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YOU HAVE A

VOICE


Our children and those who follow deserve to see our diverse wildlife in its native habitats and to enjoy North America’s spectacular wild places. These are sights to be experienced firsthand, not through picture books and old movies. —Jamie Rappaport Clark, President and CEO


THEY DON’T.


Defenders of Wildlife protects all native animals and plants in North America, keeping healthy lands and waters for the natural communities.


Since 1947 in North America


DEFENDERS IS TEACHING PEOPLE ACROSS NORTH AMERICA HOW TO COEXIST WITH WILDLIFE, KEEPING PEOPLE AND SPECIES SAFER.


EVERY ANIMAL NEEDS A HOME. DEFENDERS IS WORKING TO PROTECT HABITATS SO EACH SPECIES HAS SPACE TO THRIVE.


FOR 40 YEARS, THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT HAS HELPED PREVENT THE EXTINCTION OF OUR NATION’S WILDLIFE. NOW IT NEEDS PROTECTING.


Defenders drea when decline a does not exist.


am of a day and extinction


DEFENDERS COMMUNICATE WITH STRONG LANGUAGE AND ACTION,


but this isn’t reflected visually.


DOMINANT ENCOURAGE DIRECT ADVOCATE BOLD


MISSION Defenders is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities VISION

TNANIMOD EGARUOCNE TCERID ETACOVDA DLOB

Diverse wildlife populations in North America are secure and thriving, sustained by a network of healthy lands and waters


PRODUCT/BENEFIT Defenders allow supporters to fufill their social responsibility to protect wildlife and thier habitats POSITIONING Defenders is focused on initiatives that will strongly impact wildlife conservation

VALUES Defenders of Wildlife is fair, honest, open minded, respectful, actively collaborating, etc. STYLING Defenders is rustic, real, and bold


1947


R: 116 G: 128 B: 78

R: 60 G: 64 B: 67

R: 111 G: 114 B: 129 R: 186 G: 108 B: 59 R: 111 G: 114 B: 129 R: 199 G: 184 B: 153

MEMPHIS A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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AWARENESS Defenders uses multiple platforms to expand awareness about wildlife issues, including social media.


NAVIGATION The website content is clear and direct, making it simple for users to navigate and find information easily.


CAMPAIGNS Advertisements and protests take place to promote awareness about solutions to current problems with wildlife and their habitat, where the local community can make an impact.


ADOPTION PACKAGE Defenders offers a symbolic adoption as one of their donation options. The individual can choose which animal they would like to adopt and the proceeds go toward program that help protect that species. The package includes a plush toy of the animal, a certificate of adoption, and a booklet.


Bottom of the donation package.


CERTIFICATE OF ADOPTION This certificate acknowledges that a symbolic adoption of a BLACK BEAR has been made for

CLARISSA SZEPSKI to help protect imperiled animals and preserve their vital habitats. On behalf of all of us at Defenders of Wildlife, thank you for your caring support for these special wild animals who so desperately need our protection.

1947

Jamie Rappaport Clark, President and CEO


BOOKLET With each symbolic adoption, information about the animal comes in a booklet for the individual to learn more about habitat, behavior, diet, etc.


BLACK BEARS 4-7 feet (1.2-2m) long from nose to tip of tail

The American black bear is the smallest of the three bears species found in North America, and can only be found in North America. Black bears have short, non-retractable claws that give them an excellent tree-climbing ability. Black bear fur is usually a uniform color except for a brown muzzle and light markings that sometimes appear on their chests. Eastern populations are usually black in color while western populations often show brown, cinnamon, and blond coloration in addition to black. Black bears with white-bluish fur are known as Kermode (glacier) bears and these unique color phases are only found in coastal British Columbia, Canada.

2-3 feet (.6-.9m) tall at shoulders

The American black bear lives throughout North America, from Canada to Mexico and in at least 40 states in the U.S. They historically occupied nearly all of the forested regions of North America, but in the U.S. they are now restricted to the forested areas less densely occupied by humans. In Canada, black bears still inhabit most of their historic range except for the intensively farmed areas of the central plains. In Mexico, black bears were thought to have inhabited the mountainous regions of the northern states but are now limited to a few remnant populations.

Average lifespan is around ten years, though black bears can live upward of 30 years in the wild. Males weigh an average of 150-300 lbs (68158 kg), females are smaller. Exceptionally large males have been known to weigh 500-600 lbs (227-272 kg).

PROTECTION STATUS: THREATENED

BEHAVIOR Black bears are extremely adaptable and show a great variation in habitat types, though they are primarily found in forested areas with thick ground vegetation and an abundance of fruits, nuts, and vegetation. In the northern areas, they can be found in the tundra, and they will sometimes forage in fields or meadows.

600,000 300,000

American black bears are omnivorous: plants, fruits, nuts, insects, honey, salmon, small mammals and carrion. In northern regions, they eat spawning salmon. Black bears will also occasionally kill young deer or moose calves.

In the United States However, the Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolu) and Florida black bear (Ursus americanus floridanus) are unique subspecies with small populations. The Louisiana black bear is federally listed as a threatened species and the Florida black bear is estimated to number 3,000.

Black bears tend to be solitary animals, with the exception of mothers and cubs. The bears usually forage alone, but will tolerate each other and forage in groups if there is an abundance of food in one area. Most black bears hibernate depending on local weather conditions and availability of food during the winter months. In regions where there is a consistent food supply and warmer weather throughout the winter, bears may not hibernate at all or do so for a very brief time. Females give birth and usually remain denned throughout the winter, but males and females without young may leave their dens from time to time during winter months.

In North America

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cubs per litter, 2 cubs are most common gestation days Mating Season: Summer. Cubs remain with the mother for a year and a half or more, even though they are weaned at 6-8 months of age. Females only reproduce every second year (or more). Should the young die for some reason, the female may reproduce again after only one year.


Defenders of Wildlife is an organization we can trust to implement impactful programs that will protect and preserve wildlife and the habitat we coexist in. —Leonardo DiCaprio

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