Issuu on Google+

Cleveland State University College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

CLASS Advising Center Annual Academic Report 2012–2013

Visit us on Facebook at CSU CLASS Advising

Table of Contents Advising Center p 216.687.5040 | f 216.687.5164 class.advising@csuohio.edu www.csuohio.edu/class/advising/

Table of Contents

3

Advising Changes

4-5

Advising Updates & Current Caseloads

6

Advising Outreach

7

2012-13 CLASS Advising Center Usage Report 8-9 CLASS Advising Center Historical Usage Date 9-10

Advising Center Staff

Daily Walk-in Usage 2012-13

11

Rose Begalla, M.A., Academic Advisor

Additional Data

12

Jennifer Novy, M. Ed., Academic Advisor

CSU Student Guide - FLD/FLR

13

Michele Lieberth, M.S., M.Ed., Academic Advisor

CLASS Academic Standards Committee

14

Lacie Semenovich, M.A., Academic Advisor

CLASS Petition Actions and Outcomes

15

Stephanie Triplett, M.A., Academic Advisor

CLASS Probation and Dismissal Review

16

Michelle Knapik, Ed.S., Assistant Director,

University Petition Actions & Outcomes and Walk-in Tracking in Preparation for a New Semester Data

17

Undergraduate Programs, CLASS

Jeanatta Brown, B.A., CLASS Advising Center Administrative Secretary

Designer of annual report: Lesley Lang, Communications Coordinator, CLASS

CLASS Advising Center: On-line Survey Select respones from on-line survey

18-22 23 3

Advising Changes New CLASS Advisor The Advising Center is pleased to welcome Jennifer Novy who joined our team in January of 2013. Jennifer came to the Center with extensive higher education experience including knowledge gained from her time spent in CSU’s All-in-One office. Jennifer replaced Dr. Sandra Ezekiel who retired in September of 2012. Jennifer’s caseload consists of all majors offered in the School of Communication; but like all CLASS advisors, she is able to assist students with university and college (general education) requirements regardless of the student’s CLASS major.

Student Success Specialists In fall 2012 semester, a major change was implemented in the structure of freshmen advising. The Office of Undergraduate Studies hired four, full-time student success specialists. The specialists were housed in the University Advising Office and assigned to assist incoming freshmen who placed into remedial English (ENG99 or 100) and/or remedial math (MTH87). The specialists, who had advisee caseloads of 100-150 students, began working with their assigned freshmen at orientation, and continued through fall and spring semesters until the students earned passing grades in the remedial course(s) and earned 20 credits. Success specialists then transitioned students to the appropriate advising office, whether college or program. Created as a way to help with freshman persistence to the second year, specialists used intrusive advising techniques, such as multiple outreach by phone, email and text, to ensure the students were attending class, completing homework and taking advantage of CSU’s academic assistance. By targeting this high-risk group, specialists were charged with retention through the first year by providing intrusive advising, workshops and mentoring to enhance academic success. The smaller caseloads equated to more contact and follow up with each advisee. Fall semester 2012 began with 221 CLASS students assigned to student success specialists. At the completion of spring semester 2013, 60 CLASS students with declared majors were eligible for transition to the CLASS Advising Center. Additional outreach was completed by the CLASS Advising Center via letter and email welcoming them and requesting they schedule an advising appointment. The program has expanded for the 20132014 academic year in both the number of student success specialists and the scope of advisees. Undergraduate Studies created a First Year Advising Center with seven success specialists who will advise all first time freshmen. The exceptions to centralized freshmen advising are students in the Honors and Scholars Program, athletes and those participating in the TRiO/SSS program.

Freshman Foundations With the start of the 2012-2013 orientation season the implementation of Freshman Foundations began. Created by the Office of University Studies with assistance from each college, freshmen students attending orientation were encouraged to register for a cluster of predetermined classes based on the students’ need for remedial English and/or math courses. Each cluster included English, math and general education courses appropriate for each declared major. The program’s intent was to maximize student success and retention of the remedial subset of incoming students. Freshman Foundations were then expanded for the 2013-2014 orientation season to include all incoming freshmen. A goal of 75% freshman enrollment into a foundation cluster has been set for the current orientation season.

4

Advising Changes continued Starfish Solutions Software During summer semester 2012, CLASS began its implementation of Starfish Solutions which replaced CLASS’s Appointment Plus software. Starfish is used for appointment scheduling, interactive documentation, and provides multi-layered communication (faculty, advisor, service offices). The implementation of the pilot project began the previous year with program advising offices (TRIO/SSS, Exploratory). CLASS was the first college to adopt Starfish, as well as the largest to do so. Complete transition from Appointment Plus to Starfish Solutions’ scheduling component was made in the Center in October 2012. All CLASS students have access to Starfish by logging into CampusNet, clicking on the student tab and then the blue star. Students see their assigned advisor’s name, can access available advising appointment times and schedule their appointment all on-line. Reminder emails one day prior to their appointment are system generated. With complete transition to Starfish, CLASS advisors again have access to assisting students for whom instructors submit early alerts (a function previously done through CampusNet and disconnected spring 2012 semester during the transition). Eventually, faculty advisors will also have access to Starfish and will document their interactions with students through the NOTES function. At this time the Starfish reporting functions are still being scrutinized for type of reports available and for accuracy.

