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CLAIRE MILNES Design Process

Semester 4


CONTENTS

Orcadian Community A View of Stromness Introduction Stromness Picturebook

Project Proposal Initial Brief Design Proposal

Community & Architecture People and Place Herman Herzberger

Aldo Van Eyck Design Journal Interior Opening The Street The Window The Entrance Facade Development The Courtyard The Staircase

A Day in the Life Collage Research


ORCADIAN COMMUNITY

(Revisiting our research) This is the introduction I wrote for our group research. The writing attempted to capture the essence of Orkney and allow the reciever to obtain a brief understanding of Orkneys past and present. At one time there was between two to three thousand people living in Stromness, in a densely packed community during the high point in the herring industry. The people and urban fabric were crowded together to silence the harsh winds, resulting in narrow streets and lanes in which the activities of daily life took place. Fish and other goods from the boats were sold, people would chat and work within the shelter of the streets and children would play, all in close proximity. All shops and facilities for the necessities of daily life were within a 5 minute walk and there was a reality of sharing and reliance between businesses that allowed everything to survive and grow, a quality that still exists in Orkney today. This sense of community has been carried throughout Orkney’s history. It is present in the stories and myths carried down from their Norse history and performed throughout the island today during the storytelling festival. It can be glimpsed from the road, the sight of Neolithic landmarks quietly standing amongst sheep fields, an image almost referring to the humble way of life then and now. Pottery, Furniture, Jewellery and Artwork stand as continuation of techniques and traditions showing a pride in their history and appreciation of their beautiful landscape. All of which they can proudly show to the thousands of tourists who folk to the islands in the summer. Orkney also extends their community to outsiders. At one point Orkney was the last stopping point on expeditions travelling across the Northwest Passage. Water from community wells was given to the men of the ship and some Orcadians even joined on expeditions. The island has an innovative spirit, always welcoming new ideas and people. This can be seen within the small businesses on the island today, banding together to encourage existence and growth. Investing in their future and benefitting on the possibilities of becoming a gateway to the arctic, Orkney is implementing 5G across the island. This and the North trade routes opening up across the top of the world, has the potential to attract business. 5G will aid in opening up research and education possibilities and give people the freedom to work from home.

Introduction


ORCADIAN COMMUNITY

The research and implementation of renewable energy, wind, wave and tidal, is currently a rising industry on Orkney. They are currently able to produce more than 100% of energy for the island with the excess being converted into hydrogen. They have the most electric cars per capita, with a target of all transport on Orkney being powered by renewables. Electric planes could be running services between islands in the next three years. They have placed themselves at the forefront of sustainable energy, they are an example to the rest of the world for how we must proceed in the face of climate change. But they are also one step closer to ending fuel poverty, improving the costs of energy within homes and businesses. Innovation, sustainability and a sense of community are embedded in Orkney’s culture. Through careful speculation between these global and local issues, through master planning and architectural intervention we aim to improve the daily lives of people living on Orkney.

Introduction


ORCADIAN COMMUNITY

A View of Stromness

A view of stromness by Ian MacInnes

A VIEW OF STROMNESS By Ian MacInnes

Like a scene from a renaissance painting this painting captures the old community life of Stromness. The narrow wynding street characteristic of Stromness is the stage for all forms of interaction. It shows, children playing, people working, a woman hanging out washing, a funeral, woman gossiping, people danceing. Density of people living on this main street and mutual dependency on others during this time created a much more lively community than that of today.


ORCADIAN COMMUNITY

Picture Book

STROMNESS PICTURE BOOK This is picture book I found in the library that inspired the introduction written above. Images of people standing outside their homes quite proud, Man working on the street and events held out on the water. The short captions tell about the life of the place.


ORCADIAN COMMUNITY

Picture Book


ORCADIAN COMMUNITY

Picture Book


ORCADIAN COMMUNITY

Picture Book


INITIAL BRIEF PROPOSAL

Orkney has always had a strong sense of community life and spirit. At present Orkney faces similar communities issues to the rest of the UK such as, lack of affordable housing and a large elderly population. A lack of affordable rented housing can have an affect on young adults. They may be unable to move out of their parents homes and start families, Many are deciding to move off the island in search of better prospects. Orkney also has a growing aging population, soon 1 in 3 Orcadians will be over the age of 65. In the future this will affect some elderly people who may not be able to venture out of their homes. At present Social isolation is the biggest growing concern for the elderly, along with not enough carers for such a large population. This all in turn has an affect on the economy of the island. To sustain the island it has been predicted that 3300 new homes need to be built within the next 10 years. The majority of housing on Orkney is detached developer houses that are sprawling further out of the towns. To provide 3300 new homes new solutions will be needed at much higher density then the current housing types. Density can be a key component in creating a vibrant community. The passage above Introduction gives a glimpse of the tight-knit community of Stromness’s past, the old traditions and festivals that still take place and the new sustainable industries that give the island its name today. How could Orkneys community spirit be translated into the everyday environment of Housing?

