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Colin Kreik

b. landscape arch.


contents urban networks natural systems new american urbanism

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green line extension city of somerville research & data mapping

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nycdep stormwater graphics hartford mdc traffic calming norwalk quantico lake berryessa

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FALL 2012

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Sustainable design studio that takes place in a shipyard which shares lot space with an environmental activist art group. This studio applies large scale site analysis for environmental solutions.

NEW URBANISM

SPRING 2013

Urban planning and design studio which highlights final advanced landscape architectural studio coursework. The project takes place in Quincy, MA, and begins by studying at an urban scale to eventually hone in on a specific landscape site.

FALL 2013

THESIS

Portraying the current progress work to date of research and thesis analysis. The focus is on the MBTA’s Green Line Extension through Somerville, MA. The project seeks design opportunities for greenspaces part of the transit oriented development.

26

NYCDEP

CDM SMITH

Samples of work contracted by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection along with the Office of Green Infrastructure. This green infrastructure project took place in Edenwald, located in the Bronx, New York. This represents applying a piece of Mayor Bloomberg’s stormwater reduction plan throughout the City of New York.

espn “rise up” urban farmers’ market

38

URBAN FARMERS’ MARKET

FALL 2013

Current personal project which involves piloting an urban farmers’ market to be located in the neighborhood of Beacon Hill. This work is alongside a financial partner. The current phase of the project is obtaining permits from the City of Boston, while developing photorealistic renderings for marketing purposes.


STUDIO THESIS PRACT CE OUTSIDE WORK 4

20

25

36


STUDIO URBAN NETWORKS CD101 5

Shaun O’Rourke, Maria Bellalta

Summer 2012

Shortened 8 week long summer session studio. Understanding urban infrastructure at a variety of scales while focusing on existing routes and means of travel.

NATURAL SYSTEMS LA302 Shaun O’Rourke, Nina Chase 9

Fall 2012

Sustainability studio, co-taught with considerations of landscape architecture and environmental design. This course approached the issues of energy consumption within the built environment.

NEW AMERICAN URBANISM LA304 Justin T. Viglianti 15

Spring 2013

Comparing North Quincy planning to the rest of American cities and precedents. This course delves into the accommodations of housing, transportation and site design.

4


urban networks Sean O’Rourke, Maria Bellalta, Summer 2012

Reinventing the existing infrastructure of Boston’s Charles River Esplanade and Storrow Drive Summer in Boston is one of the most priceless times of the year. Historical designs such as Fredrick Law Olmsted’s work throughout Back Bay and Fenway neighborhoods omit an aesthetic charm reappearing in Boston’s summer each and every year. The Charles River Esplanade undoubtedly represents a keystone of precious Boston. Users of all kinds venture out to the water edge for a variety of reasons. Activities such as dog walking, boat recreation, a work-out run, or leisure summer read on the docks occur day in and day out. However there is much more to the Boston Esplanade than one may initially realize. Cyclist commuters from Allston, Brighton, Brookline, or Newton may rely on these paths as a quick route to their jobs in downtown Boston. Yet aside from the mixed-use paths along the riverfront, the focal eyesore, noise disrupting third user remains the automobile traffic along Storrow Drive. It is one of the most painful sights one may see: a 6-lane paved urban parkway cutting between the Back Bay and the Esplanade riverfront. The challenge of this studio was to determine who, where, when, and what is occurring throughout the esplanade, while proposing different forms of structure, circulation, and opportunities which can take place to better this gem of Boston. What is missing from the Esplanade, and how can I as a designer better this experience for the public?

5


PROBLEMATIC INFRASTRUCTURE DIAGRAM

analysis

EDED NATED BY 50%

TICALLY ED TO ONLY 3 ABOVE GRADE E INCREASES UTE FOR EASTBOUND DRIVERS HEADING TOWARDS I-93

EDED NATED BY 50%

OPTION 1

PROPOSED SECTIONS

Traffic & Space

I was most interested in ways I could restructure Storrow TICALLY ED TO ONLY 3 ABOVE GRADE E INCREASES Drive. Attempting to solve UTE FOR EASTBOUND DRIVERS HEADING TOWARDS I-93 SS DRIVE thisINTRODUCED problem would be a IC BELOW GRADE E INCREASES challenge, however I believed R RESIDENCE INTRODUCE, EXPANSION OF SPACE LIMINATED EDED it would later help pedestrian DUCED NATED BY 50% flow and begin to enhance existing site amenities. OSSING PEDESTRIAN ROUTES NATED BY 80% Overcoming Storrow Drive was a constant goal throughout the semester.

SS DRIVE INTRODUCED IC BELOW GRADE E INCREASES OPTION 1: R RESIDENCE INTRODUCE, EXPANSION OF SPACE • Stack lanes vertically LIMINATED DUCED • 6 lanes condensed to only 3 lanes above

OPTION 2

Measurement between nearest pathway and Storrow Drive * Measurement of entire esplanade cross section **

PROBLEMATIC INFRASTRUCTURE DIAGRAM:

Diagram illustrating a breakdown of cross sections along the esplanade. This technique measures square footage of various locations. The illustration determined relationships between the water edge, pedestrian pathways, Storrow Drive, and the neighborhoods. LEGEND: 1-3 traffic lanes 3-6 traffic lanes 6+ traffic lanes

*

• esplanade space increases • quicker exit for eastbound drivers heading to I-93 • bridges still needed OSSING PEDESTRIAN ROUTES • noise affect only eliminated by half

NATED BY 80%

OPTION 2:

• MBTA/tour/access drive introduced • 6 lanes traffic below grade • esplanade space increases • pocket parks created, expansion of space • bridges can be eliminated SS DRIVE INTRODUCED • traffic speed reduction IC BELOW GRADE OF ESPLANADE SPACE FROM RESIDENTIAL TO RIVER BANK EWINCREASES • traffic crossing pedestrian GRADE FORstill FULL PEDESTRIAN RIGHT routes OF WAY INTRODUCE, EXPANSION OF SPACE DR RESIDENCE • noise affect only eliminated by 80% LIMINATED

OPPORTUNITY DUCED LIMINATED

OPTION 3:

0-10 feet

grade

• full expansion of esplanade space to river bank edge • all traffic placed below grade for pedestrian right of way • noise eliminated OSSING PEDESTRIAN ROUTES THIN A TUNNEL NATED BY 80% • new landscape opportunities • bridges can be demolished • all cars confined within one tunnel

OPTION 3

10-20 feet

20+ feet

**

0-150 feet

150-300 feet

300-600 feet

600+ feet

bridge location

urban networks / 6


MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE

ARTHUR FIEDLER

MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE:

70  

MBTA: Hynes Convention Center (.32 miles) Hubway: Yes

60   50   40  

Totals: (paths not tallied) Walkers: 65 Runners: 118 Bikers: 26 Pets: 2

Entering   30  

Exi;ng  

20   10   0   Walking  

Running  

Biking  

Pets  

bridge data

FAIRFIELD STREET:

