July 2017 Issue

Page 1

JULY 2017

a free magazine

adoptable dogs & cats World snake day DIY enrichment activity the simple things acupuncture for pets AWARE Wildlife Center will eskridge adding a human to the pack commission meeting update animals in translation wrecking barn pups chow down on collard greens


$10 OFF (706) 543-3878 PAGE 2 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


IN THIS ISSUE:

Classic City Paw Print is a free magazine promoting pet adoption, responsible pet ownership and compassion for all animals.

ISSUE 3, JULY 2017 Editor and Publisher: Amanda Newsom Editorial Intern: Morgan Solomon Contributors: Megan Hong Chris Huskey Kaley Lefevre Amelie McKay Lisa Milot Matt Moore Caitlin O’Donnell Chuck Ramsey Maggie See Taylor Solomon William Wise Classic City Paw Print is distributed at the first of each month in Athens, GA and surrounding areas. Advertising and content deadlines are the 15th of each month. If you would like to submit an article, purchase advertisements or provide feedback, please email us.

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In MOST Issues Product Review: DIY Dog Enrichment Activity....................................... 5 Organization Spotlight: AWARE Wildlife Center..................................... 6 Dear Tabby.............................................................................................. 9 Artist Spotlight: Will Eskridge................................................................. 11 Wild Things: World Snake Day............................................................... 12 A Treat a Day Keeps the Vet Away: Acupuncture for Pets..................... 14 Pet Spotlight: Wrecking Barn Pups, Amos & Francis.............................. 23 Chow Down: Chuck Ramsey, Collard Greens......................................... 24 Book Review: Animals in Translation, Temple Grandin.......................... 25 Have Some Fun...................................................................................... 30 Adoptables Walton County Animal Control ............................................................. 16 Athens-Clarke County Animal Control.................................................... 17 Oconee Regional Humane Society.......................................................... 18 Oconee County Animal Services............................................................ 19 Athens Area Humane Society ................................................................ 20 Cat Zip Alliance....................................................................................... 21 Circle of Friends Animal Society.............................................................. 22 Magi-Cat Adoption Network.................................................................. 29 Featured this month The Simple Things................................................................................... 4 Commission Meeting Update................................................................ 9 Clementine’s Second Chance.................................................................. 13 Adding a Human to the Pack.................................................................. 27

ON THE COVER: Dash

3-year-old male; ledger #47018 Dash is a happy, affectionate boy who has been searching for his forever home. He loves a good game of fetch, then sitting for treats and pets. Dash will show you how much he loves you with his big smile! As one of the volunteers said, “I hope someone discovers what a super dog Dash is and gives him the home he longs for and deserves.” If you or someone you know is interested in meeting Dash, please contact Athens-Clarke County Animal Control at 706-613-3540.

BY THE NUMBERS

Athens-Clarke County Animal Control Year-to-date as of May 31, 2017 Dogs Adopted: 112 Dogs Reclaimed: 120 Adoptable Dogs Euthanized: 4

Cats Adopted: 61 Cats Reclaimed: 4 Adoptable Cats Euthanized: 0

MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 3


The Simple things I’m a good pet owner. I know about all those things that good pet owners do: spay and neuter, heartworm preventative, socialization, no chaining, annual vet visits, current vaccinations. Simple. With a sense of pride, I look down at my dog lying nearby and see what is hanging on his collar: nothing! During a recent review of our shelter at the Walton County Animal Control, an evaluator noted that it is often the common, simple things that we overlook. The things we all know to do are often the things we neglect, because “everybody knows that.” We think we are in compliance through knowledge but may actually fail to implement it. Likewise, as a pet owner, we can overlook the simple things… simple things that can have huge ramifications when neglected. Simple things that can mean life or death for a beloved animal. One of those simple things is an identification or rabies tag. As good pet owners, we know the importance of an ID tag in reuniting an owner with a lost pet. But look at your dog right now. Does she have a tag on her collar? We all know our dog or cat should have on a tag, but does he? A study published in Preventative Veterinary Medicine revealed that only 33 percent of owners keep ID tags on their pets. “But he’s an indoor dog.” Accidents happen: doors are left open; squirrels run by; kids drop a leash; thunderstorms pop up and random fireworks go off; the pest control guy comes in and forgets to shut the door behind him. Not to mention natural disasters, house fires or other unforeseen circumstances. Even if you have a perfectly-trained dog who is always walked on a leash, it is possible to end up losing your dog. I want you to consider another viewpoint on this issue. Having a tag on your dog or cat can be an issue of life or death in another capacity. A simple tag on your dog may save the life of a shelter dog. How so? As the director of an open-intake shelter, I have to come in each morning and assess the available room. There must be some kennel space for the day’s possible intake. The officers working after-hours and weekend emergencies must have a kennel or two if needed. Unfortunately, there are times when we reach capacity PAGE 4 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

Photo: William Wise

William Wise, Walton County Animal Control Director

and some animals must be euthanized. Each animal that comes into the shelter puts a strain on space, and sometimes tough decisions must be made. So how does your dog’s tag come into play? Recently, a dog named Ginny came into the shelter on a day when we were at full capacity. Her intake prompted one of those “tough decisions,” and a couple of dogs were put down. A few hours later Ginny’s owner came and claimed her. At the time of intake, we had no idea who owned her, and no crystal ball to know she’d be claimed so quickly. Had she had on that simple tag, she could have been re-connected with her owners even faster, and two dogs could have possibly been spared another day. So tagging your pet may not just save the life of your animal, it could also spare the life of a shelter animal waiting on a home. Don’t neglect the simple things.


