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Architecture Por tfolio Claire Koh


1-1 Porous City Exploring Architectural Porosity Through an Innovative Office Building in Easty Liberty, Pittsburgh Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture | 48-205 Instructors: Jeremy Ficca, Eddy Man Kim

East Liberty , Pittsburgh has witnessed a great change in its social and economic status in the recent 10 years. As large companies such as Google and Target were introduced to the community, it became inevitable that East Liberty go through social problems such as gentrification and social migration. The goal of this project was to inroduce an innovative workspace at the intersection of Penn Avenue and Centre Avenue, which could address the concept of ‘giving back to the community’ by the idea of porosity. Instead of monolithic structures, porous architecture could be extremely effective in engaging the both exterior and interior space, the inhabitants and the passerbys, and the topographical factors and the building itself. The goal of my design was to incorporate four site factors into the building: circulation, pedestrians and daylight, in ways which would help both urban and visual porosity.


1-2 Inchworm: Saco Lake Bath House Exploring the Relationship Between a Man-Made Form, Nature, and Water Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture | 48-205 Instructors: Jeremy Ficca, Eddy Man Kim The goal of the project was to build a year-round bath house in the midst of the White Mountains, New Hampshire, on the site that overlooks Saco Lake. Primary goal of my design was to amplify the user’s experience by a series of contraction and expansion that are expressed through the space and material throughout the building. The building is designed to take the most advantage of the contour lines as well, from which the shape of the building and the unique angles of the corners are developed.


1-3 Urban Agricultural & Eduacational Center

How do areas of low income relate to food deserts?

How does the typography

Building a Community Garden in Homewood, Pittsburgh Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture | 48-200 Instructors: Jeremy Ficca, Eddy Man Kim Center for Urban Agricuture is a comprehensive project that takes a variety of urban features into consideration, including the physical context, demographics of the residents, seasonal planting strategies, high tech and traditional methods of planting and historical and cultural meaning that the site embodies. The primary objective of this project was to build an urban agriculture center in Homewood, PA that could provide a space for farming as well as a public space for the public to interact with each other and with the products of the farm. My goal of this project was specifically to prodive a public space that emphasizes the educational aspect of the agricultural center and through a transparent but passive design that blends in with the neighborhood and attracts the visitors form within. Our Site

Undermined Areas

Food Desert

Landslide Prone Areas

Median Income Below Poverty Line

Problem

Flood Plain Area

Homewood Produce Access

Potential Growing Space in

Homewood North Homewood West Homewood South Point Breeze North

No Fresh Produce

Fresh Produce Available

Homewood is a residential neig potential growing space in vac of spaces were used Homewoo more than enough produce to

Our Site

Total Land Area of Homewood

Food Desert

Area of Potential Growing Spa

20%+ Living Below Poverty Line

Population that the Potential 9882

Some Fresh Produce

11-20% Living Below Poverty Line

Solution

Population of Homewood: 644


Solar Panel

Grass

Glass Steel Frame

Concrete

Grass

Wood


Sustainability Features

Sustainability Features Greenhouses

Waste Management Turn the human waste into fertilizer

Traditional Farming

Crops Grown in Pittsburgh / Zone 6

Solar Energy Aquaponics To p So il Su b So

il

Sustainability Features

Green Roof

Be dro ck

Vertical Garden

Gro win g Filt er

Dra Ro

ot

Su Ther mal Vap

or

ppo rt P

of

Amount of water needed

Mem

inag e

Med ium

bran

Does not require soil; can use aquaponics

e

Re

pel lant

an el Insu lati on

Con

trol

Ro

Amount of sunlight needed

Solar Panel will collect and store solar energy that would be used to power the building

Bacteria converts amonia into nigtrate. Plants absorb the nitrate and filter water. Fish produce waste and ammonia.

Waste Management

Green Roof

Turn the human waste into fertilizer

Green Roof will provide extra space for people to relax. It will also help insulate or cool the building

Size of the plant

Solar Energy

Rainwater Collection

Solar Panel will collect and store solar energy that would be used to power the building

The gutters on the side of the roofs will collect the rainwater and store it in the underground containers. Collected rainwater will be used to water the plants.