MBTA: Dartmouth (.58 miles) Hubway: no 30  

Totals: Walkers: 50 Runners: 92 Bikers: 66 Pets: 4

Path  

25  

60  

20  

50  

15  

Entering   Exi8ng  

10  

40   30  

Path  

20  

5  

10   0  

0   Walking  

Running  

Biking  

Walking  

Pets  

bridge data

Running  

Biking  

Pets  

path data

DARTMOUTH STREET:

MBTA: Dartmouth (.30 miles) Hubway: no 20  

Path  

18  

FAIRFIELD STREET

CAMBRIDGE STREET

Totals: Walkers: 46 Runners: 73 Bikers: 68 Pets: 4

16  

60  

14  

50  

12   10  

Entering  

8  

Exi9ng  

6  

40   30  

Path  

20  

4  

10  

2  

0  

0   Walking  

Running  

Biking  

Walking  

Pets  

bridge data

Running  

Biking  

Pets  

path data

ARTHUR FIEDLER:

MBTA: Arlington (.31 miles) Hubway: Yes

35  

Path  

30  

Totals: Walkers: 50 Runners: 3 4 Bikers: 35 Pets: 2

25  

25  

20  

20   Entering  

15  

Exi8ng  

10  

15   Path  

10   5  

5  

0  

0   Walking  

Running  

Biking  

Pets  

bridge data

Walking  

Running  

Biking  

Pets  

path data

Mapping Bridges DARTMOUTH STREET

CAMBRIDGE STREET:

LEGEND:

MBTA: Charles MGH (.04 miles) Hubway: Yes Bridge location

Totals: (path not tallied) Walkers: 89 Runners: 6 3 Bikers: 9 Pets: 0

Path to transit line

70   60  

Hubway path

50   40   Entering  

30  

Exi;ng  

20   10  

Walker Runner

0   Walking  

Running  

Biking  

Pets  

Biker

The following data was collected from observation sessions at each bridge location at the esplanade. Sessions took place over a span of 15 minute intervals. All walkers, runners, bikers, and even pets were tallied during peak city rush hour. The purpose of this study was to further identify the action happening at each bridge in the field, hypothesizing the study would reveal where coming from, and what their intended activity at the esplanade would be. Activity varied depending on nearby T stations or the adjacent neighborhood setting. Hubway’s were found at 3 of 5 bridges. urban networks / 7


FINAL DESIGN

MASTER PLAN

ENTRANCE DESIGN

MASTER PLAN:

Highlights material differences, showing the amount of new greenspace, new paths, and recirculated road networks. Also finalizes the proposed cafe space.

ENTRANCE DESIGN:

Through signage and grass mounds, the entrance isolates new spaces for the particular users entering and exiting the esplanade site.

SITE CROSS SECTION:

Gives a transect view on space; separating stationary and recreational spaces amongst all of the networks utilizing the new esplanade space.

SITE CROSS SECTION

Arlington Street Entrance My analysis directed me to redesign the existing Arlington Street entrance. This area had the most amount of users entering and exiting, and served as a connection from the Boston Common to the river edge. The existing bridge at Arlington Street is quite renown; the structure was dedicated to Arthur Fiedler, a former Boston Pops Orchestra conductor. Although this location serves as a major exit from Storrow Drive, it also held a great opportunity to reorganize the traffic lanes. The final design reshapes the original paths into a simpler flow,

SITE PERSPECTIVE

anticipating bicyclists and runners will now be able to share paths. This new design also incorporates paths which are much wider than existing esplanade paths. A roundabout circular fountain with outdoor seating was placed as a buffer between all of the new paths. The space was measured to be wide enough to host food trucks or farmers markets throughout weekends or concert venues along the esplanade. Roads pass by the roundabout for emergency access and give opportunities for additional parking for nearby residents.

urban networks / 8


natural systems Sean O’Rourke, Nina Chase, Fall 2012

Creating a sustainable landscape in an industrial setting, while promoting the shared program of environmental art East Boston’s harbor is a fascinating setting. Historically it was not only a staple during the industrial manufacturing era, but was also one of Boston’s main ports for the exchange of goods. The area also served as a port of entry during America’s immigration peak. East Boston today hosts the Logan International Airport of Boston. The industrial era in East Boston has become extinct, most boating manufacturing has relocated to Charlestown. Boston Boatwork’s shipyard in East Boston still remains however with full service construction, repair, and year long docking and storage. The active shipyard consists of frequent boating and automobile traffic entering and existing the site. Overall the shipyard itself however is quite unique. Different than any other shipyard in Massachusetts, let alone New England and beyond, the shipyard’s space is a shared entity of an art gallery known as Harbor Arts. The growing art group specializes in largely crafted sculptures from all around the world, displaying notions of environmental activism. The two programs are completely different, one being environmentally hazardous, while the other representing the fight for unscathed habitats. Yet they seemingly are able to continually develop a niche for one another by sharing the same grounds. As designers our studio group needed to understand the existing environment and discover a new way which the two can further work together. Our initiative was to better connect the site with the community, and proudly represent a new sustainable environment.

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SUN DIAGRAMS ON-SITE

JANUARY

JULY

OCTOBER DECEMBER ANNUAL TEMPERATURE & WIND CHART

JANUARY 13 MPH

9AM

FEBRUARY

MARCH

13 MPH

14 MPH

25-40˚

Physical Mapping After conducting the original research of the physical conditions of eastern Massachusetts and greater Boston, I now began to look closer into the data found at our site. This wind maps, annual temperatures, and modeling sun studies of the existing building footprint.

APRIL

MAY

50˚ - 65˚

14 MPH

JUNE JULY

65-80˚+

12 MPH 12 MPH

12PM

5PM

JANUARY JULY OCTOBER DECEMBER

WIND MAP ON-SITE

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

10 MPH

12 MPH

12 MPH

12 MPH

13 MPH

WIND MAP ON-SITE:

Using the wind data produced and tracked from the Boston Logan Airport. Here I chose four random months throughout the year where the temperature and wind shifts direction and speed.

50˚ - 65˚

30˚ - 50˚

ANNUAL WIND PATH DIAGRAM

ANNUAL TEMPERATURE & WIND CHART:

Simply tracking the temperature and wind speeds throughout the year. This map displays a quick reference for seasonal change.

SUN DIAGRAMS ON-SITE:

With the same months highlighted on the wind maps, this graphic tracks the sun and shadow studies from morning through noon and into the evening.

natural systems / 10


OUTLINE

The problem of a disregard

CONCEPTUAL INFOGRAPHIC

to sustainable practice among the shipyard affects the given environment, Boston’s connection to the site, and Harbor Art’s progression to the impact of unfulfilled civic engagement.

PRODUCT SELECTION

WIND TURBINES what’s suitable for the site? = 500 kilowatts

Product height from given specifications

Scirollo

40-ft

Skystream 3.7

35-ft

A successful solution would be to provide innovative methods to enhance site quality, further giving back to East Boston and the community.

Gale T5

16-ft

Quiet Revolution Harbor Arts

5

1

“Showing what each of us can do to make a difference now...”

