Page 1

JUNE 2017

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PAGE 2 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


IN THIS ISSUE:

Classic City Paw Print is a free magazine promoting pet adoption, responsible pet ownership and compassion for all animals.

ISSUE 2, JUNE 2017 Editor and Publisher: Amanda Newsom Editorial Intern: Morgan Solomon Contributors: Lindsay Baker Ashley Clarke Lisa Milot Margaret Poplin Taylor Solomon Chris Sparnicht Jan Van Horn Classic City Paw Print is distributed at the first of each month in Athens, GA and surrounding areas. Advertising and content deadlines are the 15th of each month. If you would like to submit an article, purchase advertisements or provide feedback, please email us.

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P.O. Box 502 Athens, GA 30603 classiccitypawprint@gmail.com www.classiccitypawprint.com

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In MOST Issues Dear Tabby.............................................................................................. 4 A Treat a Day Keeps the Vet Away: Flea & Tick Treatment Options....... 6 Comic Strip............................................................................................. 7 Product Review: Cat-friendly Enrichment Plants................................... 11 Pet Spotlight: R. Wood Studio................................................................ 12 Chow Down: Jarad Blanton, White Bean & Mushroom Cassoulet......... 13 Wild Things: Havoni the Bald Eagle........................................................ 21 Organization Spotlight: GA House Rabbit Society.................................. 22 Book Review: Buddy Unchained, Daisy Bix............................................ 23 What to Do if You Lose or Find a Pet...................................................... 28 Have Some Fun...................................................................................... 30 Adoptables Athens-Clarke County Animal Control.................................................... 15 Circle of Friends Animal Society.............................................................. 16 Walton County Animal Control ............................................................. 17 Cat Zip Alliance....................................................................................... 18 Oconee Regional Humane Society.......................................................... 19 Oconee County Animal Services............................................................. 20 Featured this month Commission Meeting.............................................................................. 5 Our First Success Story!.......................................................................... 9 Acrocats Come to Athens....................................................................... 12 Breed Specific Labels.............................................................................. 25 My Dog is Cool....................................................................................... 27

ON THE COVER: Alexei

2-year-old male; ledger #46807 Alexei is a gorgeous boy who has been searching for his forever home with the help of Athens-Clarke County Animal Control since April. A pretty sensitive and shy guy, Alexei opens up to be so affectionate after you spend a few minutes with him. He loves treats and head rubs, but he is a bit nervous to find himself in the shelter environment. Will you take him home to give him the good life that he so obviously deserves? If you or someone you know is interested in meeting Alexei, please contact Athens-Clarke County Animal Control at 706-613-3540.

BY THE NUMBERS

Athens-Clarke County Animal Control Year-to-date as of May 16, 2017 Dogs Adopted: 104 Dogs Reclaimed: 113 Adoptable Dogs Euthanized: 4

Cats Adopted: 59 Cats Reclaimed: 3 Adoptable Cats Euthanized: 0

MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 3


Dear Tabby...

I adopted a dog last summer, and his yearly vaccines are about to be outdated. I’m a college student with a parttime job, so I can’t afford a huge vet bill right now. What should I do? —College Student on a Budget Dear College Student on a Budget, First of all, good job remembering that your dog’s vaccines are about to be outdated! That’s one of those things all pet owners can tend to forget about, so marking it on your calendar at your annual vet visit is a great idea. While a vet visit may seem financially daunting, there are some resources out there that you can consider. One wonderful resource is CareCredit, which is a financing option accepted at many of the veterinary offices in the Athens, GA area. It is a credit card specifically for paying out-of-pocket healthcare costs for you and your pets that allows you to pay back your vet bills over six, 12, 18 or 24 months. “No interest is charged on purchases of $200 or more when you make the minimum monthly payments and pay the full amount due by the end of the promotional period.” You can find out more information about CareCredit at www.CareCredit.com. Another option is to sign up for pet insurance, which would be a low monthly cost that would help cover your vet visits for preventative care as well as any unforeseen emergencies. There are several affordable pet insurance options these days, so check online to see which ones appeal to you and check with your favorite vet to see which insurance they accept before signing up. While I definitely don’t recommend cutting corners on vet visits, if your dog needs his annual vaccines and you don’t see any other health issues that need further attention, you can request a vet tech appointment instead. This will save you on a full doctor’s visit price at some veterinary offices while meeting your basic needs. However, a veterinarian does have to administer rabies vaccines, so keep that in mind. If you get a three-year rabies vaccine this year, you’ll be able to get a vet tech appoint the next two years for his other vaccines and

heartworm or fecal tests. If your dog needs emergency care and your CareCredit or pet insurance won’t cover all of the costs, there are some national programs that can help such as the RedRover Urgent Care program. These kinds of programs do require you to apply and seek out other financial support options first, but it is there if you additional resources. You can read more about this program and the application process at redrover.org/ redrover-relief-urgent-care-grants. I’ve listed some other resources below that may be useful. The animal welfare world is here to help you—we would much rather help you keep your pet in your home than have you consider the difficult decision to give him up if your financial situation is spread too thin. Good luck! VetHeart of Georgia Fund for Companion Animals www.gvmafoundation.org WellPet Humane The Lifesaver Fund wellpethumane.com/about-the-fund/ University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine G.R.A.C.E Fund and Sundown Surgery Fund www.vet.uga.edu/giving/funds.php#grace Financial Assistance Programs by State/Province redrover.org/node/1381 National Organizations with Assistance Programs redrover.org/node/1378 Assistance with Basic Pet Care and Other Needs redrover.org/node/1382

Tabby Have a burning question for Tabby? Email her at classiccitypawprint@gmail.com—please include “Dear Tabby” in the subject line.

