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REDMOND DOWNTOWN PARK

site analysis synthesis

pfs studio | jill anholt studio | lmn | arup | the workshop


table of contents PART 1: CONTEXT ANALYSIS

PART 3: PUBLIC CONSULTATION

1. Park Network 2. Circulation Network 3. Historic Resources 4. Cultural Resources

1. Workbook Results 2. Park Vision Statement 3. Demographics of Respondents 4. “Everyone’s got a stake...”

PART 2: SITE ASSESSMENT

PART 4: ART OPPORTUNITIES

1. Identity Analysis 2. Park Adjacencies 3. Shadow Study 4. Programming Analysis 5. Regulatory Analysis

1. Observations 2. Themes 3. Conceptual Framework 4. Types of Opportunities 5. Goals for Art + Culture Collection 6. Proposed Art + Culture Opportunities 7. First Works

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PART 1

context analysis

1. Park Network 2. Circulation Network 3. Historical Resources 4. Cultural Resources

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Municipal Campus Sammammish River Trail Edge Skate Park ORSCC Anderson Park OFTC O’Leary Park Flagpole Plaza Redmond Central Connector Heron Rookery Town Center Open Space Dudley Carter Park Luke McRedmond Landing

DOWNTOWN REDMOND’S EXISTING PARK NETWORK Downtown Redmond has a wide variety of public open spaces and civic facilities with linear green corridors pedestrian trails, and streets connecting them into the public realm network. Among the open spaces in the park system, a few are used regularly to host events and festivals. Other spaces are limited in their suitability for active programming by size and by character; a number of parks are heavily treed and environmentally sensitive with primarily passive uses. Each park has been assessed for its current facilities and the extent that active programming occurs. The Municipal Campus and Anderson Park currently host special events. Marymoor Park, although part of the King County park system, is the location of big events with large crowds and will continue to be the venue for large and especially late and noisy events. Cleveland Street and the Cultural Corridor are recent projects that have added to the programming capabilities in Downtown.

Downtown Park Park System Waterbodies Downtown Boundary

park network

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

In the next pages, open spaces in the park system are assessed for current programming facilities and potential for future improvements to enhance their role in animating the downtown.

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MARYMOOR PARK Park size: 640 acres Marymoor Park is south of the City and operated by King County. It is the destination park for the region for large scale events, performances, festivals, and open air movies. It has a capacity way beyond what Redmond Downtown Park can provide and is well away from residents for noisy and late night events. It will continue to be the venue of choice for many events and festivals into the future.

Existing Infrastructure:

Potential Infrastructure:

Other Recommendations:

Marymoor Park has major infrastructure for programming of large events including a permanent stage, electrical supply, parking, open lawn areas, etc. The ready availability of supporting infrastructure make event programming cost-effective.

Park and open space planning studies have identified the need for a new pedestrian overpass over the highway to provide a link from Redmond, through the Town Centre Open Space, to Marymoor Park. Improved pedestrian and cyclist access will make it possible for Redmond residents to access events at Marymoor Park without needing to drive there.

Marymoor Park should continue to be the preferred venue for events beyond the capacity of Downtown Park and the Municipal Campus.

Existing Programming at a glance:

Existing Park Character / Infrastructure:

Main event stage

park network

Velodrome

Dog Park

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

Children’s play area

Aerial view

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MUNICIPAL CAMPUS Park size: 8 acres The civic campus around City Hall is one of the largest open spaces in Downtown. The 2008 Parks and Recreation Master Plan envisioned it as a new park, tentatively called RiverGreen. The open spaces around municipal buildings are used daily by civic workers and neighborhood residents. It already hosts events and festivals on its large central lawn; and it will continue to be a key open space for large programmed events.

Existing Infrastructure:

Potential Infrastructure:

The Municipal Campus is the City’s largest park for outdoor events. The central lawn area is highly flexible and can be set up in a variety of configurations. Basic infrastructure is supplied from nearly buildings and temporary rented facilities are used to supplement what is available on site.

In 2008, the Redmond Downtown Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan presented a conceptual plan for improvements to the municipal campus, renamed River Green. The ability for the campus to host special events and celebrations was key to the conceptual planning and its programming. Improved drainage under event lawns should be a key part of any improvements to the Municipal Campus Site.

Existing Programming at a glance:

Proposed Master Plan:

Existing Park Character / Infrastructure:

Plaza space

park network

Open lawn space

Path system

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

Derby Days event

Derby Days event

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ANDERSON PARK Park size: 2.8 acres Anderson Park is a neighborhood park that is well used on a daily basis and also programmed for events during the year. This well-treed park has a mature coniferous canopy, which contributes substantially to the historic character of the park. Historic structures currently accommodate programs and classes. A children’s play area orients this park to family usage. The park’s size and residential edges limit the scale of events.

Existing Infrastructure:

Potential Infrastructure:

Other Recommendations:

Anderson Park functions primarily as a neighborhood park. It has a small plaza with a permanent stage and built-in seating that is used as a small event venue. Electricity and water service is available from the adjacent buildings which also provide support space such as change and green room functions for events.

Anderson Park has a limited capacity for crowds at its plaza stage and adjacent open lawn area due to constraints of size, many trees, and several park structures. Planned changes to the park’s edges will not affect its capacity much but public art and wayfinding could enhance its potential as a venue within a larger multi-site festival with a ‘hub and spoke’ configuration. Electricity hookups should be expanded and upgraded in the future.

Events in Anderson Park should be kept small and low impact to avoid compaction of soil and roots around the mature coniferous tree stand. An arborist assessment of the existing trees, along with a planting plan for the future replacement of trees or other planting is recommended to maintain the unique character of this space.

Existing Programming at a glance:

Existing Park Character / Infrastructure:

Picnic shelter

park network

Children’s play space

Open green /historic cabins

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

Permanent stage

Art installation

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“THE GREEN RING” One of the “Big Ideas” of the Downtown Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan is “The Green Ring” that re-imagines the Sammamish River and Bear Creek with its linear trail system as a destination for city residents for enjoyment of nature and for a range of activities that utilize the open spaces linked by the Ring as a “string of pearls”. The Green Ring and other linkages in Downtown are key resources for events like charity runs, walks, and rides.

Existing Infrastructure:

Potential Infrastructure:

Other Recommendations:

Redmond has implemented a network of green movement corridors to facilitate connections among parks and other destinations for pedestrians and cyclists. The naturalized corridor along Bear Creek and the Sammamish River has been recently supplemented by the more urban Central Connector.

Wayfinding signage and public art are additions that will enhance the Green Ring. Planning for nodes that support walks, runs, and rides with permanent infrastructure like drinking water sources and bike racks and places designed to be temporary set-up areas during events would enhance these opportunities.

Wayfinding around the Green Ring should be integrated with an improved movement network in the downtown that links key open spaces with a role in event programming. Access to the water in multiple locations is recommended to expand recreational opportunities and to strengthen the relationship between the Green Ring and the rivers.

Existing Programming at a glance:

Existing Park Character / Infrastructure:

Sammammish River Trail

park network

Luke McRedmond: Access to water

Luke McRedmond: Open green

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

Sammamish River Trail @ Dudley Carter

Town Center Option Space: Typ. character

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HERON ROOKERY & DUDLEY CARTER PARK Park size: 4.6 acres (Heron Rookery) / 1 acre (Dudley Carter Park) Several parks in Downtown feature natural and forested settings that provide nearby access to nature for residents. These spaces are not well suited to programs that attract large numbers of people or need supporting infrastructure.

Existing Infrastructure:

Potential Infrastructure:

Other Recommendations:

The Heron Rookery has a wild, peaceful ambiance and should be protected from intensive usage. Dudley Carter Park has been developed with a unique and appropriate set of facilities that are not designed for events.

Neither the Heron Rookery or Dudley Carter Park is expected to play a role in event programming given their ecological values and role as places of respite in the downtown.

The Heron Rookery has been suggested as a potential performance venue for a small audience. It is recommended that an environmental impact assessment be prepared to evaluate the site and its potential to be resilient to temporary intensive use before using it as a performance venue.

Existing Programming at a glance:

Existing Park Character / Infrastructure:

Dudley Carter: carving shed

park network

Dudley Carter: open green and art

Heron Rookery: Existing trails

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

Heron Rookery: Central meadow

Heron Rookery: Native vegetation

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OTHER PARK SPACES Park size: 0.12 acres (O’Leary Park) / 0.11 acres (Flagpole Plaza Park) / 3 acres (ORSCC) / 1.4 acres (Edge Skate Park) Several open spaces in Downtown cater to the social and recreational needs of Redmond’s youth: the Old Firehouse Teen Centre, the Old Redmond Schoolhouse Community Centre, and the Edge Skate Park. These places provide a range of specific recreational programs, indoor and outdoor, but offer little flexible space for events and large gatherings. Flagpole Plaza and O’Leary Park are both paved plazas that provide small, informal gathering spots near Downtown Park with public art and heritage interpretation as features of interest. These places will complement and support the activities and programming for Downtown Park.

Existing Infrastructure:

Potential Infrastructure:

Other Recommendations:

Both the Old Firehouse Teen Centre and the Old Redmond Schoolhouse Community Centre offer a range of public indoor and outdoor spaces that could be used to support programming in a ‘hub and spoke’ event. Edge Skate Park could be a small performance venue in a dispersed festival.

