Page 1


Because Photography is more than pushing a few buttons. Henry’s and the Toronto Star are proud to present an exhibition of award-winning Photographic moments from the Middle East this past spring. The exhibition will honour courageous reporting on behalf of CJFE.

www.henrys.com


TABL E OF CON TEN TS

About CJFE: What We Do

4

Message from the President & Executive Director

6

Message from the Gala Chair

8

International Press Freedom Award Winners Khaled al-Hammadi Mohamed Abdelfattah

11 14

Vox Libera Award Winner Ron Haggart

17

Integrity Award Winners Dr. Shiv Chopra, Dr. Margaret Haydon and Dr. Gérard Lambert

20

MAP: Arab Spring

24

Cara Smusiak

About CJFE: Journalists in Distress Fund

70

editorial assistant

About IFEX

71

CJFE Remembers Journalists Killed in 2011

92

editorial director

Leslie de Freitas managing editor

Jaclyn Law art director

Gigi Lau ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Leslie Yun Thank you to the writers who volunteered their time to tell these stories of free expression. © 2011 Canadian Journalists for Free Expression

ABOUT CJFE: SCOTIABANK/CJFE FELLOWSHIP AT MASSEY COLLEGE

138

About the Photos: Selections from Arab Awakening

172

Join CJFE

175

Thank You

176


WHAT WE DO In 2011, CJFE celebrated its 30th year. What began as the Centre for Investigative Journalism’s Latin America Committee evolved over time to become CJFE, an independent organization that works to protect journalists, freedom of expression and access to information in Canada and around the world.

Vision To achieve universal respect for and protection of the right to free expression and access to information.

Mission CJFE boldly champions the free expression rights of journalists and media workers around the world. In Canada, we monitor, defend and promote free expression and access to information. We encourage and support individuals and groups to be vigilant in the protection of their own and others’ free expression rights. We are active participants and builders of the global free expression community. For more information, visit cjfe.org. Follow us on Twitter @canadacjfe. 4


CJFE’s work includes: The management of the global free expression network IFEX, which has more than 90 member organizations (see page 71).

Advocacy on free expression issues in Canada and around the world.

Publicizing and profiling free expression issues through events and outreach.

• •

The Journalists in Distress Fund (see page 70).

Collaboration with other free expression organizations.

Outreach and education Throughout the year, CJFE works to raise awareness and understanding about important free expression issues. The CJFE website (cjfe.org) is a key component of our outreach, education and advocacy work. Through timely and comprehensive feature articles, calls to action, protest letters and events listings, we are engaging more people than ever in support of free expression. Each year we celebrate World Press Freedom Day, and in 2011 we marked the day with the launch of CJFE’s Review of Free Expression in Canada 2010/2011 (available in 2012 as a mobile app), released at an event that explored the increasingly hot topic of Canadians’ access to information.

Advocacy work in Canada CJFE intervenes in legal cases that we hope will lead to the creation of better laws to protect freedom of expression in Canada. These include cases of access to information, defamation and libel, hate speech and protection of sources. In 2010/2011, CJFE intervened in two important cases: Crookes v. Newton (issue of hyperlinks and defamation) and Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission v. William Whatcott (issue of ambiguity and application of hate speech law).

5


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

A M OM E NT O US Y EAR Welcome to the 14th annual CJFE Gala. Every year, we gather

ARNOLD AMBER PRESIDENT

ANNIE GAME EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

6

to salute the efforts of courageous journalists around the world who stand up for the fundamental rights of freedom of the press and freedom of expression. This year’s Gala is also an opportunity to pay a special tribute to the role the media played in promoting and supporting the series of events that have come to be known as the Arab Spring. Due to some fortuitous scheduling, the 2011 meeting of the International Freedom of Expression Exchange (IFEX), the global free expression network that CJFE manages, was held in Beirut, Lebanon. We benefitted from first-hand reports on events in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, and were able to strategize about our work in Bahrain, Yemen and Syria—three other countries experiencing their own popular uprisings against tyranny.


CJFE has worked harder than ever this year on a widening scope of activities to protect and promote free expression in Canada. On the legal front, we appeared before the Supreme Court of Canada in October, in a case that examined the role that human rights tribunals should play in hate speech issues. Meanwhile, CJFE’s suit to prohibit the Ontario Provincial Police from impersonating journalists is winding its way through the court system. We published the second annual CJFE Review of Free Expression in Canada, which has already established itself as the gold standard for the analysis of the state of free expression in Canada. We established a new award this year, the Canadian Journalists for Free Expression Integrity Award. It recognizes the need to protect the rights of whistleblowers, people who expose corruption or illegal and unethical practices in the public and private sectors. The award highlights the right of all Canadians to speak out in the public interest, and our right to freedom of expression in doing so. To accomplish the work noted above and many other achievements, CJFE has enjoyed the wonderful support of its staff, the CJFE Board of Directors, a host of volunteers and our corporate and institutional partners. We thank all of them with a tremendous sense of gratitude. Arnold Amber, President, and Annie Game, Executive Director, CJFE

7


M E SSA GE FROM THE CHAI R OF T HE G A LA STEERIN G CO M M I TTEE

ARAB SPRING:

The rebirth of free expression

© Jim Rankin/Toronto Star

In February 2011, Islamists and supporters held a protest in Tunis to demand the release of political prisoners.