TELL US ABOUT YOU! Fill out our reader survey at bit.ly/2qdS0gZ by June 30, 2017 to be entered into our drawing to win a $50 PETSENSE GIFT CERTIFICATE! PAGE 4 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Our first success story! Bootsie Finds a Home Thanks to Classic City Paw Print Our first issue of Classic City Paw Print was met with a good deal of positive feedback from the community, but our favorite email was from Circle of Friends Animal Society (COFAS) to say that Randy, a dog who was featured in our May issue, had been adopted as a result of someone seeing him as she perused the magazine. Randy came to COFAS when one of their foster parents found him in a church parking lot in Commerce, GA right before Thanksgiving. The maintenance man said Randy had been there for over a week already. His rabies tag led COFAS on a month-long search for his owner that took them to South Carolina, but they had no luck. It might be better that way anyhow, as Randy seemed to have been abused by a previous owner. He was very afraid of brooms and being put in his crate, but he opened up in his foster home and learned to trust and love his foster family. Cathy Wood of COFAS says, “Randy’s foster mom called him ‘the Velcro dog,’ as he was always at her feet following her everywhere.” He loved to play with toys and his blanket and to climb on his foster mom’s shoulder to snuggle. Meanwhile, Kirsteen DeVorsey had recently lost her 14-year-old dog to cancer and was becoming open to the idea of adopting another dog as her companion. She started browsing adoptable pets online and happened to pick up the debut issue of Classic City Paw Print. While looking through the adoptable dogs to see which might be a good fit for her, she came across Randy. She said his “profile described him as ‘snuggly, affectionate and feisty.’ He sounded perfect. It also mentioned that he had been up for adoption since November. The fact that he had been available for seven months concerned me, so I decided to visit [him] that Saturday when Circle of Friends would be holding a meet and greet.” When she met him, after their introduction, he walked right up to her and let her pick him up. She didn’t know this at the time, but Randy had never done that with other perspective pet parents. Some people had been interested in adopting him, but he just didn’t seem to be comfortable with them. But with Kirsteen, it was love at first sight for both of them! “She told me that I was the first person [he] wasn’t afraid of. I adopted [him] that day.” Randy became Bootsie and is loving life with his new mom, Kirsteen. He really enjoys playing fetch in her fenced yard, and she takes him on walks each morning around her neighborhood and then on another walk later in the

Photo: Circle of Friends Animal Society

Amanda Newsom

day at Sandy Creek Park. After just a week and half together, Kirsteen said, “He is so happy with his new home, and neither of us have any regrets. Even in this short amount of time, he has brought me so much happiness. I can’t imagine life without him. And watching him slide across the hardwood floors with a toy in his mouth never fails to make me laugh.” Do you need a tissue yet? Our hope is that this story about Bootsie will turn in to dozens (and hundreds) of success stories for other homeless dogs and cats in our area. It is the main reason Classic City Paw Print was launched, and we want it to be the main reason it keeps going. You can help pets like Bootsie by telling people about the featured adoptable animals in our monthly magazine, which locals can pick up in person (distribution locations are listed on our website under the current issue), and anyone can view the issues and articles online at www. ClassicCityPawPrint.com. While Classic City Paw Print is published and edited as a mostly local effort, the articles we feature and the adoptable pets looking for homes are not restricted to Athens, GA! MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 5


A Treat a Day Keeps the Vet Away Flea and Tick Treatment Options As we enter another hot Georgia summer, one thought on everyone’s mind is how we protect ourselves from buggy visitors. As humans, we can light as many tiki torches and douse ourselves in as much bug spray as we like, but what about our furry friends? Ticks are infamous for carrying diseases like Lyme and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Mosquitos are a pest that isn’t usually thought of when considering flea and tick treatment, but they are carriers of heartworms and are an important consideration when choosing preventative options for your pets. Treatment for heartworms in dogs is a long, expensive and potentially-dangerous process, and there is currently no treatment for heartworm-positive cats. When a flea circus moves onto your pet, itching, redness, flaky skin, scabs and hair loss are soon to follow. And once fleas invade your home, it’s not an easy feat to remove them from fabrics, nooks and crannies! Prevention is key when it comes to fleas and ticks. The best way to treat these problems is to stop them before they happen. Below, we’ve outlined several products and medications available, as well as some natural methods of prevention:

Photo: Amanda Newsom

Taylor Solomon

NATURAL OILS: Essential oils like lavender, peppermint, lemongrass or cedar oils can be diluted and used as sprays or in bath products. Apply in a well-ventilated area—never around your pet’s face—and remember a little goes a long way.

FRESH CRUSHED GARLIC: Not only delicious in Italian cooking, garlic can be added to your pet’s diet for ORAL TABLETS AND CHEWS: This medication is taken orally flea protection. Anywhere from a half to two cloves is considered safe, depending on your pet’s size. A good rule and travels through your pet’s bloodstream to the skin to of thumb is to use no more than half a clove per 20 pounds kill unwanted pests. Some medications kill fleas and ticks of body weight daily, with a maximum of two cloves for any as well as heartworms and other intestinal parasites. pet. This method works best with dogs, as cats are more sensitive to garlic and often have an adverse reaction. TOPICAL TREATMENTS: Topical treatments come in drop form and are applied directly to your pet’s skin. These VINEGAR: Vinegar can be added to your dog or cat’s diet can be used to treat existing conditions and help prevent to protect them from unwanted visitors. Put 1 teaspoon future outbreaks. per quart of water in your pets’ drinking water or diluted in water in a one-to-one mixture to spray on your pet’s coat. COLLARS: Flea and tick collars are coated in a chemical which repels pests. They are thin and flexible to provide comfort to your pet and last several months, making them a very economical option. SPRAYS AND SHAMPOOS: Shampoos are used like usual bath products with the added bonus of flea and tick prevention. Sprays are used between baths and make for an easy and inexpensive prevention method. PAGE 6 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

Some flea and tick treatments have proven to be more effective than others, particularly in recent years, so we recommend doing your research to find the option that will be best for your pet. It’s also important to keep your pets, even those that are indoor-only, on treatment year-round for the most effective preventative strategy. Find what works for your pets to enjoy the summer flea and tick-free!


