Page 1

claire juyeon koh Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture Architecture Portfolio + Individual Work


1. PROJECTS 1-1

BREAKING RIGIDITY

P

Transforming Hunt Library Through Parasitic Architecture 48-105 First-Year Design Studio Spring 2017 | Instructors: Kai Gutschow, Ann Ranttila, Gretchen Craig, Lucas Bartoweicz

1-2

URBAN AGRICULTURE AND COMMUNITY CENTER

P

Creating a Center for Urban Agriculture in Homewood, Pittsburgh 48-200 Second-Year Design Studio Fall 2017 | Instructors: Josh Bard, Tonya Markowitz

1-3

VARMLADA

P

Planning and Constructing of a Year-Round Greenhouse for Phipps Convervotary Gardens. 48-200 Second-Year Design Studio Fall 2017 | Instructors: Josh Bard, Tonya Markowitz

1-4

WEDDING PAVILION AT LAKE ERIE

P

Creating Orthogonal Spaces for Wedding Ceremonies 48-100 First-Year Design Studio Fall 2016 | Instructors: Gerard Damiani, Andrew Moss

1-5

DRAWING PERFORMANCE

P

Abstracting and Transforming the Motion of an Object 48-105 First-Year Design Studio Spring 2017 | Instructors: Kai Gutschow, Ann Ranttila, Gretchen Craig, Lucas Bartoweicz

1-6

FOLDED GARDEN

Creating a Hanging Garden for a Single Plant 48-200 Second-Year Design Studio Fall 2017 | Instructors: Josh Bard, Tonya Markowitz

P


2. DIGITAL MEDIA

3. ANALOG MEDIA

2-1

3-1

PARAMETRIC ARRAYS

P

HYBRID DRAWINGS

Parametric Design Made Using Rhinoceros, Grasshopper and GH Python 62-225 Generative Modeling Fall 2017 | Instructors: Josh Bard

Hybrid Drawings Done Using Analog and Digital Methods 48-125 Fall 2017 | Instructors: Douglas Cooper

2-2

3-2

Parametric Design Made Using Rhinoceros, Grasshopper and GH Python 62-225 Generative Modeling Fall 2017 | Instructors: Josh Bard

Drawings Done Using Charcoal and Pastel 48-125 Fall 2017 | Instructors: Douglas Cooper

AGENT-BASED MODELING

CHARCOAL AND PASTEL

2-3

PARAMETRIC SCREEN & SIMULATION Parametric Design Made Using Rhinoceros, DIVA, Grasshopper and GH Python 62-225 Generative Modeling Fall 2017 | Instructors: Josh Bard

2-4

EGG SLICER MODELING 3D Modeling of an Egg Slicer Using Rhinoceros 48-125 Digital and Analog Media Spring 2017 | Instructors: Eddy Man Kim

2-5

BAKER HALL RENDERING Rendering of Baker Hall Using Rhinoceros and V-Ray 48-125 Digital and Analog Media Spring 2017 | Instructors: Eddy Man Kim

4. INDIVIDUAL WORK


1-1 TRANSFORMING HUNT - BREAKING RIGIDITY Transforming Hunt Library Through Parasitic Architecture

Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture | 48-105 First-Year Design Studio Spring 2017 Instructors: Kai Gutschow, Ann Ranttila, Gretchen Craig, Lucas Bartoweicz

The objective of this project was to insert a parasitic space into the exisiting Hunt Library of Carnegie Mellon University, The facade and the interior of the current library both display a strikingly rigid and orthogonal pattern, and the purpose of my design was to provide a space that literally and figuratively breaks away from the rigidity. Not only it intereferes with the existing facade by introducing a curved element to the rigid, orthogonal structure, it also creates a threshold space in between the old library and the new library that brings in the outdoor to the indoor and can be used as a little pathway to take a walk away from the stressed environment of the old library. The inteiror of the new space is supposed to be very relaxing, open, inviting, with the maximum inlet of natural light.