I propose a Community Housing Scheme that will be a part of the new Kirkwall Masterplan. The scheme will be housing for all ages, with a mix of house sizes and a focus on creating housing that is accessible to all. The housing will be flexible as to allow for different living situations and adaptability through life changes that may happen, as a family grows, splits or ages.

Semester 1


CONCEPT COLLAGE

Semester 2

Concept collage of garden space between the courtyards.


REFLECTING

Above is a small collection of images and text I gathered during the group research in semester one. The images and text depict the tight-knit Orcadian commuinty culture. The density/togetherness began as an aspiration for this housing project, a way to perhaps help tackle the islands current problems faced: Social isolation of the elderly and a lack of housing for young families. Reflecting on the project so far, last semester was concerned with form and organisation, creating flexible spacious flats that set the stage from various living situations. The urban forms of the blocks has established the space in which community life may take place.

S o Fa r


GROUND FLOOR URBAN PLAN

Semester 3


COMMUNITY & ARCHITECTURE

NOTES: Place is connected its people and practices. Places are not merely an effect of human agency but are created performatively as material interactivity, not merely a backdrop to the performance of human or social life. What is place? Place is a point of interrelations in space and time. In building, dwelling, thinking Heidegger uses the example of a bridge to illustrate this. The bridge is built between two previously unconnected banks of a river, with people unable to cross between them. Once the bridge is there it acts as a passage and leads people from one side to the other. But it also gathers people and a market may develop - providing food and other provisions for the travellers. Over time a town may emerge on these two banks of the river, a place, milieu, is created. Life Flows, movement and action are at the centre of everyday life. Places are (merely) pauses in the flow where live can become entangled, such as the bridge. Place and people are thus inseparable in terms of their mutual history or biography. Places are not specific points on the globe or even necessarily defined by objects, built or natural, they can be invisible. The place of an annual carnival will only manifest itself during the period of the carnival and will be another place for the rest of the year. (Degen, 2012) Whilst the objects in a place can be observed, just as the people can be, the viewpoint of the observer, especially if an outsider, may well miss what is there for local people, such as the street corner where men gather to talk and smoke. (Blokland, 2001: 273) Places like people can have multiple identities simultaneously. People whose lives are thus entangled, as shown here incorporated aspects of the place, the history of

People & Place


COMMUNITY & ARCHITECTURE

the place, into their everyday lives, their ‘way of being’ - or belonging. Places are defined by people and their practice and simultaneously the place defines people in it and informs their practice. In defining people, places create what Appadurai (1995) terms ‘local subjects’. Places are specific and the things in them, including the people, are part of that specificity (Casey, 1996), This is what makes the local and this is why place should be taken into consideration and indeed often is, without being stated: in talking to people we ‘place’ them by asking ‘where do you live?’, ‘who do you know?’. Only acknowledging place as an equal part of the triad of people, place and practice can a fully embodied account be produced: ‘neither body nor place is pre-cultural’ (Casey, 1996:46) and culture, or practice, is always and already embodied and emplaced. Heideggers dasein (being there, in place) is often assumed to imply fixity and stasis as opposed to becoming which involves progress but I feel this is at odds with the interactive creations of places through building. The building of the bridge does not create a bounded place consisting only of the pillars and archway of the bridge itself but opens up the banks of the river, has the potential to join the places on each side of the river and to gather to itself its own specific locale. Place as an event will never be static; place is interrelations cannot be bounded or fixed in gathering, places are productive of everyday life.

People & Place


COMMUNITY & ARCHITECTURE

L e s s o n s Fo r S t u d e n t s

“What makes Hertzbergers work so valuable for teaching is his close attentiveness to function, although his architecture is clearly shaped by formal concerns, not least his early work with its clearly articulated compositional and constructional disciplines” (Buchanan 2018). Hertzberger approach to design in a very functional way, but he does not prescribe or dictate a single correct use of the building elements he designs. Instead the elements can be interpreted and used in many different ways and act as formal devices allowing the users to express individuality and use the elements as they wish. The work of Herman Hertzberger is known as ‘Structuralism’ which is drawn from French Linguistical Theory, the buildings form and elements creates a potential assemblage of uses, and the individual users response to this allows for personal freedom within their environment. The book ‘Lessons for Students’ by Hertzberger displays the theoretical background to his work along with practical examplesthat underly the theories. It has a broad range of designs and subjects, with practical experience and evaluation of the use of these elements of buildings.