New infrastructure is not a priority for these parks. Infrequent inclusion of these spaces in events would likely adapt to existing facilities.

Improved wayfinding between Downtown Park and both the Old Firehouse Teen Centre and the Old Redmond Schoolhouse Community Centre along NE80th Street would assist in coordinated programming with events based in Downtown Park.

Existing Programming at a glance:

Existing Park Character / Infrastructure:

Edge Skate Park

park network

Flagpole Plaza

O’Leary Plaza

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

ORSCC

OFTC

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DOWNTOWN STREET HIERARCHY The diagram at right illustrates the hierarchy of streets in Downtown Redmond. The annual Derby Days event currently uses portions of NE 85th Street, NE 83rd Street, 160th Avenue NE, and 158th Avenue NE to host the bike race, road race, and parades. A series of improvements to Cleveland Street are also under construction, which are intended to create a programmable venue along this streetscape. A number of key links in the park and open space network are also already in place: • • • •

Redmond Central Connector the ‘Green Ring’ pedestrian trails through Downtown blocks sidewalks along Downtown streets.

Together, and with targeted improvements, this network can be used to program events like walks, runs, and cycling races.

Downtown Park Park System Waterbodies Downtown Boundary Principal Arterials Minor Arterials Collector Arterials Connector Streets Proposed Connections

circulation network

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS The priority improvements to the circulation network to enhance open space connectivity and to facilitate multi-venue events include wayfinding, streetscape improvements, and public art: • On Cleveland Street / 10th Avenue NE from a gateway at Anderson Park to Municipal Campus • On NE 80th Street from Downtown Park to ORSCC • On Leary Way to the parking lot south of the Central Corridor, especially if it becomes the site of the relocated Farmers Market.

Wayfinding Markers Downtown Park Park System Waterbodies Existing Pedestrian Trails Proposed Ceremonial Streets Downtown Boundary

circulation network

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS Recommendation 1:

Avoid dissipating activity into off-street paths such as mid block pathways. Great streets need critical mass of pedestrian activity to attract more people and leverage business.

Recommendation 2: Bicycle race: Jakarta Indonesia

Projected wayfinding system: Montreal CAN

Provide an elevated design language to establish these streets as high quality pedestrian linkages. Continuous tree canopy cover, high quality paving materials, minimizing curb cuts, pedestrian scale lighting, unique shop signage, and allowing setbacks that accommodate retail and cafe uses all contribute to pleasurable streets to occupy.

Recommendation 3:

Temporary installation: Vancouver BC

Street Festival: Vancouver BC

Provide permanent signage and wayfinding along designated circulation routes to connect park system. Wayfinding could be expressed through a number of means, including signage, art, lighting, or pavement markings. Provide temporary wayfinding along circulation routes during hub-and-spoke programming events.

Recommendation 4:

Tree-lined streets: Las Ramblas, Barcelona

circulation network

High quality paving materials and details

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

Consider streets as programmable venues during special events. This could involve the closing of the street to traffic for runs, bicycle events, or street festivals, the closing of a single lane of traffic to widen sidewalks for pedestrian circulation during hub-and-spoke events, or temporary installations that occupy the street.

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Redmond Central Connector Lot Town Center Parking Structure Key Bank Parking Lot Chase Bank Parking Lot Redmond Park-and-Ride Parking Structure

PARKING RECOMMENDATIONS Current City regulations require that the park meet “peak demand for parking”. With the intention to have some programmed events that will draw large numbers of people, this will be impractical to fulfill. The City has commissioned a downtown parking study that is running concurrently with the concept planning for Downtown Park. The City already has parking options in place to address event demand levels: • Several large surface lots and parking structures in Downtown • Arrangements with owners of lots at schools, churches, and other institutions to use them on event days • Other surface lots in a 5-10 minute walking radius that could be investigated for potential event use with or without shuttle service, depending on their location and DOWNTOWN REDMOND PARKING

NE 90th St

161st Ave NE

160th Ave NE

154th Ave NE

2hr EP2

NE 87th St 2hr

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Key Bank - Nights & Weekends (Winter 2013-14)

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Redmond Central Connector Parking Open Now

HOW TO PURCHASE A DOWNTOWN REDMOND PARKING PERMIT ($50/month) A limited number of paid parking permits, allowing on-street all-day parking in designated areas, are available for sale on a monthly basis. 1) Call 425.556.2433 2) Press 1 to be connected with Diamond Parking to purchase the parking permit.

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2hr

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NE 81st St

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NE 85th St EP2

165th Ave NE

NE 83rd St

2hr

1 hour Parking (9am - 5pm Mon-Fri)

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Downtown time-limited enforcement zone

2hr

Downtown Park

Downtown Boundary

2hr

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2 hour Parking or Extended Parking by Permit

1hr

2hr

166th Ave NE

2hr

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3 hour Parking or Extended Parking by Permit

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158th Ave NE

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City of Redmond Downtown Parking Map

circulation network

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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Noomis Clubhouse & Public Library First Community Center/Oddfellows Hall The Corner Tavern (not existing) Pope’s Hardware Skjarstad’s Shoe Repair Redmond State Bank O.A. Wiley House (Stonehouse) Auto Stage Office (not existing) Redmond Trading Company Dudley Carter Haida House Redmond Hotel & Justice White House Redmond Railway Depot (not existing) Bill Brown’s Saloon Grange and Feed Mill (not existing)

HISTORIC RESOURCES The Downtown has a number of heritage sites in the immediate vicinity of Downtown Park; most still have existing structures. Wayfinding and interpretation from Downtown Park to these sites will be considered in the recommendations for improvements to wayfinding and circulation. The design of pedestrian movement routes from Downtown Park to Leary Way and to NE 80th Street will be key to achieving integration with heritage resources.

Hotel Walther Brown’s Garage City Hall & First Fire Station Redmond Methodist Church Schoolhouse Anderson Park Log Cabins

Bill Brown’s Saloon

Early Residential Plat Downtown Park Park System Waterbodies Historic Road (Jackson St) Downtown Boundary

Lampert’s Butcher Shop

historic resources

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

Odd Fellow’s Hall

O.A. Wiley House

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ARTS AND CULTURE Municipal Campus

OFTC

Redmond Regional Library

ORSCC

Redwood Theatre

Anderson Park Cabins

Millenium Gallery

SecondStory Repertory

Vision 5

VALA Arts Center

Ben Franklin Crafts and Frames

Haida House

Soulfood Coffeehouse

Marymoor Facilities

EDUCATION/RECREATION Northern Lights Motessori Redmond Elementary “HOT SPOTS” Palmers East The Matador Restaurant Redmond Town Center Redmond Farmers’ Market Future LRT Station

CULTURAL RESOURCES Downtown has a concentration of arts and culture, education, recreation, and entertainment destinations. Each of these has the potential to be combined with trips to the park on ordinary days and with events operating on a ‘hub and spoke’ basis. In particular, the Farmers Market is a significant resource for events on Saturdays as both an attractor for people and as a place to buy food during an event in Downtown Park. Food stalls or trucks along the Central Connector and/or Cleveland Street could be part of the wayfinding between the park and the market.

Bus Transit Center

Soulfood CoffeeHouse

Redmond Town Center

Proposed future cultural amenity Downtown Park Park System Waterbodies Downtown Boundary

VALA Eastside Art Center

cultural resources

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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PART 2

site assessment

1. Identity Analysis 2. Park Adjacencies 3. Shadow Study 5. Programming Analysis 4. Regulatory Analysis

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ECOLOGICAL REDMOND Prior to European settlement, Redmond was an ecologically rich marshland at the top of Lake Sammamish. Remnants of this natural history are still found at Downtown Park, where the accumulation of partially decayed vegetation over thousands of years formed pockets of peat. Throughout the area were cranberry farms and peat factories. The Sammamish River was so full of salmon that Redmond was originally named ‘Salmonberg’ by European Settlers, and dense mature coniferous forests provided a lucrative logging industry.

Peat Pockets

Salmonberg

Cranberry Bogs

Sammamish & Bear Creek Rivers

Pacific Crabapple

Sedges

Deciduous Forest

Logging

“The Willow People”

CULTURAL REDMOND Redmond has a rich and varied cultural history. 3,000 years ago, the rich salmon reserves made the banks of the Sammamish River a popular seasonal fishing destination for the local Duwamish Tribes. European Settlers developed a new town in the fertile valley basin, and began to build an industry focused on forestry, fishing, and agriculture. A changing industrial base has created a cultural mosaic in Redmond, with many different ethnicities now calling Redmond home.

Duwamish Tribe

Hot Air Ballooning

Derby Days

Family-oriented & Arts Events

Built Heritage

Redmond Lights

Winter Skating

Public Art

Multi-cultural Celebrations

DIGITAL REDMOND Redmond has become a focus of new technology enterprises and the home for people who work in these companies. It is a digitally aware population with expectations that public space will offer ways to engage with new technologies.

GEOLOGICAL REDMOND Redmond sits within the Lake Sammamish trough, a valley that was carved subglacially when the Vashon glacier overrode the area about 17,000 years ago. The Downtown Park site sits over a portion of the Lower Issaquah Valley Aquifer, which provides Redmond’s drinking water.

