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Plate 1.9 Patch of lichenification over the front of the ankle — the site that is most easily rubbed against the opposing calf. Note: in this Indian patient the marked postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.

Plate 1.10 Rubbing of the skin under the nose can cause marked lichenification a classical physical sign in atopic eczema.

Plate 1.11 Typical lichenified and excoriated skin of atopic eczema of the wrist. This accessible area is a site of frequent rubbing and scratching.

Plate 1.12 The forehead is another area easily rubbed or scratched. Usually the back of the hand is rubbed across the forehead causing the lichenification seen in this patient.

Plate 1.13 The hand on the left is atopic and has been much used for rubbing. This results in epidemal thickening, throwing into relief the normally invisible skin creases — socalled hyperlinearity of the palms. Note the normal hand on the right for comparison.

Plate 1.14 Nipples are a common site for atopic eczema in both males and females. In this case there is much lichenification and considerable post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.

Profile for Christopher Bridgett

Atopic Skin Disease - A Manual For Practitioners  

An account of a new behavioural approach to the treatment of atopic eczema, written for practitioners, but also for patients

Atopic Skin Disease - A Manual For Practitioners  

An account of a new behavioural approach to the treatment of atopic eczema, written for practitioners, but also for patients