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The Way Forward A natural question for the liberal segment of the society and the international community is what could be done to stop Pakistan from slipping towards radicalism. Besides the usual recommendation to invest in education, development and generation of economic activity, the study proposes the following action:

Long-to-Longer term • Radicalism cannot be fought without altering the popular national narrative. An expert on Pakistan’s politics and Associate Fellow of the Chatham House, London, Dr Farzana Sheikh believes that a major shift will require de-linking politics from religion as was envisioned by the founding father Mohammad Ali Jinnah. The present national narrative is based on a tight coupling of religion with the country’s national identity. This results in forming a peculiar kind of a worldview. Such a change, however, is not going to come very easily. It will require political will and commitment which is absent at the moment. If it has to happen at all, it will only be possible through advocating secularism which has roots in Islam rather than a foreign or western construct.

Medium-to-Long Term • The narrative on religion in Pakistan predominantly follows two strands: (a) ignorance of religion or (b) a gradually growing puritanical interpretation. Although Sufism is also a part of the local culture, it’s the more puritanical versions which are getting popular in urban environments. This can only change through providing the

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Red Hot Chilli Peppers Islam – Is the Youth in Elite Universities in Pakistan Radical?  

This is a study, by Ayesha Siddiqa, of the socio-political attitudes amongst youth in elite universities in the three major cities in Pakist...

Red Hot Chilli Peppers Islam – Is the Youth in Elite Universities in Pakistan Radical?  

This is a study, by Ayesha Siddiqa, of the socio-political attitudes amongst youth in elite universities in the three major cities in Pakist...

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