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Artwork by Margaret Poplin, MargaretPoplin.com

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PAGE 8 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Commission Meeting Lisa Milot At the Athens-Clarke County Commission meeting this February, some residents raised concerns about unaltered dogs in our community. Under state law, dogs that have been classified as “dangerous” or “vicious” based on attacks on people or pets are not required to be altered (spayed or neutered). Moreover, 79 percent of stray dogs impounded at the shelter are unaltered at the time of impound. Research shows that unaltered dogs have greater problems with aggression than altered dogs, and they are more apt to stray and become a nuisance in the community, interfering with traffic and entering on private property. Additionally, dogs that wander loose intact add to pet overpopulation in our area, as they are likely to produce one or more litters of puppies outside of a licensed breeding program. After discussing the concerns, the commissioners decided to have their Legislative Review Committee review the existing county statutes. In the committee’s meetings since that date, they have developed policies and proposed changes to the ordinance to improve safety in the community and unanimously voted to send the

proposed ordinance changes to the full commission. These proposals should be on the agenda for the June 6 meeting and will be open for public comment at that time. Athenspets (www.athenspets.net), the volunteer group for Athens-Clarke County Animal Control, has assisted in this process by providing requested information on the available free and low-cost spay/neuter options in the area. University of Georgia Law Professor Lisa Milot assisted in drafting proposed language and providing an analysis of the current statutes at issue. You can show your support by attending the Athens-Clarke County Mayor and Commission meeting on Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at 6:00pm in the Commission Chamber on the second floor of City Hall at 301 College Avenue, Athens, GA 30601. More information about these meetings can be found online at www.athensclarkecounty. com/176/Mayor-Commission-Meetings.

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Product Review Cat-friendly Enrichment Plants Jan Van Horn When you are planting your summer flowers and favorite vegetables of the season, it’s a great time to put in a little love foliage for your favorite feline. We all know kitties love cat nip, but there are a few less-known herbs that they also find favor with—and you can, as well! We have put together a short list of plants that you and your feline fur baby can both enjoy. Whether you are a big farmer of land, spreading out far and wide, or more of a patio container kind of Mr. Green Jeans, these few plants are grown with ease and minimal care. LEMON GRASS: Makes a lovely tea and is pleasant to flavor food with. As far as kitty is concerned, it is a stimulant (similar to other cat grasses) that cats love to smell and nibble on. LICORICE ROOT: As someone who found licorice disgusting as a child and still as an adult, something called licorice root really held zero interest for me. However, in the name of broadening my horizons, I have opened my narrow childhood mind to the fact that licorice root is regarded as one of the best medicinal plants with a long list of do-good qualities. It is a consoling balm to an itchy kitty having anti-inflammatory characteristics and a natural cortisone. Bonus: kitties love the taste! VALERIAN: Presents itself with bunches of small white or pink blooms and is extremely pungent. It is well-known for being an aid to relaxation and restful sleep. However, that is not the case for your feline friend. It is quite

stimulating when eaten (much like catnip) to cats and has been known to put the laziest lounge lizard of a kitty into Richard Simmons exercise mode. So if you are looking for putty tat to get going while you nap, this is your plant. PEPPERMINT and CATMINT: A very easy and rampant grower, peppermint is lovely to have around to flavor your iced tea, to make a mint julep or just to take in the sweet smell. Cats are attracted to the smell, and mice find it unappealing. There could be the added benefit of Mr. Whiskers not leaving Mr. Mouse at your feet if you choose to grow some peppermint. Typically, cats are more opt to frolic in peppermint than to eat it. Catmint will not only draw your kitty in with it’s pretty purple blossoms, but it also attracts bees and butterflies. DANDELION ROOT: Once you have blown the fluff and made a wish, you can thank this little gem for all of its medicinal purposes! While generally purveyors of lawns are not happy to find dandelions, they perhaps should reassess their thinking on that. Dandelion root is a soothing anti-itch remedy for kitties bothered with allergies. You can also make you favorite feline a yummy salad from the leaves. As always, it is wise to check with your vet when introducing anything new to your pet. Hopefully these suggestions may give your beloved house plants a bit of a rest while kitty is occupied with some new feline-friendly foliage.

ADVERTISE TO SUPPORT PET RESCUE! Email classiccitypawprint@gmail.com for ad rate info MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 11


Pet Spotlight

Dusty: R. Wood Studio

When visiting R. Wood Studio, one can take in beautiful pieces of pottery and observe the process of pottery being made. Visitors with a keen eye might even notice a face peeking at them from one the pieces. This little face belongs to Dusty, the studio’s resident kitty. Dusty was a feral cat that adopted the studio as her new home, and now visitors can find this sweet orange and black cat when they come by the studio. R. Wood Studio was started by Rebecca Wood. Rebecca lived in Athens where she earned her degree in painting and drawing in 1977. After years of painting still lifes, Rebecca made the decision to try something new and eventually began to make pottery. Despite having no experience with pottery, Rebecca created beautiful plates, finding her new medium. The studio has now been around for over 20 years and continues to produce beautiful pottery, ranging from brightly-colored plates to delicately-designed floral wall hangings. You can find pieces in many stores around Athens, as well as 22 other states across the country. Dusty must have great taste in pottery and art, as she chose this colorful studio as her home. The more Dusty began to show up at the studio, the more the artists began to treat her like their own. They feed her and take her to the vet in order to make sure she is healthy, and she has everything she could possibly need. Dusty’s favorite thing

Photo: Morgan Solomon

Morgan Solomon

to do is to lay inside of the different pottery pieces in the studio. While Dusty is very cute, she can also be the cause of mischief—she keeps the studio artists on their toes as they try to rescue any mice or lizards that Dusty might catch. Although she can cause trouble, they lover her “sweet and spicy” personality. Dusty does come and go as she pleases from the studio, but no matter how often she leaves, she always comes back. She must have known that she would find a loving and welcoming family behind the bright doors of R. Wood Studio.

