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Clackamas Community College, Oregon City, Ore.

Volume 45, Issue 19

The Clackamas Print

ince 1966

www.TheClackamasPrint.com

An independent, student-run newspaper since 1966

New information on fatal CCC student accident By Joshua Dillen News Editor

Internet Photo

As the college reeled from the news of Christina Harmon’s death last week, Clackamas County Sheriff ’s Office said Tuesday this is not the first time the Clackamas student came into contact with a moving vehicle. During a phone interview yesterday, Sgt. Adam Phillips, public information officer for the department, answered questions concerning a police report filed in December of 2009 by the CCSO. He said a driver reported that Harmon fell into his lane as he was traveling northbound on Oatfield Road near the intersection of SE McNary Road. He swerved to avoid her, but ran over her feet according to Phillips. Phillips said the driver’s passenger corroborated the events. The police report also stated that Harmon could not remember why she had

Christina Harmon, 19, a Clackamas Community College student passed away last Thursday night after being struck by a car. entered the roadway, or having her feet ran over by the vehicle. Harmon was transported to OHSU after the accident, said Phillips. Harmon, 19 was hit by a vehicle about a mile from the college on April 25. She was

Opinion

Freedom VS Prohibition By Patrick Emerson Ad Manager The Oregon Cannabis Tax Act Initiative (OCTA) is here again in 2012 with more support than ever. According to gallup.com, half, yes, HALF of all Americans they polled last year are in favor of the legalization of marijuana. Proponents of OCTA, Initiative 9, are busy gathering the 82,213 signatures needed to place the decision in the hands of Oregon voters this November and set a precedent for the legalization of marijuana for states across the country. With enough signatures, citizens of Oregon will once again have their chance to reap the potential statewide benefits of legal cannabis and hemp this November. Please see PRO, Page 3

found on Beavercreek Road last Wednesday night around 10:15 p.m. in an accident that was originally reported as a hit and run. She died at OHSU the next evening.

By Craig Hartrampt The Clackamas Print Some would say this state doesn’t need OCTA. Oregon law already has soft laws against and for marijuana use. On top of that, this act would increase use of a drug that can have negative long term side effects on the users, a complaint people use against tobacco. Oregon already has legalized medical marijuana statewide. If you have a disease, ailment, or anything a doctor feels like issuing a medical marijuana card for, from that point on, you can legally obtain it. For people who don’t have any illnesses and desire to smoke a joint, Oregon laws aren’t that harsh against it. Possessing an ounce or less of marijuana is only a violation, you don’t get arrested. Possessing marijuana within 1,000 yards of a school is a misdemeanor, and most misdemeanors are pushed out of courts with only a fine attached. Please see CON, Page 3

Please see HARMON, Page 3

International week dances onto stage Chinese New Year, Native American tribal dances, Italian opera. All of these things bring one word to mind: International. This week Clackamas Community College is hosting its annual International Week in the Bill Brod Community Center,

with many performances from many different cultures, representing the diversity of the college and the melting pot that is the USA. Throughout this week, many international acts will come together and share their cultures and their artistic side. This week is full of great opportunities to share, enjoy and get involved with other peoples’ cultures. “It’s a celebration of many cultures,” said Spanish

instructor Irma Bjerre. Students from many cultures and backgrounds attend CCC, and International Week will be a celebration of those from various cultures and creeds. “We have a very diverse student body.” said Amy Larkin, administrative assistant for arts and sciences at CCC.

Brad Heineke The Clackamas Print

By Chris Taylor The Clackamas Print

Please see WORLD, Page 3

Praise through song Page 6

Par for the course Page 7

WW

FINALLY!

Website makeover finished

W

Page 3


2The Clackamas Print

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

newsed@clackamas.edu

News

HARMON: Friends, staff mourn loss of CCC student

Continued from Page 1

Harmon succumbed to her injuries last Thursday at 10:50 p.m. at OHSU, according to a press release from the Oregon City Police Department. A previous press release stated that the driver of the vehicle returned to the scene and has not been charged with any crime. He is cooperating with police. There was no damage to his vehicle, which suggests she was already in the roadway when struck police said. Police determined that the driver was not impaired in any way. “The driver simply knew he hit something because it was in the roadway, and basically went down to the cor-

Staff

The Clackamas Print aims to report the news in an honest, unbiased and professional manner. Content published in The Print is not screened or subject to censorship. 19600 Molalla Ave. Oregon City, OR 97045

Brad Heineke The Clackamas Print

Joshua Dillen The Clackamas Print

Sawyer Wilson looks on as Dylan Stronks places a bouquet of flowers on the impromptu memorial that has continued to grow since the accident. They were both long time friends of Harmon.

