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Coastal Legacy Code of Design THE STORIES OF OUR SHORES RUN AS DEEP AS THE ATLANTIC

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BEAUFORT CHARLESTON DAUFUSKIE ISLAND LITCHFIELD BEACH PAWLEYS ISLAND

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FIRST

Glance

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Coast With the Most: Where: The Darling Oyster Bar, Charleston, SC. What: Patrons dive into dishes by Chef Joe DiMaio at the new upper King restaurant, with a focus on the sea. For the story, see page 84. Photograph courtesy of The Darling Oyster Bar

Sometimes life is a real pain. We can help with that. stfrancishealth.org/orthopedics

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Contents 19 THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

25 ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

37 WEDDINGS 41 TOWNBUZZ Rebecca Hoyle paints wetland

wildlife with Impressionistic flair; luxurious living meets community experience at Charleston’s The Restoration; Daufuskie Island remembered; an ode to literary icon Pat Conroy, and more.

44 UPTOWNER

Novelist Mary Alice Monroe chats about her beloved beach-bound books and the Lowcountry lifestyle that inspires them.

57 STYLE CENTRAL

Southern fashion takes insect form; summer swimwear calls us coast-side; Mission Mercantile’s steamer bags are a shore seeker’s go-to satchel.

64 MAN ABOUT TOWN

Treading the waters of a midlife crisis, the Man’s swimming ambitions get a little hairy.

66

Traversing the salty shores of Beaufort, South Carolina, Craig Reaves and family are bringing the best of the seas straight to Upstate tables via Sea Eagle Market. / by Scott Gould / photography by Bobby Altman

6 7

BY THE SEA

Stretching from Murrells Inlet to Pawleys Island, a small strip of pristine coastline has retained a slower pace and old-style feel. For decades, Greenville families have sought solace in the relaxing waves— and way of life—preserved in these Lowcountry waters. / by Jennifer Oladipo

Our seasoned travel writer Mary Cathryn Armstrong explores Aruba’s faceted landscape. The Darling Oyster Bar’s scrumptious seafood feasts are worth frying for; homemade hushpuppies are a mid-summer song; a grown-up ice cream sundae makes for a dazzling July dessert.

93 DINING GUIDE TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

108 SECOND GLANCE

Moss-covered oaks and white-washed churches—the Greenville County Museum of Art features the great Lowcountry painter Horace Day.

8 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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A CAPTAIN’S BOUNTY

WORD PLAY

83 EAT & DRINK

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THIS PAGE: Freshly-farmed oysters are among many seafood features at the Sea Eagle Market in Beaufort, SC. For more, see “A Captain’s Bounty,” page 70. Photograph by Bobby Altman

COVER: Craig Reaves’s fishing boats scour Lowcountry waters for the best catch. For more, see “A Captain’s Bounty,” page 70. Photograph by Bobby Altman

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Exhilarating in every way, Exhilarating in price. every way, including the

including the price.

The 2016 GLA, starting at just $32,500. The GLA delivers thrills from the moment you hit the ignition button. A racing-inspired dual-clutch transmission makes for smoother shifting, while its advanced engineering

no matter what road you’re on. All that inside of sleek, muscular The 2016delivers GLA, breathtaking starting at SUV justperformance $32,500. The GLA delivers thrills from the moment you hit the ignition button. design makes the 2016 GLA one extraordinary vehicle-for an equally extraordinary price. MBUSA.com/GLA

A racing-inspired dual-clutch transmission makes for smoother shifting, while its advanced engineering delivers breathtaking SUV performance no matter what road you’re on. All that inside of a sleek, muscular

THEthe 2016 design makes 2016 GLA one extraordinary vehicle — for an equally extraordinary price. MBUSA.com/GLA STARTING AT

GLA

THE 2016

32,500*

$

STARTING AT

$ GLA 32,500* Carlton Motorcars www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

2016 GLA shown in Polar Silver metallic paint with optional equipment. *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details. ©2015 Authorized Mercedes-Benz Dealers For more information, call 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com.

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Letter

Photograph cour tesy of Bar r y & Cat hy K nobel

EDITOR’S

))) For digital extras— go to TOWNCAROLINA.COM

@towncarolina @towncarolina facebook.com/towncarolina bit.ly // towniemail

Summer Place

A

s a child, I always loved time at the beach, anticipating our summer trip to Litchfield as much as Christmas. The mystery and utter immensity of the ocean both ignited and terrified me. We’d drive for hours—stopping in Clinton for a late breakfast (always)—hitting the back roads and a spate of one-light-towns (Dad always managed without maps). Once we smelled the paper mill, we knew we were close. At the Georgetown bridge—full-on butterflies. The coast is the bearer of stories. It seems otherworldly, with its twisted trees and sticky marshes and sunsets that bleed for miles. The smells are different, salty. The air is heavy, more present. The history, more evident. The ocean itself is like a quiet monster, full of strange creatures and movement, incomprehensible depth and unbridled power. It’s both calming and frightening. Sublime and unsettling. The coast is profound. Fueling its aura is more than geography. It’s tradition. It’s memories. It’s families. It’s shared time, together, in a place absent of priorities and agendas and egos. It’s authentic experiences, spread across a big picnic table bearing Lowcountry boils and just-caught-everything. It’s the beach house and card games and waking next to your cousins for another day of sand, surf, food, and naps. It’s a feeling of childhood, of freedom, of being a kid again in a busy, messy world. As an adult, pleasure often comes at a cost. We seek the freedom of childhood, when it was easier to just be. We demand more extravagant things, tastes, and experiences. But there is something about coastal time that hits a timeless note in our psyche: we stop, remember, breathe in, listen. We slow down, the tides offering a tangible rhythm. We let go there. So, let’s go there.

Upstate families have long enjoyed the pull of Litchfield Beach and Pawleys Island. “By the Sea” (page 76) tells the story of its mid-century development and timeless appeal; (right) James Moore and Bill Miller, Sr., were among the founding partners of The Litchfield Company.

Photograph cour tesy of Jim my Moore, Jr.

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief Twitter / Instagram: @lbknobel

10 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Grainger McKoy

Grainger McKoy, born 1947 Study for Recovery Stroke, circa 2008 basswood 12 feet courtesy of the artist

opening July 16, 2016

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

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Grainger McKoy, born 1947 Three Green Herons, 1973 basswood, metal, oil paint

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Grainger McKoy, born 1947 Carolina Parakeets, 1992 basswood, metal, oil paint

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NOT ALL DRAMA IS FOUND IN THEATER.

Grainger McKoy

opening July 16, 2016 Renowned South Carolina sculptor Grainger McKoy (born 1947) grew up in Sumter, South Carolina, and attended Clemson University, earning a degree in zoology, while also studying architecture. After graduating, McKoy apprenticed for eighteen months with bird carver Gilbert Maggioni in Beaufort. McKoy slowly began transforming his own intricately carved birds into gravity-defying sculptures that play with form and space, while continuing to accurately render each species in detail. The current Greenville County Museum of Art exhibition features a twelve-foot-high basswood model of Recovery Stroke that was carved in 2008 as a maquette for the stainless steel centerpiece of Swan Iris Lake Gardens in the artist’s hometown of Sumter.  McKoy’s work has been shown at the High Museum of Art, Brandywine River Museum, Brookgreen Gardens, and many other galleries.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

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The Highest Level of Safety & Security, for What Matters Most Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com

WHAT WAS YOUR MOST UNFORGETTABLE COASTAL EXPERIENCE?

Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR ABBY MOORE KEITH EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

“I got stung by a jellyfish on Edisto once, and my brother had to carry me back to the beach house. It wasn’t bad, I was just being dramatic.”

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Ruta Fox M. LINDA LEE Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka Heidi Coryell Williams

“Getting married by the ocean on Kiawah Island.”