Digital Gaming

Gravel Outwash

Digipen/Technology

identity analysis

Tech-savvy Population

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

High Water Table

Soil

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Cascade Grind Jamba Juice Cheveron Aquaquip

Redmond General Insurance Ltd.

McDonald’s Books

NE 80th ST Zeke’s Pizza

Subway

La Quemada Mexican Market

Red m

ond

Towne Furniture

Columbia Bank

Way

Allure Salon Driftmeier Architects

Domino’s Pizza

Redmond Cleaners

Rudy’s Barbershop

Collier Salon Towne Mortgage

161 st

Red 160

Top Pot Donuts

Ave NE

Vacant Nail Salon

Minuteman Press Samila’s Boutique Windermere Realty

Gerk`s Alpine Hut

Edward Jones Investments Pacific Northwest Law Group

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Vacant Auto Service

Palmers East Timeshare Liquidation Services

Old T *Un own M ix der con ed-use stru ctio n

El Toreador

Pub (Under Construction)

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Clev elan

Meiko`s Clips Stone House Restaurant

Martial Arts

Lea

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Ashleigh`s Attic

East Pearl Chinese

Redmond Western Wear The Matador Half-price Books

Elan

park adjacencies

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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SPRING EQUINOX march 21

SUMMER SOLSTICE june 21

FALL EQUINOX september 21

WINTER SOLSTICE december 21

* Hypothtical Building shadow study

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9am

noon

3pm

6pm

*

*

*

*

9am

noon

3pm

6pm

*

*

*

*

9am

noon

3pm

6pm

*

*

*

*

9am

noon

3pm

6pm

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

21


EXISTING PROGRAMMING IN DOWNTOWN REDMOND Redmond already plays host to a number of events and festivals:

Civic Campus Downtown Park Redmond Town Centre Thrill the World

Redmond Town Centre

Vedic Cultural Centre Russian Community Centre

Second Story Repertory Theatre

Redmond Colors Festival

Redmond Saturday Market

“Professor Pomme’s Pomp and Pastry Paradoxicals” Lucia Neare, Downtown Park 2012

programming analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

22


APPROACHES TO PROGRAMMING As part of the site assessment of the downtown parks in Redmond, current and potential programming functions have been reviewed. Redmond currently programs its signature events: Derby Days and Redmond Lights using a range of spaces that together provide the range of facilities needed for the events. Only Marymoor Park is large enough to host major events on its own. Three approaches to programming Downtown Park will be addressed in the concept design as well as recommendations for future additions to other parks and to the streets and connectors that link them together.

Single Event:

Path / Circuit Event:

Hub-and-Spoke Event:

Downtown Park has the capacity to host single

Many events invite participants to move along a

Downtown Park can be the centerpiece of an event

events up to its capacity. Closing Cleveland Street

route. These circuits often need a public space as a

that has multiple venues. The Municipal Campus,

can add to this capacity as well as facilitating the

starting point and finish line as well as nodes along

Anderson Park, and spaces both indoor and outdoor

inclusion of program elements that require a paved

the way for food and water or other functions.

at the Old Redmond Schoolhouse are good ‘spoke’

location such as food trucks, market stalls, and fire engines.

Examples:

sites. Good connections and clear wayfinding to other sites is key and can be facilitated by signage,

Charity Walks and Runs

Examples:

Derby Days

Food Tasting Festival

Redmond Lights

Artist-in-Residence Performance

Examples:

Outdoor Art and Craft Market

streetscape design features, and temporary banners, signs, balloons, cones, and other markers.

Music festival with multiple stages needing acoustic separation

Outdoor art show linked to indoor gallery spaces

Children’s festival linked to indoor theatre spaces and outdoor stages like Anderson Park

programming analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

23


PRELIMINARY PARK SPATIAL CAPACITY STUDY A number of potential park programming ideas have been identified. Many of these ideas were tested in the Public Workshop and Workbook process. The diagrams below illustrate the spatial scale of programming concepts in the context of Downtown Redmond Park. BASIC PARK CAPACITY: Standing Crowd Park Area: approx 90,000 sq.ft Circulation Space: approx. 20,000 sq.ft Programmable Area: 70,000 sq.ft Crowd Density: 4.3 sq.ft. per person Maximum Crowd Capacity: 16,000 people

Sitting Crowd Park Area: approx 90,000 sq.ft Circulation Space: approx. 20,000 sq.ft Programmable Area: 70,000 sq.ft Crowd Density: 13 sq.ft. per person Maximum Crowd Capacity: 5,400 people

BEER GARDEN

MARKET

CONCERT

100 tables / 400 seated patrons

240 market stalls

12,000 maximum standing crowd

Each 8’ x 2.5’ table seats 4 patrons. The Beer Garden program also includes a 65’ x 12’ area for serving. A fenced in area of 25,000 sq.ft contains the beer garden program. Outside of the licensed area, 3 standard food trucks provide snacks for beer garden patrons along the east side of the site.

A market configuration accommodates 240 double-loaded standard 10’x10’ portable market tents. 20’ market aisles allow for circulation. The market configuration occupies the south side of the park, as well as Cleveland Street. As a temporary program, the market program might accommodate artisan groups, a night market, a farmer’s market, or a winter holiday market to temporarily activate the space.

A small- to medium- size concert event is configured on the Downtown Park site around a 40’ x 80’ stage (complete with 10’ sound wings on each side). A densely packed standing crowd (4.3 sq.ft. per person) of 12,000 people is accommodated within the view lines of the stage. A buffer area at the east side of the park is left to accommodate event staging.

OUTDOOR MOVIE

SPLASH PAD

TEMPORARY ICE RINK

PICNIC LAWN

1,500 seated audience

28 water jets @ 20’ o.c.

6,000 sq.ft. ice rink

100 picnickers

An outdoor movie event is created in Downtown Park by renting a large inflatable screen (40’ wide x 20’ tall) and projection equipment. An audience of 1,500 is accommodated on lawn chairs or blankets (at a density of 13 sq.ft. per person)

A 10,000 sq.ft. splash pad accommodates 28 water jets placed 20’ o.c., creating an activated play space in the park that doubles as a programmable hardscape.

A temporary ice rink for winter skating measures 137’ x 44’. 8 10’ x 20’ enclosed tents flank the skating area to provide space for skate rentals and storage, as well as warming stations and food/drink services. Ice rink programs likely require temporary or permanent cover over the skating surface.

A 16,000 sq.ft. passive green on the Downtown Park site accommodates 100 picnickers on 10’ x 10’ picnic blankets. This program assumes a spatial requirement of 150 sq.ft. per person.

Casual Crowd Park Area: approx 90,000 sq.ft Circulation Space: approx. 20,000 sq.ft Programmable Area: 70,000 sq.ft Crowd Density: 54 sq.ft. per person Maximum Crowd Capacity: 1,300 people

programming analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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POTENTIAL STAGE LOCATIONS: ACOUSTIC CONSIDERATIONS Stage directed north *least desirable location • Pro: Stage is directed away from residences • Con: Stage is located very close to residential units.

DIAGRAM LEGEND Residential Uses Commercial Uses Noisiest part of the site, given traffic flow and bus routes.

Stage directed southwest • Pro: Stage is as far away from current residential units as possible • Con: Stage is pointed towards nearest residential units

Stage directed east • Pro/Con: Stage is located at the noisiest part of the site, which could create a noise barrier to the audience area, however cuts off access/visibility from 161st Ave NE • Pro: Loudspeakers are pointed towards commercial buildings • Pro: Stage is reasonably far away from the nearest residences to the south • Pro: Orientation uses the aspect ration of the park to maximize seating area • Con: BoH stage area is visible to street/residential community

Stage directed west *most desirable location • • • • •

programming analysis

Pro: Stage is reasonable far from residential units (within site constraints) Pro: The nearest residential units are off-axis of stage direction Pro: The BoH area is near the commercial zone and hidden from the residential community Pro: Orientation uses the aspect ratio of the park to maximize seating area Con: The audience is located towards the noisiest end of the site.

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

25


Anderson Park Bear Creek Carter East Hill Old Town R-12 R-30 Riverbend River Trail Sammamish Trail Trestle Town Square Town Center Valley View

R-12

River Trail

Sammamish Trail

Valley View

The downtown park is located with the Old Town (OT) zoning district. Because the park will not likely involve more than a freestanding, pavilion-like structure, few regulations in the City’s Development Guide have bearing. However, two provisions do have implications. One is the prohibition on surface parking. It is possible that the Building Official will require parking for disabled people on site; that has happened with other parks in the U.S. Alternatively, on-street parking next to the park could be designated (the clear maneuvering space required for a handicapped stall can make this difficult).

Town Square

Downtown Park will have a dramatic, “signature” design that creates a distinct focus. As a centerpiece in downtown park, surrounding development projects should have a clear focus for amenities and ground-level activities that support connections and produce many different choices for people to both move about and linger. Specific design guidelines could be considered to help shape supporting design in new nearly developments.