An impromptu memorial grows near the bus stop where Harmon was hit last week. Friends and family leave flowers, pictures and candles.

ner, turned around and came back,” said Lt. Bill Kler of the OCPD. “We don’t consider that a hit and run; that’s a driver doing his duties and trying to figure out what happened.” According to Kler, the investigation is still pending and is not considered a homicide case. He said that Harmon did have a blood alcohol content of 0.094. He also said full toxicology tests have not been completed. Police are still requesting that anybody who has any information about the case to come forward. Potential witnesses with information are encouraged to call the Oregon City Police TIP line at 503-496-1616 or the non-

emergency dispatch number at 503-655-8211. Life changed abruptly for those who knew the student. Cathy Hanson, the department chair of skills development, was her instructor. She worked with Harmon and helped her acquire a GED here at CCC before she became a college student. After receiving her GED, Harmon was inspired and excited about pursuing her educational goals, according to Hanson. “She was a good soul and was doing very well at overcoming obstacles in her life. Christina was an inspiration in spite of other things going on in her life,” said Hanson. “She faced and overcame the

challenges in her life and rose above them to become a college student.” Alexandra Haynes, 24, is a student here who didn’t know her, but remembers Harmon vividly. Haynes was touched enough by the tragedy to place flowers at an impromptu memorial at the TriMet bus stop near the scene of the accident. Accompanied by her mother and two children, Haynes added her bouquet to the growing collection of pictures and items left by friends and family. “She is beautiful. Why would this happen to someone like her?” said Haynes. “It hit close to home. My brother is the same age and it could have been him. That is why I

came to pay my respects.” A Facebook page has been created in memoriam to Harmon. The page is titled “Remembering Christina ‘Tina’ Harmon.” The page states that more information will post in the future about where and when a memorial service will occur. The page will also be updated with the necessary information for people who wish to donate funds for funeral services. The page is also a place where messages can be posted in support of Harmon’s friends and family. The page can be found at www.facebook.com/ RememberingTina.

Editors

Writers & Photographers

Production Assistants

Contact Information

Editor-in-Chief: Brian Baldwin Copy Editor: Katherine Suydam News Editor: Joshua Dillen Arts&Culture: Isaac Soper Sports Editor: John William Howard Associate Sports Editor: Emily Rask

David Beasley Breanna Craine Joey Fisher Craig Hartrampt

Patrick Quinn Felicia Skriver Chris Taylor Steven Weldon

Photo Editor: Brad Heineke Web Editor: Anna Axelson Design Editor: James Duncan Ad Manager: Patrick Emerson

Adviser: Melissa Jones 503-594-6266

Christian Adams Mollie Berry Jaronte Goldsby Martin Gonzalez Harley Jackson Hicham Kerkour

Joey Nardin Darla Nguyen Ellen Niles Trent Noon Evon Trembly

chiefed@clackamas.edu copyed@clackamas.edu newsed@clackamas.edu aced@clackamas.edu sportsed@clackamas.edu photoed@clackamas.edu admgr@clackamas.edu webeditor@clackamas.edu


Opinion

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

newsed@clackamas.edu

PRO : The upside of pot Continued from Page 1

CON : The downside of ‘Mary Jane’ Continued from Page 1

Clackamas County District Attorney, John Foote doesn’t believe the state needs OCTA. “We don’t need a change of law. In most cases you can’t go to prison for possession or buying,” said Foote. “I don’t want to demonize people … but when use goes up, no one can be better off.” He also pointed out that public health would be an area of concern. A study found in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) tested the long term effects of cannabis use over a 10 year period that included 1,923 individuals that ranged from ages 14 to 24. The study found that long term use of cannabis, of individuals who had no prior history of psychotic problems, showed

Photo illustration by Anna Axelson The Clackamas Print

By Brian Baldwin Editor-in-Chief The new face of Clackamas Community College’s website has finally been released after being teased for months and delayed from its initial launch, but is it any better? After a look at the new slimmer and fancier website, my answer is a mixed ‘sort of.’ When compared to the old website, the new version is obviously more crisp, organized and targeted to attract new students coming to Clackamas. Main categories are divided up into Programs & Certificates, Admissions & Aid, Student Experience, College Information and then News & Events, as opposed to the previous vague categories. At the right side are subtopics the user can explore to find out more information, such as the complete course listings for technical career

act doesn’t solve any problems, but makes more for everyone. As Foote said, “Same problem, no need.” There are others who don’t view this potential law change as a positive thing, particularly for kids. Rachel Forbisterr, a Clackamas Community College student pursuing an English degree, is concerned about the message young people may get if OCTA becomes law. “What about our kids?” she said. “What kind of example does that set for our children? We tell them, ‘This drug is OK,’ it’s crazy. The line gets pushed back more and more. It’s a classic ‘snowball effect,’ one thing leads to another and another till nothing is illegal anymore.”

Paul Stanford (left) and co-host Casper Leach (center), receive a $3,000 donation from show producer/director William “Bill” Appel (right), to the Cannabis Tax Act on Cannabis Common Sense.