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Kathryn Davé, Scott Gould & Jennifer Oladipo

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Bobby Altman, Chelsey Ashford, Robin Batina-Lewis, Will Crooks, Jivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, Jake Knight, Gabrielle Miller, Cameron Reynolds, Spencer Stanton & ELI WARREN EDITORIAL INTERNS HAYDEN ARRINGTON Olivia McCall EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Andrew Huang

• Total Control App (remote access) • Local Monitoring

• Burglary & Fire

• Video Surveillance & Verification • Security Gates

• Home Backup Generators

“Fighting sixfoot swells in the smallest deepsea fishing boat imaginable off the coast of Wrightsville Beach.”

Holly Hardin OPERATIONS MANAGER

“Getting to hang out with and learn about sea turtles being nursed back to health at the Jekyll Island Sea Turtle Center in Georgia, and watching a baby sea turtle eat ice cubes full of shrimp.”

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS KRISTY ADAIR Michael Allen

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Donna Johnston, ANNIE LANGSTON, Nicole Mularski, Lindsay Oehmen & Emily Yepes “I went to the College of Charleston, so every day was a coastal experience.”

Kate Madden DIRECTOR, EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY kate@towncarolina.com

“My husband proposing to me on the beach, at night . . . totally unexpected!”

Danielle Car DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

We don’t sell systems, we create security solutions. A subsidiary of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op

1-888-407-SAFE (7233) blueridgesecuritysolutions.com

Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 6, No. 7) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

14 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Marg


Marguerite Wyche and Associates.

THE NAME TO KNOW.

SOLD

120 E. Round Hill Road | Green Valley | $2,495,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 23 acres | MLS 1317041

101 Woodland Way | Alta Visa Area | $1,550,000 5 bedooms, 4 full baths, 1 half bath, 6,100 sq. ft.

110 Huckleberry Ridge | Greenville | $2,495,000 5 bedooms, 6 full baths, 7,000 sq. ft., 10 Acres

18 S. Main St. #302 | Park Place On Main | $1,420,000 3 bedooms, 2 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1319110

607 McDaniel Avenue | Alta Vista | $998,500 4 bedooms, 3 full bath, 1 half bath | MLS 13063041

20 Ferncreek Lane | 3+ acres | $979,500 3 bedooms, 3 full bath, 1 half bath

TRACT R CON E D N U

100 Putney Bridge Lane | Simpsonville | $799,000 5 bedooms, 4 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 13159298

TRACT R CON UNDE

17 W. Prentiss Avenue | Augusta Road Area | $925,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1316669

NEW

1745 N Main Street | North Main Area | $565,000 3 bedooms, 2 full bath | MLS 1318462

PRICE

213 Collins Creek Drive | Collins Creek | $785,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1310241

16 W. North Street Greenville, SC 29601 www.wycheco.com 864.270.2440

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230 Riverside Drive | GCC Area | $875,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 13086073

6 Warner Street | Alta Vista | $560,000 3 bedooms, 2 baths, basement + workshop | MLS 1321422

Marguerite Wyche

Laura McDonald

864-270-2440 mwyche@wycheco.com

864-640-1929 lmcdonald@wycheco.com

Bobbie Johnson

Suzy C. Withington

864-630-0826 bjohnson@wycheco.com

864-201-6001 swithington@wycheco.com

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JULY 19-24

MAXWELL SUMMERS’ TOUR 2016 JULY 26

JULY 26

AUGUST 14

SEAL

The Lone Bellow with Aoife O’Donovan July 8

Keller Williams August 4

The Wood Brothers July 28

The Revivalists August 26

AUGUS T 23

THE 2016-17 SEASON ON SALE NOW! See the full lineup at peacecenter.org

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A vibrant mixed-use development is taking shape on more than 1,000 acres of untouched real estate within the city of Greenville. A smart, flexible plan comprises diverse housing at varying price points, thriving commercial districts and an array of recreational amenities. Fostering a walkable environment, Verdae’s vision ranges from corporate headquarters and niche offices to a village square filled with specialty retailers, local restaurants and professional services, all interconnected by pedestrian-friendly streetscapes, a lush central park and abundant greenspace. It’s happening at Verdae.

Garden photo by Promotion Imaging, LLC

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Verdae Development Visit Our New Corporate & Sales Office 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 329-9292 • verdae.com

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List z

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THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

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TOP OF THE

List

July 2016 CIRQUE DU SOLEIL OVO

Photograph courtesy of the Bon Secours Wellness Arena

What these artists are able to with their bodies is extraordinary. Premiering in 2009, the OVO incarnation of the wildly popular Cirque du Soleil experience puts a magnifying glass on something we often pass by without a second glance: insects. Complete with dazzling visual effects, magnificent costuming, and the famous Cirque aerials, OVO makes a statement that it is a bug’s life, indeed. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. July 13–17. Wed–Fri, 7:30pm; Sat, 4pm & 7:30pm; Sun, 1:30pm & 5pm. $25-$140. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

JULY 2016 / 19

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WELLS FARGO RED, WHITE AND BLUE FESTIVAL

UPSTATE WARRIOR SOLUTION POKER RUN

Nothing says the Fourth of July like a few fireworks bursting through the warm summer sky. Sponsored locally and presented by AT&T, this display is one of the largest in the Palmetto State. Even better—it’s free. The celebration will feature live music, a kids’ fun zone, and plenty of bites and brews provided by local vendors. Pick your spot in Falls Park and watch Greenville light up.

As we celebrate our independence in the month of July, it is equally as important to celebrate those who continue to help us fight for that freedom. Sponsored by the Bare Bones Biker Church, the run will begin at the Spartanburg Harley-Davidson and continue throughout the afternoon with riders drawing poker cards at each stop along the way. Cash will be awarded to the best, second best, and worst hands at the final location, and all cash will be given to the Upstate Warrior Solution organization for veterans and their families.

Downtown Greenville. Mon, July 4, 5-10pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov/246/Wells-Fargo-Red-White-Blue-Festival

The forecast for this musical by Jason Robert Brown calls for a 100-percent chance of crying. Based on the novel by Robert James Waller, the tale follows the story of Francesca, an unfulfilled housewife living in a small Iowa town. But when a young photographer arrives, she suddenly finds herself in the throes of a forbidden affair, forcing her to make a decision between the one she loves and the ones that she just can’t leave behind. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. July 19–24. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $25-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Spartanburg Harley-Davidson, 365 Sha Ln, Spartanburg. Sat, July 9, 10:30am–4:30pm. (864) 384-1495, upstatewarriorsolution.org

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY

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WEST SIDE STORY

GREGG ALLMAN

SISTERS OF SWING

Truth be told, you can’t think of rock n’ roll without thinking of the Allman Brothers Band. Founded by Gregg and brother Duane, the musicians set a precedent for future generations of Southern rockers, paving the way for bands like Gov’t Mule and others to take the national stage. Though currently touring with new accompaniment, Allman proves that even time itself can’t dull the shine of good rock.

Who would have ever thought that three sisters from Minnesota would become a singing sensation and legendary icon in the music world? You’ve probably heard their famous vocal stylings a la “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy” and “Rum and Coca Cola,” but you may not know the true story behind their ascension into the halls of superstardom. With equal parts drama, comedy, and song, Sisters of Swing is a can’t-miss summer production. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. July 21–Aug 13. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $15-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, July 27, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

In a twentieth-century update of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, GLOW Lyric Theatre’s summer season continues with a work by two heavyweights in the world of stage: Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim. When two teens from rival sides of the block fall for each other, their dueling friends intervene to curtail the romance, with dire consequences. New to the GLOW family is soprano Katherine Sandoval, who will make her debut as the female lead, Maria. McAlister Auditorium at Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. July 29–30. Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2 & 8pm. $35-$85. (800) 745-3000, glowlyric.com

July 2016

Photograph courtesy of Centre Stage

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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You Dream. We Build.