COMMUNITY & ARCHITECTURE

L e s s o n s Fo r S t u d e n t s

Public and Private “The concepts ‘public’ and ‘private’ can be interpreted as the translation into spatial terms of ‘collective’ and ‘individual’.” (Hertzberger 1991) Public: A place or area that can be accesed by anyone at all times; the collective is responsible for maintanance. Private: A place of area thats access is determined upon by an indidvual or small group; they are responsible for maintanance. The concepts ‘public’ and ‘private’ may be seen and understood in relative terms as a series of spatial qualities which, differing gradually, refer to accessibility, responsibility, the relation between private property and supervision of specific spatial units.

Territorial Claims The degree of accessibility, the supervison, the user and the carer of a space are factors that reveal to what level the space public or private. “Your own room is private vis a vis the living room and the kitchen of the house you live in. You look after your own room but the living room is a shared responsibility” (Hertzberger 1991).


COMMUNITY & ARCHITECTURE

L e s s o n s Fo r S t u d e n t s

Territorial Zoning The character of an area depends largly on the user who furnishes and arranges the space or the person who is responsible of caring for the area. “It is essential that the liberty to take personal initiatives should be embedded in the organisation structure.� (Hertzberger 1991).

(The Inbetween) Public and Private In some areas public space is being used by residents as if the space were private. This can strangthen the users claim to the area in others eyes. This is a merging of the public space with private. The thresholds between public and private are key zones for transition and connection between these two area of differing territoiral claims. Spacially this area can be a place of meeting and dialogue between the two. An example so such a threshold is the entrance to a home., between the street and the private domain of the house.


COMMUNITY & ARCHITECTURE

L e s s o n s Fo r S t u d e n t s

“The child sitting on the step in front of his house is sufficiently far away from his mother to feel independent to sense the excitement and adventure of the great unknown. Yet at the same time, sitting there on the step which is part of the street as well as home, he feels secure in the knowledge that his mother is nearby. The child feels at home and at the same time in the outside world. This duality exists thanks to the spatial quality of the threshold as a platform in its own right, a place where two worlds overlap, rather than sharp demarcation” (Hertzberger 1991). [Below] The front doors create a combined entrance sitting two by two. This allows for the user to sit outside on the bench and talk to their neighbour. The half door allows the person sitting outside to still have contact with the interior, incase the phone rings ect. The entrance becomes an extension of the home. “Concretization of the threshold as an in-between space means, first and foremost, creating a setting for welcomes and farewells, and this is therefore the translation into architectonic as a built facility is just as important for social contacts as thick walls are for privacy.” (Hertzberger 1991).


COMMUNITY & ARCHITECTURE

L e s s o n s Fo r S t u d e n t s

Conditions for social interaction are just as important as conditions for privacy within residential architecture. Therefore the staircase should be give prominence. Staircases can be used as playgrounds from smaller children, or a space for neighbours to meet. “Such an expansion in space serves as a place for neighbours to sit and talk. A truly communal atmosphere can be created when people all the house to penetrate the stairway” (Hertzberger 1991).

Private Claims to Public Space The in-between concept is the key to eliminating the sharp division between areas with different territorial claims. The point is therefore to create intermediary spaces, which, although on the administrative level belong to either the public or private are equally accessible to both sides, that is to say that it is wholly acceptable to both that the ‘other makes us of them.


COMMUNITY & ARCHITECTURE

L e s s o n s Fo r S t u d e n t s

The Street devaluation of this street concept may be due to the following factors: • •

• •

The increase in motorized traffic and the priority that it is given; The inconsiderate organization of the access areas to the dwellings, in particular that the front door vis a vis each other owing to indirect and impersonal access routes such as galleries, elevators, covered passages the effacement of the street as communal space owing to block siting; decreased densities of housing, while also the number of inhabitants per dwelling has greatly decreased. So the decrease in population density accompanied by an increase in dwelling space per inhabitant and in the width of the streets.