East Hill Trestle

Riverbend

RELATIONSHIP TO REGULATIONS

Old Town

Anderson Park

Carter R-30

Bear Creek

Town Center

Downtown Park Park System Waterbodies Downtown Boundary

Neighborhoods in Downtown Redmond

regulatory analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

26


REDMOND ZONING CODE: Title 21 of the Redmond Municipal Code contains applicable zoning standards. • District: The park is located within the Old Town District (OT), standards for which are indicated in Section 21.10.030 • Height: Key standards include a maximum height limit of six stories, although the park will not likely contain a structure of that magnitude. There is a section of the district that is covered by a 3 story height limit overlay, but the park does not lie within that portion. • Lot Coverage: 100% lot overage is allowed. The park might include a pavilion, but it would cover only a minor portion of the site. • Setbacks: The setbacks are zero. • Parking: The section indicates that a recreational facility needs to provide sufficient parking to meet “peak use.” • Street Frontage: There are Street Frontage Requirements, but the park would not invoke those standards, as it does not involve buildings along the street edge. • Surface Parking Lots: Surface lots are not allowed. This limitation might present an issue associated with providing for ADA parking. This would require a code interpretation. • Vending Carts: Vending carts are allowed but are restricted to 6’x10’ in size and must not interfere with walkways. This could result in the need for a space within the park, rather than along sidewalk edge for food vending.

regulatory analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

27


• Pedestrian System: A Pedestrian System Map indicates that the park site is surrounded on all sides by Type 1 sidewalks. These involve a total width of 14 feet, within which is a 4’ wide planting zone with trees in grates, a clear 8’ wide sidewalk, and a 2’ wide setback area. The map also indicates a “Type VII,” 30’-wide lane to be shared by both pedestrians and vehicles, crossing the park. From discussions with staff and examining other sections of the code, it seems there is latitude to approve a deviation from this standard. Land use decision criteria for downtown includes this provision: For Downtown, mid-block pedestrian walkways and vehicular lanes, per RZC 21.10.150, Pedestrian System, may be modified to allow variations in locations and minimum widths for these items to provide superiority in site design and function which benefits both the property owner and public. • Design Standards: The code contains a set of design standards applicable to Old Town. However, most of the standards are crafted to ensure that newer structures fit in with the scale and character of the district, which includes buildings left over from a much earlier era. There are a few standards addressing site planning issues such as encouraging plantings, lighting and street furnishings, but these will certainly be part of a park design.

regulatory analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

28


NOISE REGULATIONS: Noise standards for the City of Redmond are contained in Chapter 6.36 of the Title 6 of the Redmond Municipal Code. The standards indicate that noise levels received in residential areas from the park location must not exceed 57 dBA between 7:00am and 10:00pm, After 10:00, they must drop to 47 dBA. However, the closest residential area is several blocks away. Most of the noise potentially coming from the park will be experienced within downtown. The maximum allowable noise level within the downtown is 60 dBA. The noise standards contain a number of exemptions. One that is applicable to the park is “(g) Sounds originating from City-approved parades and other public events.� Another section of the Redmond Municipal Code addresses amplified music in parks: 9.32.220 Amplified music and public address systems. It is unlawful to operate a powered public address system or amplified music speaker system or other means of amplifying sound at any park areas without a written permit from the director. Battery-operated portable radios and tape players are permitted, provided they shall not be operated at a volume or in any manner

BUILDING PERMITS: Building permits will be required for any structures within the park, as well as any retaining walls that are higher than 4 feet, measured from bottom of footing to top of wall.

regulatory analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

29


DRAINAGE STANDARDS: Chapter 15.24 of the Redmond Municipal Code addresses clearing, grading and the management of storm water. Rain gardens or bioretention that are used to manage stormwater are subject to the requirements of Redmond’s Clearing, Grading, and Stormwater Management Technical Notebook (http://www.redmond.gov/cms/One.aspx?portalId=169&pageId=68224) According to Steve Hitch of the City staff, there have been issues identified with the Wellhead Protection Zones and nitrogen export. The City is in the process of monitoring this and determining whether changes to the code are warranted. In the meantime, individual projects are reviewed to minimize risks to the aquifer. Applying the criteria in the Technical Notebook, Hitch recommends the following for the downtown park: • Infiltrate as much clean stormwater as possible. The City wants water to go into the ground to restore the aquifer. • If there is stormwater runoff from clean surfaces like sidewalks and plazas, porous pavement is preferred so that it infiltrates immediately. • If porous pavement is not used, runoff from the non-porous pavement should be captured and infiltrated into an underground infiltration system, such as an infiltration pipe. • Rain gardens are allowable but would be reviewed to minimize impact on groundwater.

SEPA REVIEW: The City will need to consider potential environmental impacts under the State Environmental Policy Act. This would be initially accomplished through preparation of an environmental checklist that would identify needs for more detailed analysis.

regulatory analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

30


SIGNAGE REGULATIONS: Typically, sign regulations address advertising for commercial enterprises. The type and function of signs associated with the downtown park do not fit the categories normally associated with business-related signs. Signs for the park could be exempt under provisions of 21.44.010D. Exemptions. The following signs are exempt from the requirements of this section: Certain Public Signs. The following signs and displays are exempt from the requirements of this section: street signs and/or numbers, street address identification, traffic control and pedestrian signs and signals, governmental directional and/or wayfinding signs, public and legal notices and warnings required by a public process, signs required by law, and governmental flags. Parks often involve temporary signs informing the public of events, activities and festivals. This type of sign seems to be addressed by this additional exemption: Seasonal Decorations. Reasonable seasonal decorations within an appropriate holiday season or during a festival are exempt from this section as long as such displays are removed promptly at the end of the holiday season or festival. However, banners and sandwich board type signs are often used for announcing events within parks. It seems that the sign provisions may not allow these. Under Prohibited Signs is this provision: Temporary Portable Signs. Temporary portable signs not meeting the requirements of this chapter. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, portable reader boards, signs on trailers, banners and sandwich boards. There might be some administrative leeway for parks, but it is difficult for cities to employ signs that private parties are not allowed to use. For events in the park, there might need to be a permanent device for providing information on events.

regulatory analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

31


FOOD AND ALCOHOL IN PARKS: Section 9.32.140 of the Redmond Municipal Code prohibits serving of alcohol in city parks. Section 9.32.150 allows for the Parks Department to enter into contracts with other parties to sell “refreshments or merchandise.” This would seem to allow for the sales of food, either on a short term basis, such as food carts or trucks, or a longer basis such as in a pavilion structure. It is possible that a concession contract might include wine and beer, despite the other cited provision. Sales of alcohol also require permits issued by the State Liquor Control Board.

TEMPORARY USES, INCLUDING EVENTS: The Zoning Code recognizes that there will be short term events and lists a number of exemptions: • Motorized catering that remains at one location for no more than three hours per day; • Circuses, carnivals, fairs, or similar transient amusement or recreational activities. • Activities, vendors and booths associated with City of Redmond-sponsored or authorized special events; • Individual booths in an approved temporary use site for group retail identified under subsection Vending carts are also allowed as temporary uses but would require permits.

regulatory analysis

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

32


PART 3

public engagement

1. Results from Workbook 2. Park Vision Statement 3. Respondent Demographics 4. “Everyone’s got a stake...”

33


EXERCISE 1: Look and Feel of Downtown Park (tabulated results) EXERCISE 1: Look and Feel of Downtown Park (tabulated results)

Percentage of positive responses (“I love it!”) shown over images. • Percentage of most positive responses Yellow text indicates popular element.(“I love it!”) shown over images. • Yellow text indicates mostwithin popular element.boxes. Complete response results noted appropriate

I love it!

I love it!

Could be nice

Could be nice

Not interested

Not interested

• Complete response results noted within appropriate boxes. SPACE + SURFACE

45%

40% One big outdoor ‘room’

39 35 24

Mix of smaller spaces

46 29 28

19%

48% Grass

50 48 7

Paved

20 27 58

18% Wood decks

19 31 56

WATER

44%

21% Reflecting pool

22 30 51

Splash pad

47 25 35

42% Sculptural water feature

44 38 24

37% Stormwater garden

39 43 24

23% Ice rink

25 26 56

PLANTINGS

34%

45% Ornamental gardens

45 39 15

Islands of planting

32 47 16

41% Specimen/great tree

40 34 24

28% Grove of trees

27 27 41

45% Allee of trees

45 28 27

FURNISHINGS

workbook responses

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

34


FURNISHINGS

56%

22% Traditional furnishing

22 49 28

Movable casual tables and chairs

57 28 17

38% Large platforms

39 49 14

31% Transformative sculptural furnishings

30 32 36

37% Furnishing as artful play

37 22 41

STRUCTURE

54%

16% Enclosed pavilion

15 30 49

Open canopy

56 31 16

26% Temporary kiosks

26 38 37

33% Temporary inhabitable art installations

32 36 30

38% Bandshell

39 32 31

LIGHT / DIGITAL

50%

42% Art on the ground

43 30 29

In-ground lighting

50 34 16

50% Catenary (overhead) lights

51 43 9

43% Sculptural light fixtures

44 38 20

19% Interactive/digital display

19 20 62

INTEGRATED ART

50%

26% Iconic art installation

26 42 33

Interactive art

workbook responses

52 34 19

45% Temporary art

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

48 45 14

32% Pavilion/canopy as art

32 45 22

14% Digital art

15 26 63

35


EXERCISE 2: Programming (tabulated results)

EXERCISE 2: Programming Opportunities (tabulated results)

I love it!