Visit our model homes in the Upstate. Greenville & Upstate 864-655-7702

Mountains & Lake Keowee 864-836-3090

ARHUpstateSC.com Sales and Marketing by Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C.Dan Joyner REALTORS® American Eagle Builders, Inc., an Independent Franchise

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Quick HITS AVENUE Q

z If Big Bird and the gang tackled issues like sexuality and binge-drinking instead of what starts with the letter “A,” the world might be a different place. A recent college grad, Princeton struggles to find meaning in his new life. When he moves to an outer-outer neighborhood of the city, he meets a band of eccentric, oddball characters who turn the world he knows upside down. The awardwinning puppet hit is one of Broadway’s longestrunning shows and has spawned hit songs like “Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist,” “The Money Song,” and “The Internet Is for Porn.” Spartanburg Little Theatre, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. July 15–24. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $20-$30. (864) 542-2787, spartanburglittletheatre.com

EUPHORIA’S TAPAS & TINIS

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

z When it comes to Greenville’s most fabulous food fest, fall feels like forever away. But before your tummies growl in displeasure, Euphoria presents a preview to tide you over until September. Tapas & Tinis is part of a countdown to Euphoria’s four days of refined feasting (and music-listening), and it’s a party to make your taste buds talk. The night promises decadent bites, well-paired drinks, and some celebratory dancing. With a menu featuring Performance Foodservice chef Tony Schmidt and tunes by The Sound Committee, you’ll find a fire in your belly only Euphoria can quench. ONE Building, 1 N Main St, Greenville. Fri, July 15, 6pm. $45. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com

MAXWELL

z If you’re going to make the choice to be a one-named artist, you’d better have the chops to back it up. Fortunately, Maxwell has that down in spades, crafting a musical career that has spanned some two decades. With the recent release of his new album, blackSUMMERS’night— his first since 2009—the soul musician has plenty to celebrate, and the evening is set to sizzle with a mix of throwback jams and new hits. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, July 26, 7:30pm. $71-$325. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

BIG LEAGUE BASEBALL WORLD SERIES 2016

z Baseball may be America’s pastime, but this yearly tournament in Easley attracts teams from Mexico to New York and Taiwan to Taylors. Throughout a week of tournaments, rival teams will play against one another in bracket-style play, with the final champions taking home the title on Tuesday. It’s the perfect opportunity to take in some upcoming talent—and a few hot dogs. J.B. Owens Recreation Center, 111 Walkers Way, Easley. July 28–Aug.4. Times vary. Free-$30. bigleagueworldseries.com

The Lone Bellow with Aoife O’Donovan It might seem unusual for a band formed in Brooklyn to bring an earthy, folk vibe to the table. But the story of The Lone Bellow isn’t your typical musical fodder—the idea for the band was conceived in the emotional journal entries of its founding member Zach Williams, who documented life after his wife’s horseback-riding accident. Therefore, it seems only natural to join forces with O’Donovan, a poignant and affecting songwriter in her own right. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, July 8, 7:30pm. $35-$50. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Eric fp T


Eric Brown Design NE W YORK

|

GREENVILLE

|

T O R O N TO

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NAPLES

101A AUGUSTA ST., GREENVILLE, SC ERICBROWNDESIGN.COM | 864.233.4442 |

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as bespokebloke

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Town

ON THE

Larry Gluck, Diane Gluck, Kay Roper, Lisa Stevens, Roger Stevens & Tink Baker

Lisa & Roger Stevens

Under the Boardwalk for Cancer Survivors Park Alliance May 7, 2016 The Cancer Survivors Park Alliance hosted a magical evening of food, dance, and drink under a candlelit boardwalk to celebrate all lives affected by cancer. With live music from The Swinging Medallions, a dance demonstration from shag professionals Jill and Steve Woodard, and a moving speech by survivor Fritzi Barbour, the night was one to remember and another step forward to bringing the Cancer Survivors Park to fruition. Photography by Spencer Stanton ))) FIND MORE PHOTOS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Tom Bates & Jay Motley Polly Joyner, Maggie Joyner, Dan Joyner & Danny Joyner

Grady Butler, Sonya Caldwell & Carm Caldwell

Phil Roper & Alex Roper with Donna & Jim Rogers

Derek Wiggins, Caroline Wiggins & Will Watkinson

Helen Hagood & Carol Rosensteel

Wellington & Meredith Payne

Leigh Irwin , Keri Hall & Carole Atkinson

Helen Fortson & Ron Bruccoliere J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 2 5

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ON THE Rene & Randy Hutchisson

Suzie Townes & Virginia Abrams

Janet Summer & Joy Grayson

Town

Greenville Women Giving’s Annual Meeting May 16, 2016

Tabi Cooper & Jenna Barnett

Greenville Women Giving celebrated ten successful years with an annual meeting that saw more than $570,000 donated to 12 local nonprofit organizations including the Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Greenville and YMCA: Livewell. In addition, Mayor Knox White declared May 16 to be “Greenville Women Giving Day.”

Peggy Baxter, Brenda Kegler & Clarence Kegler

By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Frances Ellison, Harriet Goldsmith & Sue Priester

Diane Williamson, Sara Kellar, & Barbara Hocking

Laura Moore & Jennifer Howe Shirley & Kenneth Keller

26 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Kate Furman & Rakan Draz Scott Kemp, Cathy Kemp, Tracy King & Cheryl Quinn

Lynda McKinnon & Toni Paylor Tyler Sites, Cheryl Quinn, Susan Demere, Tracy King, Kiah Bellows, Zach Muellar & Sara Bopp

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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MAC Opening for Kiah Bellows at Centre Stage June 2, 2016 Centre Stage, in collaboration with the Metropolitan Arts Council, hosted a reception for artist Kiah Bellows and the opening of her exhibit Seasons Beginnings, which was sponsored by South State Bank. The 100 guests in attendance enjoyed her work in the Centre Stage gallery with refreshments provided by the artist. Bellows is a resident artist at Art & Light Studios in the Village of West Greenville.

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30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town ANGELA COX PHOTOGRAPHY

Junior Achievement’s Cheers for Charity May 19, 2016 There’s no better way to spend happy hour than over a couple of cocktails with a friend for a good cause. Hosted by Aloft in downtown Greenville, the quarterly Cheers for Charity event provided plenty of drinks and fun for guests, with 25 percent of all proceeds benefiting Junior Achievement of the Upstate. By Chelsey Ashford Photography

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ON THE

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Greenville Symphony Orchesta’s Martinis & Mahler

Christie & Bob Nachman

NOT FOR THE ORDINARY

May 5, 2016 With the promise of performance and a signature martini, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra welcomed guests and patrons alike to the Peace Center for Martinis and Mahler. In addition to wining and dining, all were treated to an exclusive rehearsal of Mahler’s third symphony Hymn to Nature, part of GSO’s Masterworks Series. Photography by Will Crooks

Andy White, Susie White, David Beard, and Ginnie Beard Edd Sheriff, Cathleen Blanchard & Bill Gaffney

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Melissa Texin & Kaitlyn Campbell J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 3 3

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Abby Moore Keith & Bethany Mlinar

Flint and Tinder Gather close and snuggle up. There’s more to winter warmth than the fire.