T h e spark that ignited r e v o l ut io n s in t he M id dl e

East could have come from anywhere. People in the region ached for civil liberties that we take for granted: the right to choose their political leaders; the right to speak their minds; the right to take their collective destiny into their hands. Eager young people—large numbers of them university-educated—dominated the population two to one. The ignition came, finally, from the single devastating gesture of a vegetable seller in Tunisia. Mohamed Bouazizi was deeply frustrated by a corrupt government that felt no responsibility to its people. In a moment of desperation, Bouazizi immolated himself. He died, but the Middle East was set alight. 8


At this year’s gala, Canadian Journalists for Free Expression celebrates the accomplishments of what is now called the Arab Spring. Not since the collapse of the Berlin Wall has there been such an eruption of liberty. With that new-found self-determination has come one of the most important rights: freedom of expression. Citizens overcame decades of fear when they came into the streets to demonstrate, when they took to the airwaves to speak out against repression, when they tweeted and blogged and texted to the world their quest for liberation. It’s not yet clear where the revolution goes from here. Libya is finding its feet after war; Egypt’s army continues to arrest and persecute; Tunisia seeks a balance between Islam and secularism; Syria attacks its own people; and Yemen teeters on the brink of civil war. Tonight, we celebrate Mohamed Abdelfattah of Egypt and Khaled al-Hammadi of Yemen not because they are singular heroes, but because they represent the collective spirit of the Arab Spring. Let’s all share in the moment when these two men were able to speak truth to power—and kindled the hopes of a generation. PHOTO COUR TESY OF CB C

Carol Off is chair of the CJFE Gala Committee and co-host of CBC Radio’s As it Happens. 9


MEDIA PROFILE supports CJFE and the journalists who dedicate their lives to telling the stories that define the world in which we live.


INT E R N ATION AL PRESS FREED OM AWARD W I N N E R

K HALE D AL-HAMMAD I Wh en a s tory brea ks in

Yemen, you’ll usually find Khaled al-Hammadi somewhere in the middle of it. The veteran journalist even camped out alongside demonstrators in Change Square, the impromptu village they erected in February 2011 in Sana’a, the country’s largest city, shortly after a wave of antigovernment rallies inspired by the revolt in Tunisia. Unrest has simmered in Yemen ever since, with numerous deadly clashes between supporters of President Ali Abdullah Saleh and protestors. Al-Hammadi, a recipient of CJFE’s 2011 International Press Freedom Award, has been immersed in reporting on the events. He is a freelance producer for Al Jazeera English TV, a journalist for Al Jazeera TV 11


and a correspondent for London-based Arabic daily Al-Quds Alarabi. He has also worked as a photojournalist for AgenceFrance Presse, capturing vibrant portraits of Yemenis immersed in their everyday lives, and as a stringer for international publications; it’s not uncommon for him to be credited in the New York Times. For chasing stories, al-Hammadi has been threatened, attacked and tossed in jail. At a time when newsrooms can only afford to parachute reporters in and out of countries, al-Hammadi provides much-needed context to a complex and evolving story. He also works as a fixer, providing vital support for visiting photographers and reporters from news behemoths such as the BBC, Sky News, CNN, CBS and the Toronto Star. He secures interviews, soothes customs officials and whisks reporters away from trouble zones. In her recent book, Decade of Fear, Toronto Star national security reporter Michelle Shephard describes al-Hammadi as “driver, translator, producer, tour guide and save-your-butt-in-a-foreign-country friend.� Al-Hammadi has charmed candid conversations out of even the most tight-lipped sources, including high-level terrorists, 12


military leaders and government officials. He was the first to interview Abu Jandal, Osama bin Laden’s former bodyguard, a journalistic coup that provided a rare peek inside the terrorist cell. He’s trusted by locals and is a reliable source for checking rumours and gossip, producing a steady stream of tweets (@KhaledHammadi) in Arabic and English about what’s happening on the ground. “Many of Yemen’s journalists double as human and/or civil rights activists,” Shephard says. “What has always impressed me about Khaled is his ability to explain situations and highlight abuses while maintaining a balance of perspectives and voices. That’s hard to do in Yemen.” Dana Lacey (danalacey.wordpress.com, @danalacey) is a freelance writer, photographer and editor in Toronto.