Acrocats come to athens Taylor Solomon When I bought my ticket to see the Acrocats at the Morton Theatre, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I knew if I did not go I would forever wonder what went on the day a bus full of cats came to town. And I mean that literally—when I walked up to the venue the night of the show, I was greeted by a large purple bus featuring the faces of Tuna, Jax, Buffy and Oz, the evening’s furry feline performers. Acrocats, and their sister performance group The Rock Cats, was started by Samantha Martin, an expert animal trainer and cat lady (she’d be the first to call herself such and would take it as a compliment). Martin started training her own cats to play instruments in the world’s first (and only) cat-fronted rock band, The Rock Cats. She PAGE 12 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

quickly realized they could take the show on the road. Now over 10 years later, Martin has fostered and found homes for over 200 cats and kittens while traveling with and training them all. Acrocats is part trained-animal show in which animals (mostly cats, along with a chicken and groundhog) perform tricks: playing instruments, jumping from stool to stool, balancing on balls and walking on tight ropes (just to name a few acts). Of course as well all know, even the most well-trained cats in the end are going to do what they want, whether it’s part of the planned performance or not. Martin herself said, “Nothing teaches you humility like a trained cat act in front of a live audience.” continued on page 13


The other part of the show expands on the humility (and heart) mentioned by Martin, a side of animal performance not always thought of in conjunction with traveling circus acts. Professionally, Martin is an animal trainer; personally, she is an animal lover and advocate. She spends one part of the show talking about the importance of animal rescue and training your pets. She demonstrates using a whistle and clicker to train a cat and models several tricks while explaining how they could be

used in your home in regards to pet safety. She is vocal about the fact that she has been lucky enough to be given a platform and uses it to inspire others to train their own cats. Seeing Acrocats and the Rock Cats was a fun, energetic and humorous evening. I fell in love with Martin and her passion, as well as her team of cute kitties. For more information on the Acrocats and their upcoming performances, visit www.circuscats.com.

Chow Down

White Bean & Mushroom Cassoulet

Jarad Blanton INGREDIENTS:

TOMATO COUSCOUS • 2 Tbsp capers • 28 oz can diced tomatoes • 1 1/2 c couscous • 2 Tbsp EVOO • 1 tsp oregano • 1 pinch cayenne BEET PUREE • 1/2 lb red & gold beets • 4 Tbsp EVOO

INSTRUCTIONS:

Feeds 6-8

Photo: Jarad Blanton

MUSHROOM CASSOULET • 2 c dried white beans • 1 small onion • 1 stalk celery • 1 small carrot • 1 tsp thyme • 2 tsp tarragon • 1/4 c EVOO • 2 cloves garlic • 1 leek (thinly sliced) • 1/2 lb mushrooms (any kind) • salt and pepper to taste • 2 qt veg stock

TOMATO COUSCOUS • Strain tomatoes and use juice to cook couscous in • Add 1.5 cups couscous and 1 cup water, plus tomato juice and salt and pepper to taste • Add oregano and cayenne pepper • Cook 5 minutes

MUSHROOM CASSOULET • Soak beans in the refrigerator overnight in enough cold water to cover by a couple inches BEET PUREE • Small dice and sauté all vegetables in 2 Tbsp EVOO • Puree cooked beets in EVOO until lightly caramelized • Add beans and veg stock The dehydrated mushrooms and beets are additions • Cook until beans are tender that make the plate prettier, but they aren’t necessary to • Puree or not—it’s your choice! still enjoy the meal... Good Luck, and happy cooking! MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 13


ADVERTISE TO SUPPORT PET RESCUE! Email classiccitypawprint@gmail.com for ad rate info.

PAGE 14 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Athens–Clarke County Animal Control 123 Buddy Christian Way, Athens, GA 30605 • Open Daily 11am-4pm except Wednesdays

Roxie

HUCKEBERRY

LYTA

ledger #46599

ledger #46915

ledger #46683

SINGLE SINCE: February 20, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: April 20, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: March 3, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • energetic • loving

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: happy • easy-going • intelligent

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • loving • silly

I ENJOY... Giving kisses and playing fetch!

I ENJOY... exploring the outdoors and treats!

I ENJOY... being with people and other dogs!

3-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

1-year-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

1-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

Primrose

Marjoram

ETHEL

ledger #46797

ledger #46974

ledger #46799

SINGLE SINCE: April 7, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 4, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: April 8, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: outgoing • affectionate • inquisitive

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: loving • gorgeous • gentle

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • shy • declawes

I ENJOY... being the center of attention!

I ENJOY... being petted and doted on, of course.

I ENJOY... catnip, toys and getting head rubs.

CATS

DOGS

10-year-old female

4-year-old female

2-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the AthensClarke County Animal Control at 706-613-3540 or visit athenspets.net to view adoptable profiles. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 15


circle of friends animal society

P.O. Box 1235, Greensboro, GA 30642 • Meet and Greets by Appointment or at Adoption Events

PEnny

Molly

Marsha

SINGLE SINCE: May 11, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: December 29, 2016

SINGLE SINCE: March 15, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • goofy • loving

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: friendly • playful • adorable

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: sweet • cuddly • playful

I ENJOY... photo-bombing selfies.

I ENJOY... eating and playing with foster siblings.

I ENJOY... snuggling with my foster mom.

1-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

6-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

6-month-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

Evie

Mr. Muffins

Rose

SINGLE SINCE: May 1, 2015

SINGLE SINCE: March 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 1, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: snugglebug • playful • talkative

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: loveable • mellow • jiggly

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: cuddly • quiet • nap-buddy

I ENJOY... Rolling around on my back.

I ENJOY... laying by the window to watch cat tv.

I ENJOY... playing then snuggling up.

CATS

DOGS

9-week-old female

8-year-old male

3-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact Circle of Friends Animal Society at info@cofas.org or visit cofas.org. PAGE 16 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Walton County Animal Control 1411 S. Madison Ave., Monroe, GA 30655 • Open Mon-Fri 2pm-4:30pm, select Sat 10am-1:45pm

Bob

Jake

Buck

ledger #20170757

ledger #20170758

ledger #20170749

SINGLE SINCE: May 12, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 12, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 10, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: Huntin’ for lovin’!

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: Nice big boy!

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: Just for you!

I ENJOY... tracking down someone to love.

I ENJOY... just being Jake!

I ENJOY... a run and a romp...

4-year-old male

CATS

6-year-old male

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

2-year-old male

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

Starla

Arnie

Lila

ledger #20170698

ledger #20170771

ledger #20170773

SINGLE SINCE: May 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 13, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 13, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: sweet and loving

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: purrrfect little kitty!

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: It’s kitten time!