Site View


Generative diagrams showing where the size and the shape, placement of the study space originated from. First, i drew an oval inside the rectangular floor plan of the existing library, scaled it down and re-positioned it to the entrance canopy and using the shape, I generated a tear drop-looking shape that would eventually be used throughout the new space, including for its floor plan, furniture and metallic fins. As for the floor plan, pushing and pulling the tear drop shape, I generated a threshold space that is open to the exterior, and a very wide, welcoming interior space that can only be reached by crossing the threshold.

Besides desining the spapce and the structure, I used the fins and the shape used to generate the new space to generate different types of furniture that would aid in the relaxing expreience in the new space. It was supposed to be symbolic as well: just like the whole design process, creating furniture was an example of creating a non-rigidity from rigidity.


Renders


Final Model


1-2 Urban Agriculture & Community Center Creating a Center for Urban Agriculture in Homewood, Pittsburgh Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture | 48-200 Second-Year Design Studio Fall 2017 Instructors: Josh Bard, Tonya Markowitz Center for Urban Agricuture is a comprehensive project that takes a variety of urban features into consideration, including the physical context, demographics of the residents, seasonal planting strategies, high tech and traditional methods of planting and historical and cultural meaning that the site embodies. The primary objective of this project was to build an urban agriculture center in Homewood, PA that could provide a space for farming as well as a public space for the public to interact with each other and with the products of the farm. My goal of this project was specifically to prodive a public space that emphasizes the educational aspect of the agricultural center and through a transparent but passive design that blends in with the neighborhood and attracts the visitors form within.


Site Context

Given site is located in Homewood, Pittsburgh. The area is suburban rather than urban and is surrounded by mostly residential buildings. The most prominent problem, to me, seemed to be the fact that it was located in the food desert area and that the residents in Homewood had a relatively low educational level, compared to the rest of Pittsburgh. Our Site

Undermined Areas

Food Desert

Landslide Prone Areas

Median Income Below Poverty Line

Flood Plain Area

Commercial Urban Farm Community Farm Community Garden Our Site

Commercial Urban Farm: Land used for agricultural p Community Farm: Land gardened collectively by peo Community Garden: Allotment garden, where invidid

Problem

Homewood Produce Access

Potential Growing Space in Homewood

Change in Average Farm Size in Allegheny County (in acres)

24 1940-1960

20 16 12

Homewood North

8 4

Homewood West

1960-1980

0

1980-2000 -4

1920-1940

-8

Homewood South

-12

1900-1920

1880-1900

Point Breeze North

No Fresh Produce

Fresh Produce Available

Homewood is a residential neighborhood that has a lot of potential growing space in vacant lots and yards. If both types of spaces were used Homewood would be able to generate more than enough produce to feed its population.

Our Site

Total Land Area of Homewood: 659.8 Acres

Food Desert

Area of Potential Growing Space: 181.5 Acres

20%+ Living Below Poverty Line

Population that the Potential Growing Space could sustain: 9882

Some Fresh Produce

11-20% Living Below Poverty Line

Solution

Site Pictures Susquehanna St - Toward the Site

Susquehanna St - Away from the Site

Population of Homewood: 6442

Percentage of Agriculture Workers in Allegheny County, Pittsburgh 1900

1950

2000

Total: 778505

Total: 1515237 Total: 1281229

Workers: 4985

Workers: 2385

.643%

1950

.157%

Workers: 410 .018%


Shape & Material

Generative Diagram

Grass

Glass Steel Frame

Grass

Wood


Program, Circulation & Renders The site of the agriculture & community center is developed so that it would facilitate the access and the circulation for the visitors to the maximum. The main concept of the building was to embody the spirit and the shape of the neighborhood and to provide an open, easily accessible space for the visitors. One of the prominent features of the building is the classroom within the glasshouse that is located on the side where there are most passerby’s. It works as an important indicator of the fact that the buliding focuses on education more than anything. The idea of visual hierarchy and dual usage of a circulation passage for another purpose (i.e. corridor that works as the museum as well) are the recurring features of this building.