Boston Harbor Marina

2

Today we see the subjects of sustainability, green energy, and renewable power topics spoken about more and more. It is not only an environmental movement, it is a global concern. Candidates and politicians campaign their ideas and goals of putting America in the forefront of global sustainability as a national interest for both political parties.

Decrease production cost through reuse of wind energy, contributing towards economic growth.

East Boston Landmark

3

Further develop site by attracting visitors through sustainable practice. A green model bringing community together.

Massachusetts State Tax Incentives

Helix Savonious

Global Political Topic

4

“Congress has provided tax incentives for a variety of renewable power technologies in recognition of the strong public interest in furthering American energy independence and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.” - Mass.gov 30% of total expenditures, money contributed back for further Harbor Art development.

Wind Turbines

CONCEPTUAL INFOGRAPHIC:

Collecting information and theories of the overall Harbor Arts picture of utilizing wind power, and displaying the overall theory into one graphic.

Wind Power Choosing wind as my natural resource gave me a widespread of options and opportunities to make the site more sustainable. I was now able to incorporate newly engineered systems which could provide an economic stimulator for the entire site. Not only would the shipyard now be able to gain power from their given windy conditions, but any money saved could be regenerated into furthering Harbor Art’s brand. Likewise, money saved could add new amenities to their own facilities.

Leading device converting kinetic energy from the resource of wind. Engineered to recharge battery or auxiliary power, these mechanisms represent the success as a modern day windmill. Tallied from August 2011 through July 2012, wind turbines generated 3.23% of the country’s electrical power.

UGE-IK

16-ft

14-ft

8.5-ft

Enflow 0110 3-ft

Wind Reduction 62-72%

24-62%

13-24%

10-13%

h 5h 15h

20h natural systems / 11

POTENTIAL CREATION THROUGH ART COMPETITION

RESEARCH

PROBLEM STATEMENT

W h


final design

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

AVERAGE SEASONAL WIND ANALYSIS

LEGEND:

Existing Harbor Arts Harbor Arts Extension Generated Power

Separating spaces to understand placement and spatial relationships. The new placement of artistic wind turbines ultimately expand the footprint of the existing Harbor Walk. This graphic also depicts the grid of produced power from the wind turbines, displaying a system of power for each building.

OL A

RE

NE R

GY

sia

TA

Winter Wind

WIND TURBINES

TEMPERATURE DICTATES WIND MOVEMENT

th

Ch

a

reduces energy needs cuts operational costs limits environmental hazards

fi

rs

dv

& a n c e fr 2 0 om 25 t h c k w to 3,0 0 0 k w e ntury

de

n sig

s

88

8

es

19

tw

bi n

in d

tur

Final graphics highlighting the main wind channels during the winter and summer months. This also shows how wind currents react when they hit each building, and which direction the currents will travel afterwards. Pocket gusts determined how particular wind turbines were located.

Pocket Wind Gust

m il

TRANSFORM MOVEMENT OF ROTORS INTO ELECTRICITY CONTRIBUTING TO EITHER LOCAL GRID OR ON-SITE POWER STATIONS

AVERAGE SEASONAL WIND ANALYSIS:

Winter Wind Gust

a r l l t o h a r v e s t e l e c tri c it y es B rush

FR OM S

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC:

Illustrates a new view of the Harbor Art’s program, while reflecting wind turbine placement. Sections also display how the valley and topography determines different climate situations.

M

CA US ES

MS

1 A.D.w ind mi lls

Summer Wind Gust

SITE SECTIONS:

LEGEND:

appear in Fran ce, En gla nd ,a

illlsland Ho dm nd

SU N

WIN DF OR

used for milli ng c rop si nP er

TH E

Winter Wind Gust

SITE SECTION

12th cent ury wi n

EN ER G

PL A

FOR STARTERS

YF

RO

NE T

SU

N

Existing Shipyard Space Existing Buildings

HE A

TO

RO TA

TIO

N

Opportunity for Artistic Turbine

IR

Suggested Turbine Location

1

IN

CL I A M IR

PR

AT

E

OD UC ES

CH

CI R

AN G AT E I

CU L

ON

promotes clean practice LEGEND: qualifies for financial merits Summer Wind gives back to the community Summer Wind Gust Pocket Wind Gust

Turbines

In short time......

generally occupy

less than 2% of land

100,000

jobs are provided by the wind industry turbines recover the energy cost of its construction

$$$ WORLD WIDE

natural systems / 12


MASTER PLAN

LEGEND:

SITE PERSPECTIVES

Harbor Art’s Building Shipyard’s Building Residential WT 1

Harbor Art’s Space

WT 5

Shipyard’s Space WT 4

WT 6

Generated Power WT 6

WT 6

Proposed Turbine Symbol

WT 1

WT 5 WT 3 WT 4

WT 3 WT 2 WT 3

SITE SECTION

PROGRAM REPRESENTATION

natural systems / 13


WT1: VESTAS 8.0MW

Largest wind turbine on site. This would generate the most power while picking up the largest wind gusts throughout the summer and winter months. For this turbine in particular, the power would be generated and sent to the main electric grid of East Boston, further producing tax credits for the shipyard. WT2: SCIROLLO

WT1

WT2

WT3

WT4

WT5

WT6

WIND TURBINES

= 500 KILOWATTS

PRODUCT: VESTAS 8.0MW DIMENSIONS: 150-FT ANNUAL POWER: 8,000KW

PRODUCT: SCIROLLO DIMENSIONS: 40-FT ANNUAL POWER: 6,000KW

Also one of the largest and tallest wind turbines on the market, this system would produce a vast amount of the energy throughout the entire shipyard and Harbor Art’s site. The location of this turbine would be placed in the southern portion of the site, on the edge between the buildings and water front. This would collect much of the wind throughout the entire year. WT3: HELIX SAVONIUS

Still producing a decent amount of power, these turbines would be placed on the new dock as part of the newly proposed extended Harbor Art’s walk. These turbines would power an interactive sign on the dock, provide night lighting, and also generate power into the main shipyard building space. These turbines in particular are designed to be eco-friendly with birds, and also have a unique shape which is meant to glide through the wind without creating loud noises. It would be an excellent display of wind power for the public. WT4: QUIETREVOLUTION

PRODUCT: HELIX SAVONIUS DIMENSIONS: 16-FT ANNUAL POWER: 2,000KW

PRODUCT: QUIETREVOLUTION DIMENSIONS: 8-FT (ROOF UNIT) ANNUAL POWER: 2,500KW

The following wind turbine placements would be situated on the roofs of the shipyard’s building. These would ideally capture wind which would bounce off of the facades of the buildings and be dragged along the building edges. All of wind trapped by these turbines would generate power into the buildings which the turbines are hosted on. WT5: ENFLOW 0110

One of the smallest wind turbines on the market, however surprisingly still producing a decent amount of energy. These turbines would be placed throughout the site at small corners and areas where it may still be possible to collect wind power. These turbines are cheap and have a quick turn around from the price initially spent, and payback results. Meanwhile, the following turbines are small and efficient, harmless within the environment, and very quiet in comparison to other turbines on the market. WT6: HARBOR ART’S CREATION

Harbor Art’s role is to create art which displays environmental awareness to the public. This presents an opportunity for artists to now enter this site, and produce works which also characterize similar results from existing wind turbines. It is an excellent approach for a new world of art and sustainability. One which can put Harbor Arts on the map as being a well recognized environmental awareness art group which they are continually working on.