CCC’s new website has hits and misses programs that the college offers. Tools and forms for current students are scattered and buried around in the site. Documents such as petitioning for graduation and transcript requests are in Admissions & Aid, tutoring services is buried in Student Experience with no specific office to visit, as well as no links for distance learning tutoring, although it gives the phone number for the office of Student and Academic Support. Also further buried in Student Experience are details for the Cougar Cave, textbook and childcare grants and links to find health insurance for students. If a student needed to access the library resources, they need to navigate through College Information, click on the college resources sub-topic, and then find the library’s website at the bottom of the article. There are other tools that are missing from the site as well. There is no academic calendar visible, so you have to use the website’s search bar to find it. The search bar itself did not work upon launch while Google was reindexing the site. It is working now, however search result links are often from the old site and do not work. The biggest item missing is a link to Moodle. Looking through categories where a link would

increased risk of incident psychotic symptoms. The study suggested the continued use of cannabis might increase the risk for a psychotic disorder. “DWIs would increase. Marijuana would be easier to get, like alcohol, and more irresponsible [users] would obtain the drug and get behind the wheel, thus causing a higher number of DWIs but potentially more car accidents,” said Foote. “So passing this bill could put motorists’ life at risk as well.” After seeing all the downsides of this act, it’s easy to conclude that the people who need marijuana are already able to get it legally and that legalizing it further could potentially put lives at risk. Whether it’s the smokers own mind, or someone else’s, it’s clear that this

3

Patrick Emerson The Clackamas Print

The flowers or buds of the female plants have properties that are very well known to most and valued highly by others. But what about its other properties? There was a time before prohibition when presidents grew hemp for fiber and food on the White House property. There was a time when hemp clothing was very popular amongst the upper class because of its strength and longevity. In the recent past, we have also discovered that hemp can be grown for the production of nutritious foods and biodiesel. According to the USDA hemp can produce four times the paper per acre that trees and is less caustic to manufacture. BMW is using hemp in the manufacture of some of its cars with the goal of making its cars more recyclable. Biodiesel, health and beauty products, wood replacement and other construction materials for concrete reinforcement and even plastic are some of the uses that have been found for hemp. A Google search of “hemp” will open a Pandora’s Box of products and possibilities of this potential “wonder”

plant. To get a better perspective, Paul Stanford, founder of the Hemp and Cannabis Foundation established in 1999 and host of Cannabis Common Sense (Portland Public Access Television, channel 11, Fridays at 8 p.m.) Stanford believes we need to change the law that is already in place regarding medical marijuana, because he believes it’s not working. “People are still going to jail,” said Stanford. “Cannabis is one of the greatest gifts. Our future’s in jeopardy if prohibition continues.” One of the biggest impacts that legalization of marijuana would create is an entire new crop for farmers. The vast array of products that industrial hemp can be used for is tremendous. The options in fuels such as, biodiesel and heating oils are huge. Nutritious food products like cooking oils and organic fillers and fibers for the use in making fabrics, paper, plastics, concrete and other building materials are just a few of the uses that Stanford talked about. Farmers would have a profitable and sustainable crop to produce and sell. The OCTA initiative could be a solution and the salvation of our struggling s t a t e ’s economy.

The Clackamas Print

logically be yielded no results, even in the Distance Learning sub-topic. This forced me to log into myClackamas and then find a link at the bottom of the page in ‘bookmarks’ to get to the Moodle login. Students will likely have Moodle saved as a bookmark on their browsers but if they are using a computer that doesn’t have it or there is a new student looking to be introduced to Moodle, a convenient link on the main website does not exist. It would be simpler to access Moodle through the same site so we do not have to login into myClackamas just to login to Moodle. Not everything on the site is bad. There is another main section on the website that allows users to search through a term’s classes without having to log onto CougarTrax. Overall I think that the new website is a major improvement, but there still seems to be areas that need to be ironed out or elaborated upon, such as a very lean “student life” section. My first reaction to the new site was that it was one big focus on public relations, and why shouldn’t it as the face of Clackamas online? Now I feel that the website can function efficiently as a resource to students if a few bugs were worked out in the design.

Want more news? Read more pros of pot, nightlife for under 21 students and spring activities exclusively online at www.TheClackamasPrint.com!