Ease of Access

Connection

Gardening

Enveloping

Program - General

Gardening

Community (Wood) Gardening

Gardening

Community

Gardening Community

Gardening

Education

Gardening

Education (Wood + Glass)

Education

Education

Community Farmer’s Market

Farmer’s Market

Gardening (Glass + Outdoors)


Planting Diagram

Sustainability Features Sustainability Features

Greenhouses

Sustainability Features

Waste Management Turn the human waste into fertilizer Traditional Farming

Crops Grown in Pittsburgh / Zone 6

Aquaponics

Bacteria converts amonia into nigtrate. Plants absorb the nitrate and filter water. Fish produce waste and ammonia.

To pS oil Su bS oil

Green Roof

Be dro ck

Filt er

Sustainability Features

Solar Energy

Vertical Garden

Gro win g

Dra

Me diu m

Does not require soil; can use aquaponics

Solar Panel will collect and store solar energy that would be used to power the building

Me

ina ge

mb ran

e

Ro

The rm

Su p

Va

po rC

ot Re pe llan t

po rt P

al In

an el sula tio n

on

tro l

Ro

of

Amount of sunlight needed

Amount of water needed

Size of the plant

Although the planting area is spread throughout the entire site, more high-tech farming was placed in the greenhouse where the classroom is to promote learning of the new techniques and to show the visitors approaching from the side that the center is different from the regular, traditional community gardens. On the other hand, the traditional farming techniques are placed deeper into the site, to aid the relaxed mood of the public space where the visitors can casually stroll along.

Waste Management

Green Roof

Turn the human waste into fertilizer

Green Roof will provide extra space for people to relax. It will also help insulate or cool the building

Solar Energy

Rainwater Collection

Solar Panel will collect and store solar energy that would be used to power the building

The gutters on the side of the roofs will collect the rainwater and store it in the underground containers. Collected rainwater will be used to water the plants.

Green Roof


Final Model


Plans, Sections & Elevations

Green Roof

Greenhouse (continued)

A Transverse Section

Plan : Second Floor

Porch

Classroom

C

Cafe Greenhouse Greenhouse (Low-Tech)

(High-Tech)

B

Kitchen Museum + Corridor

Plan : First Floor

D

A

C North - South Elevation


B Longitudinal Section

D East-West Elevation


1-3 V a r m l ĂĽ d a

Planning and Constructing of a Year-Round Greenhouse for Phipps Convervotary Gardens Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture | 48-200 Second-Year Design Studio Fall 2017 Instructors: Josh Bard, Tonya Markowitz Hoop House was a collaborative project whose objective was to build a fullsize, working green house to help sustain the plants throughout the fall and winter. With a simple geometry and complex but intuitive sliding mechanism, our design was able to achieve a clean aesthetics as well as respond to a variety of problems ranging from ventilation, circulation, insulation and precipitation. Project done In collaboration with: John Butler, Grace Hou, Jessica Kusten, Hsiao Tyng Peck, Steve Sontag, Crystal Xue


Site Context Map

Phipps Conservatory

Pittsburgh

2’-3” 2’-0”

6’-0”

2’-6”

Scale: 1/6” = 1’

N

Phipps Conservatory

Site at Phipps Conservatory

Our site is located in the Phipps Conservatory and Gardens in Pittsburgh, PA. The botanical garden at Phipps accomodates a wide range of plants, including the ones of tropical region that are grown in the greenhouses, and the seasonal ones indegineous to Pittsburgh’s climate that are grown outside. From the point of construction the site is about 0.5 miles away.