Product Review DIY Dog Enrichment Activity Caitlin O’Donnell The average dog is about as smart as a 2-year-old child. Humans bred these brilliant creatures to hunt, assist the blind and herd sheep, among other things. Before humans bred them for specific jobs, they were wolves who spent 60 percent of their waking hours hunting for food. Dogs are biologically wired to work and usually have the energy to do so. Unfortunately, most modern dogs spend most of their time indoors not getting enough exercise for their minds and bodies. This pent-up energy can lead to destructive behavior, excessive barking and general decreased quality of life. Ensuring your dog gets enough stimulation can be difficult, whether it’s your busy schedule or concerns about heat exhaustion that stand in the way. That’s where enrichment puzzles come in. Enrichment puzzles are an excellent way of exercising your pet’s mind and body indoors without much effort on your part. Just fill the puzzle up with something yummy, and your dog is ready for a workout. Enrichment puzzles can be used to give your pet treats or their regular meals, depending on you and your dog’s preference. They are recommended for healthy, energetic dogs with no eating problems. Although enrichment puzzles are primarily created for dogs, cats may also enjoy and benefit from the extra stimulation. Store-bought enrichment puzzles can be expensive, but there are plenty of DIY puzzles you can make with things you already have in your home. The following is a simple DIY to get you started. It will require your dog to use their sense of smell to identify which ball has a treat in it. Then, your dog will have to use its smarts to get the

treat out of the ball.

MATERIALS:

• six-pack of practice softballs (be sure they are the softball-sized, as smaller sizes may pose a choking hazard) • old t-shirt • training treats or pieces of dry dog food • scissors • ruler or tape measure • an excitable dog • shoe box (optional)

BUILDING INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Cut the t-shirt along the seam on both sides until you have two even halves. 2. Cut the tags and sleeves off the t-shirt. Discard them. 3. Cut the remaining fabric into one-inch wide strips. You will need at least 24 strips. If you have a larger t-shirt, you may need to cut the strips in half. 4. Stuff two fabric strips into each ball. 5. Put a few treats in three of the balls. 6. Stuff two more fabric strips into each ball, leaving enough room for the treats to fall out when the ball is played with. If you have extra strips, you can keep them to add if the game gets too easy for your dog. 7. Arrange all six balls on the floor where your dog can reach them. If desired, display the balls in a shoe box for an added challenge.

MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 5


Organization spotlight Atlanta Wild Animal Rescue Effort (AWARE) Wildlife Center

PAGE 6 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

Photo: AWARE Wildlife Center

Founded in 1999 by Michael Ellis, Atlanta Wild Animal Rescue Effort (AWARE) Wildlife Center is one of the few wildlife rehabilitation centers in Georgia. Their mission is to “rehabilitate injured and orphaned wildlife and to educate the public on how to peacefully coexist with our wild neighbors,” and they help upwards of 2,000 animals each year, which is pretty impressive. AWARE accepts any wild animal in need of help—such as owls, songbirds, turtles, snakes, deer, possums and bobcats— as long as they have the capacity to do so. If they’re unable to take an animal in, they can provide references to other organizations that may be able to help. Recently, the center received a duck that had a four-pronged fish hook that had punctured through its lower bill and tongue. Under anesthesia, they were able to cut and remove the hook, and then they administered antibiotics and monitored the duck until it was able to eat and drink. Once its tongue was fully healed, AWARE released it back to the pond where it was found. Like this lucky duck, AWARE releases every animal that recovers in their care back to the wild. Many local shelters get calls asking about wildlife they’ve found and what to do to help them, so we asked Scott Lange, Executive Director of AWARE Wildlife Center, about some of the tops questions they get. He said they get tons of calls from people who find fledgling birds on the ground, but this is actually part of their natural life cycle where they need a few days on the ground to learn how to fly. They also get calls throughout the year from people who see animals like coyotes, foxes or raccoons in their yards. Lange says it’s important to remember that these animals pose no threat to you. “They only want food and safety, and people offer neither. Next, know that trapping or killing these animals—in addition to being cruel—is counterproductive, as it simply opens up territory for others of the species, spurring them to overbreed to take advantage. In short, removing these animals can leave you with more than when you started.” One of the biggest takeaways from AWARE is that unless you can tell an animal is in distress or injured, the best thing to do is leave them be. They are wild animals

Photo: AWARE Wildlife Center

Amanda Newsom

and being in nature is what they do best! Sometimes attempts to help wildlife inadvertently lead to doing more harm than good. If you want to help the wild animals at AWARE Wildlife Center, you can of course donate online at awarewildlife. org, as the organization relies on individual donations to purchase items like food and medical supplies. You may also consider volunteering—it’s a bit of a trek from the Athens area to their facility in Lithonia, but AWARE has volunteers who drive up to three hours for their weekly shift, so it sounds like it is worth the trip!


wildLife tips If you find an animal that truly needs your help: • Always put your safety first, and be careful! • After safely retrieving a hurt animal, confine them to a box or portable carrier, and put it in a dark, quiet room. • Many injured animals need extra warmth, so you can put a heating pad under part of the carrier so they have both a warm and cool space to help regulate their body temperature. • Contact a wildlife rehabilitation center such as AWARE to ask for advice. • Don’t give food or water to an injured animal until you know what the next step will be for treatment according to professional advice. Try to eliminate food sources outdoors, like accessible trash cans and pet food, to deter wildlife from coming onto your property if you perceive them as a nuisance. Young wild animals are better off being left alone—their parents know the best way to care for them. When you hang around the babies wondering what to do next, you’re deterring the parent from returning to the area, which may prevent them for caring for their young. Unless you see a specific injury or witness something happening to the parent, leave them be and do not attempt to move them. Leave it to the professionals. Rehabilitating wild animals should only be done by licensed organizations who have the knowledge and capabilities to give them the best chance at recovery.