I love it!

Percentage of positive responses (“I love it!”) shown over images. • Percentage of most positive responses Yellow text indicates popular element.(“I love it!”) shown over images. • Yellow text indicates mostwithin popular element.boxes. Complete response results noted appropriate

Could be nice Not interested

• Complete response results noted within appropriate boxes.

Could be nice Not interested

ARTS AND CULTURE

73%

63% Ethnic festivals

67 29 10

Concert / performance

79 23 6

45% Temporary art installation

48 45 14

21% Video/digital display

21 29 51

59% Light festival

64 33 11

MARKET

57%

61% Farmers Market

64 27 14

Craft fair

60 31 14

78% Night market

82 18 5

57% Art market

59 33 11

68% Winter holiday market

71 31 3

FAMILY-FRIENDLY

44%

44% Splash pad/water play

47 25 36

Movies in the park

44 35 22

50% Holiday events

53 41 13

61% Theater/art performances

66 36 6

49% Children’s play

50 38 14

CULINARY

workbook responses

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

36


Splash pad/water play

47 25 36

Movies in the park

44 35 22

Holiday events

53 41 13

Theater/art performances

66 36 6

Children’s play

50 38 14

CULINARY

49%

65% Food festival

66 22 14

Food trucks

50 29 23

35% Community dinner

35 33 33

55% Cafe in the park

56 24 22

50% Special event beer garden

50 26 25

RECREATION / HEALTH

39%

48% Walks and runs

49 34 19

Fitness classes/ demonstrations

40 44 18

28% Bicycle races and events

29 46 28

24% Health fair

24 49 25

30% Ice skating

31 19 53

EVERYDAY USE

58%

36% Passive green

37 49 17

Picnic tables/places to eat

workbook responses

62 34 10

40% Water play

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

41 34 28

77% Weather protection

83 19 6

75% Wi-Fi connection

76 15 11

37


PARK VISION RESPONSES: • I like the word cultural congregation area

• Flexibility for future; looks good in 10 years

• Performance art instead of stage

• Should serve residents first - not a destination

• Too specific as “outdoor stage”

• Accessible to people of all means and abilities

• Emphasize all season use.

• Must be free to all

• Active gathering place - night and day. Nature and technology and art for entire

• Community / Local

community. Inclusive for everyone

• Rain or Shine

• The stage should not be too large.

• Bright and Lively

• Don’t forget to incorporate the natural beauty of the area meaning don’t make it

• Rain and shine

all concrete. • Inspires high quality design + active uses in private development + around the park. • For use throughout ALL seasons! • A quiet area - waterfall?? - there is plenty of city noise already. • A destination that is fun to visit.

• Brightens the dreary times (light and color) • Represents the community • Blending nature and tech/future art. Art is Nature + Tech. Sci Fi - art that lludes to sci-fi, not kitschy or obvious. • Respect and encouragement for native plants and inclusion of habitat for birds and bats (maybe even butterflies and bees)

• Comfortable to sit and eat or read.

• Resident focus day and NIGHT

• Peaceful environment that may include sound of water and play.

• Mixed use, don’t focus on stage but make it possible

• Performance stage is ok if it is useful day to day.

• All Seasons, weather protection.

• A cohesive whole with a large focal feature like multi-level waterfall that maximiz-

• Community hub

es sound.

• Source of joy

• More diverse ways to incorporate youth/teens.

• Something for kids to use

• More information on economical inflation

• Interactive

• More cultural /historic examples of native cultures

• Open and free

• Destination everyday + special events

• Transient/open

• People watching in restful environment

• Gathering space

• Shelter from rain + sun

• Space for activities

• Adds food and culture with people watching.

• A place to gather

park vision statement

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

38


con’t... • I don’t like the “signature” part. Too many parks in Redmond are already “signa-

• More and/or larger performance areas.

ture” parks. I prefer it to be a “Gathering” park. “Signature” seems very preten-

• Closer access to food & beverages

tious.

• Play areas for children with more seating arrangements

• I feel that the “signature” element of the park should be the community, not the

• Larger play spaces, touching more of the business developments

park itself. The park should be interactive and changeable. Lots of events, lots of

• Lots more trees!!!

change.

• Building community around the downtown neighborhood.

• Temporary events that reflect changing culture • Ice rink can be converted in summer to a concert venue • Gathering spot with a great sense of community - that feels inclusive and welcoming to all to enjoy

• Safe structures for children to play in/around without worrying about traffic on Cleveland St. and Redmond Way • More and/or larger performance areas. • Play areas for children with more seating arrangements

• ADA with interactive elements for low vision

• Closer access to food & beverages

• A place for activity

• Larger play spaces, touching more of the business developments

• Gathering place for community activities

• Lots more trees!!!

• It should be also a center for community activities mentioned

• Adequate facilities - sinks, restrooms, power for food vendors

• The park needs to be an attraction day and evening, and also in different sea-

• Some covered area/protection from weather

sons like winter and summer

• Emphasis on community

• “community activities”

• Include as a permanent fixture - Redmond Saturday Market

• “gathering space”

• Needs more permanent place for Redmond Saturday Market (cottage industry,

• “daily activities/recreation” • “Stage” needs to be multipurpose.

art, food, produce, etc.) • Attraction is a weak word. I think you need to think of the park as a place where

• All season park - usable in all seasons

the community (residents, employees, etc.) congregate and share experiences -

• Attraction - serves as a core meeting place - includes significant interactive, mul-

it’s not just an “attraction” that someone passes through.

tipurpose, changing art - destination.

• A fun space for families!

• Park needs to be changeable, multipurpose, not fixed

• Keeping it green, and not a cement horror

• The Downtown Park is the outdoor living room for the City, a place to get together

• Keeping it functional and useful before artsy

and a place to relax by oneself

park vision statement

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

• Keeping it simple, easily maintained, and family friendly

39


con’t... • Some link to the past, the history of Redmond. Could there be room for the Historical Society?

• Dog play is agility and obedience equipment, not a dog park. • ...serves as an intergenerational attraction...

• Less visual art. The space is not very big and we already have lots of art.

• Interactive things (not just passive)

• Please not spiky art like in front of city hall. The spiky art is not friendly.

• Family Friendly

• I am not sure why the stage needs to be there, unless the space is usable the

• Active Space

rest of the year.

• Builds Community

Vision Statement as presented in Workbook:

The Downtown Park is a signature park for the City, that includes significant visual art, an outdoor performance stage, and serves as an attraction for residents, employees, and visitors during the day and evening.

Revised Park Vision Statement:

Downtown Park is a community hub for the City, that includes integrated art, infrastructure for performance and cultural activities, and serves as a gathering place for residents, employees, and visitors of all ages and abilities during the day and evening, rain or shine, and in all seasons.

park vision statement

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

40


30

30

20

DEMOGRAPHICS OF RESPONDENTS

10

60 %

60

Caucasian

41 %

Other

39 %

• • • •

69% 60% 41% 75 % 73%

40

1%

• 43 workbooks completed at the open house • 71 workbooks received digitally

20

10 %

10

‐14

1% 2% 43% 39% 11%

Asian

10 % 3%

3%

15‐24

25‐44

45‐64

under the age of 14 15 - 24 25 - 44 45 - 64 over 65

Caucasian

65+

50 45

35

European

Asian

African American

Other

73 respondents indicated their ethnicity, of them: • 75% Caucasian Age of Respondents • 10% European • 10% Asian 43 % • 3% African American 39 % • 3% Other

30 25 20 15

11

10

10 % 3%

European

10 %

10

2%

43% of Respondents have children at home • 36% children are under 6 • 25% children are 6 - 12 • 27% children are 13-17 • 11% children are over 18

3%

0

Caucasian

75 %

20

40

114 responses received to date

Ethnicity

0

• • • • •

60

Shop

30

11

Shop

Live in Redmond WorkEthnicity in Redmond Own property in Redmond Shop in Redmond

Own

60

25

0

Work

70

50

0

Own

Live

30

5

Work

0

80

43 %

45

10

Live

10

Ethnicity

50

10

30

African American

15

20

40

Asian

20

30

50

European

35

40

70

3%

40

50

80

3%

Age of Respondents Age of Respondents 73 %

69 %

70

20

10 %

0

Association with Redmond Association with Redmond 80

10 %

African American

Other

5

1%

2%

‐14

15‐24

0

25‐44

45‐64

65+

Age of Respondents 50

43 %

45 40

39 %

35 30 25 20 15

11

10

Public Workshop #1 (image credit: City of Redmond)

5

1%

2%

‐14

15‐24

0

25‐44

45‐64

65+

demographics of respondents

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

41


“BIG IDEAS” RESPONSES The responses from the “Big Ideas” exercise in the workbook have been tabulated and hand-written on tags for the “everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” installation. “Big Ideas” for the park will continue to be added to the on-site art installation. Below is a list of responses received to date:

• Something to draw me in and give me a reason to stay. • More free rein on art/graffiti/expression • More community interactive events • More creative ways to involve all ages • Band stand with flexible seating and installed modular seating

• Water Feature

• People watching with wine, beer, coffee - not looking at parking or traffic

• Oak Trees

• Trees (large trees - oak?)