Climate


Our plant bed lies on the axis of Northeast - Southwest. The rooftop where the plant bed is situated is surrounded by the walls on the Northwest and Southwest, which prevent the plants on the bed to get enough sunlights throughout the day. Whereas there are some parts that receive full sunlight throughout the entire day, there are some parts that do not receive any sunlight at all. Pittsburgh is located in the Temperature zone, which means it experiences all four seasons and gets precipitation including rain, snow, hail etc.. Its average temperature peaks around July as well as its average monthly rainfall, and experiences the lowest around January. We did not have to take the wind direction or wind speed into account as much since our site is surrounded by such tall objects that block all the winds.


Design Process - Initial Stage

Render

Model Pictures

One design component that our group was excited about was the sliding door mechanism. We wanted our design to be interactive for the gardner as well as the visitors. Other design considerations include: slanted roof facing the south to maximize the sunlight inlet, varying height to accomodate different sizes of plants, and angled roof to prevent the snow or other form of precipitation from piling up. Prevalent idea for the track was to use a bigger pipe that would ride on top of the smaller conduit.


Design Process - Iteration I 48”

96” Design Process up until now: includes impletmentation of sliding doors, division and tilting of the geometry. Second iteration will include different shapes between the fixed structure and the sliding part, greater number of modules and a pair of horizontal beams in the back and front to increase the strength of the structure.

Making the door piece UNPARALLEL to the rest of the fixed structure:

Maximizing openable space

Strengthening the structure and its cohesiveness:

Slanted geometry based on proportion

Overlaps between movable module and stationary parts help reduce heat loss through the openings

96”

Low roof to minimize heat loss

Movable module echoes geometry of staionary parts

Slanted low wall in the front: distribution of structural force

Openable side facing: Mike the gardener for watering access

Overlaps between movable module and stationary parts help reduce heat loss through openings

48”

Roof angled towards south (direction of the sun)

Low wall in the front to prevent heat loss from soil

Angled roof to prevent accumulation of snow/rain

Curved edges: conduits will not actually bend to an angle

Subsequent modules have the same slant in roof

Movable piece overlaps stationary part on sides and bottom to reduce heat loss to soil


Renders

Model Pictures

Render

Renders showing the motion of the sliding door


Design Process - Iteration II

Digrams showing the motion of door

Final part of the iteration included horizontal beams at the front and the back of the door piece to facilitate the sliding motion. Also, instead of having a bigger pipe ride the smaller conduit on top, we decided to use small wooden blocks to move on the fixed pipe that is attached to the plant bed.

Model Pictures (that show motion)


6

Section 5 North-South Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" Section 4 North-South Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" Section 5 North-South Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Door Isometric Drawing

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

S20

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

S16

Stationary Box Assembly

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Door Isometric Axon

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 16 of 24

Stationary Box Assembly

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

Varmlåda

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Hoop House

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

Varmlåda Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

Hoop House

Sliding Door Assembly

Exploded Axonometric

Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck Crystal Xue

Varmlåda

Stationary Box Assembly Tonya Markiewicz

S3 Building Door Assembly

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Hoop House

Varmlåda Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

S2 Varmlåda

2

ssembly - Door

Varmlåda Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

2

Hoop House

S4 Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Hoop House

East Elevation

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 4 of 24

8'

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

3

1

or Review cale: 1" = 1' : 0" .09.2017 of 24

North-South Section

Elevation 3 East Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Hoop House

1

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 3 of 24

5

Side Elevations

11 16"

South Elevation

3" 316

1" 3'-102

3'-117 8"

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 2 of 24 Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

6

9" 3'-816

East-West Elevation Plan

3" 1'-016

1" 3'-78

8' 4

2

4

1" 3'-42

1" 4'-08

3'-7"

11" 3'-016

9" 3'-216

6"

15" 316

1'-113 4"

2'-115 8"

2'-85 8"

3'-103 8"

4'

Plan

6

Varmlåda

7" 216

Or thographic Drawings

h Section

North South Section Elevation 2 West Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

West Elevation

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

13" 16

Hoop House

1" 2'-118

1" 2'-016

h Section

2"

4

3 6"

1

Sliding Door Assembly Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Construction

Upon completing our design process, we were required to produce a set of construction drawings before beginning the actual construction part. The construction drawings had to include but were not limited to: orthographic drawings, axonometric drawings, studio setup for creating a constructino space, instruction for installation, details for joints, conduits, and plastic components.