Joe Polaneczky

“Let my dad help you find the perfect fit.” —Jazzy and Myla Polaneczky

JoeP@KW.com 706-224-7451

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Dear Tabby...

“My dog circles around over and over before laying down on her bed... what’s that all about?” —Dizzy Dog Bed Dear Dizzy Dog Bed,

walking around in circles. It is possible that the circling was a safety measure, too. Moving the grass around would startle any snakes or large bugs who may be hiding in the grass. It also could be seen as marking their territory. Other dogs passing by would see the bed and know that this space is occupied. The only time to worry is if the spinning seems excessive, as this may be a sign of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Your vet can help you resolve the stress that could be causing this disorder. So next time you see your dog spinning around before their nap, just know that they are continuing a tradition that is centuries old.

Most dog owners have watched in amusement as their canine companion spins and spins and spins before eventually laying down and wondered, “What was the point of that?” It is believed that this curious behavior goes back to the caveman days when dogs literally had to make their own beds. Even though dogs are now domesticated, their ancestral blood still runs through their veins, which can lead to them retaining some survival instincts passed down through generations. Have a burning question for Tabby? Before dogs had fancy Martha Stewart doggy beds, Email her at classiccitypawprint@gmail.com—please they had to make their own beds out of grass. They did include “Dear Tabby” in the subject line. their best to make it comfortable by—yes, you guessed—

Tabby

Commission Meeting Update At their next regular session meeting, AthensClarke County commissioners will be taking public comments on proposed changes to the Athens-Clarke County Animal Control ordinances. The changes include requiring (1) that all animals other than feral cats be microchipped upon reclaim from the shelter; (2) the spay/neuter of dogs and cats the second time they are reclaimed from the shelter; and (3) the spay/ neuter and better management of “dangerous dogs.” A draft of the ordinances should be available on the county website the Friday prior to the meeting (June 30, 2017) at www.athensclarkecounty.com/176/MayorCommission-Meetings. Come out to show your support by attending the Athens-Clarke County Mayor and Commission meeting on Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 6:00pm in the Commission Chamber on the second floor of City Hall at 301 College Avenue, Athens, GA 30601.

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Artist Spotlight Q&A with Will Eskridge: Animal Artist Maggie See

First, let’s hear about your pet(s), either current or past! Right now we have two dogs and two cats (rescues, of course). Lola and Norm Peterson are the dogs, and Alfred Hitchcock and Loretta are the cats. We’ve had a total of nine rescue animals at one time, and even a rescue Ball Python named Sue. The late but greats: Rushmore, Leeloo, Mr. Furley, Sophia, Peggy, Hank and my beloved childhood cat Kitty Picker have all entered my life and taught me many lessons. The child of both a veterinarian and an artist and then taking on a career of graphic design, were there any other career paths that you considered? Was there almost an Astronaut Eskridge? Let’s see… veterinarian, geologist, forensic sketch artist, wolf biologist and archeologist to name a few. Most of these were fleeting ideas when I was much younger, but I tried to teach myself some things and researched to dig deeper. I love anything to do with outer space, except the height. I have acrophobia and have developed a fear of flying, so Astronaut Eskridge was never considered. I also have always loved the idea of running a drive-in theatre.

Artwork: Will Eskridge

Will Eskridge is about as “Athens” as it gets. He’s an animal-loving musician with a passion for the color teal. Will’s current work features sharp geometric shapes with brilliantly-colored, impressionistic animals. From driving an “art car” and having dropped art for Free Art Friday to drawing inspiration from some of our best local animal hangouts, it was no question who I wanted to write about for this artist spotlight. Look out for his upcoming plans, including some studio night hangouts and a pretty awesome coloring book!

of love planting perennials, pollinators and other animalfriendly plants that attract butterflies, bees, birds, etc. to provide a nice little ecosystem right in our backyard. I really enjoy the simple things like hearing the owls and woodpeckers in my backyard. I love watching the hummingbirds come to our salvia bush in the mornings or our resident toad and skink that come around after a good rain. I made a bat house a few weeks ago, and hopefully we will get some bats to add to our mini-world. I love that Athens is a town where all this can happen.

You did a series of combination animals, like the Rambat and the Octobear. Would you let us in on a secret and share some of the discarded or rejected ideas that never How has living in Athens made an impact on your career got painted? If not, do you have any plans to do more? as an artist? Are there any particular activities around I am so glad you asked this! Just recently, I have town that inspire you? decided to do more but as line drawings to be turned into Oh, where do I start?! This town is full of energy a coloring book for kids and adults. I am in the planning/ and inspiration. I have been living here for a little over sketching stages but hope to have something definitive 10 years, and I keep discovering wonderful nooks and around the beginning of September. As far as throwaways crannies. My favorite place is probably Sandy Creek Nature for the original Creature Feature series, there was just Center. That or Bear Hollow Zoo. Sandy Creek has the one: Curse of the Coyotelk (coyote/elk hybrid). I mocked it education center and beautiful hiking trails. Bear Hollow is up but never painted it. At the time it seemed too obvious a sanctuary for wildlife, which is in itself dear to my heart and wasn’t ridiculous or weird enough for me. and great for animal inspiration and reference photos. Other favorites include Sweet Olive Farm, the State When painting animals, which features/characteristics Botanical Gardens and the Greenway. are the most difficult? Which ones are the most fun? My wife has an amazing love for plants, and she has Ah! Most difficult would have to be the ears or feet. done wonders to our home and yard. She has put a lot Patterned coats, like spots, stripes, etc. are extremely MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 11


tough. Because their markings are meant to be camouflage, it can be tough to discern highlights, midtones and shadows. The most fun are the eyes. They really are the windows to the soul. I also love fur, especially grizzly bear fur. You can really get the depth going because of the highlighted tips.

or by conservation status. I think placement would be somewhere at Bear Hollow, Sandy Creek Nature Center or, for more impact, somewhere downtown like one of the parking garages so that people who might not be aware or normally pulled toward the natural world might stop and think.