In the first place this feeling of belonging together revolves around everyday social interaction, such as children playing together out in the street, baby sitting for each other keeping in touch concerning each other’s health, in short all those cares and joys that perhaps seem so self-evident that one tends to underestimate their importance. Dwelling units function better if the streets on which they are sited function well as a living-street, and that in turn depends especially on how receptive they are, i.e. Upon whether the atmosphere inside the homes can blend with the communal atmosphere of the street outside. This is largely determined by the planning and detailing of the layout of the neighbourhood.

Summary • • • • • •

Draw on Experience and Memories when designing. Put yourself in others shoes eg. whats life like for others. What else might an Element be used for (such as a staircase, a door) what situations will happen here? How can you allow people to express indivdualism through architecture (Can the feeling of ones home be drawn outside? ect.) Points of interaction are importance and levels of public and private. The inbetween can act as a key place for interesting things to happen.


INTERIOR OPENINGS

3 Bedroom Flat


INTERIOR OPENINGS

3 Bedroom Flat

Enfiliade - Openings changed


INTERIOR OPENINGS

3 Bedroom Flat

Looking towards bedroom and livingroom - openings changed - Livingroom doors are solid doors to allow the livingroom to be closed off. Also allows for flexibility of use for that room.


INTERIOR OPENINGS

3 Bedroom Flat

Glass Doors on Kitchen (Initial design idea)


STREET

Haarlemmer Houttuinen Housing - Hertzberger

Activity

From Lessons for Architecture Students

Social Housing - Bogan and Van Broek

Cohousing Marmalade Lane- Mole Architects Looking at examples of the pedestrian street this has many advantages to improving the quality of space around the home. The streets will be alot quieter allowing the street space to become community space for gathering and playing. Residents will be more likely to decorate outside and use the space as an extension of home.


STREET

Privacy and Views

Original Street Layout. Highlighted above are the livingrooms of each flat. As the street is 8 metres wide there would be privacy issues as the livingrooms look into eachother.

Moving of Blocks by 5 metres and some small changes to bedroom windows allows for all livingrooms to be looking onto a wall instead of directly into another home. These walls could potentially be textured, or a tree placed here, or a plant wall, something to make the view more pleasant.


STREET

Housing Block Layout

Original Block Layout

New Layout


WINDOW

Elements

The Window Lets daylight and warmth into the room Can be opened for fresh air Outside noises and smells come from an open window Allows for views out A Place to sit or stand and contemplate And a place for people watching Acts as a small retreat from the interior world Gives a feeling of security Being able to observe outside Or close off to the outside world with curtains or blinds A point of possible interaction Through waving or talking to a person outside Provides the ability to display Objects, plants and furniture


WINDOW

Notes

Window as Place The widow has the ability to affirm itself as a place, the ley destination in a room, claiming a vast territory;it can also retreat into anonymity. The bay window can become a room-within-a-room, becomes an area of leisure, for looking wistfully out. Windowscape - Atelier Bow-Wow Yoshiharu Tsukamoto Recapture the window as a sense of place Window, climate, cultural, social The contemporary window has alot of potential because the window can act as a threshold between nature and the human body. So windows are a device to grasp what nature is in a very concrete way rather than a very abstract way. I am interested in the behaviour, of nature, buildings, and people. The window is something that synthesizes the behaviour of people and the behaviours of nature. Through the window, we don’ts see nature as statistics, we grasp it through our behaviour. The window is a device to interact with the outside world By respecting the genealogy of the window you could keep the streetscape as a cultural resource.


WINDOW

W indow as Furniture

C A P T A I N ’ S H O U S E R E N O VA T I O N B y Ve c t o r A r c h i t e c t s The locations and forms of openings were carefully reconsidered. The new concrete window frame sticks out from the outside wall, which prevents excessive rainwater from seeping into the window from the wall surface. The thickness is then designed into “window-furniture” system: window is no longer a simple opening, but serves as a medium space situating between nature and the interior space. (Archdaily)


WINDOW

C a p t a i n’s H o u s e


WINDOW

3 Bedroom

Livingroom Bay Window 3 Bedroom Flat

The wimdow has the ability to affirm itself as a place, the ley destination in a room, claiming a vast territory; it can also retreat into anonymity.


WINDOW

Bay Window

Flat with view across peedie sea

Flat with view onto street (Plant wall)

Possible Window Opening with balustrade, (Sort of ruins view though) Possible to have side windows open but not front window


WINDOW

Light Study


WINDOW

Window Box

SOMEVILLE STUDENT HOUSING By Niall Mclaughlin The student rooms are articulated using projecting oak windows . The projecting bay was conceived as a response to a 1960’s Government Report on Student Loneliness. Each student has their own projection and way of identifying their place in the whole. The bay windows will also bring a liveliness to the extreme oblique views of the building, which you will get when you pass along the narrow laneway once it is complete.