Allison Shaffer & Ian Dodge April 30, 2016

“Anchors aweigh!” takes on a whole new meaning when a priceless treasure is hiding in your boat’s anchor compartment. For Ali Shaffer, it was just a normal day on the lake, but for boyfriend Ian Dodge— it was the risk of a lifetime. Ali and Ian had met at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, and after being friends for 12 years and dating for two, Ian was ready to take the plunge. Boating out to their favorite waterfall on Lake Jocassee, Ian nonchalantly asked Ali to throw the anchor in, praying the sparkle of the hidden ring would catch her eye before she sent it overboard. Fortunately, it did, and when she picked it up and turned around, Ian was on one knee asking her to be his wife. The two were married at the Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards Lakehouse, which fittingly featured a boat get-a-way after the ceremony. Ali and Ian now live in Pendleton in their newly purchased home. Ian works as a security officer for Duke Energy, and Ali is an operations manager at RD Energy. CRYSTAL AND KEITH CARSON // RED APPLE TREE PHOTOGRAPHY J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 3 7

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TOWN

Weddings Gabrielle Grace Smith & Brad Miller May 15, 2016 A little daring, a dash of deception, and a lot of delicious romance: these are the ingredients for the perfect proposal. Back in high school, when chemistry was simply a class requirement, Brad Miller mustered up his courage and asked the beautiful blonde two desks over to be his lab partner. Now seven years later, it was time to ask Gabrielle— the same beautiful blonde—to be his life partner. The night before, Brad backed out of an anticipated trip to Savannah, but encouraged Gabrielle to go without him. Her friends spent the following day distracting the despondent bride-to-be, but it took a surprise appearance from her man, sunflower bouquet and ring in hand, to elevate Gabrielle’s spirits. Too overwhelmed to speak, a video of her father giving permission and Brad’s sweet declaration—“six years ago I knew I wanted to marry you”—sealed the deal. Gabrielle’s father married the couple at Jeter Mountain Farm in Hendersonville, NC. Brad and Gabrielle live in Greenville. JESSI NICHOLS // JESSI NICHOLS PHOTOGRAPHY

Hannah Swoap & Wesley Johnson October 17, 2015 There’s nothing like a few feet of snow to foil a romantic proposal. Wes Johnson had planned to ask girlfriend Hannah Swoap to be his wife on the striking Appalachian sloops of Max Patch Bald, but when his tires started spinning halfway up the mountain, it was time for Plan B. He quickly suggested the Grove Park Inn—knowing it was Hannah’s favorite spot in Asheville—and the following day found them in front of the majestic hotel’s roaring fires. A few hours later, Wes took Hannah out to the courtyard, pretending to set up his camera for a photo. Instead, he pressed record and asked her to dance, and when she whispered how much she loved dancing with him, he seized his moment, asking her to dance with him forever. The two shared handwritten vows at the Chattooga Belle Farm in Long Creek, SC, committing to love each other as a reflection of God’s love for them. They now live in Greenville, where Hannah is a teacher at the Frazee Center and Wes works for RCS Grading. SABRINA FIELDS // SABRINA FIELDS PHOTOGRAPHY

Chelsea Fowler and Scott Daniels April 9, 2016 When the “SOLD” sign popped up in front of the empty house next to her parents, Chelsea Fowler didn’t think much of it—that is until she met the new tenant. Scott Daniels had just made the move from Atlanta, and like a good neighbor, Chelsea offered to show him the Greenville ropes. A friendship soon grew into a relationship, and after two years of dating, Scott was ready for Chelsea to be more than just the girl-next-door. A stunning mountain sunset at Asheville’s Grove Park Inn set the scene for Scott’s romantic marriage proposal, which was perfectly finessed by the Champagne, flowers, and candles waiting in the hotel room. The couple hosted a barefoot beach wedding at Longboat Key, Florida, complete with a shoe drop to guarantee guests could sink their feet in. Chelsea and Scott continue to live next to her parents in Greenville, where Chelsea works at Emily Austin and Scott works in wholesale investments for AIG. KIMBERLY DYER // KIMBERLY DYER PHOTOGRAPHY

HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail abby@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 38 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Net Worth

Photograph by Eli Warren; artwork courtesy of Rebecca Hoyle

Rebecca Hoyle depicts Lowcountry landscapes with bold brushstrokes

Under the Impression: Morning Cast, oil on canvas. For more, turn to page 42.

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

))) SEE MORE ARTISTS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

On the Loose Rebecca Hoyle draws on coastal inspiration

HOMETOWN:

Laurinburg, NC / SCHOOL: NC State University and Eastern Carolina University / STUDIO SPACE: 102 E Augusta Place, Greenville / PAINT OF CHOICE: Old Holland oils / ARTIST OF CHOICE: Georgia O’Keeffe / RECENT EXHIBITIONS: Aiken Center for the Arts; Artisphere’s Artist of the Upstate juried exhibition; Juxtaposition solo exhibition, Charleston; studio viewings available by appointment

R

ebecca Hoyle is by no means claustrophobic, but the idea of tightness terrifies her. Though you’d assume this compact conundrum would be for spelunkers, or office assistants scrunched into cubicles, Ms. Hoyle’s fears stem from the world of a modern Impressionist painter. “I keep my paintings very loose with visible brushstrokes and bold colors,” Hoyle explains. “Getting tight is a nightmare for me . . . if I start getting tight, I just have to do an abstract painting to loosen me up again.” Hailing from small town Laurinburg, North Carolina, Hoyle’s roots are as deep as her Southern accent. But don’t let her sweet cadence fool you; her artistic experiences span the globe. She holds degrees from the likes of North Carolina State and Eastern Carolina University, has studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, and has traveled extensively, broadening her education in artistic havens like Prague, Paris, and Italy. A natural talent kindled by a middle school art teacher, Hoyle began her art career in college. After receiving her master’s, she headed south to Charleston to teach art, and it was in these salty Lowcountry waters that Hoyle’s work developed its Impressionistic tone, her paintings loosening to form vivid reflections of the wetland’s natural beauty. Travel easel in tow, she captured lonely boardwalks, mossclad oaks, and discarded oyster husks. “I’m inspired by nature, for one, and how the light dances over the landscape,” Hoyle says. “Organic space is

such a perfect creation.” These days Hoyle spends the majority of time in Greenville with her husband Justin—working from her Charleston location one week each month—but her local studio has all the class and charm of a King Street gallery. Handpicked hydrangeas fill a glass vase, the brilliant blue complementing Hoyle’s cornflower-toned dress and the painted strokes featured in the multiple gold-framed marsh scenes that decorate the walls. “I try to paint every day,” Hoyle explains. “I’ve heard it said you should use three types of brushes every day: your toothbrush, your hairbrush, and your paintbrush.” Though she still does plein air pieces, much of Hoyle’s time is spent traveling, photographing scenes, and then painting in studio. On her current itinerary—a trip to Nantucket to see Martha’s Vineyard, with a European expedition to follow. “I feel like if I start getting stale, then I’ve got to travel. It stirs me up . . . opening my eyes to new inspriation. Instead of just seeing a green tree, I see the yellows, the greens, the blues, the reds, the purples.” Hoyle says. “Over time, my art gets looser, kind of like my outlook on life. I guess I just have a looser perspective.” See more of Rebecca Hoyle’s work at rebeccahoyle.com and on instagram @rebeccahoyle, or visit her studio for an open house on Thursday, July 14, 5–8pm.

Artwork courtesy of Rebecca Hoyle

/ by Abby Moore Keith / / portrait by Eli Warren

42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Untitled


Artwork courtesy of Rebecca Hoyle

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Towner

UP

Making Waves Novelist Mary Alice Monroe hooks readers with stories on Lowcountry living / by Ruta Fox

// photograph by Bobby Altman

M

ary Alice Monroe’s bookshelves hold much more than books. Her literary accolades include the Reader’s Choice Award, South Carolina Center for the Book Award in Writing, plus many others. Monroe’s highly lauded writing touches on three pillars of Southern storytelling: a sense of place, the family, and nature. Just in time for summer comes her latest book The Lowcountry Wedding, fourth in an environmental-fiction series involving the complicated story of three sisters and their historic home on Sullivan’s Island. We poured a cool glass of lemonade, pulled out her beguiling beachy-covered books, and chatted about the two things most writers dream of—a movie deal and becoming a New York Times bestselling author.

What was the first indication that you could make a living as a writer? >> I wrote for hire as a young woman in my 20s. I wrote nonfiction mental health texts for lay people; these were my first published books. After graduate school, I created an English Language textbook series for Survival English. My graduate degrees in Asian culture and English uniquely qualified me for this. It was not until years later that I published my first fiction novel The Long Road Home.

Did you always want to be a writer? Did you have any prior jobs that contributed to your understanding of people? >> Yes, I always wanted to be a writer, but I didn’t know what to call my wildly inventive imagination. My third grade teacher asked me if I wanted to be a writer when I grew up, and I stared back at her with amazement. I didn’t know that was something I could grow up to be. But my earliest job was as a babysitter for my many siblings. One doesn’t grow up in a family of twelve without an understanding of people. I made up stories and songs at bedtime, plus we were always creating shows, plays, and musicals.