I ENJOY... a warm sunny stroll.

I ENJOY... anything that rolls or jingles!

I ENJOY... a warm window sill with a view.

CATS

DOGS

8-week-old female

8-week-old male

6-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the Walton County Animal Control at 770-267-1322 or visit waltonpets.net to view adoptable profiles. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 17


Cat Zip Alliance P.O. Box 902, Watkinsville, GA 30677 • Meet and Greets by Appointment in Athens

Leroy

CAMILLA

SINGLE SINCE: May 15, 2016

SINGLE SINCE: March 13, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: lap cat • dominant • FIV+

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: loving • sweet • tortitude

I ENJOY... food, sunshine... and then more food.

I ENJOY... soaking up sunshine with calm people.

3-year-old male

CATS

3-year-old female

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

Juliet

Prince

SINGLE SINCE: May 10, 2016

SINGLE SINCE: October 16, 2015

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: lap cat • silly • bossy

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: sweet • loving • playful

I ENJOY... laps, windows and being an only child.

I ENJOY... my best friend Juliet, quiet and calm.

3-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

3-year-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact Cat Zip Alliance at feralcatcaregivers@yahoo.com, call 706-207-1013 or visit catzip.org. PAGE 18 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Oconee regional humane Society 1020 Park Avenue, Suite 101, Greensboro, GA 30642 • Mon-Sat 11am-3pm or by Appointment

Misty

Harper

Joy

I ENJOY... giving lots of kisses!

I ENJOY... wagging my tail and having fun!

I ENJOY... hanging out with everyone!

8-week-old female

CATS

DOGS

8-week-old female

KIDS

CATS

2-year-old female

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

Biscuit

Lucy

Phyllis

I ENJOY... hanging out with dignified adults.

I ENJOY... hanging out with my friend, Phyllis.

I ENJOY... getting to know more about humans.

CATS

DOGS

9-month-old female

6-month-old female

2-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the Oconee Regional Humane Society at 706-454-1508, ORHSpets@gmail.com or visit www.orhspets.org. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 19


oconee County Animal Services 1171 Branch Road, Bishop, GA 30621 • Open Mon/Tu/Th/Fri 12pm-5pm, Sat 11am-1pm

Annie

Charlie

Cole

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: abused • energy • trainable

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: out-going • silly • friendly

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: trained • affectionate • mannered

I ENJOY... getting lots of attention!

I ENJOY... taking walks and learning new tricks.

I ENJOY... taking walks and play time.

senior female

CATS

1-year-old male

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

4-year-old male

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

Mary

Skittles

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: abandoned • loving • friendly

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: calm• entertaining • affectionate

I ENJOY... feeling secure and getting attention.

I ENJOY... playing!

DOGS

KIDS

7-year-old male

4-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the Oconee County Animal Services at 706-769-3956 or visit oconeecounty.com/215/Animal-Control. PAGE 20 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


WilD Things

Hanovi the Bald Eagle

Hanovi the American Bald Eagle came to Bear Hollow Zoo in 2005 because one of his wings does not function properly. He can hop about 6 feet. He remains with us as a native wildlife ambassador, and in return, we take care of him. Hanovi gives our citizens and out-of-state visitors a chance to see close up what kinds of animals live right in our neighborhoods—bald eagles truly live in Athens-Clarke County! A great place to view them is on the Orange Trail at the State Botanical Garden along the Middle Oconee River. In the wild Hanovi would eat fish, small fowl, rodents and reptiles, so we feed him a variety of the same types of prey. While bald eagles generally don’t prey on small pets, they can lift up to 4 pounds and will take advantage of domestic fowl or carrion if they are hungry enough. They can also see at a distance four times more sharply than humans. Their nests can be 13 feet deep, 8 feet across and weigh over a ton, so they are the largest type of bird nest found in North America! Like many of our wild raptors, bald eagles were once threatened by the widespread use of DDT, an agricultural pesticide that caused their egg shells to become weak. Because we no longer use DDT in America, their populations are again flourishing. As of 2007, they are no longer on our federal Endangered or Threatened Species Lists. Bald eagles tend to mate for life. However, if one mate passes away, the survivor may seek a new partner. Courtship can involve behavior that looks a bit like an aerial battle. They will dive, lock talons, tumble and freefall together. Mature adult bald eagles have white feathers on their heads and tails, blackish-brown feathers covering the body and wings, and a yellow beak and feet. Their talons are black. However, immature bald eagles are often covered head-to-tail with a mixture of brown and white feathers with a dark, almost-black beak. It may take as many as five or six years for a young bald eagle to fully show its adult plumage. A little over two years ago, Hanovi had a yard mate, Amazon. While they were not a bonded pair, bald eagles do tend to enjoy the company of others. Amazon was the feisty one, while Hanovi is more timid. Unfortunately, Amazon passed away due to a number of complications, but mostly because she was fairly old. In the next month or so, we are hoping to acquire a new yard mate for Hanovi who, like him, is only able to hop. She will never be able to survive on her own in the wild, so we hope we can make a permanent home for her at Bear Hollow! If things

Photo: Chris Sparnicht

Chris Sparnicht, Assistant Zookeeper at Bear Hollow Zoo

go as planned, we hope to introduce the new young eagle to Hanovi sometime next fall. She will probably still have adolescent plumage when she arrives. We also hope it may be possible for the new young eagle to become a program bird, like some of our other raptors. She would be trained to stand on a glove while a keeper talks about eagles in demonstrations for the public. Raptors recognize individual humans. It takes time to develop trust between each new keeper and any specific bird of prey, especially if they come from the wild. When I stop by his exhibit, Hanovi gives me a greeting squawk, likely because he recognizes me as one of the keepers who feeds him. He does not do this for most regular visitors. If we are able to train the newcomer as a program bird, I can only further hope that the new eagle may set an example for Hanovi that coming to the glove of a trusted trainer can mean treats as reward, perhaps deepening a layer of trust between keeper and bird. When you stare a bird in the eye, you can absolutely sense their level of trust and mutual respect. If Hanovi were able to live in the wild, he would have more opportunity to use his beak and talons. His beak and claws grow continuously, much like human hair, so about once a year, we have to trim his beak, and sometimes his claws, to make sure they don’t grow too long or crooked. The name Hanovi means “strong” in Hopi. Bald eagles and their feathers are considered sacred by many North American Native Nations. It’s important to note, however that collecting native bird feathers in the wild is not allowed in the United States, except by institutions like Bear Hollow Zoo, who are licensed to use them for our educational mission. We at Bear Hollow Zoo hope you’ll stop by to visit Hanovi and our other native wildlife ambassadors! MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 21