Assembly


S21

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 19 of 24

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" x1 x6

x1 x4 x 13

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

x3

Varml책da

For Review Scale: 6" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 17 of 24

S17

Joint Assembly

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Hoop House

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Peck Tyng Crystal Xue

Varml책da Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

x 13

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Peck Tyng Crystal Xue

x4

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Peck Tyng Steve Sontag Crystal Xue Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens x1

Hoop House

S19

Varml책da Hoop House

x6

S18

North-East Axon North East Axon

Joint Labels

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

x1

For Review Scale: 6" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 18 of 24

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck Crystal Xue

Varml책da Tonya Markiewicz

Hoop House

South East Axon South-East Axon x3

Joint Detail

For Review Scale: 3/4" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 21 of 24

Assembly - Track

Joint Details


0 40’ 120’ 200’ 360‘

6’

680’ 200’ 360‘

N

0 0.5’ 1.5’

Point of Entry

3.5’

1.5’ 3.5’ 7.5’

7.5’ 15.5’

680’

64”

46” 84”

Site: Edible Garden at Phipps Conservatory

15.5’

0 1’ 3’

N 7’ 13’ 29’

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Hoop House

Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck Crystal Xue

Tonya Markiewicz

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

22 of 24

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

6’

John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck Crystal Xue

Phipps Conservatory and Section A1 Botanical Gardens

Tonya Markiewicz

door=

S23

Varmlåda

door=

S22 S22

CFA

Phipps Conservatory and For Review Botanical Gardens 10.09.2017

CFA

For Review 10.09.2017 23 of 24

0 40’ 120’

0.5’

Varmlåda

Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck Crystal Xue

Tonya Markiewicz Grace Ho Jessica K Steve So

Varmlåda

Field Map

Transportation 2

0

Hoop House

Handling/Installing

For Review 10.09.2017 22 of 24

Site: Edible Garden at Phipps Conservatory

Transportation 1

Handling/Installing

Hoop House

N

Transportation 1

Installation


Carrying and placing the hoop house over the plant bed

Fixing the hoop house onto the bed and transferring our plants to the plant bed!


1-4 WEDDING PAVILION AT LAKE ERIE Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48-105: Freshmen Design Studio: Foundation II | S17 Instructors: Kai Gutschow, Lucas Bartoweicz, Gretchen Graig, Ann Ranttila Objective of the project was to design a wedding pavilion of with a villa size of 20’ x 20’ x 20’ in a 80’ x 80’ x 8’ garden made of hedges where the creation of the substantial relationship between the interior space and the exterior space is the primary goal of the design process


Process Work

Drawings

Floor plan of the site. Size: 20” x 20”, scale: 1/4” = 1’ : 0”

Top: Elevation of the site; Bottom: Section of the site

Sectional Perspective of the pavilion

Sectional paraline drawing of the site


Circulation of the crowd.

Public (green) vs Private (pink)

Golden rectangles


1-5 DRAWING PERFORMANCE Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48-105: Freshmen Design Studio: Foundation II | S17 Instructors: Kai Gutschow, Lucas Bartoweicz, Gretchen Graig, Ann Ranttila


Process Work

Above: Vellum drawings intended to study the physical characteristics of the given tool. << Photos of the egg slicer. < Rhino model of the egg slicer.