Green Roof Green Roof will provide extra space for people to relax. It will also help insulate or cool the building


Green Roof

Greenhouse (continued)

Plan : Second Floor

Porch

Classroom C

Cafe Greenhouse (High-Tech) Greenhouse (Low-Tech)

D

A

Plan : First Floor

B


A

C

Transverse Section

B

Longitudinal Section

North - South Elevation D

East-West Elevation


1-4 Breaking Rigidity Transforming Hunt Library through Parasitic Architecture Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture | 48-105 Instructors: Kai Gutschow, Ann Ranttila, Gretchen Craig, Lucas Bartoweicz The objective of this project was to insert a parasitic space into the exisiting Hunt Library of Carnegie Mellon University, The facade and the interior of the current library both display a strikingly rigid and orthogonal pattern, and the purpose of my design was to provide a space that literally and figuratively breaks away from the rigidity. Not only it intereferes with the existing facade by introducing a curved element to the rigid, orthogonal structure, it also creates a threshold space in between the old library and the new library that brings in the outdoor to the indoor and can be used as a little pathway to take a walk away from the stressed environment of the old library. The inteiror of the new space is supposed to be very relaxing, open, inviting, with the maximum inlet of natural light.


Site View


Generative diagrams showing where the size and the shape, placement of the study space originated from. First, i drew an oval inside the rectangular floor plan of the existing library, scaled it down and re-positioned it to the entrance canopy and using the shape, I generated a tear drop-looking shape that would eventually be used throughout the new space, including for its floor plan, furniture and metallic fins. As for the floor plan, pushing and pulling the tear drop shape, I generated a threshold space that is open to the exterior, and a very wide, welcoming interior space that can only be reached by crossing the threshold.

Besides desining the spapce and the structure, I used the fins and the shape used to generate the new space to generate different types of furniture that would aid in the relaxing expreience in the new space. It was supposed to be symbolic as well: just like the whole design process, creating furniture was an example of creating a non-rigidity from rigidity.


1-5 Varmlada: Hoop House Transforming Hunt Library through Parasitic Architecture Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture | 48-200 Instructors: Jeremy Ficca, Eddy Man Kim Hoop House was a collaborative project whose objective was to build a full-size, working green house to help sustain the plants throughout the fall and winter. With a simple geometry and complex but intuitive sliding mechanism, our design was able to achieve a clean aesthetics as well as respond to a variety of problems ranging from ventilation, circulation, insulation and precipitation. Project done In collaboration with: John Butler, Grace Hou, Jessica Kusten, Hsiao Tyng Peck, Steve Sontag, Crystal Xue


Phipps Conservatory

Pittsburgh

2’-3” 2’-0”

6’-0”

2’-6”

Scale: 1/6” = 1’

N

Phipps Conservatory

Site at Phipps Conservatory

Our site is located in the Phipps Conservatory and Gardens in Pittsburgh, PA. The botanical garden at Phipps accomodates a wide range of plants, including the ones of tropical region that are grown in the greenhouses, and the seasonal ones indegineous to Pittsburgh’s climate that are grown outside. From the point of construction the site is about 0.5 miles away.


Making the door piece UNPARALLEL to the rest of the fixed structure:

Maximizing openable space

Slanted geometry based on proportion

Overlaps between movable module and stationary parts help reduce heat loss through the openings

Strengthening the structure and its cohesiveness:

Movable module echoes geometry of staionary parts

Openable side facing: Mike the gardener for watering access

Overlaps between movable module and stationary parts help reduce heat loss through openings

96� 48�

Low roof to minimize heat loss

Roof angled towards south (direction of the sun)

Low wall in the front to prevent heat loss from soil

Angled roof to prevent accumulation of snow/rain

Curved edges: conduits Movable piece will not actually bend to an overlaps stationary angle part on sides and bottom to reduce heat loss to soil


Section 5 North-South Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" Section 4 North-South Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Section 5 North-South Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Stationary Box Assembly

Door Isometric Drawing

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Section A1

Varmlåda

Tonya Markiewicz

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Exploded Axonometric

Hoop House

Varmlåda

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Varmlåda Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