Grad Express Degree Audit In fall 2012 the Registrar granted advising access and the ability to enter two fairly typical graduation exceptions into the PeopleSoft system which then fed into Grad Express Degree Audit (GEDA), allowing this tool to read more accurately. With positive feedback pertaining to accuracy, GEDA was updated spring semester 2013 to include an advisor communication tool. This allows advisors, professional and faculty, to communicate exceptions to the Registrar’s Office within GEDA itself. Following review and Registrar’s approval, adjustments are made to an individual student’s degree audit in order to reflect each change and/or exception leading to greater accuracy.

Program Sheets and Degree Maps Program sheets for each CLASS major are now automatically produced through the University’s new catalog software, Acalog. Implemented for the 2012-2013 year, program sheet automation ensures accuracy of information as it reads directly from the department reviewed, edited and approved catalog content. Degree maps are also easily accessible through the on-line undergraduate catalog.

Multi-term Enrollment and Waitlists The Office of the Registrar now offers students the ability for multi-term enrollment and waitlist options within CampusNet. Advisors can assist students with enrollment for a full year of coursework; and for seniors, their last semesters before graduation. Of course, if courses are failed or dropped multiple semester registration must be reworked.

Assessment This past year CLASS advising produced its first assessment report as a singular submission as opposed to a component of the university-wide advising report. Our report was incorporated into the campus wide report submitted by the Office of Undergraduate Studies. The CLASS report contains information and data specific to CLASS Advising and reflects the strengths and needs of this particular Center. Feedback from this report was positive and indicated our mission is being met.

5

Advising Updates Advisor Caseloads CLASS advisor caseloads for the 2012-2013 academic year averaged between 850 to 950 advisees. This takes into consideration the extraction of the remedial freshmen assigned to the student success specialists. This total includs the percentage of students who came to the Center as pre-advising students (non-matriculated), which is 8% of total appointments. With the new 2013-2014 initiative to extract all freshmen advisees from CLASS, advising caseloads for the 2013-2014 year will average between 810-910 advisees per advisor. CLASS advisors are assigned caseloads by major. Although major advising is done by a faculty advisor and general education advising is done by the CLASS professional advisor, caseload assignments allow CLASS advisors to act as the liaison to their assigned departments. This assists in the communication between the Advising Center and the various CLASS schools/ departments/programs.

Daily Walk-ins at the Center Daily walk-in advising continued this year offering 31.5 hours in the fall semester, and 28 hours in the spring. Times offered were modified in fall in relation to student usage the previous year. The Center now has two advisors available for the heavily used Thursday and Friday afternoons.

Strategic Retention and Graduation Work continues on the first-time, full-time student retention and graduation rates. The final graduation rate for the 2006 cohort, with a summer 2012 cut-off for IPEDS reporting, has been confirmed: CLASS graduated 44.8% of this cohort, exceeding the University target of 32%. The 2007 cohort, with final numbers to be confirmed at the end of summer semester 2013, has a University graduation goal set at 34%. Currently the CLASS percentage has met and exceeded the goal with a 37.6% graduation rate. The 2008 University goal is a 36% completion rate by the end of summer 2014. CLASS currently has a 30% rate, with projections for meeting and possibly exceeding the University goal. CLASS advising continues to work on active cohorts and has begun assessing and completing outreach to the 2009 cohort.

Current Caseloads Rose Begalla: Black Studies, English, French, Religious Studies, Social Work (last names L-Z), and Spanish Jennifer Novy: Communication, Communication Management, Film and Digital Media, and Journalism and Promotional Communication Michele Lieberth: Anthropology, Economics, International Relations, Linguistic Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Social Work (last names A-K), Social Science, Theatre Arts, and Women’s Studies Lacie Semenovich: Criminology, Sociology, and Undecided Stephanie Triplett: Art, Classical and Medieval Studies, History, Liberal Studies, Music, and Social Studies

6

Advising Outreach Enrollment In preparation for the 2012-2013 academic year, the Advising Center completed 492 phone calls and emails to CLASS students who were not yet registered for fall semester. Although retention was the driving force of this effort, it is also in the Center’s best interest to have students come in prior to the beginning of the semester in order to minimize the high volume rush the Center encounters once the semester begins. The benefit also extends to the student to ensure enrollment in their required courses.

Midterm During fall semester 2012, CLASS advisors completed midterm outreach to a total of 866 students. Type of outreach was distributed as follows: 38 emails for multiple failing grades, 196 for one failing grade, 22 for outstanding grades, and 610 for passing grades. During spring semester, advisors completed outreach to 1134 CLASS students. Type of email outreach was distributed as follows: 60 emails for multiple failing grades, 229 for one failing grade, 363 for outstanding grades and 483 for passing grades.