If you were to design a mural for any space in Athens, where would you choose and what would you do with it? A depiction of endangered Georgian species’ portraits on a sea-foam green background. The portraits would be composed one after the other in a line horizontally and either organized by size from largest to smallest

Color and animals are constant themes in your work. What is your favorite color? What is your favorite animal? Tough question! I love color and animals so much. I’ll have to go with grizzly bear (or little brown bat) for animal and seafoam green (or hot pink) for color.

WilD Things

World Snake Day is July 16! Matt Moore

“What good are snakes?” Snakes are essential components of functioning ecosystems. They eat other animals, and other animals eat them. If snakes were removed from the ecosystems that they evolved to inhabit, it would be tantamount to removing a huge supporting structural block from a giant Jenga puzzle. Removing an essential part from a complex system inevitably puts the entire remaining structure in jeopardy of collapsing. In addition to the critical ecosystem role that they fill, snakes directly help people in many ways. They consume huge quantities of disease-carrying pests. These pests include rodents and the disease-carrying parasites that are on the rodents (especially ticks!). There are even some snakes that specialize in ridding your gardens from slugs and snails. “Are snakes dangerous?” A relatively small number of snake species native to Georgia—only six species are venomous out of a total of 46—are potentially dangerous, but only if they feel their life is threatened. It is important to realize that no one ever gets bitten while consciously leaving a snake alone; however, lots of people get bitten while NOT leaving them alone (i.e. trying to kill or handle them). Accidental bites do sometimes occur inadvertently (i.e. stepping on or placing a hand on an unseen snake), but these accidents PAGE 12 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

Photo: Matt Moore

Happy World Snake Day! If there ever was a wild animal that was a candidate for needing advocates, undoubtedly the snake is that animal. Below are a some common questions and beliefs that I have heard from people regarding snakes native to the southeastern United States:

are statistically rare. “Poisonous snake bites can kill you, but non-poisonous snake bites will just make you sick.” Bites from nonvenomous snakes native to the United States are not capable of causing injuries of any medical significance to people or pets. I have been bitten at least a few hundred times over the last 20 years by native nonvenomous snakes of a variety of species—every one of those bites was due to me catching or handling them— and have never gotten sick from a bite from any of them. Nonvenomous snakes here in the Southeast are only capable of bites that are of less than a brier scratch in significance. “But snakes chase people, especially those aggressive ‘water moccasins!’” A snake has nothing to gain by chasing something much larger than itself that it perceives to be a predator (i.e. humans). What does occasionally happen though is attempted escape behavior, which is mistakenly perceived


by people as chasing. A snake that feels threatened by SNAKE TRIVIA: will often attempt to flee in the direction where they feel • Although there are six total species of native there is a safe refuge. If a person startles a snake and they venomous snakes that can potentially be found in happen to be in between it and the hole in the ground Georgia, there is only a relatively small area within the or the pile of sticks that it wants to escape into, then the Coastal Plain where all six of those species co-occur. snake may crawl towards the person in order to get to that The majority of Georgia’s counties only have three or refuge. I have actually had snakes crawl right over my feet four species of venomous snakes. on numerous occasions in their attempts to reach safe • It is illegal to kill a nonvenomous snake in the state of refuge. The problem is that very few people wait around Georgia. Misidentification of a harmless snake is not an to see why the snake is coming towards them. They too excuse. Although it is currently legal to kill venomous often just kill the snake that was crawling in their direction snakes in the state of Georgia, it is very seldom and tell people they were “chased by an aggressive snake.” necessary and doing so puts the person at great risk of being bitten. “What should I do if I find a snake in my yard?” • A triangular-shaped head, thick body and/or short Leave it alone, and let it go about its business of tail are not traits exclusive to venomous snakes and helping keep our environment healthy. If you have snakes therefore are not reliable ways of differentiating in your yard, it is a sign that you are in an area that is still between venomous and nonvenomous species. A capable of supporting wildlife. This is a good thing! Also, quality field guide is a much better way of learning to it is a good idea to learn what the few venomous species properly identify snakes. that are native to your area look like. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources World Snake Day is a perfect day to start looking at has two great online field guides called Is it a Water snakes in a more positive light. Let’s all give snakes the Moccasin? and A Guide to Venomous Snakes of Georgia at respect and appreciation that they deserve, not just on georgiawildlife.com/GeorgiaSnakes. World Snake Day, but rather on every day of the year. Please remember: the only good snake is a live snake!

Clementine's Second Chance I’ve been in rescue for years, and I still am never prepared for the urgent pleas we receive at Circle of Friends Animal Society. A volunteer at Barrow County Animal Control (BCAC) recently messaged me: “Possibly hit by car. Having issues with its back end. Any possibilities?” She proceeded with an adorable picture of a tiny dilute calico kitten. I, of course, said yes. At first, BCAC believed she couldn’t use either of her back legs, but when we got her to Bates Animal Hospital in Watkinsville, we noticed that it was just her back left leg. Dr. Bates did x-rays, and our little calico kitten Clementine had no breaks or fractures. The bizarre part is that she has no deep feeling at all in her back left leg—which would likely indicate a spinal cord injury of some kind, but her right back left was functioning fine. Dr. Bates suggested waiting to see if we could get any function back in her leg (and waiting until she is bigger for amputation if that is the route we need to take). He also said to reach out to Dr. Dodd at Animal Wellness Center of Athens for acupuncture and laser treatment. Dr. Dodd has started acupuncture and laser treatment for Clementine in the hopes that she will regain some mobility in her leg.