13


I N TE R NATION AL PRESS FREED OM AWARD W I N N ER

M OH AME D A BD EL FAT TA H “The government is trying to

spread fear among the population,” Egyptian journalist Mohamed Abdelfattah told the CBC. “But I don’t think this will work because the high dam of fear has already collapsed yesterday, and the water is just flooding massively. The people have broken this fear already.” It was the day after the massive demonstration in Alexandria that would mark Egypt’s inclusion in protests sweeping the Middle East and North Africa—now known as the Arab Spring. The demonstration on Jan. 25, 2011, was a beginning, but also part of a larger story about human rights and police corruption. The wave of discontent that broke the dam of fear had been building for months. On June 6, 2010, two policemen attacked Khaled Said, a young 14


Mohamed Abdelfattah (right) has been blogging about human rights violations since 2010.

Egyptian man, in an Internet café. Witnesses reported the officers dragged Said outside and fatally beat him. Officials said the cause of death was asphyxiation from swallowing a concealed packet of narcotics. But given that Said had recently helped circulate a video allegedly showing local officers divvying up the spoils of a drug bust, the finding was questionable. In October, the officers were convicted of manslaughter; evidence indicated that the drugs were forced into Said’s mouth after he died. Abdelfattah, who had completed citizen journalism training with the International Centre for Journalists and had been blogging about human rights violations since early 2010, blogged about Said’s “torture-to-death.” By finding and showing eyewitness accounts, Abdelfattah blew away the government narrative regarding Said’s death. In November 2010, Abdelfattah’s work helped draw international attention to the case of Ahmed Shaaban, also allegedly murdered by Alexandria police. An investigation was launched and later dropped, but the case was not forgotten: “I was happy to see Ahmed Shaaban’s picture carried along other victims’ during the January 25th demonstrations,” says Abdelfattah, who was reporting for news website Ahram Online that day. 15


Demonstrators numbered 10,000 to 15,000 when police began tear-gassing. Officers attacked Abdelfattah and others hiding in a building, he told the BBC. “I kept telling them that I was a journalist but they didn’t care about this at all. I was severely beaten and my glasses were broken.” Abdelfattah was never charged, never told why he was detained for seven hours in an underground cell. The experience only strengthened his resolve. Like many of his fellow bloggers and journalists, he went right to work, reporting as protests swept across his country. To view Mohamed Abdelfattah’s work, visit anegyptianjournalist.com. Writer Cara Smusiak is managing editor of Canadian Family magazine.

16


VO X LIBERA AWARD W I N N ER

RON H AG G A R T

May 11, 1927 – August 27, 2011

W h en rioting King st o n

Penitentiary prisoners wanted their grievances heard in 1971, they called on Toronto Telegram columnist Ron Haggart to tell their story. He had a reputation for seeking—and telling—the truth that apparently everyone respected. Haggart accepted the dangerous invitation and, along with four lawyers, spent four tense days inside Kingston Pen mediating an end to the prison uprising. He is credited with playing a key role in averting a bloodbath, and his gripping account of the riot earned him a National Newspaper Award. 17


“Mr. Haggart used powers of persuasion like I have never seen before, even in a court of law,” said Prof. J. Desmond Morton of Osgoode Hall Law School, a member of the hastily convened citizens’ committee that helped resolve the Kingston crisis, in an interview with the Toronto Telegram. “He was responsible for maintaining contact with the prisoners. He kept them talking.”  Haggart died 40 years later “a fearless titan” and “one of the few remaining legends of journalism,” who spent years focused on civil liberties, labour, government and the complexity of human beings. He was known for his sharp intellect, stunning memory for detail and stubborn insistence on getting the story. Born in Vancouver in 1927, Haggart began his journalism career in the student press—as a young boy convinced that the windows should be open in his grade school, and later as editor of the University of British Columbia student newspaper. From there he rode the communication wave, first as a crusading print reporter and columnist, then as a pioneering television producer. He wrote for the Vancouver Sun, the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star and the Tely, and was a prolific correspondent, as friends and newspaper editors here and abroad can attest. With Toronto lawyer Aubrey Golden, he co-authored the controversial book Rumours of War, which chastised the Trudeau government for violating civil liberties during the 1970 October Crisis.

18


On the broadcast side, Haggart produced Citytv’s nightly news program in the early 1970s before joining CBC as a founding senior producer of the fifth estate. For 13 years, he helped forge the program’s reputation for in-depth, provocative reporting. Later, as co-executive producer of the debate shows Face Off and counterSpin and a consultant for independent media outlets, Haggart taught a whole new generation of journalists to be relentless in their craft and fearless against injustice. Perhaps William Donkin, former York County legal aid director, put it best after serving with Haggart on the Kingston Pen negotiating team: “That man was magnificent.”  Paula Todd is a Canadian journalist and lawyer who sits on the CJFE Board of Directors. She nominated Ron Haggart for this prestigious award.