Graduation Application Advisor outreach took place in both fall and spring semesters to students who had earned over 100 credits. Students were asked to schedule an appointment to determine if and/or when a graduation application was to be processed. Advisors also completed outreach to those students in their caseload with a marginal cumulative grade point average (1.5-1.99). Again, advisees were urged to schedule an appointment to review their transcript with an advisor and to create an action plan to achieve good academic standing.

Early Alerts With the adoption of Starfish Solutions, early alerts were again generated to inform advisors of various faculty concerns for their students. Reasons include low attendance, missing homework, low class participation and low test scores. During fall semester, CLASS advisors received and responded as appropriate to a total of 686 alerts, of which 364 were for low attendance and 322 were for an academic concern. In spring semester, CLASS advisors received and responded to 2050 alerts, of which 647 were related to low attendance and 1403 were of an academic concern.

7

2012–2013 CLASS Advising Center Usage Report Student Appointments: Total 5216 June 243 July 345 August 62 August walk ins 704

September 10–28 188 October 379 November 403 December 1–14 242 December walk-ins 83

January walk-ins 590 January 51 February 286 March 448 April 700 May 492

Summer 2012

Fall 2012*

Spring 2013

1354

1295

2567

*remedial freshmen pulled out of college-seen by student success specialists in MC110 & multi-term registration implemented

Drop-by traffic: Total 2327 June 202 July 227 August 242

September 105 October 202 November 182 December 149

January 304 February 136 March 288 April 188 May 102

Summer 2012

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

671

638

1018

Computer Usage: Total 1786 June 159 July 99 August 325

September 153 October 176 November 137 December 76

January 220 February 55 March 163 April 150 May 73

Summer 2012

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

583

542

661

In-coming Calls: Total 2501 June 322 July 166 August 173

September 162 October 183 November 175 December 177

January 243 February 160 March 276 April 274 May 190

Summer 2012

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

8

661

697

1143

2012–2013 CLASS Advising Center Usage Report Out-going Calls: Total 5214 June 496 July 557 August 774

September 583 October 387 November 261 December 410

January 270 February 287 March 444 April 333 May 412

Summer 2012

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

1827

1641

1746

2012/13

5216

2011/12

5492

2012/13 2012/13Data CLASS Advising Center Historical 2010/11 Usage 2011/12 2011/12 2009/10 Academic Year Comparisons 2008/09 2010/11 2010/11 5216

5492

5371

2009/10 2008/09 Appointments 4358 Student 2007/08

2012/13

3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 5500 5216

2011/12

5492

2010/11 2012/13

1507

2007/08

5064

4358

2007/08 2009/10 2008/09

5371

1294

2009/10 2011/12 2008/09 2010/11

1971

3377 1072

2008/09

2011/12

2011/12

2010/11

2010/11 2012/13

2009/10

2009/10 2011/12 1072

2008/09

2008/09 2010/11 1006

586

1971 2327 2160

750 1929 1750 2000 4358 1000 1250 1500

2007/08 Not Tracked 3377

2012/13

2011/12 2010/11 2012/13 2009/10 2011/12 2008/09 2010/11

2010/11

1882

500 1000 1500 2000 1786

1294

1867

1507 1301 2501 1971

1291 3679 225

43

2007/08 Not Tracked 2009/10

2802

0

2011/12

1000 2000 3000 4000 2501 2327

3679

2160

2010/11 5214 1786 2012/13 1882 2009/10 2011/12 6196 1922 1867 2008/09 738 2010/11 1929 1301 2007/08 Not Tracked Not Tracked2009/10 Not Tracked 1291

43 2802

753

0 1000 2000 3000 4000 225 2008/09 Not Tracked 1250 1500 1750 2000 2250 2500 2007/08 Not Tracked2007/08 Not Tracked 250 2012/13 500 1000 5500 15006000 20006500 25007000 7500 5214 2011/12

2160

1294

250

5500

2008/09

3000 2012/13 3500 4000 1250 45001500 50001750 5500 2000 2250 2500 2327 2011/12

586

Computer Usage 2012/13

2007/08 2009/10

1922

5064

1291

2008/09 738 1000 1500 2000 750 1000 1250 250 1500 500 1750 2000 2007/08 Not Tracked

586

750 1000 1250 1500 semester 1750 2000 Drop-by-Traffic throughout 1294 2012/13 (not resulting in appointment) 1507 2011/12

2008/09 2010/11 2007/08 2009/10

2012/13

2007/08

5216 1072 5492 1006 1882 5371

2009/10 3377

2012/13

10064000 4500 5000 5500 3000 3500

2010/11 2012/13 2009/10 2011/12

1301

2008/09 225 Walk-in-Traffic in preparation 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 2007/08 Not Tracked of new semester