• Shelter

• Cover (weather protection for all year use)

• cultural events

• Music

• an enclosure and lights for night use

• Traditional, Calm, relaxing, simple park

• an urban feel that fits with the city

• Water Fountain

• To hear music for all ages

• No drastically contemporary design and art work

• A place to read and people watch

• The Park and City to be conservative in color coordination and design to last

• To hang out all day… a place for evenings and nights

many years to come

• Natural areas + pavilions

• To eat lunch

• Light day + night

• Listen to a local band

• Water flowing + hard surfaces

• Watch people

• Flowers

• This park for all

• Lots of people

• Available day and evening

• Something fun to interact with

• To soak in the sun and escape from the rain

• Memorable events

• Markets and festivals for a variety of ages and interests

• Creative winter uses to bring people outside during stormy weather!!

• To showcase local art

• Edible plants throughout the park - think about local + sustainable + teachable

• Nature + stylish allusion to Sci-Fi Art/Style

moments!

• Rain + shine

• Large focal waterfall. Multi-level water feature.

• Light + color

• Comfortable seating, shelter from rain and sun

• Habitat for birds!

“everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” installation Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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con’t.... • Group sitting spaces

• Water + Grass

• Night markets and night events!

• Organic trees/ plants / gardens

• A place to hang my hammock

• Ice skating - because it would be unique during winter

• A place to walk at night

• Splash pad

• A place to hang out with friends.

• Meet up with friends - a space for gathering

• A park for all seasons

• A place to retreat and be contemplative

• A place to read and a place to play

• A water feature

• Shade, sun, cover, water, movement

• Interesting lighting!

• A splash pad

• A place to play… splash, skate, climb, slide

• Community involvement

• Some shelter from rain, shade

• A Pea Patch

• Water flow - sound fountain

• Kids play area or structure

• Happy hour with friends

• Nature

• A place to dream

• A new energy

• Food and cafes

• Color and vibrancy

• Happy kids playing

• Play

• Flowers and colors

• People

• Splash pad

• Community

• skating

• (it all) space for kids to play, wet and dry

• Bike racing

• (it all) café/patio away from traffic and relaxation in green space, generally

• A place of true beauty

• (it now) food festivals

• A place where this multicultural community can meet.

• Single men my age!

• A fountain, flowers, beautiful atmosphere, lighting. I want Magic in DTP.

• Community projects (like making quilts for “Wounded warriors” or homeless

• Cool Lights for nighttime interest

• Culture

• Food trucks that have a good spot to park and get to

• Community

• A place to refill water bottles + get water for my dog

• More access, more local parking nearby

• A place that is versatile when it comes to weather/seasons - ice rinks, splash pad,

“everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” installation Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

43


con’t.... partially covered areas • A place that ALL age groups can enjoy - I have a 13 year old daughter and it would be great to have a remote, local place that would interest them

• Tether-ball • A swing • Digital games on walls and floor

• The potential to have activities and a space that would “come alive” at night

• Lighting on building

• Informal areas, seating, a water feature - doesn’t have to be

• Lanterns

• OK with some of the ideas on a short term basis

• Overhead lights

• Christmas Tree park in commemoration of the one on Redmond Way & 164th that

• Gym class

was sent to the White House in the 1970s (maybe on the outer island of NE80th

• Milkshake day

street and Redmond Way)

• Ice skating

• A place to set up the carnival for Derby Days and an uncluttered place to relax

• Holiday

• It should allow for multi-purpose use without the feeling that everything is tempo-

• Lanterns

rary.

• Art installations on the ground

• Easy access and parking

• Fun and interesting place to sit

• Live outdoor music

• Indoor swimming pool

• Large craft shows close to all the business areas

• Roller skating

• Art

• Ball

• Ice Skating

• Overhead lights

• Green spaces/lawns

• Playful seating

• Busker festivals

• A football stadium or field

• Roller skating

• Sports Events

• Ice cream stand

• Holiday parties

• Playground

• Water park

• Ice cream stands

• Shade/shelter

• A party • Holiday celebrations • Ice cream sundaes

“everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” installation Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

44


“EVERYONE’S GOT A STAKE IN DOWNTOWN PARK” INSTALLATION UPDATE

Perspective view from corner of 161st Ave NE and Redmond Way

The “everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” temporary on-site installation project has moved from concept into installation. Multiple stakeholders have been involved in the painting of stakes, including City Staff, elementary school children, and the local teen center. The installation was installed on April 1st, and is intended to provide a continued platform for public engagement.

View looking south from Redmond Way

View looking northeast from 161st Ave and Cleveland Street

View looking east from 161st Ave and Redmond Way

View looking

Installation layout plan

“everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” installation Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

45


Installation Photos (image credit: City of Redmond)

“everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” installation Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

46


PART 4

art opportunities

1. Observations 2. Themes 3. Conceptual Framework 4. Types of Opportunities 5. Goals for Art + Culture Collection 6. Proposed Art + Culture Opportunities 7. First Works

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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OBSERVATIONS/ nature • Redmond sits in a fertile basin created by ancient glaciers. Partially decayd vegetation over thousands of years formed pockets of peat found in DTP today. • Coniferous forests were logged and deciduous forests fliled in the landscape creating an area of great biodiversity today. • Sammamish River that runs through Redmond is home to salmon, trout, and many species of birds and mammals. Waterways have been important to residents of Redmond since its beginning. • isurrounding green hillsides and snow capped mountains form Redmond’s backdrop • Current extensive system of parks and green spaces within the City and continous green trails. • strong “material” presence of nature in Redmond

observations

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48


60,000

56, 561 40,000 1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

OBSERVATIONS/ human history • Native Americans in + around Redmond area for at least the last 6000 years • European settlers arrive in 1870s working primarily in logging and fishing as well as mehantile jobs • Currently Redmond evolving into a city of increasing diversity as there is a large influx of Southeast Asian and other foreign born highly educated workers moving to Redmond to work at technology corporations • Redmond has the largest daytime population surge in the US (111%), as workers commute into the City. • Population of Redmond is increasing in recent years as immigrant families including children and grandparents of hi-tech workers are beginning to move into the centre of Redmond. Largest population demographic is 25-44 years old.

observations

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OBSERVATIONS/ digital + hi-tech • Redmond is well known home of Microsoft and other large software and technology corporations like Nintendo, At&T and Physio-control • Across the world the name Redmond is synonymous with Microsoft • Actual presence of Microsoft and other hi-tech companies in Redmond is not very evident as many companies tend to be quite introverted and closedoored within their own campuses. • Redmond is home of Digipen Institute which offers degrees in video game design, computer science, animation, etc. as well as DAFNE: the Redmond Digital Arts Festival. • Tech-savvy population in Redmond

observations

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50


THEMES/ place - placeless Redmond exists within two extremes: • the physical, lived immediate presence of Redmond experienced through its natural environment; a strong sense of place • the unseen yet somehow ubiquitous recognition of the digital environment of Redmond; a sense of placenessness

themes

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future

LINEAR TIME

CYCLICAL TIME

present

THEMES/ time + duration continuum Redmond contains many different experiences of time: • geological time (slow/incremental/ imperceptible) • indigenous time (cycles/ patterns based on nature) • current (linear, sequential, chronological time)

past

• digital (immediate/ instantaneous/ distant)

GEOLOGICAL TIME

DIGITAL/ NETWORKED TIME

themes

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THEMES/ tension The extremes of substance/ephemerality and the varied experience of time found in Redmond are what make it truly unique Redmond’s character is neither one of nature or one of technology, one of the immediate nor one of the eternal, but it is in fact the tension and simultaneous existence of these extremes – seen and unseen that gives Redmond its unique identity. They are all integrated inter-related elements of this particular place.

themes

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CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK/ substance and ephemerality • Artworks for Redmond should capture the substance and material presence of Redmond’s natural surrounds as well as the immateriality + ephemerality of Redmond’s digital presence. • Art opportunities should bring Redmond’s omnipresent + globally understood but largely unseen digital presence into the public sphere.

conceptual framework

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CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK/ Perrigo Heights

NE 100th ST

Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

Nike

166 th AVE NE

171 st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

166 th AVE NE

NE 83 rd ST

161 st AVE NE

160 th AVE NE

NE 85 th ST

Edge Skate Park

NE 80 th ST

ORSCC

NE 80 th ST OFTC O’Leary Park Flagpole Plaza

CLEVELA ND

REDMO ND

ST

Luke McRedmond Landing

WAY Anderson

WAY LEARY

Redmond

164 th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

Dudley Carter

Central

Connector

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

relevance + significance • Artworks created should be locally relevant but also internationally significant. Works need to resonate beyond the specifics of a given location

transformation + continuum • Artworks created should not memorialize the understanding of Redmond at a singular particular moment in time but rather recognize that the City is in constant transformation (incremental, sequential, cycllical, etc.) • Consider works that operate within a continuum of both space and time.