Freedom to express. Daily.


I NT E G R I T Y AWARD WIN N ERS

Dr. Shiv Chopra Dr. Margaret Haydon Dr. Gérard Lambert Dr. Shiv Chopra is tireless.

Speaking from his home in Ottawa, Chopra describes how he and his Health Canada colleagues were consistently harassed, reprimanded and eventually dismissed for whistleblowing on issues involving public health and food safety between 1988 and 2004. “It’s not just our right, it’s our obligation to blow the whistle,” he says. “This is a matter of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and these freedoms are on behalf of the public, for the public.” Dr. Shiv Chopra

20

In 1998, Chopra, Dr. Margaret Haydon and Dr. Gérard Lambert, scientists working for Health Canada, testified before the Sen-


ate, raising concerns about the controversial bovine growth hormone (rBGH) developed and manufactured (at that time) by multinational food corporation Monsanto. The drug was designed to promote milk production in dairy cattle, and testimony from the scientists led to a ban of the drug in Canada. And they didn’t stop there. Later, the group warned against carbadox, a drug that promotes growth in pigs. In 2003, before mad cow disease grabbed headlines, Chopra and Haydon called for a total ban on including animal parts in the feed of other animals. In 2001, Haydon publicly argued that a ban on beef from Brazil was focused more on politics than public health. The scientists say that during this time, they experienced pressure from the highest levels of bureaucracy, and that this was at the behest of large corporations. Over six years, Chopra, Haydon and Lambert were reprimanded, muzzled and eventually dismissed in 2004 for insubordination. “By dismissing us from our jobs, the government is trying to scare other public service employees so nobody else will speak out about any illegal things being done in the workplace,” says Haydon. “Since our dismissal, they have legislated new rules under the Public Service Accountability Act, administered by the Public Sector Integrity Commission, which provide no protection to whistleblowers. More than 21


PHOTO: RICHARD SOBKOW ICZ

10 years ago, we were sent to the then-new Public Service Integrity Office, which dismissed our complaint without conducting a duly proper investigation. Ten years later, we are still waiting for a proper investigation ordered by the Federal Court.” Dr. Margaret Haydon

Dr. Gérard Lambert

In August 2011, the scientists’ complaints were considered at the Public Service Labour Relations Board. In a 208-page report, the Board ruled against seven of the eight grievances filed by the scientists. In one case, they agreed that Lambert was wrongly dismissed—but Chopra and Haydon remain fighting for their jobs. Chopra, Haydon and Lambert exemplify why whistleblowers should be lauded and protected. By risking their careers to keep Canadian food safe, they’ve led the way in protecting the public good. Lyndsie Bourgon (lyndsiebourgon.com) is a freelance writer in Toronto.

22


Global nance

M E SSA GE FROM THE PRESI D EN T

Food security

Climate change

Infectious diseases

An excellent local source of global expertise

IDRC For 40 years, Canada’s International Development Research Centre has supported cutting-edge research across the developing world on many pressing issues making today’s headlines.

23

More than 100 sta experts, based in Ottawa and at regional o ces in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East can help journalists report with authority on complex issues and connect quickly with researchers on the ground. Tap into a worldwide network of informed sources: www.idrc.ca/idrcexperts


oammar Years that M in power Gadhafi was in Libya until his overthrow and death in 2011


SPOTLIGHT: ARAB SPRING ITALY

TURKMENISTAN

GREECE

A

TURKEY

B

TUNISIA

SYRIA

C D

ALGERIA

LEBANON

E

LIBYA

IRAQ

F

IRAN

ISRAEL JORDAN

EGYPT

BAHRAIN SAUDI ARABIA

RED SEA

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

OMAN

SUDAN

NIGER

H

QATAR

I

CHAD ERITREA

YEMEN

T U NISIA B

A

D E C . 17 , 2 0 1 0 • S IDI BOUZID • Street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi sets himself on fire in front of the municipality building after his vegetable cart is seized by police, prompting demonstrations in protest of his treatment. He dies of his injuries on Jan. 4, 2011. JA N. 1 4 , 2 0 1 1 • TUN IS • Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali flees Tunisia after weeks of protests. He is the first leader in the region to be ousted in response to protest movements. O C T. 23 , 2 0 1 1 • ACR OS S T U NISIA • The first free elections since the uprisings are held, with an estimated voter turnout of 70 per cent.

LIB YA E

24

F E B . 1 7, 2 0 1 1 • Ben g h azi • “Day of Rage” in Libya is accompanied

by calls for Colonel Moammar Gadhafi to step down after 42 years of despotic rule. Several civilians are killed in the violence.