3377

1867

5064

4358

2007/08

5064

1786

5371

2012/13

2010/11

6196 2501

9

753

1507

2011/12

1867

3679 reporting; sp12 only) 658 (partial 4324 Not Offered and/or Tracked 2802 Not Offered and/or Tracked

2009/10 2009/10 2009/10 CLASS Advising Center Historical Usage Data 2008/09 2008/09 2008/09 2007/08 2007/08 Academic Year Comparisons continued 2007/08 1072

1006

586

2010/11 2010/11

1971 1301

2010/11

2011/12 2011/12

1291

Not738 Offered and/or Tracked

225

Not Tracked Not Offered and/or Tracked

Not Tracked

750 1000 1250 250 1500 500 17501000 20001500 2000 2500

0

1000 250 2000 500 3000 750 4000 1000 5000 1250 1500

Telephone In-Coming Calls

Telephone Out-Going Calls

2012/13

2012/13

23272501

2011/12 2010/11

2011/12

3679

2160

4324

1882

2009/10

1922

2008/09

1929738

2802

Daily Walk-Ins 5214

6196

1473 7538 658 (partial reporting; sp12 only)

Not Tracked Not Offered and/or Tracked Not Tracked Not Offered and/or Tracked Not Tracked Not Offered and/or Tracked

5500 and/or 6000Tracked 6500 7000 7500 8000 2007/08 Not Offered 250

10

2010/11

7538

2009/10 Not Tracked 2007/08 Not Tracked

1250 1500 1750 020001000 22502000 25003000 4000 5000

2011/12 2012/13 2010/11 2011/12 2009/10 2010/11 2008/09 2009/10 2007/08 2008/09

6196

2008/09 Not Tracked

Not Tracked2007/08 Not Tracked

2012/13

5214

500

750 1000 1250 1500

5500 6000 6500 7000 7500 8000

Daily Walk-in Usage 2012–2013 Data excludes when the Center goes to a strictly walk-in status in preparation for a new semester. CLASS Advising has instituted limited daily walk-in availability in order to assist students who find it difficult to schedule an appointment. Walk-in times vary from semester to semester but are offered a limited number of hours every day. Times vary between mornings and afternoons to accommodate the variety amongst students’ schedules.

SEMESTER

MONTH

Walk-in MONTHLY TOTAL

Walk-in SEMESTER TOTAL

% OF STUDENTS USING WEEKLY WALK-IN AVAILABILITY (as opposed to a scheduled appointment)

Spring 2012

Jan 30 & 31

72

February

111

March

221

April

181

May

73

658

37%

# of walk in hrs offered weekly: 28

Summer 2012

June

73

July

141

August 1-3

20

234

36%

# of walk in hrs offered weekly: 23

Fall 2012

September

118

October

130

Novemeber

171

December

98

517

42.6%

# of walk in hrs offered weekly: 31.5

Spring 2013

January 28-31

18

February

105

March

143

April

254

May

202

722

36.50%

# of walk in hrs offered weekly: 28

11

Additional Data College to College Transfers Processed The CLASS Advising Center processes students transferring in to CLASS or adding a CLASS major through the PeopleSoft system. For each student processed the Center does outreach to educate students about the services the Center provides and outlines the University’s foreign language deficiency (FLD) and the CLASS foreign language requirement (FLR).

Total Transfers Processed into CLASS Summer 2012: Fall 2012: Spring 2013:

90 76 109

Orientation Season 2012-2013 Number of new student orientations Number of express orientations Number of new student appointments

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

8 2 142

2 1 7

Although advising has been removed from the official transfer orientation schedule, CLASS advising has collaborated with the Office of Admission to have CLASS advisors available on transfer dates for those students who have still not met with an advisor. Number of transfer orientations Number of transfer students assisted

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

4 54

1 28

CLASS Dean’s List Summer semester 2012: Fall semester 2012: Spring semester 2013:

139 883 877

CLASS Valedictorians Summer and Fall 2012: Fourteen CLASS students were eligible for consideration of this honor.

CLASS Valedictorian: Jordan Stevenson

Majored in Journalism and Promotional Communication

Spring 2013: Twenty-seven CLASS students were eligible for consideration of this honor.

12

CLASS Valedictorian: Justine Keenan Majored in Linguistic Studies and French Keenan was also selected for the University Valedictorian

 requirement  for  ALL  students  in  the  State  of  Ohio  and  at  Cleveland  State  University  

and  

Foreign  Language  Requirement  (FLR)  

 additional  requirement  for  students  in  the  College  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Social  Sciences  (CLASS)    

What  did  you  do  in   All  CSU  students  must   do  this  to  remove  the   high  school?   State/University’s  FLD  

 

(Foreign  Language  Deficiency)  

0  years  of  foreign  language  in   high  school:  

1  year  of  a  single  foreign   language  in  high  school  with   passing  grades   (Ex:  1  year  of  French):  

2  years  of  the  same  foreign   language  in  high  school  with   passing  grades   (Ex:  2  years  of  Spanish):  

3  or  more  years  of  the  same   foreign  language  in  high  school   with  passing  grades   (Ex:  3  years  of  French):  

CLASS  STUDENTS  ONLY  

You  need  to  remove  the  University   FLD  (previous  column).    