conceptual framework

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CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK/ relationships • Artworks should engender highly proactive relationships with visitors predicated on participatory interaction, not passive viewer-ship. • Artworks should allow for deep and meaningful connections of people to place through direct engagement

interaction • Artworks should engender a complex interaction not only with the site but with people using it. • Artworks should somehow charge the place with their presence and remain valid through their life spans regardless of their duration

conceptual framework

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56


type+

=

collaboration

+ +

= =

collaboration collaboration platform platform connection platform connection moving connection

duration

moving moving long duration long duration short long duration short duration short duration

frequency episodic episodic episodic continuous continuous continuous cyclical

CLASSIFICATION OF ART + CULTURE OPPORTUNITIES TYPES • Collaborations: connections between different people/disciplines to create unique work) • Platforms: (location constant, artwork transforms) • Connections: (art that connects people to + between places) DURATION • Long (from years to decades or more) • Short (from minutes to months) FREQUENCY • Episodic: (occasional + unexpected) • Continuous: (ongoing) • Cyclical: (re-occuring in expected timeframes)

cyclical cyclical

classification of art + culture opportunities Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

57


GOALS FOR REDMOND ART + CULTURE • Create a multiplicity of opportunities for artists + the public to define new relationships to Redmond • Create a process for commissioning of works that allow for both seasoned and new artists to enter the public sphere • Encourage collaboration between artists and other disciplines in order to expand the possibility of what is possible. • Consider the collection of works as a whole, as a curated collection - and how the works contribute to a cumulative experience of place for the viewer.

goals for artwork collection

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CITY OF REDMOND/ downtown core Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

Nike

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

ART OPPORTUNITIES/ locations NE 85th ST

NE 83rd ST

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

downtown park (dtp) cleveland street park network (projects within other parks) moving projects (projects that move between parks) event based work

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Red

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

mon

d Ce

ntra l Co nn

ecto

r

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

art opportunities

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REDMOND DOWNTOWN PARK (DTP) Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

Nike

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

REDMOND DTP/ opportunities NE 85th ST

NE 83rd ST 166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

pavilion lighting + digital works artist in residence/animateur construction fencing pedestrian crossings alleyways

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Red

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

mon

d Ce

ntra l Co nn

ecto

r

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

art opportunities

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166th AV

161st AV

collaboration long duration

=

platform ORSCC short duration

DTP/ pavilion (collaboration)

NE 80th ST

connection

NE 80th ST

moving

DTP

FP

+

=

OFTC

collaboration episodic long duration platform continuous short duration connection cyclical moving

Heron Rookery

AY W Y

AR LE

Red

164th AVE NE

r

+

mon

d Ce

ntra l

long duration episodic

Con necduration short tor continuous cyclical

PAVILION collaboration/ long duration/ continuous Anderson

• Artist collaboration with design team to design an inhabitable shelter for downtown park • Artist and Designers work as a team at the early onset of the project to envision the pavilion and the user experience within. Art fully integrated into the final form.

episodic continuous cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY • Serpentine Pavilion, Herzog & de Meuron collaboration with Ai Open Weiwei Town Center Space

art opportunities

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166th AV

161st AV

DTP/ pavilion (platform)

moving

NE 80 ST

+

th

DTP

ORSCC

collaboration episodic long duration platform continuous short duration connection

=

FP

long duration episodic short duration continuous

Heron Rookery

AY W Y

AR LE

NE 80th ST

OFTC cyclical moving

Red

164th AVE NE

r

connection

mon

d Ce

ntra l

cyclical

Con n

ecto

episodic

r

PAVILION platform/ short duration/ cyclical Anderson

• A curator initiated program to select artists to transform the pavilion through lighting or digital means. • New works initiated several times a year and/or as related to certain events occuring in DTP .

continuous cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY • Serpentine Pavilion, Zaha Hadid, London, UK • Town RivaCenter Gallery,Open Erwin Redl, NY Space

art opportunities

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166th AV

161st AV

DTP/park (platform)

connectionORSCC long duration moving short duration collaboration

NE 80th ST + DTP

=

FP

NE 80th ST

long duration

OFTCplatform

short duration connection episodic moving continuous

Heron Rookery

AY W Y

AR LE

long duration episodic cyclical

Red

164th AVE NE

r

moving platform

mon

d Ce

short duration continuous

ntra l

Con n

e

cyclicalctor

PARK platform/ short duration/ episodic Anderson

• Expand on the Artist Residency program that began this year. Open call to select artists to enliven the DTP through interactive works that involve the public • Current artist in residence is Lucia Neare

episodic continuous cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY • Professor Pomme’s Pomp and Pastry Paradoxicals I, II, Center & III, Redmond Town Open Space

art opportunities

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166th AV

161st AVE

DTP/construction fencing (platform)

connection ORSCC long duration moving short duration collaboration

NE 80th ST + DTP

=

FP

NE 80th ST

long duration OFTC platform short duration connection episodic moving continuous

Heron Rookery

AY W Y

AR LE

long duration episodic cyclical

Red

164th AVE NE

r

moving platform

mon

short duration ntra continuous l Co nne c cyclicaltor

d Ce

episodic

CONSTRUCTION FENCING platform/short duration/ episodic Anderson

• Construction and temporary fences around DTP during its construction can be used as spaces for temporary installations • RFP type process to select best artist ideas to bring life to un-prepossessing but highly visible barriers during construction

continuous cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space • New Readers, Christian Moeller, King County, USA

art opportunities

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64


166th AV

161st AV

collaboration long duration

=

DTP/ pedestrian crossing (connection)

NE 80th ST +

platform ORSCC short duration collaboration connection

=

NE 80th ST

platform moving

DTP

FP

OFTCconnection episodic long duration moving continuous short duration long duration cyclical

Heron Rookery

AY W Y

AR LE

short duration

Red

164th AVE NE

r

+

mon

d Ce

ntra episodic l Co nne ctor continuous episodic cyclical

PEDESTRIAN CROSSING connection/long duration/ continuous Anderson

• Catenary lighting that connects Cleveland Street to DTP can be designed to work with and enhance the design of the park • Artist collaboration with design team for DTP to envision this element as part of the overall design for the park

continuous cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY • Weihnachtsbel Baden, Catenary Lighting | TensileTown Design & Construct Center Open Space

art opportunities

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166th AV

161st AV

DTP/ pedestrian crossing (platform)

connectionORSCC long duration moving short duration collaboration

NE 80th ST + DTP

=

FP

NE 80th ST

long duration OFTC platform short duration connection episodic moving continuous

Heron Rookery

AY W Y

AR LE

long duration episodic cyclical

Red

164th AVE NE

r

moving platform

mon

short duration ntra continuous l Co nne cto cyclical r

d Ce

PEDESTRIAN CROSSING platform/short duration/ episodic Anderson

• The catenary lighting could be come a platform for changing artwork either through a programmable lighting component or an attachment system for changing artistisc elements

episodic continuous cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY • Claude Cormier, Montreal, Canada

art opportunities

Town Center Open Space

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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166th AV

161st AV

DTP/alleyways (connections)

NE 80th ST + DTP

connectionORSCC long duration collaboration moving short duration platform

=

FP

short duration moving episodic long duration continuous

Heron Rookery

AY W Y

AR LE

NE 80th ST

long duration OFTCconnection

short duration episodic cyclical

Red

164th AVE NE

r

moving platform

mon

d Ce

ALLEYWAYS connections/short duration/ episodic Anderson

• Artist temporary installations in alleyways that draw people into downtown park from its edges

ntra continuous l Co nne cto cyclical r episodic continuous cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY • The Meeting Place, Aspect Studios, Australia + Bill FitzGibbons LightSpace Rails, USA Town Center Open

art opportunities

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

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CLEVELAND STREET Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

Nike

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

CLEVELAND STREET/ opportunities NE 85th ST

1. art interruptions 2. storefront installations

NE 83rd ST

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Red

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

mon

d Ce

ntra l Co nn

ecto

r

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

art opportunities

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connection

NE 85th ST

CLEVELAND STREET/art interruptions (platform) NE 83 ST rd

+

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

=

NE 80th ST FP

OFTC

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Red

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

mon

d Ce

ntra l

Con n

collaboration episodic long duration platform

ORSCC

NE 80th ST DTP

moving

continuous short duration connection cyclical moving

ecto

r

long duration episodic short duration continuous cyclical

• RFP opportunity for temporary artworks along Cleveland street that cause surprise, laughter and questions for the pedestrian

episodic

• opportuntiy for new and emerging artists to do public works

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

ART INTERRUPTIONS platform/short duration/ cyclical

continuous

• opportunities can occur and change every few months for increased interest

cyclical

• Luzinterruptus, Weeds/ Konstantin Dimopoulos, Blue Trees/ guerilla knitting

art opportunities

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moving platform

NE 85th ST

connection

CLEVELAND STREET/storefronts (platform)

long duration moving

NE 83 ST rd

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

+

ORSCC

NE 80th ST

=

NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Red

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

mon

d Ce

ntra l

Con n

ecto

r

short duration collaboration long duration platform short duration connection episodic moving continuous

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

long duration episodic cyclical short duration continuous

STOREFRONTS platform/short duration/ cyclical • Vacant spaces along Cleveland street can be activated by temporary art installations and working spaces for artists

cyclical

• Enliven the street while waiting for retail to move in

episodic

• Opportunity for artists who normally work within interior museum or gallery spaces to move into the public realm.