A new possibility changes everything. WARNERPACIFIC.EDU PORTLAND, OR


& Bamboo Sushi — not intended for consumption by giant pandas

4The Clackamas Print By Isaac Soper Arts & Culture Editor

served must come from healthy, plentiful populations, and must be caught in an “environmentally ethical manner, thereby not damaging the surrounding ecosystem.” Their business practices also run in a sustainable manner, meaning that all of their power is from renewable energy sources, their reusable chopsticks are made from sustainably harvested teak wood, and all of their paper products are 100 percent recycled. To see a full listing of their sustainable practices, see bamboosushi.com, or stop in and take a look at their menu. On May 1, Bamboo Sushi donated 10 percent of its net profit to Crag, a law center focused on protecting and sustaining the nature of the Pacific Northwest. With every meal, a glass of cucumber water (in which the cucumber adds a delicate freshness) and an appetizer plate of edamame is offered. The salted edamame are served in a small wooden box, which is pretty cool (the same boxes are used in their chandelier, each of which have lights recessed within them). As expected, wasabi and ginger are served with every meal. Many house rolls are offered, one being the new and delicious

aced@clackamas.edu

Arts Culture

Isaac Soper The Clackamas Print

Bamboo Sushi, a sustainable sushi bar located in SE Portland on 28th and Pine, is a brick faced building with a beautiful ivy covered wall on its exterior, astoundingly good food and sustainable practices on its interior. The restaurant is open seven nights a week from 4:30 to 10 p.m., with a happy hour menu running Monday through Friday from 4:30 to 6 p.m. (in which one must order something off of the drink menu, but not specifically alcohol). The menu features many varying entrees and appetizers ranging from $4 to $20. There are many vegetarian and gluten-free options; many of the sushi rolls come vegetarian with the option of adding meat or seafood to them. There is even a section the menu deemed “kids safe,” featuring sushi and seafood safe for small children and pregnant mothers to enjoy. Within the confines of the menu, Bamboo Sushi describes what sustainability is, and how they follow those guidelines within their practices. Some of those practices are, but are not limited to, that all of the fish

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Bamboo Sushi is located in Southeast Portland on 28th and Pine; the restaurant features sustainable business practices, excellent service and mouthwatering (and affordable) sushi. PDX Roll, featuring asparagus and shitake mushrooms. All things considered, it’s a delightful environment, located in a quiet little part of Southeast Portland, with plenty of free parking available. They have a very friendly and attentive wait staff, a full-service bar and pleasant art on the walls to

enjoy (including a large collection of origami fish). The food is delicious, visually appetizing and served in a reasonable amount of time for a very reasonable price, with sustainable practices to boot that set it apart from any other sushi bar, let alone restaurant, around. Whether one wants to stop

in for a quick snack or a full meal, Bamboo Sushi is the place to go.

5 out of 5

WORLD: International Week stirs the melting pot on campus Continued from Page 1

Chinese New Year, Native American tribal dances, Italian opera. All of these things bring one word to mind: International. This week Clackamas Community College is hosting its annual International Week in the Bill Brod Community Center, with many performances from many different cultures, representing the diversity of the

college and the melting pot that is the USA. Throughout this week, many international acts will come together and share their cultures and their artistic side. This week is full of great opportunities to share, enjoy and get involved with other peoples’ cultures. “It’s a celebration of many cultures,” said Spanish instructor Irma Bjerre. Students from many cultures

experience something different. A lot of effort is put in to make the event a success; it takes almost a whole year to plan out and put together, but the hard work really pays off when International Week rolls around. It has much more value than just entertainment, it’s also educational. “International week really helps students become aware of all the cultures that are represented on campus,” said Larkin.

Students, staff and faculty, community members and guests have the opportunity to come together and experience something new. “I think that during International Week, I see a lot of people [who] have hidden talents that they don’t realize they have, and it’s just astounding. “I’m amazed by it,” said French instructor Heidi Cropsey.

Brad Heineke The Clackamas Print

Felicia Skriver The Clackamas Print

Mary Collins, who works in IT at Clackamas, shares her passion of tribal dancing with a crowd. This is just one of many inspiring performances ongoing in the community center this week.

and backgrounds attend CCC, and International Week will be a celebration of those from various cultures and creeds. “We have a very diverse student body,” said Amy Larkin, administrative assistant for arts and sciences at CCC. The schedule this year is impressive, with some big acts and some local talent as well. There will be a Taiko drum group, sacred Buddhist dancers from Nepal, Viva Mexico, which is an authentic mariachi group and some Aztec dancers. There will also be acts from the college such as a French puppet show, written by past sudents and played by French students, a Celtic dance by Elaine Ingram, Pacific Islander songs and dances by Shaun Lemafa, an international student, a French song by student Alyssa Rands and a performance by CCC’s own chamber choir. Some of the acts this year are new and some are from recurring participants, like the Aztec dancers. “I loved the Aztec dancers last year. They were just so lively,” said Larkin. If the entertainment isn’t enough to entice you, maybe the food will bring you in to share in the experience. “There will be foods from around the world each day,” said Larkin. The food itself will be provided by ASG Monday through Thursday, with many different foods from around the world to choose from. On Friday, catering will be provided by local Mexican restaurant Cinco de Mayo. International Week isn’t only a fun event, but it’s also a chance to

Dance Mandal members perform sacred Buddist dances on Monday, April 30 in the Community Center.