PRODUCT: ENFLOW 0110 DIMENSIONS: 3-FT ANNUAL POWER: 1,000KW

PRODUCT: HARBOR ART’S CREATION DIMENSIONS: __-FT ANNUAL POWER: __-KW

natural systems / 14


new american urbanism Justin T. Viglianti, Spring 2013

From macro-scale to micro-scale planning, turning a car-centric park and ride into a liveable place on Boston’s exterior Just 6 miles south of Boston is Quincy, Massachusetts, a location of the state’s original settlement during the colonial era. Today it has developed as a largely populated city hosting many different cultures of diverse nationalities. Quincy’s location is situated conveniently along a major transportation line, giving residents a direct commute into downtown Boston and further into Cambridge , Somerville, and Alewife. Our site location of North Quincy is actually quite different than downtown Quincy. The area lacks depth, currently serving as a corporate satellite office location for a variety of firms such at State Street. The entire footprint of North Quincy is utterly impervious with little access or reason for pedestrian activity. It is simply an awkward zone planned as a park and ride commute into the city. Our challenge as students was to reshape this area. Through a series of site analysis and precedent projects, it was our role to determine what exactly North Quincy needed. Strategies were based off of regional, cultural, transportation, and geographical research to determine our initial steps. Our was split between architects and landscape architects, yet the role for all of us was to begin as urban planners, and eventually delve into site context to create appropriate places for current and future residents. The constant question asked was “what does North Quincy need, and what is needed to craft a unique experience?”

15


proposal

Project Goals

BLOCK STUDIES

• • • • •

BLOCK B BLOCK D

E

SIT

Bring back 24-25 year range to North Quincy Promote and/or utilize diverse growth Provide family life amenities Understand dominating workforce industries Provide aesthetics for appropriate culture

EPICENTER DISTANCE COMPARISONS

EPICENTER DISTANCE COMPARISONS:

PHOTOGRAPHED OVERLAYS:

Comparing the distances between North Quincy and Boston to other “young” cities which are outside of city epicenters. As trending now in Brooklyn, Manayunk, and Lincoln Park, these neighborhoods are young and affordable, with easy commutes to downtown financial districts or common employed areas within the given city. The results were remarkably similar in the sense of distance and time travel.

Taking existing images taken in North Quincy to highlight key focal points from a given vantage point. This quickly displayed site observations as a walk through, and possibly geared towards certain designs reflecting the feeling of space perceived.

BLOCK A

BLOCK C

BLOCK STUDIES:

This breaks up the given site context into four quadrants. The idea was to specifically analyze each area to help determine the cultural differences between one block and another. Whether the differences be fiscal, social, or racial, this technique would help sift through the vast amount of cultural information and found.

A B C D

• Majority 25-34 age range compared to N. Quincy • Majority of residents paid above salary average • Majority of households own 1 car, 23% own 2 cars

LINCOLN PARK - CHICAGO (LOOP)

MANAYUNK - PHILADELPHIA

PARK SLOPE - MANHATTAN (MADISON SQ.)

N. QUINCY - BOSTON (STATE ST.)

Distance: 5.0 miles Driving Time: 19 min Estimated Time per Transit Ride: 25 min

Distance: 6.6 miles Driving Time: 16 min Estimated Time per Transit Ride: 38 min

Distance: 6.0 miles Driving Time: 25 min Estimated Time per Transit Ride: 33 min

Distance: 6.3 miles Driving Time: 18 min Estimated Time per Transit Ride: 24 min

(Chicago L, M Train)

(SEPA 9 Bus)

(NYC Metro, F Train)

(MBTA, Red Line)

PHOTOGRAPHED OVERLAYS LOW HEIGHTS ALONG COMMERCE FACADES

• Majority 25-34 age range compared to N. Quincy • Average income ranges from $25k - $100k • Majority of households own 1 car • Majority 25-34 age range compared to N. Quincy • Majority of residents paid above salary average • Majority of households own 1 car, 26% own 2 cars • Most populated block • 2% difference between 0-19 and 25-34 age groups • Majority of residents paid above salary average • Majority of households own 2 cars, 25% own 3 cars

OVERBEARING INFRASTRUCTURE, LIMITING STREET FRIENDLY WALKABILITY AND MOBILITY

PARKING OVERLOAD, DOMINATING TRANSPORTATION NORM OF NORTH QUINCY

MIXED ETHNIC BUSINESSES AMONGST THE BLOCKS, ASIAN COMMUNITY IN PARTICULAR

new american urbanism / 16


development Initial Framework Our final design phase broke the site up into four separate areas. These areas included the Waterfront, Office Park, Residential Section, and Transit Hub. Transit: I believed this was the most crucial site area which could help begin to tie in the rest of North Quincy. Required Program: Per requirement the transit station must host a theater along with the following deliverables: • 3,500 residential units • 3,200 office units • 1 theater, 75,000 sq. ft., 2,500 seat capacity

Centralizing the T Station MBTA station is placed in the direct center (along the existing rail line). Roads are realigned for new site entrances and exits, while circulation has enhanced through the new transit zone. When entering the site the MBTA station is visible from each and every angle. This gives familiarity with the downtown area for pedestrians, bikers, and drivers coming from all angles. Row housing is placed along the easterly side. The required program of a theater is placed at the corner entering from Hancock Street’s existing streetscape. This intention is meant to benefit the local high school which is located adjacent to the proposed building. PHASE SITE TRANSECT 3 MODEL

PHASE 3DEFINED NEWLY MODEL BOUNDARIES

PHASE 3 MODELMODEL DEVELOPMENT


SITE PERSPECTIVE

AERIAL VIEW

final design

typical street tree planting pedestrian walkway 2-in elevated bike lane (3) 11-ft wide vehicular lanes

BLOCK DIAGRAM office units residential units businesses

RESIDENCIES

OFFICES

Residencies

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DENS E CIR C U L

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DDEENNSSE E CCIIRRCCUULLA ATTIIOONN

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PEDEST RIAN CIRC ULA TIO

infill

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connections

DENS E CIR C U L

office / commerce

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employment

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proposedfabric fabricMBTA proposed N. Quincy.