How much do you draw on your own background, or is everything just conceived? >> All writers draw from their background, their ideals, and values. But truthfully, I draw much more heavily on my experiences than from my research when I write. My novels, themes, plots, characters, and metaphors are based on what I’ve learned from the animal species I build my book around. When I describe moving turtle nests or raising monarch butterflies or looking into the eyes of a wild dolphin, the emotion is authentic because the experiences are my own. The emotions are mine.

Under the Sea: Passionate about the beloved aquatic animals that frequent her stories, Mary Alice Monroe also serves on the board of the South Carolina Aquarium. Her latest novel The Lowcountry Wedding is out now, just in time for summer vacations.

Where did you grow up and live before Charleston? >> I was born outside Chicago. Then we lived in Alabama, New York, and New Orleans before my family returned to Illinois. I followed my husband’s medical career to New Jersey, Wisconsin, and Washington, DC. During the DC years, we visited Charleston and the Isle of Palms often. When my husband was offered a position at MUSC, we moved to the Isle of Palms permanently. It felt like a homecoming for me. As Pat Conroy told me, “You must have been born here in another life.” What types of events have inspired your stories? >> My volunteering creates scenarios for my novels. I cannot make up anything more fascinating or unbelievable than what I hear or see myself. I always say a good writer is a better listener. While volunteering, I hear stories or witness interactions with wildlife that are awe-inspiring, and I know I must include them in my book. It’s all instinct. It often feels like I was meant to be there at that moment. Your book The Beach House will be a Hallmark Channel original TV movie starring Golden Globe nominee Andie MacDowell due out this year. Do you visualize the novels as movies when writing? >> Never. I don’t think in terms of a script when I write. That is a different form of story construction, viewing the scene from the point of view (POV) of a director’s camera. Rather, I’m seeing the scene through the POV of my character. I am that character when I write. And, for me, I need to be in my office, in my safe space, to totally let go, at least for that first draft. My novels are very personal. ))) READ MORE OF MONROE’S INTERVIEW TOWNCAROLINA.COM

44 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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History Alive: The Restoration’s authentic focus and community feel, not to mention the modern-rustic decor, welcome patrons in Charlestonian style. The hotel encourages guests and locals to “re-create history.”

I

n general, we prize answers over questions. But this is not the case at a boutique hotel, where questions are as welcomed as a king-sized bed: “Would you like a glass of wine?” “Would you prefer a massage or a facial?” “Would you like to build your own motorcycle, or perhaps take home these fine art prints by our artist-in-residence?” The questions, themselves, are like a beautiful, rarefied dream at Charleston’s The Restoration, which allows guests to create their own luxurious reality—or “re-create history.” Formerly named The Restoration on King, the newly enhanced and expanded hotel now comprises four additional buildings around its original restored location on King Street. Once developed as condominiums in 2010, the units were not selling well, so the former owners decided to rebrand as a hotel, offering 16 airy

New South Standard The Restoration in Charleston offers an updated backdrop to connect, indulge, and inspire / by Blair Knobel

46 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Photographs courtesy of The Restoration

suites, ranging from 800–1600 square feet, each with a full kitchen. In 2012, the current owners bought the brand along with three additional buildings and a total of 54 luxury suites, with intentions to introduce The Restoration in other cities. The newest building on Wentworth Street, a brandnew, seven-story construction, houses the hotel’s modern lobby of elegant invention—the design of the entire property utilizes reclaimed industrial materials, such as the pulley-inspired light fixtures in this space. Additionally, 90 large prints by Charleston photographer Ben Gately Williams, the hotel’s current artist-inresidence, hang throughout the property, in the library (where guests may check out or buy books), hallways, and suites, and most are available for purchase. Each suite has a king-sized bed, artisanal bath products by Beekman 1802, a “Nosh Box” with small-batch goods such as Mast Brothers chocolate, complimentary beverages, and—soon to come—ice cream. If you’d like to host friends, a wedding party, or simply stretch out, the 2- and 3-bedroom suites—up to a stunning 2,300 square feet—should do the trick. The Restoration’s broad objective is to bring guests into an authentic lifestyle, connected to history, craft, and community. “When the new owners set out to build the property, they wanted more of a community feel.

Suite Life: Not only can guests enjoy the most spacious of rooms with the charming amenities (many with private terraces), The Restoration offers a formidable cocktail program at The Watch: Rooftop Kitchen & Spirits, as well as superior java and pastries at the Rise Coffee Bar.

CELEBRATE THE FOURTH OF JULY AT THE RESTORATION’S WATCH RESTAURANT AND OBSERVATORY, COMPLETE WITH BBQ, SPIRITS, AND ONE OF THE CITY’S BEST VIEWS.

We do events like rooftop yoga, free to the public,” says director of sales Karen Winn. The Watch: Rooftop Kitchen & Spirits (with killer cocktails and an internationallyinspired menu, deftly executed by Chef Chad Anderson) and the Rise Coffee Bar allow guests and locals to mix and mingle. The Amethyst Spa pampers with a melange of treatments for the body, mind, and spirit—I opted for a massage with essential oils. And the Port Mercantile shop features products with a focus on makers—handmade candles, chocolate, soap, jewelry, and more—echoing the philosophy of the hotel: that the best things are made by touch and that we are creating our own history with each moment. No question about that.

The Restoration, 75 Wentworth St, Charleston. (843) 518-5100, therestorationhotel.com; rates start at $299.

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New Iron Tribe Fitness coming to Woodruff Rd. Here’s why Augusta St. members are getting such amazing results PERSONAL PHYSICAL ASSESSMENTS: Before you begin classes, Iron Tribe looks at your medical history, your previous injuries, physical capabilities and your personal goals. If you are thinking about joining a gym, and they don’t do a personal assessment, think twice! 30 DAY BEGINNERS CLASS: When you join Iron Tribe Fitness, you, along with other beginners will be coached through 12 structured workouts that are expertly designed to take the most de-conditioned individual and gradually increase your strength and stamina over the course of four weeks. Many new members have dropped 5, 7, even 10 pounds of fat in the first few weeks. ONE-ON-ONE RELATIONSHIP WITH COACHES: It doesn’t take long to acknowledge an expert when you see one in action, and with the personal attention you’ll get from your Iron Tribe certified coaches, you gain a measure of confidence you’ve rarely experienced in a fitness facility. THE MAGIC OF IRON TRIBE’S CULTURE: Iron Tribe members develop meaningful friendships that last a lifetime. At least that’s the testimony of hundreds of Greenville members who say that there’s something very special about the Iron Tribe community. NUTRITIONAL GUIDANCE, AND REAL FOOD: Iron Tribe has taken nutrition to a whole new level to help keep you on track with your goals. Not only do they give you a food journal to help keep you accountable, but if you choose, they also have expertly prepared breakfasts, lunches and dinners prepared for you.

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TOWN

Buzz

Biding Time: This portrait of a Daufuskie resident, titled An Old Woman Sitting at a Table in Her Home, is one of many by photographer Jeanne MoutoussamyAshe, during her four years documenting the island. The images are now on view at the Columbia Museum of Art.

Past Presence Daufuskie Island lives on through the work of Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe

Photograph courtesy of the Columbia Museum of Art

/ by Hayden Arring ton

I

t took only twenty-five minutes for photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe’s boat to cross the threshold of the present and dock peacefully in the world of the past. It was 1977 when the artist first set foot on South Carolina’s humble nine-mile stretch of land. Moutoussamy-Ashe first caught word of Daufuskie Island from a friend while on vacation in Charleston with her husband, the tennis phenom Arthur Ashe. With no bridge to the mainland until the 1950s, the island managed to isolate itself from the outside world, abstaining from modern luxuries such as electricity and telephone service. In doing so, Daufuskie was like a time capsule, perfectly preserving the roots of a culture that had remained untouched for more than a century.