Hoop House

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

Varmlåda

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Hoop House

S2

Stationary Box Assembly

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 16 of 24

S16

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Exploded Axonometric

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

2 Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Sliding Door Assembly

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

S3 Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

1

Sliding Door Assembly

Hoop House

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 3 of 24

2 of 24

1

Assembly - Door

Varmlåda Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

Hoop House

S4 2

S6

North-South

Elevation 3 East Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

t

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 4 of 24

s Varmlåda

8'

1" 3'-102

East-West For Review

Plan

3

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" Varmlåda10.09.2017

3" 316

Hoop House

a Hoop House

5

Side Elevations

11 16"

South Elevation

3'-117 8"

9" 3'-816

6

1" 3'-78

3" 1'-016

th - South Section

South E 4

2

4

1" 3'-42

8'

3'-7"

1" 4'-08

9" 3'-216

6"

15" 316

11" 3'-016

2'-115 8"

2'-85 8"

3'-103 8"

4'

1'-113 4"

view 1" = 1' : 0" 2017

North Elevation 2 West Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

t

S6

s

Varmlåda

e

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Tyng Peck Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

W

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

13" 16

Hoop House

7" 216

1" 2'-016

th - South Section

1" 2'-118

Plan

view 1" = 1' : 0" 017

2"

4

3 6"

1


S21

x6

x1 x4 x 13

S18

x1

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

x3

Varml책da

For Review Scale: 6" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 17 of 24

S17

Joint Assembly

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Hoop House

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Peck Tyng Crystal Xue

Varml책da Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

x 13

Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Peck Tyng Crystal Xue

S19

Varml책da Tonya Markiewicz Section A1 John Butler Grace Hou Claire Koh Jessica Kusten Hsiao Peck Tyng Steve Sontag Crystal Xue

Hoop House

x4

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

For Review Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 19 of 24

Joint Labels

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0" x1

Hoop House

North East Axon North-East Axon x6

For Review Scale: 6" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 18 of 24

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

Varml책da Tonya Markiewicz

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck Crystal Xue

Hoop House

Scale: 1" = 1' : 0"

x1

Joint Detail

For Review Scale: 3/4" = 1' : 0" 10.09.2017 21 of 24

Assembly - Track

South East Axon South-East Axon x3


0 40’ 120’

0 40’ 120’ 200’ 360‘ 200’ 360‘

Site: Edible Garden at Phipps Conservatory

N

0

680’

0.5’ 1.5’ 3.5’ 7.5’

680’

64”

46” 84”

15.5’

N 0 1’ 3’

15.5’

Point of Entry 7’ 13’ 29’

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

For Review 10.09.2017 Varmlåda 22 of 24 Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck

7.5’

Tonya Markiewicz

3.5’

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

1.5’

Hoop House

0.5’

S22

Transportation 1

6’

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Hoop House

Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

door=

For Review 10.09.2017 23 of 24

N

Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck Crystal Xue

Section A1 John Butler Claire Koh Hsiao Tyng Peck Crystal Xue

Tonya Markiewicz Grace Hou Jessica Kusten Steve Sontag

Varmlåda

Handling/Installing

Transportation 2

0

S22

Site: Edible Garden at Phipps Conservatory

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

6’

Varmlåda

CFA

Tonya Markiewicz

door=

Hoop House

Handling/Installing

For Review 10.09.2017 22 of 24

Field Map

Transportation 1

Field Map

CFA


2-1 Jusangjeolli The goal of this project was to explore the extent to which the pre-determined rules and their applications could affect the outcome of the design process. By applying the four rules that are mentioned above - Splitting, Translating, Rotating, and End Rule to the given 14” x 8” 5.5” - wooden block, we examined the change the medium underwent which at the end enabled it to take a form that was completely different from the beginning. Although the orthogonal paths to which the rules were applied may seem boring and restrictive, they were done on purpose to help us explore how creative we could get with such little freedom. Also, after having expmerimented with various sizes of triangles and trapezoids at the preliminary stage, we decided to adhere to the orthgonal shapes to enhance the computational aspect of the project and to reduce the degree of randomness.

Rule 1 - SPLITTING Solid is spliced along a plane.

Rule 2 - TRANSLATING One of the two adjacent solids is translated in one direction.