SHUTTERS

Shutters like these can allow for a level of privacy while still allowing light into a room. Shutters can also be used to reflect light.

Barragan House


SHUTTERS

3 Bedroom Livingroom Window

Shutters to allow different light situations. The front of the window may be shut off and light can still come in from the sides and the opposite is possible.


SHUTTERS

3 Bedroom Livingroom Window


SHUTTERS

3 Bedroom Livingroom Window

Shutters on the living room window take away the ability to easily place furniture and objects into the windowbox, like a table or chair, as the shutters will get in the way while opening and closing. I think it would also be preferable to have as much light as possible coming in this window at the same time as allowing for privacy.


J A PA N E S E S C R E E N S

Japanese Washi Paper - a similar effect might be created with different material

Privacy and Light


J A PA N E S E S C R E E N S

Privacy and Light


WINDOW

Ground Floor Apartments


WINDOW

Ground Floor Apartments

Wilderness Mews by Morris + Co A seat looking onto the street outside a window


The Entrance You stand outside while looking for your keys Where someone will stand and wait to be greeted Postman deliverys parcels and mail A place where the home might spill out; plants and furniture Somewhere to sit; adult, child, pet A place to leave a wet umbrella or muddy boots An open door can be an invitation for interaction You sit to put your shoes on


PERSONAL NOOKS

Stromness


WINDOW

Ground Floor Apartments


WINDOW

Corner Flat Balcony Window


WINDOW

Corner Flat Balcony Window


WINDOW

Corner Flat Balcony Window


FA C A D E

Fa c a d e P r o g r e s s i o n

Original Facade Openings

Current Facade change with new openings


FA C A D E

Fa c a d e P r o g r e s s i o n


FA C A D E

Timberyard Housing


FA C A D E

Fa c a d e P r o g r e s s i o n


FA C A D E

Original Brickwork


FA C A D E

Orkmey Stone


FA C A D E

Brickwork Plaster Casts


FA C A D E

Basic Street Impression


STREET

Urban Concept


STREET

Urban Concept

The Square A Small Cafe sits between the public space and courtyard. The cafe has a seating area out onto the sunny public square. This at times will be a lively area. At the back of the cafe looking out onto the courtyard is a quieter area. The Flowershop also sits between the public square and courtyard. At the front in the sun there are plants and flowers for sale. There is an area at the back in which the flowers are kept cold and can be seen from the courtyard. On the otherside of the cafe is a gift shop frequented by tourists arriving and leaving Kirkwall, often buying last minutes gifts. People with time before their bus arrives often look into the open gallery space on the corner of the square.


STREET

Urban Concept

The Bakery The Bakery is across the road from the Post Office infront of an open space that benefits from the morning sun. People stop by on their way to work to grab something to eat. Those who have more time sit outside and enjoy the morning sun.

The Ice Cream Shop On summer evenings Families, Couples and friends walk around the Peedie Sea. The ice cream shop becomes a point to stop along the way and some sit infront to enjoy their ice cream by the sea.


C O U R T YA R D

Elements

The Courtyard It lets light and fresh air in A place to lookout over A place to relax in quiet A place to spy on neighbours A place to see the hear wildlif A place to dry clothes Where children play safely People can garden and grow vegtables Talk to neighbours across Balconies Could be opened up for events and festivals Somewhere to excercise


C O U R T YA R D

Monastery Gardens

Feeling of safety through enclosure Tranquil


C O U R T YA R D

Mental Health and Architecture

HAPPY BY DESIGN A Guide to Architecture and Mental Health Happy by Design is a design guide to aid in the creation of spaces that positivly effect our mental health. The book is split into 7 Sections like Light, Comfort, Control, Aesthetics, Nature ect. I read this book last semester and incorporated some design decsiions on light, comfort and control. Revisiting the book now, here is some notes on Nature:

Nature - Nature can make us happier, reduce stress, improve memory and make us more creative - Bring nature into the building - Provide views of nature - Design gardens and parks as an escape from the urban. Giving an outdoor space a more rural feel can also help, perhaps through the use of winding, unpaved paths that feel more like country tracks. Wildlife is also extremely important in helping to create a sense that we are out of the city - Integrate or give views to water. Water can most easily be integrated through the landscape, ponds, streams or fountains. - Improve ecology and biodiversity, biodiversity creates healthy and stronger ecosystems, this can lead to bright colourful displays that can improve our mood. Biodiverse plant life can also attract wildlife and our interactions with animals - Nature can be used to educate engage and involve people, ecotherapy programmes are now used extensively for rehabilitation, things such as gardening.