At the end of the Civil War, with nowhere else to go, freed slaves re-inhabited land of the very men that once held them captive, finding work in the oyster and logging industries. Like many other refugees across the nation, the new Daufuskie residents were the product of plantations, blending their native West African tongue with the new American dialect to create a hybrid culture that would come to be known as Gullah. The new community prospered until excess pollution forced closure on the oyster beds and the population dwindled from 2,000 down to 60. Abandoned by progress and virtually marooned on the island, the residents were forced to rely on a primal system of commerce in order to survive. “There were fewer than 50 homes and only about 80 African-American people. Many still spoke their native Gullah language,” the artist recalls about her first trip. “There was only a store, a two-room school, a nursery, and one church. Even though the culture had been relatively undisturbed for nearly 50 years, it was obvious that the island was going to develop into a resort like its neighbor, Hilton Head.” Realizing the danger of incoming development, Moutoussamy-Ashe vowed to preserve what she could of the dying culture and to document the lives of its people. Over the four-year project, the artist not only photographed but also befriended the natives of Daufuskie, encasing their history J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 4 9

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TOWN

Island Living: A few of MoutoussamyAshe’s photographs include Blossom (left), Shrimper Pulling in His Line (above), and An Old Fallen House Next to a Moss-Draped Tree (below right).

in more than 80 black-and-white gelatin prints. Starting slow at first, Moutoussamy-Ashe took the time to learn the stories and personal histories of the natives before ever lifting up her camera. Although her time was brief, the artist was able to immortalize all that the island culture had to offer by capturing the simplicity, and beauty, of everyday life. From expressions of young love, to the comforts of home cooking, her images reveal raw humanity of a culture before the tides of commercialism and development took over. “We can’t stop change,” Moutoussamy-Ashe admits. “but we need to be more mindful of helping people develop when we develop their land. Now, I can see how things can work better.” Today, Daufuskie boasts luxury resorts and a growing market for tourist activity. The breath of the Gullah people is long lost in the newly-developed soil, but their legacy remains stamped in every one of Moutoussamy-Ashe’s photographs. Her collection Daufuskie Island, first published in 1982, has gone on to be featured in museum exhibits across the nation, most recently finding a home at the Columbia Museum of Art. “With Moutousammy-Ashe’s photos, people see and feel the rapid and drastic change that is going on all around us,” says William South, curator

Native Tongue: The word daufuskie— which comes from the native language of Muscogee, the first inhabitants of the island—translates to “sharp feather,” due to the island’s unique shape.

of the new Daufuskie Memories exhibit. “It feels like the world we grew up with is slipping away.” The exhibit features 60 of MoutoussamyAshe’s original images of the daily lives of Daufuskie’s Gullah residents. South believes that the lesson of the series can still be felt in modern society. “Standing in front of her photos, I hear people talk about where they were from, how life was for them, and how things are now. I hear people talk about getting involved politically to help preserve what is important.” To South, these conversations are of vital importance, the soul of the exhibit—preservation of a culture and time, lost to the present but resounding clearly as ever. The Columbia Museum of Art will be showcasing Moutoussamy-Ashe’s Daufuskie Memories through August 7. For more information please visit columbiamuseum.org

50 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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PAST

Lives

King of Tides Pat Conroy’s illustrious oeuvre explores the essence of Lowcountry life / by M. Linda Lee

The Great Santini (1976): Eventually made into a movie starring Robert Duvall, the novel describes a fictional account between an abusive Marine fighter pilot and his son. The story was based on Conroy’s own experience with his father and caused a rift in the family dynamic. The Lords of Discipline (1980): Another fictional account based on Conroy’s own experience at The Citadel military school. The story follows a young cadet and aspiring novelist through his first year of training as a plebe and the abuse he suffered at the hands of the institution. The Water Is Wide (1972): This memoir details Conroy’s one year of teaching on Daufuskie Island in a one-room schoolhouse. He was fired for his experiential style of teaching, mainly his aversion to corporal punishment. It won two awards and was made into a movie starring Jon Voigt.

N

o other contemporary author has done more to immortalize the Lowcountry of South Carolina than Pat Conroy (1945–2016). Born in Atlanta and the oldest of seven children, Conroy spent his childhood moving constantly to follow his Marine pilot father’s career. His mother, a Southern belle from Alabama, instilled in the young boy a strong love of language. When Conroy was 15, his family landed in Beaufort, South Carolina, which became his self-proclaimed hometown. All nine of Conroy’s novels and memoirs (he published two additional works of nonfiction) are set in the South Carolina Lowcountry. His family’s dysfunctions and the abuse he and his siblings suffered at his father’s hands became fodder for several of his novels, including The Great Santini—a portrait of Conroy’s sadistic father—and his best-selling 1986 novel The Prince of Tides, both of which were later made into films. After graduating from The Citadel, he taught underprivileged children in a one-room schoolhouse on Daufuskie Island. An idealistic young teacher in the 1960s, Conroy struggled to find ways to reach the students, many of whom were illiterate. He was fired after a year for bucking the system by refusing to allow corporal punishment in his classroom and discarding the school’s outdated textbooks in favor of experiential education. His frustration inspired him to pen a memoir of his experience, The Water Is Wide, in 1972. Of the students, Conroy wrote: “I don’t think I changed the quality of their lives significantly or altered the inexorable fact that they were imprisoned by the very circumstance of their birth.” The memoir, which won a humanitarian award from the National Education Association, was the first of his books to be made into a movie, Conrack, in 1974. Although Conroy succumbed to pancreatic cancer in March of this year, he leaves an indelible legacy in the evocative prose he set against South Carolina’s compelling backdrop of sea islands and salt marshes.

52 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Adv


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SAY

YES TO YOURSELF

! Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

WOW

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Central

STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

What’s the Buzz?: Charleston-based Croghan’s Jewel Box creates in(sect) style with its Goldbug Collection. Large Goldbug cuff bracelet, designed by Mariana Hay for Croghan’s Jewel Box, $250.

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Winged Inspiration Bug baubles fly into summer fashion J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 5 7

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THE

Object

R

Gold, Plated Bug out with these pest-inspired pieces / by Laura Linen // photograph by Paul Mehaffey Silver-cast carpenter bee earrings from Custard Boutique, $137. (864) 2710927, custardboutique.com

Dragonfly pendant with an enlarged Tahitian black pearl set amongst almost a carat of white diamonds in 14k white gold from Hale’s Jewelers, $2,250. (864) 5975600, halesjewelers.com

Gold bee ring by Sandy Hyun from Muse Shoe Studio, $45. (864) 271-9750, museshoestudio.com

2

Goldbug stud earrings by Mariana Hay for Croghan’s Jewel Box, $23.

18k yellow-gold brooch and “Modullyn” clasp bezel set with a 5.5 carat Australian black opal for the head; all colored stones totaling 6.57 carat weight by Llyn Strong, price upon request. (864) 2335900, llynstrong.com

“ p c a —

Dragonfly pendant with 1.5-carat diamonds and yellow sapphire eyes from Plaza Jewelers, $5,000. (864) 241-0690

Goldbug brooch by Mariana Hay for Croghan’s Jewel Box, call for cost. (843) 723-3594, croghansjewelbox.com

R 58 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Marchan


Relationships are the Foundation for Strong Communities

ours last a lifetime

Realtor Joan Rapp (center) poses with happy clients and friends Brian Brigham Lehman (right) owner of The Galleries of Brian Brigham and Interior Designer Jonathan Reyes (left).