LIBYA MAR . 1 9 , 2 0 1 1 • ACRO SS LIBYA • Air and missile strikes against Gadhafi’s forces begin after the UN Security Council votes in favour of authorizing “all necessary measures to protect civilians under threat of attack, in particular Benghazi.”

C D

A UG. 2 6 , 2 0 1 1 • TR IPO LI • The National Transitional Council an-

nounces they will move their base to Tripoli from Benghazi, and will govern from Libya’s capital city. O CT. 20 , 2 0 1 1 • S IRTE • After months of protests and violence, Moammar Gadhafi is found and killed near his hometown of Sirte.

EGYPT JA N . 25 , 2 0 1 1 • ACRO SS EGYPT • The first day of protests in Cairo,

Alexandria and other cities. The government attempts to disrupt social media and mobile networks. F

F E B. 11 , 2 0 1 1 • CAIRO • President Hosni Mubarak steps down after 30 years of rule, transferring power to the military.

BAHRAIN H H

F E B. 14 , 2 0 1 1 • MANA MA • Dissent spreads to Bahrain as citizens gather around Manama’s Pearl Monument to protest economic and political inequality. MAR . 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 • MANA MA • The Pearl Monument in Manama is demol-

ished by government forces.

Y EMEN I I

I

F E B. 3, 2 0 1 1 • S AN A’A • Tens of thousands of Yemeni anti-government protesters take to the streets of Sana’a in a “Day of Rage”. JU N . 3, 2 0 1 1 • S AN A’A • President Ali Abdullah Saleh sustains major

injuries in an attack on his mosque. He travels to Saudi Arabia on June 5 to receive medical treatment. SE P T. 2 3 , 2 0 1 1 • S ANA’A • Saleh returns to Yemen after three months in Saudi Arabia. His surprise return sparks protests and clashes between his supporters and anti-government protesters.

25


Number of social media co users in Mexi y b killed drug cartels in 2011 for their g crime reportin f o (as ) Nov. 16, 2011


Estimated number of tweets per day from the Middle East in the first three months of 2011


Num be for Sc r of days i aban otland Ya t took Engla don plan rd to s n Act t d’s Offici to use o forc al Se crets e the to rev G e that t al how it uardian le h Missy en-missin arned g tee Dowl n er’ had b een h s phone acked


AB O U T C JFE

Journalists in Distress FUND CJFE provides humanitarian assistance to journalists who have been attacked or threatened, usually because of their work. We also coordinate an email group of 18 international organizations that provide distress assistance to writers and journalists, to share information and speed up response time. This year, CJFE helped a journalist with medical and living expenses after his newspaper was shut down by the government and he was forced to flee his country. Another journalist, who went into exile after receiving death threats, received funds to help his family. CJFE also paid for a journalist’s airfare when he fled his country after being jailed three times. These cases are just a few examples. To date, CJFE has provided more than $200,000 in funding for journalists in distress.

OMNI Television Embracing Diversity Recognizing courageous journalists here and internationally.

70

OMNITV.CA


We have no words to express what your support means to us. The money is most definitely obliging and will go to tremendously good use, there’s no hesitation about that. But more than the monetary value, we so greatly appreciate the thought behind instantaneous response. Exile life is a burden but your actions have really lightened the load. For that especially, we thank you.” — Ethiopian journalist

IFEX: THE INTERNATIONAL FREE EXPRESSION EXCHANGE CJFE has been a member and the manager of IFEX, a global network that monitors, promotes and defends freedom of expression, since its inception in 1992. IFEX has more than 90 member organizations in over 60 countries. It produces daily alerts and weekly information products, helps build members’ capacity, facilitates campaigns and advocacy, and creates space to discuss and collaborate on strategies to address free expression issues. This year, IFEX launched the International Day to End Impunity on Nov. 23, the anniversary of the 2009 Maguindanao massacre (also called the Ampatuan massacre) in the Philippines, the deadliest attack on journalists in recent history. In the past 10 years, 500 journalists have been killed; in nine of 10 cases, the murderers have not been brought to justice. The day’s aim is to raise awareness of impunity and showcase IFEX members’ work in fighting for justice and freedom of expression. Visit daytoendimpunity.org to join the campaign. 71


JOURNALISTS KILLED IN 2011 A fgh a ni sta n

Ahmad Omid Khpolwak, journalist

Taqaddosi, cameraman (Iranian) blogger

B ahr ain

Karim Fakhrawi, newspaper publisher/owner

David Niño de Guzmán, journalist/news director Luciano Leitão Pedrosa, TV journalist