IN  ADDITION,  you  need  to   complete  the  College’s  FLR FLR      (Foreign  Language  Requirement)  

You  need  to  take  2  semesters  of  a   single    foreign  language  at  CSU  (Ex:   ARB  101  and  ARB  102)  

You’re  required  to  continue  the   language  sequence  and  take  2   additional  semesters  of  intermediate   foreign  language  at  CSU  (Ex:  ARB  201   and  ARB  202).  Or  you  may  choose  a   new  language  and  take  2  semesters   of  beginning  language  courses  (Ex:   JPN  101  and  JPN  102)   You  need  to  take  1  or  2  semesters  of   You’re  required  to  continue  the   the  same  foreign  language  depending   language  sequence  and  take  2   on  placement.  The  Placement  Test  is   additional  semesters  of  intermediate   available  in  French  and  Spanish  (see   foreign  language  at  CSU  (Ex:  FRN  201   Note  below);    your  score  may  require   and  FRN  202).  Or  you  may  choose  a   you  to  take  2  semesters  at  CSU  (Ex:   new  language  and  take  2  semesters   FRN  101  and  FRN  102)  or  you  may   of  beginning  language  courses  (Ex:   place  higher  and  only  be  required  to   ITN  101  and  ITN  102)   take  1  semester    at  CSU  (Ex:  FRN  102)   FLD  removed*   You’re  required  to  continue  the   language  sequence  from  high  school   and  take  2  semesters  of  intermediate   foreign  language  at  CSU  (Ex:  SPN  201   and  SPN  202).    Or  you  may  choose  a   new  language  and  take  2  semesters   of  beginning  language  courses  (Ex:   CHN  101  and  CHN  102)   FLD  removed  *   FLR  met  *  

-­‐  A  minimum  grade  of  C  is  required  to  continue  in  the  foreign  language  sequence  -­‐    

Note:    The  Placement  Test  is  available  in  French  and  Spanish  at  the  Academic  Services  Center  in  Rhodes  Tower  West,  Room  289  (call  216-­‐687-­‐ 2566  for  their  hours).    For  placement  information  in  languages  other  than  French  and  Spanish,  please  contact  the  Department  of  Modern   Languages  at  216-­‐687-­‐4646.     *Even  if  your  foreign  language  requirement  has  been  met  you  should  consider  the  benefits  of  further  language  study.  By  building  on  previous   knowledge  to  maintain  or  improve  language  proficiency  you  can  earn  “retro  credit”  that  may  count  toward  a  minor  or  a  second  major  (some   majors  also  require  further  language  study  such  as  International  Relations,  International  Business,  Art  History,  etc.).    The  Retroactive  Foreign   Language  Policy  is  for  students  whose  first  college  course  in  a  foreign  language  is  taken  at  CSU.    If  you  receive  a  B-­‐  or  better  in  the  course,  credit   will  be  granted  for  previous  courses.    For  example,  if  you  had  two  years  of  Spanish  in  high  school  and  take  SPN  201  at  CSU  and  receive  a  “B”,  you   can  apply  for  retro  credit  and  receive  a  total  of  14  credit  hours  (4  for  SPN  201  and  10  hours  for  SPN  101  and  SPN  102).    Contact  the  Department   of  Modern  Languages  for  more  information:  216-­‐687-­‐4646.  

This    guide  applies  to  all  students  who  graduated  from  high  school  AFTER  1987.  If  you    graduated  prior  or  are  a  BM  in  Music    see  your  advisor  for  other  options  .  

CSU  STUDENT  GUIDE   Foreign  Language  Deficiency  (FLD)  

13

CLASS Academic Standards Committee

14

Summer 2012 Committee Members

Fall 2012 & Spring 2013 Committee Members

Russ Revock, Art, Chair Kelly Wrenhaven, Modern Languages Bill Kosteas, Economics Stephen Gingerich, Modern Languages David Goldberg, History Holly Holsinger, Theatre/Dance Il Hyun Cho, Political Science

Russ Revock, Art, Chair Stephen Gingerich, Modern Languages David Goldberg, History Holly Holsinger, Theatre/Dance Il-Hyun Cho, Political Science Mark Souther, History Robert Whitbred, Communication

CLASS Petition Actions and Outcomes Change F to I, extend I: 12 Reinstatement of Class(es): Approved: 9 Approved: Denied: 3 Denied:

1 1 0

Complete Withdrawals: 33 Selective Withdrawal: 21 Approved: 24 Approved: 5 Denied: 9 Denied: 16 Early Readmit-Dismiss Appeal: 7 Sub For. Culture for FLR: 13 Approved: 4 Approved: 8 Denied: 3 Denied: 5 Extend an Incomplete: 1 Substitute course(s) for FLR 2 Approved: 1 Approved: 2 Denied: 0 Denied: 0 Grade Dispute: 1 Waiver of credit(s) 4 Approved: 1 Approved: 1 Denied: 0 Denied: 3 Late Add of Course(s): 6 Waiver of FLR: 1 Approved: 6 Approved: 0 Denied: 0 Denied: 1

Readmission after Dismissal: 51 Approved: 29 Denied: 22 Total CLASS petitions submitted: 153

15

CLASS Probation and Dismissal Review (PDR) At the conclusion of the semester, the CLASS Academic Standards Committee meets to review the status of those students deemed “subject to dismissal.� These students either had a term GPA below 1.0 and/or a cumulative GPA below 2.0. The students reviewed by the ASC have earned 60 credits or fewer. The committee also reviews those who have earned more than 60 credits for the same criteria who were NOT on probation the previous semester. Students who met the criteria above and earned over 60 credits and were on probation the previous term of enrollment had their academic status determined by the Office of the Registrar.

Summer semester 2012

Fall semester 2012

Of the 3 dismissed, their majors were: Art 1 English 1 Undecided 1

Of the 4 dismissed, their majors were: Criminology 1 English 1 Film/Digital Media 1 Social Work 1

Automatic Probation: 36 Subject to Dismissal: 42 Dismiss: 0 Retain: 39 *Other: 3

Automatic Probation: 67 Subject to Dismissal: 219 Dismiss: 48 Retain: 169 **Other: 2

Automatic Dismissal:

3

Automatic Dismissal:

4

Automatic Dismissal: 7 Of the 7 dismissed, their majors were: Art 1 Communication 1 Criminology 1 History 1 Linguistics 1 Sociology 1 Social Work 1 Automatic Probation: 87 Subject to Dismissal: 228 Dismiss: 74 Retain: 154

Of the 48 dismissed, their majors were:

Of the 74 dismissed, their majors were:

Art 2 Music 4 1 4 Economics 1 Sociology 1 English 3 Social Studies 1 Film/Digital Media 3 Theatre 1 History 1 Undecided 7 Journal/Promo Com 2 Post-Bacc Und 1 Linguistics 1

Art 1 Black Studies 2 Communication 5 Criminology 15 English 3 Film & Digital Media 3 History 1 Journal/Promo Com 6 Liberal Studies 1

Communication 4 Political Science Criminology 11 Social Work

Of the 48 dismissed, their academic year was: Freshman 11 Sophomore 14 Junior 11 Senior 11 Post-Bacc 1 Total Probation: 75 Total Dismissed: 3 *Other: 3

Spring semester 2013

Total Probation: 236 Total Dismissed: 52 Other: 2

Linguistics 1 Music Therapy 1 Political Science 4 Sociology 6 Social Studies 1 Social Work 7 Theatre Arts 2 Undecided 15

Of the 74 dismissed, their academic year was: Freshman 37 20 of which were advised by Student Success Specialists

Sophomore 14 Junior 16 Senior 7 Post-Bacc 0 Total Probation: 241 Total Dismissed: 81 Other: 0

*placed on good academic standing **remedial freshmen placed on CLASS list by mistake; determination of acacdemic status made by Office of Undergraduate Studies

16

University Petition Actions & Outcomes Approval of Unapproved Course

Total: 40 Approved: 39 Denied: 0 Deferred: 1

Credit Hour Waiver

Total: 13 Approved: 8 Denied: 4 Deferred: 1

Credit Hour Waiver-Natural Science

Total: 3 Approved: 2 Denied: 0 Deferred: 1

Exemption from Residency Requirement Total: 30 Approved: 21 Denied: 9 Readmit After Second Dismissal

Total: 3 Approved: 2 Denied: 1

Restoration to Previous Catalog Rights Total: 1 Approved: 1 Denied: 0 Substitute Foreign Culture Course(s) for FLD Total: 1 Approved: 1 Denied: 0

Exemption-Transient Policy Over 59 Hrs Total: 30 Approved: 21 Denied: 9

Waiver of Foreign Language Deficiency Total: 2 Approved: 2 Denied: 0

Total University petitions submitted: 123

Walk-in Tracking in Preparation for a New Semester Two to three weeks leading up to the start of each semester and into the first two week of classes, the CLASS Advising Center moves from an appointment and limited daily walk in system, to strictly a first come, first serve system in order to accommodate the rush of students seeking advising assistance. These weeks are the busiest times of year for the Center as students need assistance with last minute enrollment, changes to schedules, completing Satisfactory Academic Progress forms for financial aid reinstatement, changes of major/minor/college forms, petition assistance and starting the graduation application process.