“When I realized we had to relocate our business, my thoughts went immediately to Downtown Greer due to its quaintness and growth. During my estate sales I had come to meet Joan Rapp as a customer and found out that she worked with The Marchant Company. Knowing that I needed help and guidance in finding the right building I asked if she would be willing to help me. We ultimately found a historic building on Trade Street that wasn’t even on the market and our forever home became a reality. The transition was made so much easier because of Joan’s knowledge and expertise, and we are now finally settled. Not only did we find our forever home, we found a wonderful friend. If ever in the market for buying or selling please don’t forget the name Joan Rapp and The Marchant Company.” — Brian Brigham Lehman, Owner of The Galleries of Brian Brigham

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THE

Look

Water’s Edge Vintage glamour gives summer a seductive appeal / by Laura Linen // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

60 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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The Reserve at Lake Keowee A lakeside sanctuary with a style and serenity that rivals most resorts, The Reserve is a collection of premier neighborhoods nestled quietly on the shores of Lake Keowee. Play nine holes on Jack Nicholas’s signature golf course, catch a Clemson football game, or relax the day away at the lake or one of the clubhouse pools. No matter your choice, you can’t go wrong in this slice of paradise. reserveatlakekeowee.com

ON LINDSEY:

Calypso Island cutout swimsuit by La Blanca from Splash on Main, $125; Mother of Pearl circle earrings from Lou Lou Boutique, $55; Lee cuff with semiprecious stones from Lou Lou Boutique, $18; modern pearl necklace from Lou Lou Boutique, $28; “Irina” sunglasses by Tom Ford from Monkee’s of the West End, $450; 4 in 1 tote bag from Lou Lou Boutique, $75; CVX straw panama hat from Lou Lou Boutique, $25; Vagabond round towel in “wildflower” (reverse side shown) from Splash on Main, $89 Special thanks: Model Lindsey Shifflett (Millie Lewis Greenville); hair & makeup by Isabelle Schreier; shot on location at The Reserve at Lake Keowee

J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 6 1

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THE

Purchase

Bag Check Pack in a snap with Mission Mercantile’s leather luggage / by Laura Linen // photography by Paul Mehaffey

• • •

100 -percent full-grain, vegetable-tanned leather Waxed canvas 100 -percent metal hardware

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62 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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PHOTO BY ANGELA COX PHOTOGRAPHY

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Get a taste. Get a taste. Page 82 Page ��

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Swim Lessons

A past pool experience proves more than what the Man signed up for

M

y swimming instructor was named Randy, and he was waiting for me at the edge of the pool with his hands on his hips. This was back in 2006 when I was going through what I refer to as my first midlife crisis and on a desperate attempt to lose the thirty pounds that a failing marriage, two kids, and a thankless job had added to my midsection. I’d signed up for swimming lessons at a health club in rural western North Carolina and had been told that Randy was among the best teachers in the area. In retrospect, being one of the best swimming instructors in a town with only one pool that’s 300 miles from the nearest beach was not exactly a glowing endorsement. Randy was wearing a tiny, black Speedo, which from the front looked like a tarpaulin pulled tight over a flea market table filled with used sporting equipment. I was a little concerned that Randy didn’t have quite the swimmer’s physique I was hoping to achieve. He appeared to be a bodybuilder whose workout schedule had never included a leg day. Barrel chested and broad shouldered with tiny legs, Randy looked like a giant double-stick Popsicle with a black rubber band around the center. It was not just that Randy’s legs were so out of proportion to his upper body; they actually appeared to belong to another person altogether. It was as if his Speedo divided two completely different men. From the waist down Randy was rather hirsute, with short black ringlets of hair shooting out from his shins, calves, thighs, and nether regions of

his Speedo. But from the waist up he was as smooth and polished as a hardwood floor. Obviously Randy shaved his upper body, but I couldn’t help but wonder, how did he decide where to stop? Randy instructed me to get into the pool and swim a couple of laps so he could watch my form. I could have saved him the time by telling him that my swimming form was similar to someone who has just stepped on a bee’s nest, or is being attacked by jellyfish, or whose parachute is descending directly toward an alligator farm. After I flailed and kicked my way to the other side of the pool and back again, Randy began describing everything I was doing wrong. But holding onto the edge of the pool and looking up at Randy’s scrawny, hairy legs, all I could think about was what was underneath that Speedo? Where did the hair stop? Was it a straight line, or did he fade it down gradually? An hour later I was in the locker room changing clothes when Randy entered and headed toward the showers. Now was my chance, I thought, and followed after him as nonchalantly as possible. I walked by the row of stalls and glanced toward the one I’d seen Randy enter. And there he was, standing proudly with the curtain wide-open, water spraying down over his enormous chest. He was still wearing the Speedo. For the next six Wednesday evenings, Randy was nothing if not consistent. He never got in the water. He never put on a shirt. He never took off that Speedo. And, he never taught me how to swim.

64 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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JULY 2016 / 65

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WORD

Play

Home Sweet Aruba A well-traveled writer enjoys extravagant living on the island’s clear blue shores / by Mary Cathryn Armstrong

Photographs (3) courtesy of the Ritz-Carlton Aruba

Sunny-side Up: From the the Ritz-Carlton’s plush amenities to the island’s sublime waters and attractions, such as its iconic California Lighthouse, Aruba has much to see and absorb.

66 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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there's a difference between simple and easy. there aren't a lot of moving parts to this model. but it's a lot of work. Hard work. – shannon hudson

6

6/ Heather Hudson, co-owner of the exploding 9Round Fitness franchise 7/ Shannon Hudson, co-owner of the 9Round Fitness franchise and former kickboxing Middleweight Champion of the World

I

t’s 4:30 on a Thursday afternoon. Back in Greenville, the inferno of workday traffic on I-85 is just getting started. My current plight is only slightly different: wading ankle deep through the luminous, crystalline waters of the Caribbean Sea. If a short end of the stick exists, I am, quite literally, over a thousand miles away from it. Bon Bini

I was hooked on Aruba long before the plane touched the tarmac. Craning my neck from the aisle seat—breaching the unspoken rules of in-flight etiquette—I watched the creamy shores and lustrous blue waters form in greater detail. Maybe it’s because I was raised on the South Carolina coasts, where the ocean is a dark emerald rather than a clear-cut topaz. Maybe it’s because a small child hollered for the entire last leg of my flight. Whatever the reason, stepping into the fragrant, sunlit lobby of the Ritz-Carlton’s seafront resort felt like shrugging off a bulky winter coat in exchange for a temperate, naked breeze. The glass of Champagne at check-in certainly didn’t hurt either.

Photographs (3) courtesy of the Ritz-Carlton Aruba

SAIL AWAY

7

As a vetted traveler, I’ve stayed in plush Las Vegas hotels, roadside inns off Florida interstates, and everywhere in between. One thing I seek consistently is the marriage of extravagance and comfort; after all, your temporary home away from home should feel just like that—a home. The Ritz-Carlton, Aruba, does this exceedingly well. Whether you’re (hopefully) cleaning up in the casino, indulging in a sunset dinner prepared by Executive Chef Stephen Toevs, or lounging in the adults-only pool (yay!), there’s an omnipresence of unwinding leisure. The property’s design brings in elements of the island’s natural beauty, capturing scenes from my ocean-view balcony and reflecting them in the spectrum of cerulean, pear-green, and saffron that dictate the rooms’ plush interiors. The sugary sands spread below like a crisp white apron, which I documented religiously. What is social media for, if not to tell the world that you are in Aruba? Bon Dia

It took some steely reserve to pry myself from the downy comforts of room 3207 the next morning—I’m not exactly sure what the Ritz-Carlton puts in their mattresses, but I now regard my own bed as less than satisfactory. Any lingering remnants of travel exhaustion quickly dissipated when I climbed aboard the Monforte III, a spacious teak vessel that matches its sumptuous ambience with plenty of go get ’em speed and agility. Insert your boat theme song of choice. We anchored in Boca Catalina, a quiet crescent of ocean characterized by mild currents and a lively underwater ecosystem perfect for snorkeling. After a minor mea culpa consisting of a face plant against the waves and sucking down J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 6 7

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WORD

Play Tidal Wave: Beautiful sights and activities mingle with history and tradition to infuse this tropical paradise with depth, variety, and calm.