Georgia House rabbit society “Stu Hopps” Finds a New Home as “Quincy” Last December around the holidays, my mom opened her back door to find a matted grey rabbit that clearly didn’t belong in the wild and texted me a photo, and so we were immediately on our all-too-familiar rescue mission for him. From my experience working with local shelters, I knew the best organization to contact first: the Georgia House Rabbit Society (GHRS). We contacted them and agreed to help find a foster home until they could get him vetted and up for adoption. Luckily, a friend put us in touch with Stephanie Aarstad who had experience working in shelters and with rabbits. She agreed to take him in temporarily, and so the path to a new home began! Quincy started his new journey in life as Stu Hopps, named by Stephanie’s boys who are big fans of the movie Zootopia. His fur was matted, he has a crooked foot from a prior injury that didn’t heal properly, and he didn’t seem to feel well when Stephanie first got him. GHRS provided everything she needed to care for Stu Hopps, from housing to food to toys—the only things they don’t provide fosters with is love and greens. They gave her an educational packet and talked her through everything she needed to know about caring for a rabbit. Though Stephanie had been around rabbits at previous jobs as an animal control officer and veterinary staff, she had never owned one before. About her decision to foster Stu, Stephanie said, “I love rabbits and thought it would be fun to have one visit for a while—plus my kids would get a kick out of it. We had a spare room, a suitable cage and lots of love to spare.” Once Stu was neutered and had a vet visit to be sure he was healthy, he began to feel better and act more like himself. Stephanie and her family earned his trust and learned more about rabbits as pets. They are quiet and clean pets, though, as Stephanie said, “successfully keeping a pet rabbit healthy and happy is not as simple as sticking it in a rabbit hutch outdoors and throwing it poorquality pellets and water occasionally.” They do require care beyond the efforts of having a dog or cat, but they can be wonderful companions. Stu enjoyed time on his floor pallet with his foster family and enjoyed playing with toys—his favorite was a jingle ball that he would throw up in the air! When he wasn’t playing or following Molly the Maltese (his new instant friend, mostly on his end) around the house, he would relax on the couch next to Stephanie or one of her boys. If he required pets, he would nudge one of them with his head to let them know they had a job to do. Stephanie says, “I never knew rabbits had so much PAGE 22 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

Photo: Georgia House Rabbit Society

Amanda Newsom

personality. Stu Hopps taught me so much about rabbits. By the time he left our house to be put on display for adoption at the [GHRS] shelter, he was a different rabbit. He trusted us, loved us and communicated with us. He was no longer skinny. His fur was shinny and soft, not matted, and he was happy. I absolutely took so much joy in turning something that was neglected and tossed out to fend for itself into a beautiful, healthy, loving furry friend.” GHRS is the only licensed rabbit rescue in Georgia. A no-kill and self-funded organization, their goal is to educate, rescue, rehabilitate and re-home domestic rabbits. They work throughout the state to help rabbits like Stu Hopps, a classic example of the work that they do on a daily basis. With the help of Stephanie as a foster parent, they were able to find Stu Hopps a new home this May with a family who has four other rabbits. They named him Quincy, fitting as their fifth rabbit, and he bonded particularly well with their rabbit Jackie who is now his “wife.” Quincy had a happy ending that could have easily ended badly, as he clearly was a pet who had been let out into the wild by someone who decided they no longer wanted him. Domestic rabbits cannot survive on their own in the wild, so taking them to a shelter is a more humane way to find a new home for an unwanted pet rabbit. If you are considering a rabbit as a new pet, the GHRS is a perfect first place to look. They offer a Rabbit 101 class that will help you learn about rabbits as pets, and they have some great information on their website: HouseRabbitGA.com. If you’re not quite ready to commit to the 10 to 12 years as a rabbit parent, they are always looking for temporary foster homes or volunteers who can spend even a couple hours a week at their shelter in Marietta, GA!


Book review

Buddy Unchained by Daisy Bix Richly illustrated and incredibly heartfelt, Buddy Unchained is a story that will resonate with anyone who has ever met, owned or loved a rescue animal. As the mother of three rescue dogs myself, I spend far too much time wondering about what their lives were like before they came to my family. Where did my lab mix live for three years before ending up at a shelter? (We speculate it was somewhere in the city, as she has an inexplicable understanding of elevators.) How did little Max, who turns his nose up at rain and has a disdain for all things nature, survive on his own for any amount of time at all? Buddy Unchained tells the story of a similar dog, a story all rescuers have heard in some form or another. When we first meet Buddy, he has been neglected, forced to live outside chained to a post without regular access to food, water or attention. Like many dogs in the real world, Buddy is not violently abused, but rather left unattended and ignored until the day his rescuer comes. Told from Buddy’s point of view, Buddy Unchained draws out empathy in all readers—whether child or adult—pointedly showing how neglect can emotionally and physically affect an animal, but also the difference a simple act of love can make. Karly Noel is the Director of Education and Outreach at the RedRover Readers program, which “helps develop perspective-taking, empathy and critical thinking skills as children explore the bond between people and animals through stories and discussion.” Buddy Unchained has long been one of RedRover’s—and Karly’s—recommended reads, and with good reason. “The beautiful illustrations done by Joe Hyatt make this title perfect for our program’s read aloud format,” Karly Noel said. “The story is told from the dog’s perspective, which helps the students better understand what Buddy may be thinking and feeling throughout the book. In the RedRover Readers program, we practice prosocial skills like perspective-taking to help students seeing things from others’ perspectives in order to empathize with what they are going through.”