Rule 3 - ROTATING Solid is rotated along one of its edges.

Rule 4 - END RULE A dot is placed on a prism’s face to mark the final step in the computation.


2-2 Avoid the Murky Water

Avoid the Murky Water

Visualizing Spatial Data | Yoojin Kim, Claire Koh

NORTHERN TERRITORY QUEENSLAND

NT WA

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

SA

SOUTHERN AUSTRALIA

VICTORIA Ocean Outfall

Injured

NSW VIC

Outfalls

NEW SOUTH WALES

Fatal

QLD

Uninjured

TASMANIA

Attacks

State NSW QLD SA WA VIC TAS NT

Cases Fatal 221 47 161 52 90 17 43 13 34 3 10 1 8 1

TAS

Injured 119 91 57 22 20 5 6

Uninjured # Ocean Outfalls 55 28 18 51 16 10 8 12 11 18 4 41 1 14

Is There a Relationship Between the Locations of Ocean Outfalls and Shark Attacks?

The map is intended to show the relationship between the locations of the ocean outfalls and the locations of the shark attacks. As you can see, the attacks have almost always happened near the ocean outfalls. According to the statistics, about 30% of the total attacks (mapped) happened within five kilometers from the outfall. The smaller map on the right is to show the relationship between the number of ocean outfalls and shark attacks per state. The correlation is not so strong, but it definitely exists - for states such as Queensland and New South Wales that exhibit greater number of attacks have clearly bigger number of ocean outfalls. One peculiar case would be that of Tasmania, where the number of outfalls is outpropotionally larger than the number of the attacks. We assumed that it is because Tasmania is a small island, where it is inevitable to have lots of outfalls compared to the area where shark attacks could happen. (Caution: the sizes of the circles representing the number of outfalls and attacks are not to the same scale, but you can see that when one circle gets smaller, the other circle gets smaller as well) Researchers have been cautioning that the nutritional discharge from these ocean outfalls may be attracting the baitfish, which in turn attract the sharks that are looking to be fed. Footages have shown the cases in which the fish circle around the wastewater fallout that spirals out from the sea floor. Even the government-run campaigns such as SharkSmart have warned the beach users to “avoid murky water, waters with known effluents or sewage”. So we decided that it’d be interesting to explore whether most shark attacks really do happen where the ocean outfalls are located - and the answer was yes.


Connect each dot to generate a polygon

Put a parabolic curve to on each segment

Put a parabolic curve to on each segment

Flip every other parabola

Flip every other parabola

For the inner parabolas: stretch the ones pointing downwards, contract the ones pointing upwards

Generate a curve that connects

the vertex of each parabola

the vertex of each parabola

Generate a curve that connects the vertex of each parabola

Plan

Pipe the edges

26.5’

Section (Simplified) Claire Koh and Leah Kendrick / 62-275

Plan

4

58.5’

16’

10

“Cone-ception” concept

Section (Simplified) 16’

Parametric Variations Initial Sketches

Plan

6

Pipe the edges

Loft the lines

When designing our architectural object from conic section, we considered the key themes of the project: symmetry, rotation and 26’ mirroring. Through experiementation with conic orientation and sections, variation of specific parameters, and finding inspiration from 12’ 16’ architects like Gyo Obata, we landed on a final design that exhibited unique mathematical qualities of parabolic and hyberbolic structures. We originally found interest in the 16’shape formation and fluid continuity of pencil shavings and took it futher by creating what we like to Elevation call “cone-ception” as the forefront leading to an inverted, reflected design. The (conic from 360 two cones in)the same rule only sections one b/c taken continous degrees 26.5’ 58.5’ format allow for architectural aperatures for light in the center and openings around the edges for circulation of users. The warping quality of the interior parabolas act like columns and give form to the inside of the building/object.