Valderlei Canuto Leandro, radio journalist

cameraman

Ch i n a

E g yp t

Wael Mikhael, journalist

cameraman

H on d u r a s

Luis Mendoza, journalist

In d i a •

Umesh Rajput, journalist

Hoda Saber, journalist

Mohamed al-Hamdani, journalist

African/Austrian)

Kambale Musonia,

Alfredo Hurtado,

Nery

• •

Taha Hameed, journalist

Hadi al-Mahdi, radio

Ali Hassan Al Jaber, cameraman •

Sabah al-Bazi, broadcast reporter

Mohammed

Anton Hammerl, photographer (South

Tim Hetherington, photojournalist (British)

Hondros, photographer (American)

92

Luis

Hilal al-Ahmadi, journalist

Salem Alwan Al-Gharabi, cameraman L i b ya

Jyotirmoy Dey, journalist

Muammar Khadir Abdelwahad, journalist

Nabbous, citizen journalist

Marcel Legré, media

Adán Benítez, journalist

Medardo Flores, radio journalist

I raq •

José Agustín Silvestre de los

journalist

Colombia

Héctor Francisco Medina Polanco, TV

Jeremías Orellana, radio journalist Ir an

Yenis Roberto Ordoñez Galdámez,

journalist

Ahmad Mohamed Mahmoud, journalist

journalist

E l Salvador

G u at e m a l a

Boliv ia

Lago Sylvain Gagneto, journalist

D om i n i can R e p u blic

Santos, journalist •

Br azil

Gelson Domingos,

De m o c rat i c R e p u b l i c o f Congo

journalist

Auro Ida, reporter

C ô t e d’Iv oir e

worker—printing press employee •

Li Xiang, TV journalist

Eduardo Gómez, journalist

Farha

Valério Nascimento, journalist

Ednaldo Figueira, blogger/newspaper owner •

Zakaria Rashid al-Ashir,

Me xico

Chris

Rodolfo Ochoa


Moreno, media worker—television engineer photographer journalist

Miguel Ángel López Velasco, journalist

photographer

journalist/news editor

journalist

Wali Khan Babar, TV reporter

P eru

journalist

Nasrullah Afridi, journalist

Asfandyar Abid Naveed, journalist journalist

Yolanda Ordaz

Pakis tan

Zaman

Syed Saleem Shahzad, journalist

Shafiullah Khan, journalist

Faisal Qureshi, journalist/editor

Javed Naseer Rind, journalist

Pedro Alonso Flores Silva,

José Oquendo Reyes, TV journalist

freelance journalist

Philippine s

Johnson Pascual, journalist

Neil Jimena, radio commentator

Ibrahim Foday, journalist

Noramfaizul Mohd Nor, cameraman/TV journalist (Malaysian)

Somalia

Ahmed Aden, radio journalist cameraman

Romeo

Farah Hassan Sahal, radio presenter •

Abdiaziz

Thailand

Sornwichai Khatannukul,

Phamon Phonphanit, journalist

Tunis ia

Dolega, photojournalist (French) •

Sie r r a Leone

Gerardo

Roy Bagtikan Gallego,

Maria Len Flores Somera, radio broadcaster

Olea, radio broadcaster

Vietnam

Al-Nour, cameraman

Ve ne zue la

Le Hoang Hung, reporter

al-Sharabi, photojournalist al-Wadhaf, cameraman

Muneer Shakir,

Julio Castillo Narváez, radio host

Ortega, radio journalist

journalist

Ilyas Nazar,

Abdost Rind, journalist •

Maria Elizabeth Macías, freelance

Identity unknown (a.k.a. “Rascatripas”), blogger

Alhaji Zakariya Isa, cameraman

N i g eria

Noel López Olguín,

Humberto Millán Salazar, director of online journal

Rocio González Trápaga, freelance reporter

Ali, journalist

Misael López Solana,

Angel Castillo Corona, reporter/columnist

de la Cruz, journalist

Luis Emanuel Ruiz Carrillo,

José Luis Cerda Meléndez, journalist

Lucas Mebrouk

Wilfred Iván Ojeda Peralta, •

Ye me n

Jamal

Mohamed Yahia Al-Malayia, journalist

Abdel Majid Al-Samawi, reporter

Abd Al-Ghani Al-Bureihi, cameraman

Hassan

Abdel Hakim •

A s o f N o v. 1 1 , 2 0 1 1 , the total numbe r of j o u r n a l is ts kille d in 2 0 1 1 is

89 . 93


7

of ber Num before ert rs yea rd Lamb d e a stat GĂŠr Dr. as rein as fired w w b at r he afte his jo ada from th Can dly l e Hea repeat ng i r k e a t af spe penly o he to t dia me


The number of civilians brought before military tribunals in Egypt since the departure of former president Hosni Mubarak