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proposed fabric

Offices

proposed fabric

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IDENTIAL RES

ial

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street section perspective

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AVERAGE HEIGHTS

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1/4 miles

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elevated 5-ft wide bike lanes

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MINUTE WALKING RADII ENTIAL 5 RESID alkk

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pedestrian circulation

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les

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green

office / commerce AACCCE

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walk

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11,3,322 00ffee eett

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MINUTE WALKING RADII ENTIAL 5 RESID

1/4 miles

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1,3

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1,32

QUERCUS americana N. Q UI N CY STA TIO N

5 minute

employment

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domicile

outdoor dining

NCEE RANC EENNTTRA

FOO D

CO NVEINECE

si re

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proposed fabric

ENTRANCE

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DIAGRAMS

existing fabric

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street tree planting

QUERCUS phellos

1,32

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infill infill

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PPEDEDEESSTTR RIAIANN CCIRIRCC UULALA TITOIO

GLEDITSIA TRIACANTHOS

*

office//commerce commerce office

eeddg gee rreess ttrraa iinntt

PRUNUS SARGENTII

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infill infill

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theater theater

theater

*

office / commerce

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PEDEST RIAN CIRC ULA TIO

N

infill

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infill infill

*

office / commerce

ed

office//commerce commerce office

office / commerce

eses 1/44mmilil 1/

MBTA 5 MINUTE WALKIN

G RAD

II

new american urbanism / 18

CO NVEINECE


residential square footage: proposed units: residents:

21%

**

SITE SECTION

3,749,071 sq. ft. * 3,408 (1,100 sq. ft.) 6,816 (2 per unit)

office

LIGHT DENSITY

square footage: 2,438,315 sq. ft. proposed offices: 883 (2,500 sq. ft.) jobs: 22,066 (1 per 100 sq.ft.)

13%

commerce square footage: businesses:

11%

CONVENIENCE

PARK SPACE HIGH DENSITY N. QUINCY MBTA

BOSTON CONCEPT

PARK SLOPE CONCEPT

277,815 sq. ft. 141 (calc. varies) MANAYUNK CONCEPT

LINCOLN PARK CONCEPT

civic

mbta station: 25,751 sq. ft. theater: 83,100 SQ. FT. 5,000 seats

4.5%

LIGHT DENSITY: Residential district zone, open green alleys, long stretches of exterior corridors for exercising, secluded entrances and exits.

*square footage includes each floor **percentage reflects BUILDING FOOTPRINTS

PARK SPACE: Room for recreation, tree canvas providing shade, benches for activities such as reading, commerce centrally located, grass patches, paving patterns. HIGH DENSITY: Downtown zone, centralized commerce, gathering spaces, water feature, outdoor dining, transit located landmark.

100%

EXISTING

N. QUINCY MBTA: Centralized location, sighted from every angle, accessible for work and residential neighborhood blocks. CONVENIENCE: Appropriate business zone, commerce catering to residential needs and residential demographics, quick access from each block, targeted economic center. BOSTON CONCEPT: Accessible train stations, open greenspace, young demographic.

100%

MANAYUNK CONCEPT: Urban revival, close proximity to city epicenter, similar ethnic neighborhoods, adjacent to riverbank and highway access.

PROPOSED

MASTER PLAN

PARK SLOPE CONCEPT: Diverse, multicultural, close to newly built venues, exciting popular up and coming young lifestyle outside of Manhattan. LINCOLN PARK CONCEPT: Communal neighborhood feel, outdoor venues and dining, young, energetic atmosphere, multifamily homes and apartments.

new american urbanism / 19


THESIS LA DEGREE PROJECT LAN1015 Juli Riemenschneider 21

Fall 2013

Monitoring the Green Line Extension from Boston through Somerville and in to Medford. This section highlights current analysis of graduating degree project, and presents ongoing research.

20


7

degree project

EVERETT

6

SOMERVILLE

Juli Riemenschneider, Fall 2013

5

My project proposes walkable routes and destinations for pedestrian and recreational users. Analysis has determined an ideal site will extending Somerville’s existing community path into the city’s civic center. The attempt will begin to solve the MBTA barrier by connecting Somerville’s spaces and neighborhoods with other points of interest along the throughway. This project will ultimately promote health and safety, while lessening Somerville’s current dependency on automobiles.

COMMERCE SHOPPING, HIGH RISE RESIDENCIES, KENDALL MIT

2 - BRICKBOTTOM STATION DENSE RESIDENCIES, ADJACENT TO MCGRATH HIGHWAY

3 - UNION SQUARE STATION (thesis FOCUS)

Solving urban disconnect by weaving void spaces through landscape architectural design. Somerville, Massachusetts is notoriously recognized as New England’s densest city. In only 4.12 square miles, the population is just shy of 76,000 residents. The tightly confined city lacks a sufficient amount of green & recreational space, and an existing MBTA right-of-way divides the entire city in half. This right-of-way is a critical barrier in Somerville, causing disrupted latitudinal street connections and intermittent neighborhood transitions.

1 - LECHMERE STATION (existing)

INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL DOWNTOWN, OFFICE, EDGE OF RESIDENCIES

4 - GILMAN SQUARE station civic center, residential 4

5 - Lowell street station residential, redeveloped residential, post industrial

6 - ball square station

CAMBRIDGE

main entry from medford, commercial mix, dense residencies

7 - college avenue STATION

2

tufts university campus, dense residencies

3

BOSTON 1

21


ANALYSIS Davis Square

Ball Square

Arguably Somerville’s downtown. This area surrounds the transit oriented development of the Red Line’s Davis Square T station, and has progressively defined itself as the Central Business District in regard to Somerville zoning.

Close proximity to the existing Somerville Community Path. This area is a dense residential zone. Limited amount of green space available for residents. “Sharrow” roads promoting bicycle activity / commutes. Excellent food options here.

SommerByDesign:

Problems: Due to the barrier of the MBTA rail, as well as the McGrath Highway, the entire city is divided. There are also limited amounts of business zones, and highly packed One of two locations for farmers’ markets in the neighborhoods. Therefore the combination of barriers and entire city. Highly recognized downtown area for difficult street connections cause an unfriendly pedestrian food and local businesses. Streetscapes play with environment. interesting street furniture and mural art. Area serves most requests from SomerByDesign.

Union Square

Active residential / local ad hock committee designated by Somerville’s community planning department. The following information comes from a design packet from a extensive design charrette for Davis Square. This is a great opportunity for designers such as myself to listen and hear what active residents with a nondesign background are saying about 41 their community. ConCept 35 ConCept

REFERENCE: OFFICE OF STRATEGIC PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Food trucks have become popular in cities across the U.S., because of their funky character as well as their suitability for startup restaurants. But their mobility creates several challenges: first, food trucks need a place to park. Second, their gas-powered generators can undermine the outdoor dining experience. Third, competitors in brick and mortar restaurants can feel like the playing field is not level: food trucks don’t have property taxes passed onto them by their landlords, and operators are not necessarily maintaining public spaces (like sidewalk snow shoveling) in the same way that traditional restaurant operators do. A solution that has gained popularity to address these

Every Wednesday and every Sunday between spring and fall, Davis Square offers an open-air market experience. The long-running Farmers’ Market (located on the Day Street / Herbert Street public parking lot) and the Davis Flea (now in its second year at the Buena Vista public parking deck) are popular shopping venues, for residents and visitors alike. Both events utilize roughly half the space available on their respective sites. To reinforce Davis Square’s market culture, these successful markets could potentially be expanded onto larger footprints. Opportunities for

thesis / 22


Connections

Elevated Promenade

Promoting Fitness

Food Culture

Cox Architecture - Helix Bridge (Marina Bay, Singapore) Cox Architecture - Kurilpa Bridge (Queensland Australia) Ipv Delft - Hovenring (Eindhoven, Netherlands)

Phillippe Mathieu - Promenade Plantee (Paris, France) Diller Scofidio + Renfro - The Highline (New York, New York)

Millennium Park- McDonald’s Cycle Center (Chicago, Illinois)

Austin - Food Trailers (Austin, Texas)

data

POPULATION: 31,260

MAGOUN SQ. WINTER HILL POWDER HOUSE SQ.