Flip every other parabola

Connect the inner and outer curves with another set of curves that oscillate between hyperbolic curves parabolic curves

Extract the curves

Axonometric

Section (Simplified) 26’

12’

Renders

8

Elevation (only one b/c continous 360 degrees)

Start with two concentric circle

6

# of conic curves

4

Loft the lines

Connect the curves inner and outer curves parabolic with another set of curves that oscillate between hyperbolic curves parabolic curves

Extract the curves

Put a parabolic curve to on each segment

Offset the inner circle so that it'd be situated above the outer circle

Divide each circle into (#) segments

Connect each dot to generate a polygon

Put a parabolic curve to on each segment

Flip every other parabola

For the inner parabolas: stretch the ones pointing downwards, contract the ones pointing upwards For the outer parabolas: do the same thing but opposite.

26’

Generate a curve that connects

Generate a curve that connects

the vertex of each parabola

the vertex of each parabola

Architectural materials in mind: Fiberglass cloth and metal-like structure

Extract the curves

Connect the inner and outer curves with another set of curves that oscillate between hyperbolic curves parabolic curves

Loft the lines

Pipe the edges

12’

10

Elevation (only one b/c continous 360 degrees)

8

# of conic curves

Connect the inner and outer curves with another set of curves that oscillate between hyperbolic curves

Extract the curves

Designing with Structured Respresentations / SQUID

When designing our architectural object from conic section, we considered the key themes of the project: symmetry, rotation and mirroring. Through experiementation with conic orientation and sections, variation of specific parameters, and finding inspiration from architects like Gyo Obata, we landed on a final design that exhibited unique mathematical qualities of parabolic and hyberbolic structures. We originally found interest in the shape formation and fluid continuity of pencil shavings and took it futher by creating what we like to call “cone-ception” as the forefront leading to an inverted, reflected design. The conic sections taken fromof two cones in the same rule format concept allow Conic Section (slope cone=plane) “Cone-ception” for architectural aperatures for light in the center and openings around the edges for circulation of users. The warping quality of the interior parabolas act like columns and give form to the inside of the building/object.

Conic Section (slope of cone=plane)

Generate a curve that connects

For the inner parabolas: stretch For the Generate outer parabolas: do thethat connects a curve the ones pointing downwards, same thing but opposite. contract the ones pointing upwards the vertex of each parabola For the outer parabolas: do the same thing but opposite.

6

Divide each circle into (#) segments

Connect each dot to generate a polygon

8

situated above the outer circle

Divide each circle into (#) segments

# of conic curves

2-3 Squid Offset the inner circle so that it'd be

situated above the outer circle

4

Start with two concentric circle Offset the inner circle so that it'd be

Start with two concentric circle

Put a parabolic curve to on each segment

Flip every other parabola

Extract the curves

16’

Connect the inner and outer curves with another set of curves that oscillate between hyperbolic curves parabolic curves

Axonometric

Parametric Variations

26.5’

Conic Section (slope of cone=plane)

10

Renders

58.5’

“Cone-ception” concept 16’

4

Connect the inner and outer curves with another set of curves that oscillate between hyperbolic curves parabolic curves

Plan

Section (Simplified)

Axonometric 6

26’

Renders 8

Extract the curves

# of conic curves

Parametric Variations

Flip every other parabola

12’

Architectural materials in mind: Fiberglass cloth and metal-like structure

Elevation (only one b/c continous 360 degrees)

10

Put a parabolic curve to on each segment

Architectural materials in mind: Fiberglass cloth and metal-like structure

Put a parabolic curve to on each segment

Parametric Variations

Flip every other parabola

Extract the curves

Connect the inner and outer curves with another set of curves that oscillate between hyperbolic curves parabolic curves

Axonometric Renders Architectural materials in mind: Fiberglass cloth and metal-like structure


Project Description: Our project program is a filter, and our architectural system filters rain water. Our filter is made up of diamonds connected at the joints, similar to an accordian when folded and unfolded. It forms an arch that can be covered over any space that can be used to filter the amount of sun that filters through the space. An example of a type of space where this mechanism could be used is sports stadiums. The diamonds rest on a series of tracks that extend beyond the borders of the actual stadium. This also acts as a filter for people through the entrance of the stadium. When the diamonds are extended fully, the let through the most amount of sun. When the diamonds are retraced towards the top of the stadium, they overlap each other and filter less light into the stadium. This allows for any experience inside the stadium that is fit for the specific event and weather.

