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5.3 Treatment O 2

Introduction

n

The patient handbook As already mentioned, it is helpful to support treatment with previously prepared written material. In addition to the handbook it is useful to provide additional diagrams, instructions and information during consultations, to emphasise points relevant to each discussion. The main principles of the treatment approach are as for older children and adults, and are dealt with in previous chapters. They will not therefore be repeated again in detail in this section, but they should nevertheless be considered for each patient and their family.

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Fig 5.5 Suggested Schedule for Visits 1st

Assessment and explanation

2nd Planning treatment

3rd

Review of phase one

4th

Review of phase two

5th

Follow-up

The protocol (Fig 5.5) The number and frequency of visits required, together with the length of each visit and how the patient handbook is given to the family, can be varied according to circumstances. The younger the child and the larger the group interviewed, the more time needed. For example, for a child of two years with both mother and father, the first visit can take up to an hour and a half, but much less time may produce equally good results, especially when the therapist is experienced. The first visit allows for assessment and explanation of the approach. A second visit can then be arranged to plan the treatment and the third visit will follow the first intensive phase of treatment. A further consultation is useful towards the end of the second phase, perhaps two or three weeks after starting treatment. Once the follow-up phase has started visits can be quite short and infrequent, but should be arranged prospectively to provide encouragement, support and continuing advice. All families find it helpful to have access to the therapist between visits, e.g. by telephone. During the first phase of treatment when activity at home is most intensive the therapist may telephone the family to give extra support, or a home visit may be appropriate, if practical to arrange.

Phase 1: all three levels

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Explaining the programme From the beginning the distinction between long-standing atopic skin disease and recent relapses needs clarification.

Profile for Christopher Bridgett

Atopic Skin Disease - A Manual For Practitioners  

An account of a new behavioural approach to the treatment of atopic eczema, written for practitioners, but also for patients

Atopic Skin Disease - A Manual For Practitioners  

An account of a new behavioural approach to the treatment of atopic eczema, written for practitioners, but also for patients