REFERENCE: GOOGLE EARTH PRO SPRING HILL

Powderhouse Square

PROSPECT HILL

Spring Hill

1 PERSON HOUSEHOLD: 2 PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: 3+ PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS:

Magoun Square

4,532 4,628 3,438 12,598

0 CAR OWNERSHIP: 1 CAR OWNERSHIP: 2+ CAR OWNERSHIP:

Winter Hill

2,786 6,329 1,103

Prospect Hill

POPULATION: 5,501

POPULATION: 12,765

POPULATION: 2,463

POPULATION: 6,515

POPULATION: 4,014

1 PERSON HOUSEHOLD: 2 PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: 3+ PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS:

708 897 795 2,400

1 PERSON HOUSEHOLD: 2 PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: 3+ PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS:

1,959 2,026 1,628 5,613

1 PERSON HOUSEHOLD: 2 PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: 3+ PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS:

297 347 412 1,056

1 PERSON HOUSEHOLD: 2 PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: 3+ PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS:

746 815 1,018 2,579

1 PERSON HOUSEHOLD: 2 PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: 3+ PERSONS HOUSEHOLD: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS:

822 543 603 1,968

0 CAR OWNERSHIP: 1 CAR OWNERSHIP: 2+ CAR OWNERSHIP:

331 (14%) 1,102 (46%) 967 (40%)

0 CAR OWNERSHIP: 1 CAR OWNERSHIP: 2+ CAR OWNERSHIP:

1,139 (20%) 2,853 (52%) 1,530 (28%)

0 CAR OWNERSHIP: 1 CAR OWNERSHIP: 2+ CAR OWNERSHIP:

171 (18%) 479 (46%) 368 (36%)

0 CAR OWNERSHIP: 1 CAR OWNERSHIP: 2+ CAR OWNERSHIP:

501 (19%) 1,156 (45%) 922 (36%)

0 CAR OWNERSHIP: 1 CAR OWNERSHIP: 2+ CAR OWNERSHIP:

644 (34%) 739 (39%) 514 (27%)

MAGOUN SQ.

POWDER HOUSE SQ.

WINTER HILL

PROSPECT HILL

SPRING HILL thesis / 23


COLLEGE AVE

15 MINUTES

.5 MILE WALKSHED

BALL SQ.

MAGOUN SQ. WINTER HILL LOWELL ST.

POWDER HOUSE SQ. DAVIS SQ.

GILMAN SQ.

DAVIS SQ.

WASHINGTON ST

PROSPECT HILL

SPRING HILL PORTER SQ.

PORTER SQ. UNION SQ

MBTA RAIL MAP

NEIGHBORHOOD MAP

H

LECHMERE

H

DAVIS SQ.

DAVIS SQ.

H H

H H

PORTER SQ. H

H

H

PORTER SQ.

H

CIVIC MAP 7.5 MINUTES

MOBILITY MAP

DAVIS SQ.

DAVIS SQ.

PORTER SQ.

GROCERY MAP

.25 MILE WALKSHED

PORTER SQ.

LATITUDINAL - LONGITUDINAL MAP

thesis / 24


PRACT CE CDM SMITH, PRACTICE EMPLOYMENT Landscape Designer October 2010 - Present Examples of works completed throughout practice curriculum at CDM Smith.

nycdep stormwater graphics hartford mdc traffic calming norwalk quantico lake berryessa 25


nycdep Background:

Bronx, New York 20 Person Project Team Drafting, Site Visit / Documentation, Logo Design

RAIN GARDEN DESIGNS

Mayor Bloomberg’s “PLANYC” proposed a large mix of environmental initiatives and goals to set forth. One of his department’s target was to minimize storm water runoff of waste water dumped into the city’s surrounding water bodies. NYC’s Department of Environmental Protection was given the task of conquering different critical areas of all boroughs for planning stormwater management projects. Our contract was a very large site in the Bronx at a New York City Housing Authority location.

Our goal was to naturally settle the water prior to directing runoff into closed systems. During rainfall, the water would travel through the project buildings into a combined system. The water would normally be directed to be treated, but during large storm events the water would overflow into the Hudson river. CDM Smith was to separate the closed systems to dramatically reduce the water going into closed systems. This would keep the water level below the check dams to prevent sewage from over flowing into the Hudson river.

SITE VISIT IMAGES

LOGO SUBMITTAL

practice / 26


stormwater graphics Background:

Background:

Malden, Massachusetts 3 Person Project Team Rendering, Graphic Presentation

Queens, New York 5 Proposal Team Rendering, Graphic Presentation

Malden streetscape was a public presentation from CDM Smith to the city and public. My overall role and purpose was to prepare a cross section of the street. This was for the public to be able to see what CDM Smith was doing during construction of new water and sewage lines throughout the streets.

The following image was a photo simulated rendering of a typical cross section in a street once a bioretention area has been installed. This graphic was used for a project which CDM Smith was going after in Queens, where we are now currently placing stormwater systems throughout select streets in our contracted area.

The following image was then printed on a large board and was used by one of the principal engineers throughout his public presentation.

This graphic is now commonly used in our proposal sets as a quick, easily read graphic depicting our firm qualifications for stormwater management in urban streetscape conditions.

STORMWATER

INFI

LT R A T I O N

RUNOFF

STORMWATER OVERFLOW

URBAN STORMWATER INFILTRATION Bioretention is a stormwater filtration practice that provides water quality treatment and infiltration, while also creating attractive streetscape plantings. Stormwater runoff is captured and then treated by passing the runoff through a

filter bed mixture of sand, soil and organic matter. This filtration process allows clean water to replenish the groundwater while keeping untreated runoff from polluting downstream water bodies.

practice / 27


Display of Green Infrastructure:

Hartford, Connecticut - 4 Person Project Team - Educational Sign Creator - Will be mounted upon completion of construction

STORMWATER COLLECTION:

AXONOMETRIC

hartford mdc

Background:

This environmentally engineered site was designed to display a series of green solutions to manage and process stormwater.

ROOF LEADER SYSTEM:

RAIN GARDENS:

DRAINAGE SYSTEM 3

DRAINAGE SYSTEM 2

DIAGRAMMATIC SECTION

DRAINAGE SYSTEM 1

Water from the roof of the MDC building is directed to a downspout drain, where is will travel down the side of the building to select rain gardens. Typically, stormwater would end up on sidewalks and streets - this altenative provides and environmentally friendly and efficient way to harbvest the stormwater

A natural irrigation system for stormwater to be absorbed and filtered through vegetation. Throughout this site, plantings have been chosen for efficient purposes with aesthetic results.