&

Arts Culture

aced@clackamas.edu

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

The Clackamas Print 5

Wildman suggests reusing plastic

By Isaac Soper Arts & Culture Editor

Find more stories and photos from The Print at www.TheClackamasPrint.com

Brad Heineke The Clackamas Print

Oil and food prices rise everyday. Soon, without food stamps and gardening, the lower middle class won’t be able to afford to drive to and from work. As the Earth becomes more and more polluted and people can no longer work or eat, corporations try to convince the American populace that everything is going to be okay. We can’t conceive of life without oil. In the age that we live in, no longer is wood or metal the basis for which things are manufactured; oil is the medium in which all is created by man. Our food is wrapped in it, our cars are built out of it and run on it even our clothes are made with it. Most plastics are made with oil, and due to the non-stop increase in oil prices (which may rise significantly, or lower slightly on an oil baron’s whim), corporations have begun to try and convince us that we can lower oil prices and save the Earth by redesigning the creation of plastic. By breaking down certain foods, namely corn, scientists can create plastics. We have designed fuel that can be used in our automobiles out of food as well; fuel that we used to use for our bodies, fuel that multitudes of people are lacking worldwide. Instead of looking for more sustainable options for powering our cars, we continue to confirm our allegiance to the oil companies by using their—now corn-based—gasoline and oil. Wow, we sure figured out the oil crisis on that one. Short on food and oil? Now you can drink the new corn-based gasoline and put it into your car—it’s got electrolytes! The disadvantages of oilpowered cars can be easily seen, and yes, there are definite disadvantages to hybrid cars as well as fully

electric cars. Why aren’t we looking into other sources of fuel? Water-powered cars were first patented in 1935, using the properties of electrolysis (separating hydrogen and oxygen from water molecules). Normal plastic takes about 1,000 years to biodegrade, under normal conditions. When I say “normal conditions,” specific things come to mind, let’s say, outside, and between 30 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Remember that. Biodegradable plastic, which is commonly made out of cornstarch or other plant-based materials, is used in many new disposable utensils and water bottles. You are supposed to have a warm, fuzzy feeling when you throw these bottles away. Did you know that if you put a “plantbottle” in the ground, a tree will grow? Biodegradable plastic “under normal conditions” will, at least according to the companies that manufacture them, biodegrade in much less time than regular plastics. “Normal conditions” for biodegradable plastics differ from what you and I consider “normal.” “Normal” to them means between 140 and 300 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s normal, for let’s say, the surface of Mercury in the dead of winter. Under the normal conditions of Earth, they will biodegrade in about 999 years. Saving the planet one year, or let’s say, one starving child at a time. It can be assumed that the typical process of recycling plastics is a process that is harmful to the environment. What about reusing the plastics opposed to “recycling” and remanufacturing them? Many plastics, especially containers, could simply be washed, sanitized and reused. Even germaphobes (properly titled mysophobes) can use dishes that have been sanitized. Instead of wasting food on creating new plastics and gasoline, it seems as though we could solve at least a few of our environmental problems by looking at them from a different perspective. If we recycled plastics that are already created better and worked on making truly environmentally friendly sources of powering our vehicles, it would be a step in the right direction.

The Portland Aerial Tram takes passengers from OHSU to the South Waterfront. This is one of the stops on the 4T Trail that loops in Portland, starting at the Oregon Zoo.

Trail explores Portland sights By Brad Heineke Photo Editor 4T = T + T + T + T. The most elementary of algebraic functions, right? However in Portland, 4T = Trail + Tram + Trolley +Train. Portland’s 4T is a hike growing in poularity. It’s an eight-mile loop that traverses some of the unique highlights of the Rose City via the Southwest hills, with a great combination of nature and urban scenery. It specifically includes a hike from the Oregon Zoo up the Marquam trail, to the city’s highest point at Council Crest, then on to three of P-Town’s unique modes of transport: the Portland Aerial Tram, the Portland Street Car (trolley), and TriMet Max (train) back to a train tunnel then elevator to the zoo. There were great views of the city, the Willamette, bridges and the Cascade Range. Start the hike at the Oregon Zoo. Nearby is the Washington Park Max station, highlighted by Les AuCoin Plaza. Signage for the 4T hike was immediately visible. Walk across the overpass of Highway 26, turn left onto the shoulder of the freeway on ramp, then down about halfway to the well marked trailhead of the Marquam trail. The trail hike portion covers three and a half to four miles depending on the chosen route. It is very well marked at all trail crossings and provides reassurance with helpful signage along the route. It took two and a half hours with many brief photo stops. Hiking time could range from one and a half to three hours depending on whether you take the urban route, Forest Trail or combinations of the two. I can’t imagine bypassing