Marymoor (King County)

continuous cyclical

• Half the Air, Martin Creed, Cleveland/Beth Cambel Threads, Naeemalam

art opportunities

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

70


PARK NETWOK Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

Nike

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

PARK NETWORK/ opportunities NE 85th ST

1. 2. 3. 4.

NE 83rd ST

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST

gateways green ring heron rookery anderson park

NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Red

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

mon

d Ce

ntra l Co nn

ecto

r

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

art opportunities

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71


moving Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

+ PARK NETWORK/gateways (connection)

=

Nike

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

+

=

NE 85th ST

platform moving

NE 83rd ST

connection

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Redm

ond

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

collaboration long duration platform short duration collaboration connection

Cen tral Con ne

ctor

episodic long duration moving continuous short duration long duration cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

short duration episodic continuous episodic cyclical continuous

GATEWAYS connection/long duration/ continuous • inter-related large scale art installations at three major gateways into the downtown core:

-municipal campus at 160th St -convergence of Redmond Way and Cleveland St. at 160th St (depends on future ownership) -convergence of Redmond Way and Cleveland Street at Anderson Park (new park corner)

• 2 stage artist selection process for experienced international artists to create dynamic works.

cyclical

• Radiant Fountains, Dennis Oppenheim, Houston Airport

art opportunities

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+

=

Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

connection collaboration moving platform

PARK NETWORK/gateways (platform) Nike

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

+

NE 85th ST

=

NE 83 ST rd

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

long duration platform

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Redm

ond

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

connection long duration moving short duration collaboration

Cen tral Con ne

ctor

short duration connection episodic moving continuous

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

long duration episodic cyclical short duration continuous cyclical episodic continuous cyclical

GATEWAYS platform/short duration/ episodic • lighting programming creates relationships between gateway works and other Redmond artworks with lighting components such as:

Redmond Erratic Signal Art Trestle Bridge Cleveland Catenary Project

• Programming can be related to events in Redmond i.e. Derby Days or Redmond Lights, delineating routes between related event spaces • Limited 2 stage artist call for artists with light media experience

• “Erratic” + “Signal “by John Flemming, Redmond/ LAX, Paul Tzanetopoulo

art opportunities

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73


Sammammish River Tr

Nike

+ = PARK NETWORK/green ring (connections) 166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

NE 85th ST

+

NE 83rd ST

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

=

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Redm

ond

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

Cent

ral Co

nnec

tor

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

collaboration long duration platform short duration collaboration connection platform moving connection episodic long duration moving continuous short duration long duration cyclical short duration episodic continuous episodic cyclical continuous

GREEN RING connections/long duration/continuous • artist collaboration with communications designer to create inter-connected series of distinctive markers/ artworks that run the length of the Green Link • works tell the story of the river + the river ecology in a poetic and meaningful way • integrated way-finding system, will help people find their way from the trail into downtown and downtown park

cyclical

• Moose Jaw Trail, JAS+ Susan Mavor Communications Designer, Public

art opportunities

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74


Sammammish River T

+

=

moving platform

Nike

NE 90h ST

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

PARK NETWORK/heron rookery (platform) Municipal Campus

NE 85 ST th

NE 83rd ST

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

+

=

Anderson

Dudley Carter

Redm

ond

164th AVE NE

AY YW

AR LE

connection long duration moving short duration collaboration

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing Heron Rookery

connection collaboration

Cent

ral Co

nnec

long duration platform

tor

short duration connection BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

episodic moving continuous long duration episodic cyclical short duration continuous cyclical

HERON ROOKERY platform/short duration/episodic • non- invasive transient, ephemeral and ecological artworks explore and preserve the natural quality of forest and tree canopy • works can be spatial installations or narrative works/events enhanced by the magical setting of their surrounds

episodic continuous cyclical

• Storytelling/ Zander Olsen, Tree Line

art opportunities

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Sammammish River T

+

=

collaboration

Nike

platform long duration connection short duration moving

NE 90h ST

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

PARK NETWORK/anderson park (platform) Municipal Campus

NE 85th ST

NE 83rd ST

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

+

=

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Redm

ond

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

collaboration

OFTC

Cent

ral Co

nnec

tor

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

long duration platform episodic short duration connection continuous moving

ANDERSON PARK platform/short duration/cyclical

Marymoor (King County)

cyclical long duration episodic short duration continuous cyclical

• child centered installations that are interactive, playful and participatory • instllations can occur at certain times of the year or as connected to events in the Park • get kids involved in making art or interacting with it

episodic continuous cyclical

• The Ego + the Id, Franz West, NY/ Crochet, Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam, Japan

art opportunities

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

76


MOVING ARTWORK Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

Nike

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

MOVING ARTWORK/ opportunities

NE 85th ST

1. mobile art bus (currently in design) 2. 1000 stakes project

NE 83rd ST

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Red

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

mon

d Ce

ntra l Co nn

ecto

r

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

art opportunities

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

77


platform short duration

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

MOVING ARTWORK/ mobile art center (platform)

moving

NE 85th ST

NE 83rd ST

+

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

=

ORSCC

NE 80 ST th

NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Redm

ond

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

connection

Cent

ral Co

nnec

tor

BEAR CREEK PKWY

collaboration episodic long duration platform continuous short duration connection cyclical moving

Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

long duration episodic short duration continuous cyclical episodic continuous cyclical

MOBILE ART CENTER platform/short duration/cyclical • Janet Zweig currently designing a Mobile Art Centre that will travel throughout downtown Redmond • one side of MAC will be able to open to create a stage area that has its own lighitng and sound system • MAC can be programmed with different events including dance and theatre performances, art making, etc. • possibilies of live podcasts from events airing on local radio station • programming strategies include curator generated works at different times of year or city staff initiated programming

art opportunities

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

78


platform short duration

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

STAKES INSTALLATION

Municipal Campus

MOVING ARTWORK/ 1000 stakes (platform)

moving

NE 85th ST

NE 83rd ST

+

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

STAKES INSTALLATION

=

ORSCC

NE 80 ST th

NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Redm

ond

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

connection

Cent

ral Co

nnec

tor

collaboration episodic long duration platform continuous short duration connection cyclical moving

BEAR CREEK PKWY

1000 Stakes platform/short duration/cyclical

Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

long duration episodic short duration continuous “everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” installation Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis

2014.04.03

cyclical

30

• Following the PFS team’s public engagement strategy for DTP, the 1000 stakes become a kit of parts that artists can use to create temporary installations in other Redmond parks for periods of time

episodic “everyone’s got a stake in downtown park” installation Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis

2014.04.03

continuous

30

cyclical

• public engagment stragegy: PFS Studio Team: Everyone has a stake in DTP

art opportunities

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

79


platform short duration

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

MOVING ARTWORK/ 1000 stakes (platform)

moving

NE 85th ST

NE 83rd ST

+

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

=

ORSCC

NE 80 ST th

NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

AY YW

Dudley Carter

AR LE

Redm

ond

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

connection

Cent

ral Co

nnec

tor

BEAR CREEK PKWY

collaboration episodic long duration platform continuous short duration connection cyclical moving

Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

long duration episodic short duration continuous cyclical

1000 Stakes platform/short duration/cyclical • first installation proposed is a temporary pavilion in downtown park conceived as an artist/engineer collaboration that plays with the idea of magnetic attraction.

episodic continuous cyclical

• possible stakes installations (jill anholt studio and arup engineers)

art opportunities opportunity- initial implementations Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

80


EVENT BASED WORKS Sammammish River Trail

Reservoir

Nike

166th AVE NE

171st AVE NE

NE 90h ST

Municipal Campus

EVENT BASED WORKS/ opportunities NE 85th ST

1. art and technology festival NE 83rd ST

166th AVE NE

161st AVE NE

160th AVE NE

EDGE SKATE PARK

ORSCC

NE 80th ST NE 80th ST DTP

FP

OFTC

Luke McRedmond Landing

Anderson

Dudley Carter

Y AR LE

Y WA

Red

164th AVE NE

Heron Rookery

mon

d Ce

ntra l Co nn

ecto

r

BEAR CREEK PKWY Town Center Open Space

Marymoor (King County)

art opportunities

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

81


166th AV

161st AV

moving

EVENT BASED WORKS/art + technology festival (collaboration) ORSCC

NE 80th ST +

hi-tech

D

P

art

episodic long duration collaboration

=

moving episodic long duration continuous

Heron Rookery

AY W Y

AR E L

NE 80th ST

continuous short duration platform OFTC cyclical connection

FP

Red

164th AVE NE

r

connection

short duration d Ce cyclical ntra l Co nne ctor

mon

ART + TECHNOLOGY FESTIVAL collaboration/short duration/cyclical Anderson

• yearly festival in Redmond brings artists together with technologists for discussions, lectures and collaborations to create new public works in downtown park

episodic

• capitalize on Redmonds status as a center of technology + innovation

continuous

• possible partnerships between large hi-tech companies + artists

cyclical

BEAR CREEK PKWY • Grace State Machine, Emma Waltraud Howes, Subtle Toronto TownTechnologies, Center Open Space • Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks, Janet Echelman + Google, Vancouver

art opportunities

Redmond Downtown Park: Site Analysis Synthesis 2014.04.03

82

Redmond Draft Downtown Park Analysis  

Preliminary results from Downtown Park system programming analysis and public input from workbooks about park programming and design. This...

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