Photo: Amanda Newsom

Ashley Clarke

RedRover Readers has made it their mission to spread this empathy throughout the community, training “teachers, humane educators and volunteers to read the pre-selected program books to groups of students in elementary school and then facilitate discussions… We have curriculum written for each of our books including Buddy Unchained, and after reading to the students, the facilitator does activities to reinforce the concepts such as ‘What does a dog need to be happy, healthy and safe?’” Through reading stories like Buddy Unchained, children learn not only to care for and love their animals, but also how important rescuing is. Even more importantly, Buddy Unchained shows that just because a dog is ignored, neglected or abused, it doesn’t mean they can’t be a happy, loving member of the family. More information about the RedRover Readers program can be found at www.RedRover.org/Readers. Buddy Unchained is written by Daisy Bix and illustrated by Joe Hyatt. You can purchase a copy at your local independent bookstore. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 23


MyVintageLook.com PAGE 24 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Breed specific Labels Why It Can Hinder Dogs from Being Adopted in Shelters Take a look at the photo on the right of Lyta at the Athens-Clarke County Animal Control. What breed would you label her as? Based on her appearance, one might say she has Labrador Retriever and perhaps another American Staffordshire Terrier. And based on her appearance, those would be reasonable guesses. But they may also be entirely incorrect. Recent studies show that trying to determine breed based on appearance alone is highly inaccurate. This is because only a small portion of a dog’s DNA has to do with their physical appearance. When a stray or lost dog ends up at a shelter, they are impounded—a process that typically includes determining age and sex, administering vaccination(s), dewormer and other medical evaluations or procedures deemed necessary. Finally, they get labeled as the breed they most resemble (here in Northeast Georgia, “pit bull” type mixes and Labrador mixes tend to be common breed labels given at shelters). Assuming they are healthy and no owner steps forward within the hold time, the dog will be made available for adoption. The paper on their cage will reflect all the details that are currently known, including things like age, personality and assumed breed. A recent study showed that approximately half of all shelter dogs labeled as pit bulls did not have any pit type breeds (also sometimes called “bully breeds”) in them at all. This is a real problem because unfortunately some breeds, especially bully breeds, still have a negative stigma attached to them. When the only media coverage they get is negative and involves attacking another dog or a human, many people believe all pits must be vicious attack dogs that are most certainly not family dog material. I’m going to go out on a ledge here and say that any of us that have interacted with a pit-type dog know them to be extremely kind, loving and gentle dogs—there’s a reason they were formerly used as nanny dogs!—but if your only experience with them is hearing how horrible they are, of course you don’t want to adopt a “pit bull mix.” Our local animal shelters have made leaps and bounds of progress over the past several years, but we still have room to improve. If you’re looking to adopt a dog, I urge you to look beyond what the cage card says and view each dog as an individual. Judge them based on personality, not a breed label. It’s unfair to make generalizations about a shelter dog that is probably a blend of six, eight or even 10 different breeds anyway—at that point, breed-specific personality traits are often lost. Also, pits are some of the BEST dog models, as evidenced by Lyta here who is still looking for a forever home!

Photo: Susan Hawkins

Lindsay Baker

MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 25


Voted Athens’ FAVORITE VET CLINIC! 2016 & 2017 Flagpole Athens Favorites 2016 Reader’s Choice Award Winner

boarding • digital x-ray acupuncture • chiropractic laser surgery • endoscopy

exceptional care for exceptional pets

Dr. Jenifer Gustafson Hope, DVM Dr. Kasey Stopp, DVM Dr. Sarah Clifton, DVM

1150 Mitchell Bridge Road hopeamc.com • 706-546-7879 Office Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30am-6pm, Sat 8am-1pm PAGE 26 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


My Dog Is Cool

A Cool Campaign about Not Leaving Dogs in Hot Cars As I was leaving a store recently, I noticed a car in the back of the parking lot with its windows cracked and two large dogs sitting on the front seats inside. The weather that day was in the mid to high 70s and sunny, so after just a few minutes of being in the store, my car was already pretty toasty. Seeing the dog was a reminder of the My Dog Is Cool campaign. Their vision is “a country where every dog is a cool dog. Where people keep their dogs out of harm’s way by not leaving them in a hot car, even for a few minutes.” They have a great website with information about the seriousness of leaving your dog in the car when it’s hot outside. According to My Dog Is Cool, “a little heat outside a car can quickly make it very hot inside. On a summer’s day of only 85 degrees Fahrenheit, for example, even keeping the windows slightly open won’t stop the inside temperature from climbing to 102 degrees in 10 minutes, and to 120 degrees in 20 minutes. A dog whose body temperature rises to 107 to 108 degrees will within a very short time suffer irreparable brain damage—or even death.” The site has flyers and brochures, and you can print or order them to keep in your car during the spring and summer (and sometimes fall!) months. If a dog is not in immediate distress, you can put a brochure on the windshield of the car with dogs in them on hot days. It may sound a bit invasive to do this, but owners may genuinely not realize the seriousness of leaving their companions is the car for what seems to only be a few minutes with the windows cracked for a quick errand. “If you see a dog in distress in a hot car, call the local animal control agency, police or 911 right away. If possible, you can also try to find the dog’s owner.”

Is Your Dog Cool?

Is Your Dog Cool?

HOT

HOT

Signs an animal is in distress include: • Excessive panting • Excessive drooling Temperatures • Increased heart rate Can Be Fatal To Your • Trouble breathing • Disorientation • Collapse or loss of consciousness • Seizure • Respiratory arrest

Dog

Remember to think twice before loading up your car and your pet for a trip around town—be sure your dog’s safety is a priority, even if they’ll be bummed about staying home for the day. And if it’s a good day to get your dog out, don’t forget to bring along plenty of water (and a

Temperatures Can Be Fatal To Your Dog

Image: My Dog Is Cool Campaign

Amanda Newsom

bowl) to keep them hydrated! If you would like more information about the My Dog is Cool campaign or want to print or order some of their materials, please visit www.MyDogIsCool.com.

MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 27


BE PROACTIVE: If your pets are microchipped and wear collars with ID tags at all times, the chances of you being reunited with a lost pet in a timely manner increase significantly!