the trail. It is a beautiful gem of a forest filled with ferns, blooms, birds and a wide variety of trees. The trails are well groomed but can be muddy after rains. The trails and signs will lead you across a couple roads until you have reached Council Crest with its large lawn and circular observation area. It offers sweeping views including Mt. Hood, Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Adams and Mt. Jefferson. Leaving in the direction you came from leads to signs continuing our loop, back down the forest trail to the Marquam shelter, and Oregon Health Science University campus with its buildings, which are precariously built inside a small canyon and its two flanking ridges is quite interesting. This is the longest suspended pedestrian bridge in North America at 660 ft. It connects OHSU with the VA Hospital and with glass sides gives a thrilling view. Following the 4T signs a few hundred yards brings you to the Peter Kohler Pavilion, which is the upper side of the Portland Aerial Tram. If you haven’t yet enjoyed the Tram, this loop provides a great opportunity to experience this fun yet simple ride and city feature, with the free ride down; the $4 fee is only charged when riding up. The high suspended view has slight dips and lifts, as you glide down 3,300 feet to the South Waterfront district, which are very interesting. The street car stops adjacent to the tram approximately every 15 minutes. Take it northbound for a cool ride along this waterfront area with its newer high rise condos. It then turns west up and through the PSU

campus. About 20 minutes of sightseeing later get off at 10th and Yamhill which is the Multnomah Central Library stop. Pioneer Courthouse Square is just four blocks east from here. When ready to depart downtown and return to the Oregon Zoo, you will go one block north to Morrison, at which the Beaverton and Hillsboro Max lines run. Board the Blue or Red line Max toward Beaverton or Hillsboro. After it stops at JeldWen Field and Goose Hollow, it will soon enter the three mile long Robertson tunnel. Exit at the only stop in the tunnel, Washington Park. This is the deepest train station in North America. There is a great geographic timeline and a drilling core sample displayed here. You can take the elevator 260 ft. back up to the Oregon Zoo to complete the eight-mile loop. It’s hard to beat the 4T for a fun and affordable day. Enjoy great scenery, grand viewpoints, fun rides, and much more for as little as a $2.10 Max pass. There are detailed directions and loop maps online, but the excellent signage will truly lead your way. Name: 4T Trail Location: Portland (starts at the Oregon Zoo) Type: Groomed and marked trails Length: Eight miles Difficulty: Easy/ Moderate Equipment needed: Boots, water, money for max ride


6The Clackamas Print

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

From Ashes Fall

Band overcomes adversity with diversity By Craig Hartrampt The Clackamas Print

etc. The message I hope that our listeners take from our music is a message of finding the strength to persevere in the face of adversity and to rise up and overcome struggles and addictions. Our music has always been about overcoming and healing.” From Ashes Fall’s members don’t live very close to each other, with one in Gladstone and the others living in Aloha and Cascade, but that doesn’t stop them from creating and playing music with each other. While the band does get together to practice, they use Facebook and file sharing website DropBox to connect and share their pieces of music to create tracks. “What happens is our guitar player comes up with a riff, records it, sends it along to the bass player who writes something that works along with it; the bass player would email it to me and I will write out a drum part and when we used to have a vocalist, [we] would send that to him and he’d write the lyrics,” Clark said. The band recently signed on new vocalist Jesse Keller, who will join the band just before they play at MetalFest Friday May 11. This will be the band’s first time coming together on stage with Clark and Keller and should be interesting to see what kind of music this band can tap into. Though MetalFest is sold out, you can catch From Ashes Fall at the Tiger Bar downtown on May 5. Tickets are $7 at the door, first come first serve. They will be creating an EP that’s to be released sometime in June or July. You can also check out the band on their Facebook page at facebook.com/FromAshesFall. “Come out to a show, you can’t experience a band through a paper, you’ve got to see us in person,” said Clark.

Universal Studios

Avenged Sevenfold, Skillet, folk, and Marvin Gaye; not your typical list of inspirations, but drummer Beau Clark from local band From Ashes Fall says that’s what they as a group, bring to the table. Rewind four years, the band Almond Buds were playing in the Seattle area doing gigs here and there. Now fast track to last December, the Almond Buds disband and since then posted an ad on craigslist. Through that ad, the found percussionist drummer Clark. Clark, along with guitarist Richard Staats and bass player John Randall, formed From Ashes Fall, and started playing rock music. From Ashes Fall is a Christian band that doesn’t want to be confused with a praise and worship band that is “preachy” and that shoves religion down your throat, but plays and conveys a positive message that most rock bands don’t. Clackamas Community College’s audio engineering courses were useful in getting Clark into the band. “I told them when I started this that I was in the audio engineering program, and they were excited that someone could help them with the recording process because that’s what they were really focusing on at the time I got in,” Clark said. Taking the audio engineering classes has many benefits. “You get to practice and learn how to record in a studio, which in the real world, saves you time and money,” said Kim DeLacy, audio engineering student. “You get to make mistakes and not pay for them.” In the real world where bands have to spend money and