2-4 Jusangjeolli

Our project program is a fi lter, and our architectural system fi lters rain water. Our fi lter is made up of diamonds connected at the

joints, similar to an accordian when folded and unfolded. It forms an arch that can be covered over any space that can be used to fi lter the amount of sun that fi lters through the space. An example of a type of space where this mechanism could be used is sports

Tanvi Harkare, Claire Koh Fundamentals of Computational Design, Spring 2018

stadiums. The diamonds rest on a series of tracks that extend beyond the borders of the actual stadium. This also acts as a fi lter for

people through the entrance of the stadium. When the diamonds are extended fully, the let through the most amount of sun. When

the diamonds are retraced towards the top of the stadium, they overlap each other and fi lter less light into the stadium. This allows for any experience inside the stadium that is fi t for the specifi c event and weather.

Screenshots of GIF in motion

Section

Process:

Elevation when closed

Elevation when opened

Floor plan when closed

Floor plan when open


1 CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL KEY:

2 3

4 9 5 6 8 7 10 11 12

13 15 16 17 20

1. EPDM ROOFING 2. HIGH LOAD RIGID INSULATION 3. STEEL DECKING 4. STAINLESS FLASHING 5. TREATED WOOD BLOCKING 6. STEEL BAR JOIST 7. STEEL SECONDARY BEAM W8X21 @ 24'-0" CENTERS 8. STEEL PRIMARY BEAM W16X45 9. 3/8" TK. STEEL PLATE (WELDED TO STEEL BEAM) 10. 3/8" TK. STEEL PLATE (WELDED TO STEEL BEAM) FASCIA 11. RIGID INSULATION 12. COLD ROLLED METAL FRAMING @ 16" O.C. SPACING (SOFFIT) 13. 1/2" TK. FIBER CEMENT PANEL 14. COLD ROLLED METAL FRAMING (BRISE SOLEIL SUB STRUCTURE) 15. 1/2" TK. FIBER CEMENT PANEL 16. KAWNEER WINDOW 451T SPACED 4'-0" O.C. (VERTICALLY) 17. STEEL COLUMN W8X24 @ 24'-0" O.C. 18. STEEL DECKING 19. WELDED WIRE MESH 20. POLISHED CONCRETE SLAB 21. 1" RIGID INSULATION (THERMAL ISOLATION) 22. SLOPED SITE CAST SILL 23. #6 REINFORCING BAR 16" O.C. EACH WAY) 24. 3/8" STEEL PLATE WELDED TO FLANGE AND WEB. 25. 3/8" TK. STEEL PLATE (WELDED TO STEEL BEAM) FASCIA 26. 1/2" TK. FIBER CEMENT PANEL 27. COLD ROLLED METAL FRAMING @ 16" O.C. SPACING 28. CORRUGATED METAL SIDING 29. VAPOR BARRIER 30. RIGID INSULATION 31. 5/8" TYPE X GYPSUM BOARD 32. CONCRETE SLAB W/ WELDED WIRE MESH 33. VAPOR BARRIER 34. SILL SEAL

18 19 21 25 24 22 23 26

ASSEMBLY SEQUENCE

27 28 29 30 31 33

ASSIGNMENT 1

34

48-215 MATERIALS & ASSEMBLY SPRING 2018 INSTRUCTOR: DAMIANI

32

CLAIRE KOH


CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL KEY: 35. 1/2" DIA. ANCHOR BOLTS WITH NON SHRINK GROUT BED 36. 18" WIDE CONCRETE PIER 37. RIGID INSULATION 38. 10" TK. CAST IN PLACE CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL 39. GRAVEL BACKFILL 40. FOUNDATION DRAIN W/ GEO TEXTILE FABRIC 41. WATERPROOFING 42. REINFORCED CONCRETE FOOTING (W/ (3) #6 REINFORCING BAR 43. COMPACTED GRAVEL FILL

ASSEMBLY SEQUENCE 35 36 37 38 39 41 40 42 42

ASSIGNMENT 1 48-215 MATERIALS & ASSEMBLY SPRING 2018 INSTRUCTOR: DAMIANI CLAIRE KOH


Individual Work


Architecture portfolio 2018  

Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Portfolio - First two years

Architecture portfolio 2018  

Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Portfolio - First two years

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