C O U R T YA R D

Garden as Community Space

Children Outdoor areas are used by children to learn and play. A natural environment allows children to explore and make their own mistakes in a way that manufactued play equipment cannot. Examples of play areas - Sand pits and Mud gardens - Areas to climb such as crates and logs - Swinging opportunities, ropes from trees - Stepping Stones, rocks for climbing, pebbles make noise under feet. - Vegatable Plots and Flowers, gardening - Art and murals - Places to hide - Paths to run or cycle bike or scotter down

Elderly Outdoor areas and Gardens can help entice people outdoors and have a posivtire benefit on their physical amd mental health. If living alone, the outdoor can sometimes be the only social contact with others, Social Isolation is associated with the decline in health and mobility of elderly people. Having a place for social contact, and an area for small activities can be of great benefit. Garden Features that can help elderly poeple - A shaded area to sit out of the sun - Looping paths to allow small walks with seating provided along the way - Raised Planters to allow easy access to gardening - Multiple textures to experience in one place

Community Participation - Area for gathering - Area to Grow Vegtables and Garden - Possible BBQ area - Excercise - Areas to personalise


C O U R T YA R D

Cohousing Garden

B I G YA R D By Zanderroth Architekten The garden area in this housing project has alot of the same features as the section before. The garden has areas for children to play, a sandpit, a tree house, platforms to sit, pebbles, raised areas to climb and sit and a winding path to play along. The path at one side isalot wider and ca be used for community gatherings.


C O U R T YA R D


H A P P Y VA L L E Y

An Orcadian Oasis


C O U R T YA R D

Sun Analysis

June 08:oo

Mar/Sep 08:oo

June 12:oo

Mar/Sep 12:oo

June 16:oo

Mar/Sep 16:oo


C O U R T YA R D

Ground Floor Balcony

If the Street on the ground floor has the potential to open up perhaps the back ‘balcony’ area could be a little more intimate.


C O U R T YA R D

I think the wall in the previous sketch between the ground floor patios and the courtyard although giving privacy, it becomes a barrier that stops the ability to step out into the courtyard. Here there is no boundary between the patio and courtyard garden, the wild bushes of the garden become the boundary between the small path and the patios.

Collage


C O U R T YA R D

Privacy at ground Floor


C O U R T YA R D

Idea

Courtyard Concept Sketch


C O U R T YA R D

Relationship between balconies and staircase window - point of interaction


The Staircase A meeting place to talk to neighbours A place for neighbouring children to play out of the rain Where a pet might sit Teenagers wait downstairs while friends pop home Furniture and old carpets are placed Somewhere to sit and wait when you forget your keys A place to lookout and wait for someone arriving or wave goodbye


S TA I R C A S E

Leth and Gori - Very Social Housing


S TA I R C A S E

Idea

Orignal Stairs

Proposed Stairs Thinking of developing this: Moving the stairs so the circulation area becomes larger allows for space for children to place and objects to be place. gives space to design front door space in include small storage of shelves for plant ect. Moving the stairs here also gives the circulaion a connection with the street. (terrace could be placed on upper floor) An Initial Idea not implemented


LIVING IN THE COMMUNITY a day in the life


A Day in the Life Morning The Doors are opened to let in the fresh morning air A view of the courtyard is glimpsed on the way down the stairs The street is busy with people walking to work On the corner is the bakers shop It gets the morning sun Late morning washing is hung out to dry A man sits in the courtyard reading A woman waters her plants, Her cat finds a warm spot to sit in the street Midday Blinds and windows are opened to views Doors are left open and the apartment becomes a place for wandering, In a courtyard there’s a conversation over the vegtable garden In another an old woman talks to a child playing The Square across from the bus station gets busy around midday The cafÊ gets ready to serve lunch And a man browses the flower shop Afternoon Blinds are drawn to the street As Children play in the streets and courtyards after school A woman is reading on her balcony while the children are out Evening A workspace catches the evening sun The sun can be watched setting over the peedie sea It lights up the central hall


Profile for Claire Milnes

Claire Milnes Thesis Journal  

Claire Milnes Thesis Journal  

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