Walk-in Tracking 2012-2013 and Historical Comparision Data In preparation for beginning of a new semester

SEMESTER TOTAL Number of Days Saturday Traffic Academic Year TOTAL Walk-ins Students Assisted on Walk-ins Fall 2008 Spring 2009

539 457

16 14

14 11

2008-2009

996

Fall 2009 Spring 2010

557 515

19 15

10 19

2009-2010

1072

Fall 2010 Spring 2011

592 632

21 19

9 8

2010-2011

1224

Fall 2011 Spring 2012

682 825

26 29

13 3

2011-2012

1507

Fall 2012* Spring 2013

704 673

25 24

7 4

2012-2013

1377

*multi term enrollment began and remedial freshmen advised by Student Success Specialists

17

CLASS Advising Center: On-line survey With the adoption of Starfish Solutions Software, the function of a post-appointment email requesting students take the Center’s survey and providing an embedded link in the email for easy access was no longer possible. For fall semester, weekly emails were sent manually to students who had visited the Center. This led to a smaller amount of respondents than in previous years. Also during the fall semester the Center sent out an email blast, modified with additional questions, to all active CLASS students (over 4000) who may or may not have used the Center’s services. The intent of the email blast was to gather additional feedback as to why the Center’s services were not used and to request feedback again from those who did use advising services.

Fall 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013

Email Blast

Total students that started survey

29

280

123

Total students that completed the survey

21

244

100

Completed survey percentage

72.40%

87.10%

81.30%

29 0

278 2

115 8

(students can progress while skipping a question)

I am currently working on or intend to work toward a bachelor’s degree at CSU.

Yes No

Specific to Fall 2012 Email Blast Have you been advised in the CLASS Advising Center?

Yes

193

No

84

If no, why not?

Advised in different advising office

28

Work only with major/faculty advisor

24

I didn’t know about CLASS Advising Center

27

I never felt I needed an advisor’s help

19

Summary of “Other” responses

Other

24

Difficulty in scheduling appt at time needed

9

Previous bad experience

9

Get advising from friends/family/staff

6

When making academic decisions, rate the FIRST important resource you use.

College advisor

14

60

42

24

15

Faculty/Professor 2

Staff 0

1

0

Classmates/students 0

3

2

CSU website

3

5

3

Undergrad catalog

0

11

2

Degree Audit

2

57

34

Friends/family 0

4

3

none 0

2

0

18

CLASS Advising Center: On-line survey continued

Email Blast

Fall 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013

When making academic decisions, rate the SECOND important resource you use.

College advisor

2

38

28

36

25

Faculty/Professor 6

Staff 2

4

2

Classmates/students 2

6

9

CSU website

1

15

11

Undergrad catalog

3

13

5

Degree Audit

4

38

15

Friends/family 2

6

4

none 0

3

0

31

15

When making academic decisions, rate the THIRD important resource you use.

College advisor

4

Faculty/Professor 1

30

17

Staff 0

11

5

Classmates/students 0

20

14

CSU website

2

16

9

Undergrad catalog

6

15

15

Degree Audit

7

23

11

10

6

5

0

Friends/family 0

none 0

What was the reason for your appointment?

Course selection

71.4%

77.4%

70.0%

Check sheet/requirements

61.9%

66.5%

47.0%

Pre-admission advising

0.0%

9.8%

3.0%

7.9%

5.0%

Petition 9.5%

Transfer credit evaluation

4.8%

22.0%

13.0%

Graduation application

4.8%

16.5%

25.0%

Major/minor change

4.8%

29.9%

12.0%

Explore career/major

0.0%

6.7%

4.0%

Academic Problems

9.5%

7.3%

4.0%

Personal issues

4.8%

3.0%

5.0%

2.4%

5.0%

164

100

Other 9.5% total answered

21

19

CLASS Advising Center: On-line survey continued

DURING THE ADVISING APPOINTMENT

Email Blast

Fall 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013

My advisor listened to my concerns/questions.

Strongly agree or agree

100.0%

84.3%

96.0%

7.5%

4.0%

0.0%

8.2%

0.0%

95.2%

82.2%

96.0%

8.9%

4.0%

4.8%

8.9%

0.0%

95.0%

75.0%

88.9%

Neutral 0.0% Disagree/strongly disagree

There was adequate time to deal with my concerns/questions.

Strongly agree or agree

Neutral 0.0% Disagree/strongly disagree

I learned more about my requirements and my chosen program of study.

Strongly agree or agree

Neutral 5.0% Disagree/strongly disagree

0.0%

14.2% 9.8% 10.8%

1.3%

66.7%

86.7%

My advisor helped me identify and set realistic academic goals based on my academic history.

Strongly agree or agree

100.0%

Neutral 0.0% Disagree/strongly disagree

16.0% 8.9%

0.0%

17.3%

4.4%

90.4%

74.7%

86.7%

I learned about my progress toward graduation.

Strongly agree or agree

Neutral 9.6% Disagree/strongly disagree

12.1% 12.0%

0.0%

13.2%

1.3%

83.4%

49.7%

69.1%

I learned about other campus resources that I may need.