After having observed the physical aspects of the object, we studied the movement of the object through the recording of the tool in action. We were encouraged to study the motion of the object especially in relation to the human movement, its purpose and its shape. < screenshots from the egg slicer video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaSwHgjmXYE Top: Drawing of the motion of the egg slicer. Intended to emphasize the arch-shaped path that the slicing arm makes and the pressure present at the momentwhen the slicing arm contacts the egg.


Above: Exploded view of slits + core. Above: Rhino model of the core. Above: Actual wood model of the core. Left Above: Rhino model of the model Left Below: Rhino model of the joints.

After individual studies on the tool, we were paired up with a partner to study each other's tool and its movement. First, we took sections from each other's drawing and devloped into an abstraction of the tool's physical characteristics and its motion. During the model making stage of the project, we produced a set of designs that physically and conceptually connects the two sections of our drawing.


1-6 MESH

Creating a Hanging Garden Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48-200 Second-Year Design Studio Fall 2017 Instructors: Josh Bard, Tonya Markowitz Folded Garden is a simple project with an objective of designing a small, portable hanging garden that would help sustain the plant throughout the fall until the first frost of the season. The primary materials used in this project were piano wires with the radii of 0.032mm and 0.062mm and the shrink-wrap plastic. The theme of my project was â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Meshâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. By utilizing the mesh system, I hoped to build a flexible but substantial structure that would harbor the plant safely until winter.


Process: Baby Carrier

Process: Meshing Around I wanted to create a structure that could wrap around the plant safely and soundly. The first concept that I came up with this project was a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;baby carrierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, which inspired many of my initial forms and sketches.

Primary concern of my design was to provide a maximum care for the plant. I tried to maximize the received sunlight by utilizing a deep teardrop shape pertruding outwards that would provide the plant an adequate coverage from the wind and cold as well.

During the second phase of the design process, I decided to incorporate the mesh structure into my design. As mentioned before, I wanted to provide my plant a substantial support that would help it survive in harsh conditions. I figured a mesh structure would be appropriate for its extraordinary strength and flexibility. Even though I used the thinnest wire allowed for the structure on the left. it was strong enough to hold a 4.4 lbs apple cider bottle.


Process: Finalization

The final phase of the process revolved around integrating the two concepts together: baby carrier and mesh. I used the mesh system to create a strong but flexible structure that would change its shape according to its content and protect the plant from the wind and cold temperature while providing it with maximum sunlight and rainwater.

Final Product: Diagrams


Final Product: Front Elevation

Final Product: Side Elevation

13”

7”

8.5”

Final Product: Plan

8.5”

7”


Explosion

Final Product: Exploded View

: Wire unit: inches scale: 1” = 3” 3 2.5

1

2 1.5

: Connection Path

Hanger 0.037mm

Back

0.032mm

Bottom 0.032mm

Front

0.032mm

Hanger 0.037mm


Final Product


1-6 MESH

Creating a Hanging Garden Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48-200 Second-Year Design Studio Fall 2017 Instructors: Josh Bard, Tonya Markowitz


Final Product


Pictures showing the sliding motion of the door


EGG SLICER MODELING Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48-120: Analog and Digital Media I | F16 Instructors: Gerard Damiani, William Cooper Recreation of the egg slicer; made from scratch using Rhinoceros 3D. Spatial features created by different position and orientation of the egg slicer.

Variations of the egg slicer.


BAKER HALL Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48-125: Analog and Digital Media II | S17 Instructors: Eddy Man Kim, William Cooper Rendering of one of the buildings on Carnegie Mellon campus. Made from scratch using Rhinoceros 3D and V-Ray renderer.


FINAL PROJECT: HYBRID DRAWING Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48-125: Analog and Digital Media II | S17 Instructors: Eddy Man Kim, William Cooper Hybrid drawing of a street scene and a view of the cube house. Analog portion (linework) done in ink and digital portion (coloring) done in Photoshop.

Architecture Portfolio - First Three Semesters  
Architecture Portfolio - First Three Semesters  
Advertisement