Photo: Jessica Boston

Megan Hong

Dr. Dodd said that she has noticed more reaction to the acupuncture recently compared to the first few rounds, so there is some progression! Although Clementine has obvious trauma to her leg, she doesn’t let it slow her down. She climbs, plays and wrestles like any other happy kitten. She scales the cat tree and even climbs into our bed at night to sleep! Clementine is available for pre-adoption through Circle of Friends Animal Society and should be ready to go home in four to six weeks. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 13


A Treat a Day Keeps the Vet Away Acupuncture for Pets Acupuncture, a centuries-old traditional Chinese practice, has recently made strides in popularity amongst Athens veterinarians. This natural approach to healing has resulted in notable success, specifically among patients who were not benefitting from Western medicine. Dr. Heather Fields, a veterinarian at Sycamore Veterinary Services, said one of the most amazing events she’s participated in involved a paralyzed dog who was not responding to any Western medicine she prescribed. With the use of acupuncture, however, the dog walked again. Fields said she chooses to incorporate acupuncture with herbs and Western medicine simultaneously, considering that all the drugs will work together in different ways to help the patient find relief. “We treat internal medicine problems, skin problems, anxiety and more,” Dr. Fields said. “You name it, and there’s a treatment regimen with acupuncture to treat it.” Acupuncture is able to address these various problems by stimulating different channels in the patient’s body. This stimulation releases anti-inflammatory mediators and opioid receptors and also stimulates blood flow and healing. The body is essentially finding ways to heal itself, resulting in less side effects, aside from the initial discomfort of the acupuncture process. Because of the side effects that accompany Western medicine, Dr. Fields said she has some pet owners who request natural medicine and practices before Western drugs. She prefers to try a natural approach with her patients before introducing them to other drugs. Dr. Angela Dodd of Animal Wellness Center of Athens said she has also seen extraordinary results from the use of acupuncture, even with her own pets. Though she is still a traditional veterinarian, she chose to take a course with the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society to learn about the many other ways she could treat her patients. “[Traditional Chinese medicine] is a whole other mindset; it’s a whole other way of looking at a patient; it’s another way of thinking about a patient’s problems; and it’s another way of treating that patient,” Dr. Dodd said. Because of her understanding of Chinese medicine, Dr. Dodd said she has also found it to be beneficial to PAGE 14 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

Photo: Jessica Boston

by Kaley Lefevre

incorporate both natural practices and Western medicine simultaneously. Dr. Dodd, like Dr. Fields, admits that the specifics of the actual acupuncture process are complicated. By sticking needles into the area causing problems for the patient, she is increasing blood flow and nutrients to that area, pulling waste products away and strengthening the organs that are causing issues. “I’ve seen success time and time again,” Dr. Dodd said. “[Practicing Chinese medicine] adds another dimension to our practice that has proven to help our patients.” Simply because of the lack of side effects, Dr. Dodd encourages pet owners to consider natural medicines and herbs before resorting to traditional Western medicine and surgeries. “I like to use everything I have to treat animals because [they are] so important to me and to so many other people,” Dr. Dodd said. “These animals are members of the family and deserve to be comfortable.” Read more about how acupuncture helped Clementine, a kitten up for adoption through Circle of Friends Animal Society (pictured above), on page 13.


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Walton County Animal Control 1411 S. Madison Ave., Monroe, GA 30655 • Open Mon-Fri 2pm-4:30pm, select Sat 10am-1:45pm

Hailey

June

Lane

ledger #20171022

ledger #20171022

ledger #20170995

SINGLE SINCE: June 11, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: June 9, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: June 7, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: medium-sized sweetie

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: gently, calm girl

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: ready to go!

I ENJOY... runnin’ with kids!

I ENJOY... a good scratch behind the ears.

I ENJOY... taking long walks.

2-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

4-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

4-year-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

Dusty

Pingo & Raul Baxter 7-week-old males

4-year-old male

ledger #20171025

ledger #20170991 & 20170990

ledger #20171027

SINGLE SINCE: June 12, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: June 6, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: June 12, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: quiet young boy

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE US: cuddly fur balls

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: all nub waggin’

I ENJOY... a nice blanket.

WE ENJOY... bird-watching and things that jingle.

I ENJOY... just about everything.

7-month-old male

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the Walton County Animal Control at 770-267-1322 or visit waltonpets.net to view adoptable profiles. PAGE 16 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Athens–Clarke County Animal Control 123 Buddy Christian Way, Athens, GA 30605 • Open Daily 11am-4pm except Wednesdays

Reed

Van Halen

Della

ledger #46618

ledger #47054

ledger #47069

SINGLE SINCE: February 24, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 15, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 19, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: sweet • energetic • playful

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: smart • friendly • energetic

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • loving • friendly

I ENJOY... playing with other pups!

I ENJOY... getting treats and learning new tricks!

I ENJOY... lots of exercise and time with people.

8-to-12-month-old male

CATS

DOGS

6-to-12-month-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

2-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

bertha

Fog Hat

Basil & Sage

ledger #46889

ledger #46793

ledger #46977 & 46975

SINGLE SINCE: April 21, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: April 3, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 25, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: beautiful • affectionate • calm

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: loving • energetic • easy-going

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE US: playful • curious • affectionate

I ENJOY... taking naps in the sunshine.

I ENJOY... toys and anything with my people.

WE ENJOY... playing and checking out new things.

CATS

DOGS

6-week-old females

1-year-old male

4-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the AthensClarke County Animal Control at 706-613-3540 or visit athenspets.net to view adoptable profiles. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 17


Oconee regional humane Society 1020 Park Avenue, Suite 101, Greensboro, GA 30642 • Mon-Sat 11am-3pm or by Appointment

Pumpkin

Ty

Spot

SINGLE SINCE: March 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: March 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: Janaury 1, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: sweet and loving

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: sweet and loving

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: a great personality

I ENJOY... getting lots of attention.