3 11

INFILTRATION: This rain garden system is designed to manage various volumes of stormwater by allowing natrual penetration through the soil.

2

PERMEABLE PAVERS: curb

ove r w flo

1 During the first stage of rainfall, the planting system is designed to naturally absorb water from the storm.

2 Water that penetrates through the rain garden will be collected into a perforated underdrain system to direct water outward.

3 In the event of heavy rainfall, the inlet curb cuts will allow ponding water to overflow to the next rain garden.

The pavers are designed to allow stormwater to penetrate into the ground. This walkway showcases an alternative for of hardscape, unline the standard impervious surfaces we typically see.

TREE PLANTINGS: These stations provide larger vegetation which will retain stormwater. Trees offer another form of filtration and absorption, providing shade for visitors while emitting clean oxygen into the air. practice / 28


traffic Calming Background:

New Haven & Meriden, Connecticut Rendering, Drafting, Site Design, Graphic Presentation

CDM Smith has been monitoring rail extensions from New York City who were demonstrating the importance extending their sidewalks further into the through Hartford Connecticut. Our planning department has been contracted to road to counter aggressive automobile usage among these districts. design safe intersections particularly around the proposed transit stations. Excerpt from New Haven Independent: In both New Haven and Meriden, Connecticut, my group and I were able to propose ideas of mitigating traffic, anticipating the rail extension will activate The crosswalks will extend between curb “bump-outs,” significantly shortening the pedestrian circulation around the transit and commercial zones. Much of our distance pedestrians have to walk to cross the street. The intersection will have new work included bump-outs and raised intersections, which caught the Mayor of trees, bollards, LED lights, and flashing, pedestrian-activated crosswalk lights. New Haven’s eye. As shown presented our work alongside citizens,

SITE PLAN

MAYORAL PRESENTATION STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE

REMOVABLE PLANT BOX REMOVABLE BOLLARDS

PERMEABLE CONCRETE UNIT PAVERS

FLUSH GRANITE CURB EDGE RESTRAINT

STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE

REMOVABLE PLANT BOX REMOVABLE BOLLARDS

PERMEABLE CONCRETE UNIT PAVERS

FLUSH GRANITE CURB EDGE RESTRAINT

STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE

REMOVABLE PLANT BOX REMOVABLE BOLLARDS

PERMEABLE CONCRETE UNIT PAVERS

FLUSH GRANITE CURB EDGE RESTRAINT

STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE

REMOVABLE PLANT BOX REMOVABLE BOLLARDS

PERMEABLE CONCRETE UNIT PAVERS

FLUSH GRANITE CURB EDGE RESTRAINT

PLAN

OPTION 1:

STREETSCAPE AMENITIES AREA

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE PAVING

CONCEPTUAL AXONOMETRIC

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE PAVING

FLUSH CONCRETE BUMPOUT

STREET PLANTING

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE PAVING

STREET PLANTING

STREET PLANTING

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE PAVING

FLUSH CONCRETE BUMPOUT

PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY

PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY STREET PLANTING

FLUSH CONCRETE BUMPOUT

PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY

CONCEPTUAL SECTION

FLUSH CONCRETE BUMPOUT

PLAN

OPTION 1:

STREETSCAPE AMENITIES AREA

STREET FURNITURE

STREET FURNITURE

STOREFRONT PLANTING BOXES

STOREFRONT PLANTING BOXES

OPTION 1: STREETSCAPE PLAN AMENITIES AREA

STREETSCAPE AMENITIES AREA

STREET FURNITURE COMMUNITY DEMONSTRATION STOREFRONT PLANTING BOXES

OPTION 2:

STREET TREES, STORMWATER INFILTRATION STREET FURNITURE

OPTION 1:

PLAN

STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE

OPTION 2:

STREET TREES, STORMWATER INFILTRATION STREET TREE

STOREFRONT PLANTING BOXES

STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE

TREE GRATE

STREET TREE TREE GRATE

OPTION 2: 15’ +/-

5’-0”

STREET TREES, STORMWATER INFILTRATION

10’-5”

COLONY STREETSCAPE SECTION 15’ +/-

TYPICAL STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE DETAILS

5’-0”

10’-5”

COLONY STREETSCAPE SECTION

OPTION 2:

AXONOMETRIC

STREET TREES, STORMWATER INFILTRATION

MAY 2013 STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE

MERIDEN STREETSCAPE CONCEPTS

STRE

AXONOMETRIC STREET TREE

TYPICAL STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE DETAILS

DESIGNED BY: DRAWN BY:

TREE

JOE COAN TREE GRATE COLIN KREIK

MERIDEN STREETSCAPE CONCEPTS 5’-0”

STOR INFIL PLAN

MAY 2013

DESIGNED BY: DRAWN BY:

JOE COAN COLIN KREIK

10’-5”

15’ +/-

EETSCAPE SECTION

5’-0”

10’-5”

COLONY STREETSCAPE SECTION

TYPICAL STORMWATER INFILTRATION PLANTING ZONE DETAILS

AXONOMETRIC

TYPICAL STORMWATER INFILTRATION

MAY 2013

AXONOMETRIC

practice / 29


norwalk

CONCEPT SIMULATIONS

Background:

Norwalk, Connecticut 15 Person Project Team Conceptual Design, Rendering, Drafting Support This project is also similar to the “Traffic Calming” portfolio page. Here, CDM Smith along with Sasaki Associates have been paired to consult for the City of Norwalk’s new waterfront district: an area which will also be part of the rail extension to / from New York City. My role within the project was to work alongside one of our lead Landscape Architect’s to serve dead ends of two particular streets which are blocks away from the Norwalk transit station. Resident’s call for the need of serving better street connections from the neighborhoods leading into the entrance of the station. Cyclists in particular end up altering their commute and riding down the busy street of Martin Luther King Boulevard, a 4+ lane street with heavy traffic. Below shows a concept I designed which has the staircase meander and settle into the steep existing slope between the dead end and MLK Blvd. Bike troughs are proposed adjacent to the staircase railing for cyclists to easily push their bikes rather than carry them in awkward positions. This shape created space for seating at the bottom of the stairway for a possible bus stop, while mural art can potentially be added to the wall. The city chose this concept, and the project is currently being produced through construction drawings. LAYOUT AND MATERIALS

practice / 30


quantico Background:

The following project was a very high profile design within our design group. Of each United States military branch, the Marines are currently the only branch to not have their own collegiate institution. CDM Smith worked alongside AECOM to redesign additions to their Quantico, Virginia base facility.

Quantico, Virginia 15 Person Project Team Drafting, File Coordination, Entire Campus Planting Design

Cross-disciplinary work amongst architects, landscape architects, telecommunication engineers, civil engineers, and traffic engineers coordinated throughout the entire project’s design.