A B O U T C J FE

SCOTIABANK/CJFE FELLOWSHIP AT MASSEY COLLEGE In 2009, CJFE partnered with Scotiabank and Massey College to create the Scotiabank/CJFE Fellowship at Massey College. Open to a mid-career journalist from South America, Central America, Mexico or the Caribbean, the fellowship’s objective is to enhance inter-American understanding and promote dialogue through exploration of issues in journalism and free expression in the Americas in an academic setting. “Run in tandem with the Canadian Journalism Fellowships, the Scotiabank/CJFE Fellowship for Latin American Journalists provides a great opportunity for Latin American and Canadian journalists to exchange ideas and learn from each other in a collegial setting,” says Massey College administrator Anna Luengo. This year, the fellowship was extended to two semesters, allowing the fellow to take full advantage of the Canadian Journalism Fellows program. The fellow audits courses at the University of Toronto, makes connections with Canadian media, and expands his or her work on a significant issue. The fellowship is made possible by a generous grant from Scotiabank and partnership with Massey College. Current fellow Luis Horacio Nájera is a veteran journalist who reported for Reforma media group in Ciudad Juarez and other hot-spot areas on the Mexico-U.S. border. He dedicated himself to investigating politically sensitive issues rang138


PHO TO : STEVE RUSSEL L /TO RO N TO STAR

Luis Horacio Nájera

ing from government corruption to the trafficking of drugs, people and weapons, until fears for his life and his family’s safety forced him to seek asylum in Canada. In 2010, Nájera was honoured with a CJFE International Press Freedom Award, and in the spring of 2011 he was granted the fellowship. “Thanks to CJFE, Scotiabank and Massey College, my life has changed dramatically already,” says Nájera. “I’m getting access to a completely new world where my knowledge is expanding. Also, I’m making new friends, but the most important thing so far is to recover my sense of myself as a real person, instead of just a file number.” 139


Canada’s ut ranking o tries n of 89 cou 11 0 2 on the ht to Global Rig Rating (tied n o Informati ia and n with Esto gro) Montene

Number of freedom of expression cases CJFE has intervened in since 2006


Average number of days it takes to resolve an Access to Information complaint in Canada


AB OU T T H E P H O TOS In honour of CJFE, Henry’s has sponsored Arab Awakening: A Revolutionary Snapshot, an exhibition featuring the work of Toronto Star photographers and photojournalist Ed Ou, reporting for the New York Times. These are selected images from the exhibition. CJFE is grateful to Henry’s for its generosity. T u ni s i a

Toronto Star photojournalist Jim Rankin was in Tunisia on Feb. 11, 2011, when Egypt’s president, Hosni Mubarak, stepped down. Rankin captured the jubilation among the people who had started it all. He was back in Tunis to cover the country’s first free election on Oct. 23. © Jim Rankin/T oronto Star

B A H R AIN

© Lucas Oleniuk/Toronto Star

172

Lucas Oleniuk, a Toronto Star photographer, often found himself too close to the action in Bahrain. In this photo, taken Feb. 18, 2011, a protestor gestures to supporters after helping an injured man to safety. Shiite antiregime demonstrators marching from Budaiya to Pearl Square were fired on by security forces near Manama.


When revolution spread throughout the Middle East and North Africa, images of protest, triumph, tragedy and peace brought it home. A flood of photos from Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain and Libya, shared via social media, made it impossible for stalwart autocrats to deny the brutal force they were using to fight back. YEMEN

© Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star

Michelle Shephard Michelle Shephard was one of only a few foreign journalists in Sana’a during the revolution’s early days, capturing images of a people delirious with their newfound voice. But calls for President Saleh to step down have gone unheeded, and to date hundreds of demonstrators have died.

L I B YA

© Rick Madonik/Toronto Star

Rick Madonik braved gunfire to track Libyan rebels’ path through Ras Lanuf until Gadhafi’s regime started air strikes, forcing a retreat. In this image, taken at an antiGadhafi rally in March 2011, a woman makes the victory sign behind Libya’s new flag. Gadhafi would be ousted in August; he died after a firefight with government forces in October.

173


174


JO I N C J FE I’ll join CJFE and help advance freedom of expression and press freedom around the world YOU CAN SIGN UP TO BECOME A CJFE MEMBER OR MAKE A DONATION ONLINE AT CJFE.ORG, OR YOU CAN FILL OUT THIS FORM AND MAIL IT TO THE ADDRESS BELOW.

Enclosed is my membership fee of

$75 ($25 for students and those on fixed incomes) I would prefer to make a donation of $ • I would prefer to make a monthly donation of •

$10 $20 Other $ which will include my membership fee My cheque made payable to CIFET (Canadian International Freedom of Expression Trust) is enclosed. P L EA S E C H A RG E MY C RE DIT CAR D

VISA

MASTERCARD

NUMBER:

E X P I R Y DAT E :

S IG NATURE:

MEMBER INFO NAME: ADDRESS:

PHONE: EMAIL:

RECEIPTS FOR TAX PURPOSES WILL BE ISSUED FOR ANY CONTRIBUTION OF $10 OR MORE.

