how it might be expanded if being mass manafactured or universally supplied to Key Stage One children.


SOLUTION Interactive and collectable toys for children to ‘play’ maths. A fun way of engaging children in mathematics studies and appealing to a child’s creative and visual way of thinking. The numbers can be recognised using three senses: the visual shape of the object, the weight of the toys and the noise they make when shaken. The toys also help ‘Inversion’ associated with Dyslexia. Numbers that are often misinterperated backwards or upside down are made clearer in form with the ‘Dyslexables’. For example Number 2 (the duck) has an eye hole on its front face and the 9 (key) has an indented detail on its front face. These fun, multifunctional and attractive toys seek to make specialised learning tools desirable rather than filled with the stigma of dyslexics being ‘different’ from their peers. Give young dyslexic children independance in their learning and make the boring subjects fun!


DYSLEXABLES DYSLEXABLES The The Multi-Sensory Multi-Sensory Number Number Association Association Toys Toys

SIGHT

TOUCH

SOUND

The toys have been designed to represent each digit visually. Each of the toys has a similar form to that of a digit. The children can associate a digit with an object or animal to make up ‘Sum Stories’ and think of sums in a visual storytelling way.

The toys are made with an interactive and ergonomic design in mind. Each toy has a different weight depending on which digit it represents. The higher the value of the digit the heavier the toy. As well as being a way of distinguishing the toys this teaches the young children about the values of numbers which Dyscalculia affects.

The way that the toys have been filled to add weight is similar to that of maracas. The rice inside the toys makes a sound. Because each of the toys is filled with a different quantity of rice, the figurines make a different sound when shaken. This is an interactive and fun way to distinguish the numbers from each other.


DYSLEXABLES

Interactive and collectable toys for children to ‘play’ maths. A fun way of engaging children in mathematics studies and appealing to a child’s creative and visual way of thinking. The numbers can be recognised using three senses: the visual shape of the object, the weight of the toys and the noise they make when shaken. The toys also help ‘Inversion’ associated with Dyslexia. Numbers that are often misinterperated backwards or upside down are made clearer in form with the ‘Dyslexables’. For example Number 2 (the duck) has an eye hole on its front face and the 9 (key) has an indented detail on its front face. These fun, multifunctional and attractive toys seek to make specialised learning tools desirable rather than filled with the stigma of dyslexics being ‘different’ from their peers. Give young dyslexic children independance in their learning and make the boring subjects fun!


THE BATH BOAT RSA STUDENT DESIGN AWARDS SUSTAINABLY CLEAN, 2016 2nd PLACE, Highly Commended

SUSRAINABLY CLEAN 2nd Place Highly Commended

BRIEF

‘Sustainably Clean’ - Design a product or system that allows people to wash and clean themselves using less water and/or lower water temperatures.


THE PROBLEM The U K has less available water per person than most other EU countries. But where i s this water going?

20 % of Water in the UK is used in baths

WaterWise UK, The Facts


USER RESEARCH


When the water level rises it pulls the plug chord tight. When the chord is fully taught the rubber duck will light up. The whale has been designed to light up too flashing different colours: blue, purple and pink.


the bath boat


GREEN CREATOR RSA STUDENT DESIGN AWARDS MAKING IT INCLUSIVE, 2016 BRIEF

‘Making it Inclusive’ - Design a way to enable more people to enjoy the benefits of making.


Solving The Problem of Anxiety Among UK Teens 1 in 10 children between the ages of 10-16 in the UK suffer from Anxiety or Depression. Depression can leave sufferers feeling persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days. This has had a huge effect on the UK GCSE reulsts. In 2012 7.3%of UK students recieved A* whereas only 6.2% suceeded to that extent in 2014.

The Future

Education & Exams

Sports

Moving House

Family & Friends


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The Pot Candle

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Step Two

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Find an unused terracotta plant pot with a hole in the bottom. Make sure it has no cracks that might grow and cause the pot to break when it becomes hot.