I ENJOY... hanging with my BFF, Pumpkin.

I ENJOY... getting brushed and petted.

8-year-old male

CATS

DOGS

8-year-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

2-year-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

Roxy

Star

Wayne

SINGLE SINCE: May 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: April 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 1, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: loving best friend

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful and loving

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: sweet and cuddly

I ENJOY... being in the great outdoors.

I ENJOY... going on walks and playing.

I ENJOY... playing with other dogs.

4-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

3-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

3-month-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the Oconee Regional Humane Society at 706-454-1508, ORHSpets@gmail.com or visit www.orhspets.org. PAGE 18 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


oconee County Animal Services 1171 Branch Road, Bishop, GA 30621 • Open Mon/Tu/Th/Fri 12pm-5pm, Sat 11am-1pm

Shadow

Lucy

Mary

SINGLE SINCE: unknown

SINGLE SINCE: unknown

SINGLE SINCE: unknown

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: unique, handsome guy

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: loving senior lady

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: very sweet girl

I ENJOY... looking for a home to love me.

I ENJOY... spending time with my friend Weezy.

I ENJOY... learning about indoor life.

9-to-month-old male

CATS

DOGS

10-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

4-year-old female

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

ginny

Woo

sleepy

SINGLE SINCE: February 2017

SINGLE SINCE: unknown

SINGLE SINCE: unknown

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: a love bug

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: looking for love

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: a little shy

I ENJOY... pleasing people and getting treats.

I ENJOY... not being in the shelter.

I ENJOY... working to come out of my shell.

2-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

8-year-old male

KIDS

CATS

7-year-old male

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the Oconee County Animal Services at 706-769-3956 or visit oconeecounty.com/215/Animal-Control. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 19


Athens area humane society 1781 Mars Hill Road, Watkinsville, GA 30677 • Open Mon-Sat 12pm-6pm, Sun 12pm-4pm

Tina

gloria

buba

SINGLE SINCE: May 18, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 30, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 30, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • sweet • cuddly

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: friendly • cuddly • playful

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • goofy • loving

I ENJOY... playing outside and with other dogs!

I ENJOY... dogs, toys and running.

I ENJOY... running, other dogs and toys.

4-month-old female

CATS

DOGS

9-month-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

7-month-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

mrs. darling douglas 1-year-old female

2-year-old male

ocean

SINGLE SINCE: March 24, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: April 19, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: April 15, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • friendly • curious

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: sweet • playful • cross-eyed

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: curious • friendly • cuddly

I ENJOY... getting head scratches and playing.

I ENJOY... I ENJOY... getting belly rubs and eating wet food. laying in cozy beds and getting treats.

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

1-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact the Athens Area Humane Society at 706-769-9155 or adopt@athenshumanesociety.org or visit athenshumanesociety.org. PAGE 20 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Cat Zip Alliance P.O. Box 902, Watkinsville, GA 30677 • Meet and Greets by Appointment in Athens

zoey

chai

strawberry

SINGLE SINCE: June 10, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: June 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: June 1, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: friendly • calm • beautiful

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: diamond in the rough

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: loving • out-going • soft

I ENJOY... getting head scratches and dinner.

I ENJOY... a calm environment.

I ENJOY... sunshine and bird-watching.

2-year-old female

CATS

DOGS

12-week-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

1-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

jet

juliet

leroy

SINGLE SINCE: June 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 10, 2016

SINGLE SINCE: May 15, 2016

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: playful • shy • silly

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: lap cat • silly • bossy

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: lap cat • dominant • FIV+

I ENJOY... chasing my tail and playing with toys.

I ENJOY... I ENJOY... laps, windows and being an only child. food, sunshine... and then more food.

12-week-old male

CATS

DOGS

3-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

3-year-old male

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact Cat Zip Alliance at feralcatcaregivers@yahoo.com, call 706-207-1013 or visit catzip.org. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 21


circle of friends animal society

P.O. Box 1235, Greensboro, GA 30642 • Meet and Greets by Appointment or at Adoption Events

Rayner

Maisey

Wynter

SINGLE SINCE: June 2, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 15, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: May 1, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: intelligent • gentle • trained

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: loving • playful • smart

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: adorable • sweet • playful

I ENJOY... long walks and hanging out with folks.

I ENJOY... playing and cuddling.

I ENJOY... sitting in anyone’s lap.

8-year-old male

CATS

9-month-old female

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

2-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

Harley

Spackle

Charlie

SINGLE SINCE: March 25, 2016

SINGLE SINCE: May 1, 2017

SINGLE SINCE: December 23, 2016

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: snuggly • chirpy • sweet

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: purr-machine • playful • coy

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: charming • playful • silly

I ENJOY... sunbathing and warm beds.

I ENJOY... playing with other kitties!

I ENJOY... wrestling with my kitty buddies.

CATS

DOGS

1-year-old male

3-month-old female

2-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact Circle of Friends Animal Society at info@cofas.org or visit cofas.org. PAGE 22 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Magi–Cat Adoption Network 1870 Hog Mountain Road, Watkinsville, GA 30677 • Meet and Greets by Appointment

apollo

bonnie

gloria

SINGLE SINCE: September 26, 2016

SINGLE SINCE: August 20, 2014

SINGLE SINCE: September 6, 2016

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: petite • talkative • intellectual

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: vivacious • playful • photogenic

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: fuzzy • petite • energetic

I ENJOY... getting belly rubs.

I ENJOY... high-energy play time.

I ENJOY... yogurt and play time.