Strongly agree or agree

Neutral 11.1% Disagree/strongly disagree

5.5%

24.5% 22.5% 25.8%

8.4%

74.80%

89.70%

AS A RESULT OF MY ADVISING APPOINTMENT All my questions/concerns were addressed or I was directed to the appropriate resource.

20

Strongly agree or agree

95.30%

Neutral 4.70% Disagree/strongly disagree

0.00%

11.40% 6.60% 13.80%

3.70%

CLASS Advising Center: On-line survey continued

Email Blast

Fall 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013

I understand how to use CampusNet for course selection and registration.

Strongly agree or agree

100.0%

Neutral 0.00% Disagree/strongly disagree

81.60%

95.40%

10.90% 4.60%

0.00%

7.50%

0.00%

100.0%

80.30%

92.00%

I understand what to do next, the steps I need to take or the decisions I need to make.

Strongly agree or agree

Neutral 0.00% Disagree/strongly disagree

12.10% 5.40%

0.00%

7.60%

2.60%

100.00%

75.40%

89.30%

I understand how to pick the appropriate general education courses.

Strongly agree or agree

Neutral 0.00% Disagree/strongly disagree

13.00% 7.70%

0.00%

11.60%

3.00%

84.30%

79.60%

87.50%

I understand how to access and understand Degree Audit.

Strongly agree or agree

Neutral 5.30% Disagree/strongly disagree

10.40%

12.20% 9.40% 8.20%

3.10%

I understand the CLASS foreign language requirement.

Strongly agree or agree

89.50%

72.00%

83.00%

Neutral 10.50% 14.50% 10.80% Disagree/strongly disagree

0.00%

13.50%

6.20%

72.40%

88.90%

I understand the need to return to CLASS Advising Center to do my graduation application.

Strongly agree or agree

71.40%

Neutral 23.80% 8.60% 6.40% Disagree/strongly disagree

4.80%

19.00%

4.70%

76.70%

91.70%

I understand the need to meet with my faculty/departmental advisor for major advising.

Strongly agree or agree

94.70%

Neutral 5.30% Disagree/strongly disagree

0.00%

9.70% 7.30% 13.60%

1.00%

21

CLASS Advising Center: On-line survey continued

Email Blast

Fall 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013

Is welcoming

100.0%

BASED ON MY RECENT VISIT, UNDERGRADUATE ADVISING AT CSU

Is accessible Is professional Is knowledgeable Is supportive

Strongly agree or agree

Neutral 0.00% Disagree/strongly disagree Strongly agree or agree

Strongly agree or agree

Strongly agree or agree

4.30%

100.0%

75.80%

91.00%

Strongly agree or agree

9.90% 4.50%

0.00%

14.30%

4.50%

100.0%

80.80%

93.40%

13.00% 4.40%

0.00%

6.20%

2.20%

100.0%

78.80%

90.10%

Neutral 0.00% Disagree/strongly disagree

11.90% 4.30% 9.90%

Neutral 0.00% Disagree/strongly disagree

91.40%

0.00%

Neutral 0.00% Disagree/strongly disagree

78.20%

13.10% 7.00%

0.00%

8.10%

2.90%

100.0%

76.40%

88.80%

Neutral 0.00%

11.30% 8.90%

Disagree/strongly disagree 0.00% 12.30% 2.30%

BASED ON MY RECENT VISIT, HOW SATISFIED ARE YOU WITH UNDERGRADUATE ADVISING AT CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY?

22

Very satisfied/satisfied

100.0%

Neutral 0.00% Unsatisfied/very unsatisfied

0.00%

74.80%

90.80%

10.10% 5.80% 15.10%

3.40%

She m a real s kes every th imple and e ing I look as f time or her eve y. I sch ry appo edule an intme nt.

My advisor was one of the best I have ever met with. She understood all of my concerns and addressed them appropriately. I finally feel like I am in the right track to graduating.

I almos t th diplom ink there sho a to pu t her na uld be a place front-d me a on my esk accomm staff is amaz s well! Also, Serious odating, an ingly efferves the d ly, Und c ergrad knowledgeab ent, Advisin le!!! g is FAN TASTIC !

She

was

awe

som

ea

nd

as

erio

us

hel

p!!

ss advisor say that my new cla to nt wa ly al re st ju I dule epared with my sche pr d an gh ou or th so was ts when I arrived. and class requiremen ess me. That really did impr

s solved All her help ha for me in a big problem or and deciding a maj ses, which scheduling clas lot of has relieved a my stress.

The best advisor I’ve had my entire 7 years of college life. She is smart, kind, funny, and helpful. I consider myself lucky to have her!

They a r and k e all very ni now th ce The fr e ont de ir stuff! sk as we is great ll!

Cleveland State University College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

Advising Center

2300 Chester Avenue | CB 279 | Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2214 www.csuohio.edu/class/advising/


Advising Annual Report 2013