PLANTING PLAN

My role within our group was assistance in general site design. For this project in particular, symmetry was extremely crucial to follow. However the project was one of my most valuable design opportunities, having the role of designing the entire campus planting plan. Plant choices were determined by the client, but included the following: Prunus serrulata, Quercus Phellos, Clethra Alnifolia, Forsythia virdissima, Ilex glabra, Juniperus communis, Lindera benzoin, Myrica pensylvanica, Rhododendron calendulaceum, Rhus aromatica, Vaccinium angustifolium, Viburnum dentatum, Carex stricta, Euphorbia corollata, Galanthus nivalis, Hypericum calycinum, Iris cristata, Liatrus spictata, Penstemon digitalis, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Lirope muscari, Pachysandra procumbens, Phlox divaricata, and Viola labradorica.

ENLARGEMENT DETAILS

practice / 31


lake berryessa

Napa County, California - 6 Person Project Team - Technical Coordinator, Diagrammatic Design, Slope Analysis

PROPOSED SITE DIAGRAM

VEHICLE ACCESS CIRCULATION

*

SHORELINE TRAIL ENTRY STATION CAMPING

Tent Site Overnight Group Use Area RV Site Standard Campsite KNOXV ILLE ROA D

The Bureau of Reclamation hired CDM Smith to design their 200+ acre site in Napa Valley for future recreational use. Due to market demand, this site has been experiencing heavy volume with limited recreational and camping options to supply all users. The Bureau of Recreation and Department of Interior plans to develop a series of overnight camping, day use activities, boating, and RV / trailer experiences for the public. Our consulting will eventually be handed to concessionaire developers.

Background:

LODGING

Park Models Yurts, Tent Cabins, Rustic Cabins, Cabins BOATING

Marina & Retail Store Boat Launch Fish Cleaning Station Boat Slip Rental DAY USE

Individual Picnic Site Group Picnic Site Playground Trail Connection

C

LAKE AMENITIES

Restaurant Retail Store

C

FACILITIES / INFRASTRUCTURE

PARKING

Vehicle Parking Vehicle w/ Boat Trailer Parking

With Restroom & Sanitary Pump-out

Campground Common Area

C

Handicapped Accessible Dock

io n Z o n e

Restroom Vault Toilet / Comfort Station / Showers Laundry Fuel Station Sanitary Disposal Tow Service / Yard Shop Camp Host Site Employee Housing

CS

clu s

VCS

Ex

The bubble diagrams I have created will be presented by our client to the public. Following this, the slope analysis depicts buildable areas, monitoring crucial contours and easements which we will need to consider during the entire project.

Lake Access

at

My role within the project was to work alongside the Principal Landscape Architect by responding to the official market assessment by translating these needs graphically into site plans and concept diagrams, while working with the infrastructure engineers at our firm to determine functionality.

Bo

practice / 32


C

*

VEHICLE ACCESS CIRCULATION

*

SHORELINE TRAIL ENTRY STATION

Dry Boat Storage

*

CAMPING

Tent Site Overnight Group Use Area RV Site Standard Campsite

Exc B o a t n e lu s i o n Z o

LODGING

Park Models Yurts, Tent Cabins, Rustic Cabins, Cabins

C

BOATING

Individual Picnic Site Group Picnic Site Playground Trail Connection LAKE

Lake Access AMENITIES

Restaurant Retail Store FACILITIES / INFRASTRUCTURE VCS

Restroom Vault Toilet / Comfort Station / Showers Laundry Fuel Station Sanitary Disposal Tow Service / Yard Shop Camp Host Site Employee Housing

PARKING

Vehicle Parking Vehicle w/ Boat Trailer Parking

OAD LE R XVIL

DAY USE

KNO

Marina & Retail Store Boat Launch Fish Cleaning Station Boat Slip Rental


*

SHORELINE TRAIL ENTRY STATION

D ROA LLE XVI KNO

VEHICLE ACCESS CIRCULATION

CAMPING

Tent Site Overnight Group Use Area RV Site Standard Campsite LODGING

Park Models Yurts, Tent Cabins, Rustic Cabins, Cabins BOATING

Marina & Retail Store Boat Launch Fish Cleaning Station Boat Slip Rental DAY USE

Individual Picnic Site Group Picnic Site Playground Trail Connection LAKE

Lake Access AMENITIES

Restaurant Retail Store FACILITIES / INFRASTRUCTURE VCS

Restroom Vault Toilet / Comfort Station / Showers Laundry Fuel Station Sanitary Disposal Tow Service / Yard Shop Camp Host Site Employee Housing

PARKING

Vehicle Parking Vehicle w/ Boat Trailer Parking

V


SLOPE ANALYSIS


OUTSIDE WORK ESPN “RISE UP” CDM Smith Volunteer Work 37

August 2011

Shortened 8 week long summer session studio. Understanding urban infrastructure throughout a variety of routes and means of travel.

URBAN FARMERS’ MARKET Personal Project 38

October 2012 - Present

Sustainability studio, co-taught with considerations of landscape architecture and environmental design. A course on designing for the issues of energy consumption within the built environment.

36


espn “rise up”

LAYOUT AND MATERIALS

In the summer of 2011, ESPN created a series called “Rise Up”, which served as a national effort dedicated to rebuilding and revitalizing inner city high school athletic programs and facilities. The Boston episode selected Roberts Field, a field located at Dorchester High School. Limited lighting was found at this location, which was an vital concern for parents and athletes, since post practice many crimes including theft continually occurred in succession. Along with this, the high school’s track team lacked proper outdoor practice facilities, forcing athletes to use narrow hallways inside the school as a sprint track, and trash barrels as hurdles. CDM along with other firms and sponsors worked with ESPN pro-bono, providing a 200-meter sprint track, new mixed-use practice grounds, and new weight & locker rooms. In addition, ample light was supplied throughout the entire site. My participation included drafting of the 200-meter sprint track, locating northing and easting locations, adjusting the ADA accessible path between the high school and field, and assisting work in the field setting up for the main event. It was a great moment to witness former Mayor Tom Menino, Celtics President Danny Ainge, and the Dorchester High School administration applaud our work and the overall collaboration. Students and faculty looked forward to their upcoming seasons.

outside work / 37


urban farmers’ market

PERSPECTIVE RENDERING

This entrepreneurial venture has begun in my residing neighborhood, Beacon Hill. Over the years I have grown keen to the culture and lifestyle which the Boston neighborhood personifies. Along the famous Charles Street, businesses such as quaint boutiques and restaurant options able to satisfy any pallet are discovered in succession. Charming and local character embeds the historic architecture and incessant foot traffic. This led me to the realization that the neighborhood could be a promising location for an urban farmers’ market. A financial partner and I are currently in the process of obtaining permits from the City of Boston, and anticipate the market will begin by spring 2014. We are currently gaining interest from the local businesses along Charles Street, and are reaching out to our resources for start-up business loans. AERIAL RENDERING

TWITTER INTERACTIONS

SITE IMAGE

“IDEAL SITE” GRAPHIC

outside work / 38


Colin Kreik - Portfolio