11-month-old male

CATS

DOGS

3-year-old female

KIDS

CATS

1-year-old female

DOGS

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

kevin

kodiak

lucas

SINGLE SINCE: July 20, 2016

SINGLE SINCE: November 11, 2016

SINGLE SINCE: June 8, 2017

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: stunning • sweet • loving

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: really cool cat

3 WORDS THAT BEST DESCRIBE ME: big for my age

I ENJOY... sleeping under the covers.

I ENJOY... retrieving toys!

I ENJOY... laying on soft blankets.

1-year-old male

CATS

DOGS

10-month-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

10-week-old male

KIDS

CATS

DOGS

KIDS

If you or someone you know is interested in meeting any of these adoptable animals, please contact Magi-Cat Adoption Network at 706-769-4624 or visit magi-catrescue.org. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 23


Pet Spotlight

Wrecking Barn Pups: Amos & Francis One would think it impossible to work on a farm without thumbs, but Francis and Amos—the resident dogs at the Wrecking Barn Farm in Loganville, GA—are proof that you do not need opposable thumbs to get the job done. Wrecking Barn Farm was established in 2015 by the owners of the Wrecking Bar Brew Pub in Atlanta’s Little Five Points. The farm is owned by Bob Sandage and managing partner, Stevenson Rosslow. The farm works closely with Wrecking Bar, growing fresh organic produce that is used in countless dishes on the restaurant’s acclaimed menu. The farm’s produce is also used by other restaurants, a growing local CSA and local farmers’ markets. The farm covers 63 acres, of which seven are currently being used in cultivation. The owners plan to make it even more impressive by eventually building a brewery and barrel aging room and adding an event space to the farm. Amos, a sweet boy who greets anyone on the farm with a warm smile, was rescued in August 2014 by Rachel Hennon. He was found in South Atlanta by a friend of Hennon when he was around 10 weeks old. He is a terrier mix with a short black coat and white markings on his chest. Francis, who is hard to miss because of his perky ears and happy face, was rescued in 2010 by Shannon Wright. He was part of a litter born to a Blue Heeler and Australian Shepherd. Wright came across Francis’ litter and adopted him when he was just a small seven-week-old puppy. Both Hennon and Wright studied at Savannah College of Art and Design, but they never knew each other during that time. Each of them had their own journey in realizing that they wanted to work in agriculture. They worked at the same farm in Georgia but at different times. Their paths finally crossed when they both started working at Wrecking Barn Farm. Hennon began working on the farm as the manager in October 2015. This is also when Amos began working on the farm. Wright and Francis became a part of the crew in February 2016. Amos and Francis, while very cute and cuddly, are also extremely hard workers. They both help around the farm by doing various tasks like eating weeds and chasing deer and birds away from the produce. But it isn’t all hard work—there are plenty of treats involved. Amos will even steal cabbage and carrots from PAGE 24 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017

Photo: Morgan Solomon

Morgan Solomon

the bucket when nobody’s looking (or so he thinks) to treat himself, while Francis loves blueberries. Sometimes they get into trouble when they “accidentally” eat radishes, which, unlike weeds, they are not supposed to eat. You can support all the hard work these good boys put in by eating at Wrecking Bar Brewpub or joining the farm’s CSA, which is short for Community Supported Agriculture. If you decide to participate and choose to pick up from the farm, you might be able to meet Francis and Amos and let them know what you think of their tasty produce by giving them each a good ole belly rub.


Chow Down Collard Greens

Chuck Ramsey, Pulaski Heights BBQ INGREDIENTS:

• 1 pound trimmed collards (weighed after stems removed) • ¼ cup olive oil • 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced • 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced • 1 tsp chile flake • ¼ cup soy sauce • 1 tsp salt • ¼ cup cider vinegar • ¼ cup water

In a large pot over medium heat, heat the olive oil and sauté the onions and garlic until cooked down but not beginning to caramelize. Add the chile flake, soy sauce, water, vinegar and salt, and bring to a simmer. Add the collards to the pot, in batches if necessary, and simmer until wilted down but not overcooked.

Feeds 6

Photo: Chuck Ramsey

INSTRUCTIONS:

MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 25


PAGE 26 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Book review

Animals in Translation by Temple Grandin I first fell in love with Temple Grandin while studying psychology in college. I loved her advocacy for herself and others living with autism and respected her ability to talk publicly about her personal experiences. My appreciation for her grew when learning about her groundbreaking work in livestock handling, groundbreaking not only because she was one of the first to promote humane treatment of livestock but also because she was doing so in what at the time was a male-dominated industry. In Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior, Grandin argues that people with autism think the same way animals do and uses her distinguished career as an animal psychologist and her personal experiences living with autism to support her claim. I found this book not only informative (as both a student of psychology and as a pet owner) but an interesting and entertaining read. Though I studied psychology for four years, I have barely skimmed the surface of animal psychology and found Grandin’s thorough research and plainspoken language to make for the perfect introduction. This is not a dense textbook-esque writing, this is a captivating and enlightening read helpful to both livestock farmers and pet owners alike. One of my favorite things about Animals in Translation is the way Grandin explains and directs the everyday idiosyncrasies of animals in a way that puts you inside their head. As much as we love our pets, I feel comfortable saying we each have that thing we wish they would not do. Whether it slows down our day or we just find it a nuisance, there is always that thing. Our lab mix is hesitant to walk on our black and white checked kitchen floor. Every day it is a struggle to get her to come inside and walk the short distance across the checkerboard floor. After reading about Grandin’s work with cattle and changes in scenery that made them anxious while being herded from one area to the next, I was able to better understand how my dog was feeling and became more tolerant of what I found to be an annoying behavior. Whether you’re looking to get into animal psychology, to better understand the mind of your pet or jto ust have an interesting scientific read for the summer, Animals in Translation will not disappoint. Take a moment to get inside your furry friends’ head and discover Temple Grandin, the fascinating, empowering scientist I first fell in love with as an 18-year-old psych student.