have limited time to make their music, it really helps bands out to know ahead of time what they’re doing when they step into the recording studio. “There are no real world consequences [while recording at CCC]. You get to make mistakes,” said music tech student Phil Bursch. One thing that sets this group apart is their ages. “I’m 18 years old, our guitar player is 25 years old; our bass player is 48,” Clark said. Not only does the band’s unique age difference set them apart, but their individual styles does as well. For example, Clark explained that his style is more folk and soul rather than the classic rock beat. “From me, my influences have always been more folky and soul. So lots of Marvin Gaye, and that’s where I get my playing style from. More like a ‘60s Motown sound that you don’t find in hard music.” The band has a varying style. “I really feel like any person can find something about the band that they can like. And you don’t necessarily have to like metal to listen to us, because we have a lot of alterative influences,” said Clark. “If you like jazz, we have some jazzy songs, we have a country song that’s kind of like Limp Bizkit meets country guy Kid Rock. We cover all the bases.” Guitarist Staats claimed that the band has a more Skillet and Red kind of sound, but that his band has a more progressive sound with rock/metal influences. “First and foremost I want a listener to be able to connect to the music on a deeper more spiritual level. Music is the soundtrack of our lives; we all remember wedding songs, breakup songs, songs we used to blast with the windows down,

By Steven Weldon The Clackamas Print

Brad Heineke The Clackamas Print

From Ashes Fall’s Drummer Beau Clark looks stoic behind his drum set. Beau is currently enrolled and engaged in the audio engineering program. See From Ashes Fall live Saturday at Tiger Bar.

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Arts Culture Unlike typical romantic comedies, ‘Five Year Engagement’ brings laughs aced@clackamas.edu

Too many romantic comedies have the same style. Guy meets girl, crazy circumstances stand between them and love finds a way in the end. Hey, I’m not mad at that. It’s what drew me to that genre of movies and made me root for that guy who gets the girl in the end. “The Five-Year Engagement” is not like other romantic comedies. Writer, producer and director Nicholas Stoller puts the reallife strains on relationships on display with bits of comedy along the way and shows that true love can stand the test of time. Jason Segel stars as Tom, a chef in a high-end San Francisco restaurant with his friend Alex, played by Chris Pratt. Tom is introduced to his girlfriend, Violet, played by London-born actress Emily Blunt. The misadventures begin from the opening of the movie as Tom attempts to propose to Violet, but in real-life fashion messes up when he can’t keep a straight face. As the two plan their wedding, Violet awaits a letter from University of California-Berkley to join their social psychology department as a postdoctoral assistant. Instead, she receives an acceptance letter from a different university and must put off the wedding in order to chase her dream. Tom accepts the fact he will have to move, but sadly finds out he would have become head chef at a new restaurant opening up.

Swallowing his pride and following his love for Violet, they set off on a journey to a city very different from eclectic San Francisco where the two live very different lives. Year after year, the wedding is put off due to travel, location and other concerns. While Violet thrives in her program, Tom is forced to take a job at the best sandwich shop in town, but still broods over the chef job in his former home, which was taken by Alex, who has since married Violets’ sister, Suzie, played by Alison Brie. The movie shows the ups and downs of true relationships, and the true nature of what an adventure love can take people on. I was laughing through the whole movie, as it struck my quite immature funny bone at the inane moments by Alex, but also had me rolling at impressions of lovable characters by Violet and Suzie for the amusement of Suzie’s children. Segel adds another quality, good time romantic comedy to his acting and writing resume and even adds his dorky, large man charm in the picture. Judd Apatow had a hand in production, continuing his streak of comedies. All in all, the movie is a good time with the summer blockbusters coming up. It left me laughing hard and saying ‘awww’ even harder. If you want a great date movie, this might be the one, as long as you’re both in for the long haul. You never know what ideas the movie may give you.

4 out of 5


Sports

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

sportsed@clackamas.edu

The Clackamas Print 7

Sports This Week Baseball Chemeketa CC - April 26 W 9-7 WP - Burbury (3-2) Game 2 postponed to May 3 Lane CC - April 28 L 0-8 LP - Wright (0-5) L 3-13 LP - Baldocci (1-3)

All photos by Felicia Skriver The Clackamas Print

Golf class under par Alexandra Kazmeirowicz and Ilse Kindler (inset) take part in CCC’s golf class at Sah-Hah-Lee golf course in Clackamas. Students in the class, which is offered every spring, range from beginner to experienced.