File a report with Animal Control Look for your pet

File a lost pet report with the closest animal control agency and with any other agencies within a 60-mile radius. After filing the report, check with them periodically to see if any animals in their care match your pet.

Canvas the area where your pet was lost. Ask friends or neighbors to help. Try not to panic, and stay calm so you can think clearly as you search.

Some of the info animal control will ask you: • Pet’s Name • Is Your Pet is Wearing a Collar • Pet’s Sex • Is Your Pet Spayed/Neutered • Pet’s Size • Does Your Pet Have a Microchip • Pet’s Color • Address/Street Where Pet Was Lost • Pet’s Breed(s) • Your Contact Information • Pet’s Personality

Indoor cats are often found hiding very close to home but may not come to your calls, so be sure to check under porches, in bushes and in any hiding spots nearby.

TELL EVERYONE Print and post flyers in the area where your pet became lost, as well as at local pet stores, veterinary offices and businesses. Pet FBI has a free flyer template online that’s easy and quick. Share photos with info about your lost pet and how to contact you on social media. Social media is a quick way to let a lot of people know to be looking for your pet. Be sure your lost pet post is public so that people can help share it. Post it to your personal page and to community pages such as Lost and Found Pets of Athens, GA. Post periodically to remind people that you’re still searching for your pet. If your pet is microchipped, tell the microchip company your pet is missing.

DON'T GIVE UP! Losing a pet can be an emotional event, but don’t give up! Keep looking for your pet in the area where they were lost, and keep checking with animal control and posting on social media. Many pets are reunited after weeks, months or even years. Read more at www.ClassicCityPawPrint.com. Athens-Clarke Animal Control: 706-613-3540 Oconee Animal Control: 706-769-3956

BE AWare Be aware of potential pet-recovery scams. If someone contacts you to say they have your pet or that the pet you’ve found belongs to them, ask them to describe the animal in detail including any identifying characteristics. Consider meeting in a public space to retrieve or reunite the pet. If someone asks you to transfer them reward money before meeting you with your pet, it is likely a pet-recovery scam that you should be wary of and should report to the police. Madison Animal Control: 706-795-5589 Walton Animal Control: 770-267-1322

PAGE 28 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

Barrow Animal Control: 770-307-3012 Elbert Animal Control: 706-283-5054


Always assume that someone is looking for the found pet. Do what you can to reunite the pet with its owner, and file a found pet report with animal control, even if you want to try to find the owner before taking them to an animal control facility.

File a report with Animal Control File a found pet report with the closest animal control agency and with any other agencies within a 60-mile radius. You should also take them to animal control for a “stray hold” so the owner has a better chance of reuniting with them if you cannot find the owner in steps 3-4.

SAFETY FIRST Always put your own safety first! Lost pets may be scared, so approach the animal cautiously—do not attempt to retrieve any animal displaying aggressive behavior. If you are unable to retrieve the animal or don’t feel comfortable doing so, call the nearest animal control agency.

Some of the info animal control will ask you: • Pet’s Name • Pet’s Sex • Pet’s Size • Pet’s Color • Pet’s Breed(s)

• Pet’s Personality • Is the Pet is Wearing a Collar • Does the Pet Have a Microchip • Address/Street Where Pet Was Lost • Your Contact Information

TRY TO FIND ITS OWNER Does the animal have a collar with ID tags and/or a microchip? If the pet has a collar with ID tags, that’s the quickest way to get in touch with the owner. If there is no collar with ID tags, take them to a local veterinary office or animal shelter to get the pet scanned for a microchip—this is a free service. If the animal has a microchip, they can help you look up the number to contact the owner.

Share online Share posts with information about the found pet on social media. Social media is a quick way to let a lot of people know that you are looking for the pet’s owner. Be sure your found pet post is public so that people can help share it. Read more at www.ClassicCityPawPrint.com. Athens-Clarke Animal Control: 706-613-3540 Oconee Animal Control: 706-769-3956

Print and post flyers in the area where the pet was found, as well as at local pet stores, veterinary offices or businesses nearby. Pet FBI has a free flyer template online that you can use that’s easy and quick. We suggest not including a photo or identifying features of the pet on flyers or ads to prevent people who are not the owners from claiming the pet.

If you can't find the owner right away You may not be able to find the owner right away, and that’s normal—these things can take time. But we also know that not everyone has the ability to keep a lost animal until the owner is found. In addition to filing a found pet report with animal control, you can take the pet there and they will hold the animal for at least five days on a “stray hold.” This is sometimes the best or only option for some people. However, if the shelter is full, you may want to consider keeping the pet in your home or finding a trusted friend to keep them so that it doesn’t jeopardize any of the animals in the full shelter. Madison Animal Control: 706-795-5589 Walton Animal Control: 770-267-1322

Barrow Animal Control: 770-307-3012 Elbert Animal Control: 706-283-5054

MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 29


This pup needs its bone—help it find the way with this fun maze designed by Ashley Clarke! Share a photo of your finished work on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter using #ClassicCityPawPrint.

PAGE 30 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


WAGGIN’ TAILS DOG BOARDING & DOGGIE DAYCARE

OVERNIGHT STAY: $25 Locally-owned & operated with DOGGIE DAYCARE: $10 plenty of space for your pup to run. HOUSE VISIT: $15 Ear scratches, belly rubs & lots of one-on-one attention included in our prices!

706-340-1644 www.WagginTailsBogart.com www.Facebook.com/WagginTailsBogart MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 31


• Doggie Day Care • Dog Overnights • Kitty City • Grooming

• Self-service Doggie Spa • Pet Boutique • Adoptions

Watch our webcams online!

Pawtropolis Eastside 670 Olympic Drive Athens, GA 30601 706-850-8744 Pawtropolis Westside 130 Whitetail Way Bogart, GA 30622 706-227-7887 www.Pawtropolis.com

Stop in any time for a tour... We love showing people around!

June 2017 Issue  

Classic City Paw Print is a free magazine in the Athens, GA area promoting pet adoption, responsible pet ownership and compassion for all an...

June 2017 Issue  

Classic City Paw Print is a free magazine in the Athens, GA area promoting pet adoption, responsible pet ownership and compassion for all an...

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