Find an unused candle stick or tea light. Place this in the bottom of the Plant Pot.

You can now use this as a little candle light. Make sure to keep it away from anything

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The Plant Pot BBQ

Step One

Step Two

Step Three

Step Four

Find an unused terracotta plant pot with a hole in the bottom. Make sure it has no cracks that might grow and cause the pot to break when it becomes hot.

Fill the bottom of the plant pot with sand to 3/4 of the way full. Make sure to place something under the pot so that the sand doesnt spill when the pot is moved.

On top of the pot place the fuel for the

Place an iron BBQ Grate over the top of the pot. This will be used to place the BBQ food onto as it cooks.

the pot too full!

Top Tip - The BBQ will work better if the coals Step Five are already hot.

The Spade Table

Light the BBQ with supervision and away from anything Make sure you are supervised and DON’T touch the pot once its hot!!

I have designed a manual for teenagers to be inspired by and projects for them to accomplish at home. The processes don’t require a large skill set or expensive tools. The projects will only incorporate organic or found objects encouraging teenagers to get outside and be creative in the healthy outdoors environment.

Step One

Step Two

Step Three

Step Four

Step Five

Find an unused spade from the garden shed.

Find a piece of unused wood or drift wood.

Cut the found wood into the shape you would like your table to be.

Cut a hole in the piece of wood which the spade

Unscrew the spade head and slip the wood onto the pole. Glue this into place and then re-attach the spade head.

through.


http://greencreator.weebly.com/

Once the teenagers have been inspired by the Green Creator manual, they can move on to their own creations. Through the Green Creator website teenagers can post their accomplishments and their peers vote on them. The projects with the most votes will win prizes. The prizes include personal book tokens and money for the school to expand creative clubs.


FLATWARE BRIEF

Produce a functional and attractive set of flatware incorporating investigations into ergonomics and human interaction.


THE PROBLEM ‘Lack of manual dexterity’ (Dyspraxia Foundation) is commonly found in Dyspraxia. Many dyspraxics have no dominant hand (ambidextrous) and have a very weak grasp. Repetitive tasks such as mixing can really tire dyspraxics and they are often unable to hold utensils correctly. Many people with Dyspraxia often find their condition embarrassing so she agreed that it was particularly important to resolve the issue of ‘stigma’ in design.

‘A key problem with Dyspraxia is the ‘motor planning’ and organisation of the brain to grip an object correctly’ Dyspraxics need more ‘strategy’ when interacting with tools. Utensils for dyspraxics should incorporate visual or tactile grip references. Tactile ques teach and give more feedback to muscles, making tasks much easier. Weighted equipment has also proven to trigger a faster feedback through the muscles to dyspraxics.


‘SPECIALISED’

ERGONOMIC

UNIVERSAL

MARKET RESEARCH I researched and critqued a wide range of exisitng flatware. I began with cutlery for disabilities and compared this with contemporary attractive designs to develop the correct aesthetic.

AESTHETIC


AUTOCAD TECHNICAL DRAWINGS (2D Design)


THE BOX LAMP BRIEF:

Make a working, user friendly task lamp for a home or office space.


ADAPTABLE

ORGANIC

MARKET RESEARCH I researched and critqued a wide range of exisitng lights both pendant and task. The key areas of research were mobility and adapting to ther user, organic shapes and geometric shapes.

GEOMETRIC


DEVELOPING THE ROTATION MECHANISM


AUTOCAD TECHNICAL DRAWINGS (electronics skills)


AUTOCAD 2D MODEL

FINAL WORKING PROTOTYPE (Beech and Brass)

SOLID WORKS 3D RENDER


COMPUTER MODELLING BRIEF:

Choose two products and model them precisely on SolidWorks.


ALESSI COFFEE POT

MALLET


T H A N K YO U ! claudia.brewster@hotmail.co.uk

Claudia Brewster Design Portfolio 2016  
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