By Joey Fisher The Clackamas Print At Clackamas Community College during spring term, a golf class is offered at the Sah-HahLee golf course in Clackamas. It’s taught by Paul Fiskum, who is also an assistant coach for the men’s basketball team. Sah-Hah-Lee is an 18 hole, executive par three golf course, with no need for a driver. When you arrive on the course it looks like something the likes of Rory McIlroy or Tiger Woods might have started on, but instead the course is full of students from CCC. With several golf courses right up the road from the college, some may wonder why on earth the class is held way out in the boondocks. There are several reasons for that,

including the fact that Sah-Hah-Lee is the only course around that has a practice chipping green. Sah-HahLee also doesn’t charge anything to bring the class out to use the course, since it has the potential to bring in more business for them by having students come and practice during the free time they may have. Ever since the golf class has been available through CCC, registration has always varied in terms of how many people signed up to take this class. This year however, is the first time the golf class has ever had students on a waiting list to get in. It seems like the class has been getting more popular amongst students as word of mouth about the class has spread, helping it grow to be what it is — which is a fun and exciting time while also learning the game of golf.

The class doesn’t begin immediately on the golf course like some might expect. The students spend the first two class periods on campus watching videos and learning the basic fundamentals for golf. After the first week, they spend the majority of their time at the driving range and on the chipping green. The class has students ranging in ability from beginners to more advanced golfers. The more advanced you are in the class, the more freedom you will get to have to do what you want. The students usually just stick to the driving range and the chipping range. The more advanced students have more opportunities to play the 18-hole course. The students in the class all have such a great time it has even become a family affair for some,

with a mom and her daughters, and their cousin all taking the class together. According to Fiskum, there is something much more important than the skills his students pick up. “My number one rule is to have fun,” said Fiskum. “If you don’t have fun, I won’t let you come back.” If you are looking for something amusing to do to keep your mind off of those stressful classes you’re taking, definitely look into taking this golf class. It’s cheap and tons of fun. In fact, fun is in the syllabus.

Mystifying activities add variety to world of sports By Emily Rask Associate Sports Editor Sports are different throughout the world, but there are a set few that just about everyone in the world knows of. Those include soccer, football, volleyball, basketball, lacrosse, tennis, gold and rugby … you get the picture. Most people aren’t even aware of all the unique and weird sports that there are out there in the world. For instance, the majority of people wouldn’t even know the first thing about the PFL, better known as the Pillow Fight League in Toronto. Yes, this is a real and very competitive sport. It was just established in 2005, but has been a huge hit and is growing in popularity every day. As it turns out, most Clackamas Community College students aren’t able to identify sports other than those that are popular in America. Student Yoshi Gostevskyh knew of

one he thought was unique, “The one on the horses with the mallets, I think it’s called polo.” Polo is indeed one of the oddest sports out there. Not many people would think that, while on horseback, they would be able to hit around a plastic or wooden ball with mallets and shoot it into the opposing team’s goal. To most people, UFC stands for Ultimate Fighting Championship, but for this crazy sport UFC actually stands for Ultimate Firefighting Competition. This contest is part of the World Police and Fire Games which was first promoted in 1967 and then was held for the first time officially in 1985 in San Jose, Calif. Another odd sport started a little further from home, but has caught hold in some of the colder parts of the world because of its introduction to the Olympics. “Curling,” said William Kass, a CCC student. “The players slide stones across a sheet of ice and

another person sweeps the ice in front of it so they can get it to go to the target area.” Curling originated in Scotland in the 16th century, but back then they used oddly shaped rocks called “loafies,” and played on the frozen marshes and lochs of Scotland. Curling may not be one of the world’s most popular sports, but it has made an impact since it was an official event in the Winter Olympics in 1988. From ice to water, another sport that CCC student Adrienne Whitaker mentioned was water polo. “I don’t really know anything about it, but it’s weird,” said Whitaker. ‘Water’ polo doesn’t mean that the horses have to swim. The horses are replaced with people treading water and trying to throw the ball in to the opposing goal, which is defended by a goalie. It is very similar to the game of handball that is

played on land. Water polo, like curling, became an Olympic sport. However, there was a controversy because men’s water polo became a sport in the Olympics in 1900, but the women’s game wasn’t added, sparking political protest. Finally in the year 2000 women’s water polo was finally added to the Winter Olympic games. There are hundreds of other weird sports in this world, some even more crazy than others. Some require the strength of a person’s toes as they do in toe wrestling, while in others you can do a simple household chore but in a competitive environment, such as in the sport of extreme ironing. No matter how challenging, lazy, crazy, weird, and unique any of these activities are, they all have one thing in common and that is that they are considered a sport.

Overall Record: 8-21, 5-12 Southern Region

Softball Chemeketa CC - April 25 W 8-4 WP - Marshall(13-2) W 7-4 WP - Wright( 6-1) SW Oregon - April 28 L 0-4 LP - Marshall(0-5) L 3-13 LP -Wright(3-6) Overall Record: 22-10, 9-3 Southern Region

WP = Winning pitcher LP = Losing pitcher The softball and baseball games scheduled for May 1 were rescheduled due to rain.


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8The Clackamas Print

Find and circle each of the words from the May list2, below. Words may appear aced@clackamas.edu horizontally, Wednesday, 2012 Games vertically or diagonally, but forwards only.

100 words every high school grad should know

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