Photo: Morgan Solomon

Taylor Solomon

MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 27


WAGGIN’ TAILS DOG BOARDING & DOGGIE DAYCARE OVERNIGHT STAY: $25 DOGGIE DAYCARE: $10 HOUSE VISIT: $15

As a veteran owned and operated business, we would like to thank all past and present service members by always offering a 20% discount to all current and former military members.

706-340-1644 WagginTailsBogart.com www.Facebook.com/WagginTailsBogart PAGE 28 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Adding a Human to the pack Bringing Baby Abigail Home to Five (then Six!) Pups As owners of six rescue dogs, my wife Catherine and I decided that perhaps we should try our hands at a tiny human. After all, they can’t be much more difficult than puppies right? Upon finding out we were pregnant, we instantly went into first-time parent mode. The nursery had to be perfect, the house had to be spotless and the puppies had to be prepared to accept their slightly less-furry sibling into the pack. Catherine swears that Jeter, our Jack Russell mix, knew she was pregnant the whole time. Jeter would lie on her belly and give extra sniffs and kisses. Dogs can detect cancers and other sicknesses, so I firmly believe they can recognize a tummy tumor! Abigail Elizabeth Huskey came into the world at 4:28pm on April 22, 2017. After a few days in the hospital, it was time for us to introduce Abigail to her siblings, protectors, playmates and friends. We heard that we should take a blanket from the hospital that Abigail used and introduce it to the puppies in order to get them used to her smell. Anyone who has ever experienced taking home their first kid knows that we were so frazzled that we were lucky to remember to bring the baby home with us! I guess you could say this was our first of many times where we decided to “just wing it.” Safety was obviously our top priority. As much as we love and trust our dogs to protect and love us, we have heard horror stories of dogs attacking newborns. We made sure that we did not leave the baby alone with the dogs, especially in the early weeks. We encouraged them to spend time with the baby, sniff and give kisses to let them feel at ease with their new pack member. Here we are at week seven, and they have never once shown anything but curiosity and gentleness to baby Abigail. As new parents and dog lovers, we had hopes and dreams of filling social media with pictures of our baby sleeping on a dog or of one of the them constantly by her side always protecting her. But this is real life, and our dogs already had five other siblings. They were very curious about this new screaming potato and curious as to why it did not want to sniff their butts. Early on Brooklyn, our Great Dane/Labrador mix, would run to her crib when she would start crying and stare intently. Was it a connection that these two shared? Would we finally have that adorable relationship where they would snuggle and be best friends?! Not even close. After a few weeks of this, Brooklyn became immune (annoyed?) to the crying and would not even lift an eyebrow at the sound.

Photo: Catherine Huskey

Chris Huskey

My wife and I foster through Oconee Regional Humane Society and took a two-month hiatus to get into some sort of a routine before taking on this responsibility once again. This past weekend we picked up our first foster in awhile, a 10-week-old sweetheart named Camry. Camry took an instant interest in Abigail and will even nap on her nursing pillow while we feed the baby. Honestly, the puppy has taken more interest in Abigail than her own fur siblings. Perhaps Camry feels more of a connection with Abigail because they are both just figuring out this great big world with their humans leading the way. Our best advice as new parents and crazy dog people is not to expect anything, and enjoy the little moments that melt your heart. Do not spend your time behind the lens of a camera trying to get the next viral video or “awww” inspiring picture. As Abigail gets bigger and able to interact more with the pups, we will certainly keep a close eye to ensure a curious tail pull or ear tug doesn’t result in a reaction by the dogs. We also have visions of her developing a more interactive relationship with them by playing more, helping to feed and bathe them, and maybe even painting their toenails bright pink. There is a very slim chance that any of those moments will make it to social media though, because we will be too busy loving our baby girl and six rescue dogs that all need our patient love and tender kindness to ensure that the nine of us stay happy and healthy. MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 29


Color in the sections with dots to reveal a hidden image! Designed by Amelie McKay.

PAGE 30 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • MAY 2017


Plus

Minus

Prices you love.

Long lines you hate.

At Pet Supplies Plus, there are no long lines and no winding aisles. Our shelves are stocked with just the right products, specifically chosen to help you get in, get out, and get home happy. + Carefully selected products for all your furry, scaly & feathery friends + Large variety of Made in the USA treats & toys + Join our pack (it’s free!) - Preferred Pet Club members get exclusive coupons and pricing, freebies, and a birthday gift for your pet

5 off

$

Any purchase $30 or more

Must be a Preferred Pet Club member. Sign up in store today. It’s easy. STORE COUPON. May be redeemed at Athens Pet Supplies Plus location only. Must be a Preferred Pet Club member. One coupon per household please. No cash value. No cash back. Not valid on the purchase of gift cards or prior purchases. May not be combined with any other offer. OFFER VALID THRU DECEMBER 31, 2017.

PLU #89364

Pet Supplies Plus Athens 191 Alps Rd, Suite 15 | 706.353.0650 | Open 7 days a week. Mon-Sat: 9am-9pm • Sun: 10am-7pm Independently owned and operated MAY 2017 • www.classiccitypawPRINT.com • PAGE 31


• Doggie Day Care • Dog Overnights • Kitty City • Grooming

• Self-service Doggie Spa • Pet Boutique • Adoptions

Watch our webcams online!

Pawtropolis Eastside 670 Olympic Drive Athens, GA 30601 706-850-8744 Pawtropolis Westside 130 Whitetail Way Bogart, GA 30622 706-227-7887 www.Pawtropolis.com

Stop in any time for a tour... We love showing people around!