PLE AS E R E T UR N T O : CJFE 555 RICHMOND ST. W, SUITE 1101, PO BOX 407 TORONTO, ON M5V 3B1

Charitable #BN 89104 3 747 RR000 1

175


T HA NK YOU C JF E/ I FEX S taff Annie Game, Executive Director Leslie de Freitas, CJFE Manager Rachael Kay, IFEX Manager Elena Romanova,

CJFE Office Manager Michaël Elbaz, Senior Alerts Network Coordinator Natasha Grzincic, Online Editor Maureen James, IFEX Fundraising Coordinator Zaynah Khanbhai, IFEX Development Outreach Coordinator Lama Mourad, Action Alerts Coordinator Christina Rutherford, Web Coordinator Kristina Stockwood, IFEX Development Outreach Coordinator Laura Tribe, Web and Social Media Editor Erin Woycik, IFEX Action Alerts Coordinator Elysse Zarek, IFEX Action Alerts Coordinator

C JF E B oa rd of d i recto r s Morteza Abdolalian Arnold Amber Bob Carty Havoc Franklin Peter Jacobsen Anjali Kapoor Alice Klein Donald Livingstone Anita Mielewczyk John Norris Mary Deanne Shears Frank Switzer Paula Todd Anna Maria Tremonti Philip Tunley

176

Gala Co- Chair s Lori Abittan Denise Donlon Wendy Freeman Patrick Gossage Frank Switzer Madeline Ziniak Gala S tee r ing Committee Carol Off (Chair) Jet Belgraver Diane Eros Susanne Gossage Jaclyn Law Tim Lewis Willa Marcus Pacinthe Mattar Anita Mielewczk Susan Reisler Mary Deanne Shears Michelle Shephard Cara Smusiak Sarah Spinks S pecial Thanks Saman Aghvami Franklin Carter CNW Kelly Haggart Juniper Park Gigi Lau Media Profile Jennifer Murray NOW Magazine Julie Payne ScribbleLive UNESCO Anne Wright-Howard Leslie Yun …and to all of CJFE’s wonderful volunteers


M E SSA GE FROM THE PRESI D EN T

177


Friends of Roy Bennet t congratulate

Mohamed Abdelfattah &

Khaled al-Hammadi Winners of this year’s International Press Freedom Awards and other brave journalists who continue the fight for press freedom.

178


M E SSA GE FROM THE PRESI D EN T

“ By protecting the right of free expression, we protect so much more.” – Peter Mansbridge, CBC News Chief Correspondent

“ So much respect is owed to those who realize there’s nothing more dangerous than silence.” – Adrienne Arsenault, CBC News Correspondent - The National

“ The lone voices that sound in the darkest corners of our world are the ones that must be heard. ” – Margaret Evans, CBC News Foreign Correspondent

“ I went to the first independent radio station in Libya, where people spoke their own thoughts for the first time. There I saw freedom.” – Derek Stoffel, CBC News Foreign Correspondent

CBC News Logo

CBC News is proud to sponsor the CJFE International Press Freedom Awards.

FINAL

179 STACK VERSION FULL COLOUR


Responsibility means Responsibility means the toto usus theworld world Corporate SocialSocial Responsibility (CSR) is(CSR) a fundamental part of part the way Scotiabank Corporate Responsibility is a fundamental of the way Scotiabank does business and anand essential element of our of success. does business an essential element our success. We want to acknowledge the CJFE and reporters around thethe word whowho work We want to acknowledge CJFE and reporters around word work tirelessly and fearlessly in the pursuit of truth and the fulfilment of their profession. tirelessly and fearlessly in the pursuit of truth and the ful lment of their profession. Scotiabank recognizes the profound implications of living in an increasingly Scotiabank recognizes the profound implications of living in an increasingly interconnected world and we understand that to succeed, we must act in a manner interconnected world and we understand that to succeed, we must act in a manner that is environmentally, economically and socially responsible. that is environmentally, economically and socially responsible. For more information on Scotiabank’s CSR activities, please visit: ww.scotiabank.com For more information on Scotiabank’s CSR activities, please visit: ww.scotiabank.com

* Trademark of the Bank of Nova Scotia, used under license (where applicable) * Trademark of the Bank of Nova Scotia, used under license (where applicable)

CJFE 2011 Gala: A Year to Honour Courageous Reporting  
CJFE 2011 Gala: A Year to Honour Courageous Reporting  

This year's annual publication focuses on the state of press freedom in the Arab Spring, and recognizes the courageous work of journalists b...

Advertisement