An alternative to the close quarters of hotelliving, Tierra del Sol’s family of pristine condos, villas, and palatial estate homes accommodates those pursuing both privacy and plenty of space, which I gratefully appreciated during that morning’s sun-salutation yoga. It was an authentically calm, renewing experience held poolside at one of the properties. I’ve since tried to recreate that same atmosphere in my own backyard, but with little success. Our ritual complete, we gathered around the dining table for a meal with one of Tierra del Sol’s personal chefs. Like Aruba itself, the menu was a fusion of culture, carefully curated with influences from Dutch, Asian, and Caribbean cuisines. For once, I was thankful for small portions, as I was able to savor every dish in its entirety. Tierra del Sol’s crown jewel, however, is the golf course, an 18-hole tour de force that capitalizes on the landscape’s rolling hills, native foliage, and perennial winds to stimulate even the most seasoned athlete. My hand-eye coordination (or lack thereof) has been set in stone since I failed out of tee ball, so I opted for a massage instead of a tee-off. I’m not sure if I’ve ever experienced a more peace-filled 45 minutes. Bon Nochi

saltwater, a colorful prism came into focus. Swirls of silvery grunts, electric blue tangs, and striped angelfish threaded around me, floating above tufts of rigid coral and lazily swaying algae. They observed me with casual indifference, evidently accustomed to the occasional interloper. Fine by me. Having convinced myself that snorkeling was similar to working out, I accepted the regionally-brewed Amstel Bright as a reward for my efforts and toasted our on-deck chef, who prepared shrimp, steak, chicken, and pineapple kebabs for lunch—an impressive feat considering the grill is on the rear platform of a moving boat. Bon Tardi

One perk of a less-than-20-mile-long island is that it takes a relatively short time to reach any of Aruba’s many destinations. A short car ride brought us to Tierra del Sol, a combination resort, spa, and golf course rambling across nearly 600 acres of prime real estate.

Aruba continued to surprise with its diversity, not only in an amalgam of ethnicities, but also in the topography of the island itself. Our last day began with a 4 a.m. wake-up call—and fortunately plenty of coffee—as we ventured out of the resort region to Rancho Daimari for a sunrise horseback ride through Arikok National Park. I’d not ridden a horse since summer camp, and was anxious about getting back in the saddle. But our equine friends expertly picked their way up and down the craggy earth before breaking into swift trots in the soft sand. The sun climbed upward, dappled in hues of tangerine, rosy pink, and pale yellow. It was hanging high when we reached the “conchi,” a natural pool encircled by high, jagged rock walls. I felt like I was swimming in the eye of a storm; with each rolling wave came a thunderous crash as water made contact with rock, sending salty sprays above my head. Following lunch in the Arikok National Park, we spent the afternoon traveling to some of the island’s landmarks, including the Alto Vista Chapel, Bushiribana Gold Mill Ruins, and the California Lighthouse. A personal highlight was the Terrafuse Aruba glass and ceramics studio, a sunny workshop located in Noord. Sitting behind a burner torch, I watched the glass colors melt together to form an individual bead. It was simple, yet perfect. The bead now rests on my key ring, a constant reminder of an incredible adventure on the One Happy Island. I have an inkling I will be back someday, but until then, Ayo, Aruba.

68 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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NATURAL

HERITAGE A

Commercial fisherman

C A P TA I N ’ S

C R AAs I GSoutherners, R E AV E S our relationship to the land is complex. We’re

B OU N T Y

w e a t h protective e r s t i d e s a nof d tit r e as n d sour as fiercely to ensure smooth sails for his family-run business

people. We have a drive to claim a stake, to preserve, to pass down. In this spirit, Liberty S E Abusinessman E A G L E M Tom A R KO’Hanlan ET is restoring a tract in Pickens to pristine conditions—essentially molding it back to its wild glory—for communion, camaraderie, and conservation. b y Scott Gould photography by Paul Mehaffey

70 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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b y SCOTT GOULD photography by

BOBBY ALTMAN

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TIG H T S H IP : (above left) Commercial fisherman Craig Reaves at the helm of one of his boats. He and his

family catch shellfish and purchase fin fish from other local outfits; (above right) a crew member takes a break during a hard day’s work.

SOMETHING HAPPENS WHEN Craig Reaves WALKS INTO THE WHEELHOUSE OF HIS SHRIMP BOAT, the GR ACIE BELLE.

SOMETHING CHANGES.

T

he expression relaxes. The tension evaporates a little from his shoulders. He lets out a long, slow breath as the Gracie Belle shudders slightly against the dock. “Take a look at that,” he says, gesturing through the open window at the falling tide on Village Creek and the ocean far beyond the marsh. “That’s my office. And I love my office.” Craig is a commercial fisherman, which automatically qualifies him as one of the hardest-working people in America. Commercial fishermen don’t punch a rational time clock. They are indentured to tide charts and fish migrations and weather patterns, and they labor constantly with the roller coaster vagaries of a fickle marketplace. Craig has spent decades in the family business, chasing shrimp and gathering oysters. These days, he and an entire roster of Reaveses—three generations of fathers and mothers, sons and daughters—pull together in the family enterprise, keeping the long hours required to run Sea Eagle Market in Beaufort.

They harvest shrimp and shellfish, work closely with other coastal fishermen to purchase their various fin fish catches, and coordinate delivery of Sea Eagle seafood to wholesale and retail customers, both local and across the state. It’s an energy-draining, timesapping business, but right now, business is good. Craig’s cell phone rings in his pocket, shattering a rare moment of silence on the Gracie Belle, and he shakes his head. It has been blaring maniacally all afternoon. He’s a wanted man—wanted for advice, for keys to the walk-in cooler, for delivery schedules, for instructions, for construction plans, for leadership. In other words, the evolution of Sea Eagle Market has brought Craig to this point, a point where he spends more time on his cell phone and less time on his boats, more time coordinating the growth of Sea Eagle and less time watching the tides change. That’s why even short visits aboard the Gracie Belle are important. They remind him where he started and how far he’s come. And where did he start? Well, that’s an easy one. As Craig says, “I didn’t pick fishing. I was born into

72 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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B O O T S O N TH E G RO U ND: (above left) Craig Reaves harvests oyster baskets; (above right) lemon peels

cover the sharp, briny scent of fresh-caught shrimp, a staple air freshener carried by Reaves’s crew.

COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN DON’T PUNCH A RATIONAL TIME CLOCK. THEY ARE INDENTURED TO TIDE CHARTS AND FISH MIGRATIONS AND WEATHER PATTERNS, AND THEY LABOR CONSTANTLY WITH THE ROLLER COASTER VAGARIES OF A FICKLE MARKETPLACE. it.” His father Laten began shrimping off of the North Carolina coast during the heyday of the industry, in the early 1960s. Craig keeps a stack of photos from those early days that he likes to deal out for visitors. One of his favorites is a faded color picture of him as a youngster on the deck of his father’s shrimp boat, kicking a buoy, pretending it was a football. “It was always about fishing,” he says, even when it was supposed to be about football. s a nine-year old, Craig bussed tables in the family restaurant and learned the seafood business from that angle. As a high schooler, he began shrimping off the coast, near Georgetown, and not long after, Laten set him up with his own boat, the Boy Shrimper. Craig made a business of it, following in the wake of his father, but times weren’t always good for the Reaves clan or the fishing industry as a whole. “I remember some slow winters back in the ’90s, really slow. When shrimping was over for the season, I was scratching out clams just to feed the family. It was like that scene outta of Forrest Gump.

A

We had fried clams and clam fritters and clam stew and steamed clams and . . . ” The industry improved slightly until what Craig calls a “perfect storm of bad things” in the early 2000s. The price of diesel fuel more than tripled, landing far north of $3 a gallon. Coupled with the fuel increase, huge commercial fishing companies began dumping foreign shrimp in the marketplace, dramatically undercutting prices on South Carolina catches. “You’d have to catch two pounds of shrimp to pay for a gallon of fuel,” Craig says. “It put a lot of people out of business.” As a result, the commercial fishing fleet on the South Carolina coast began to shrink, a decline hastened by a real estate boom. “Listen, real estate developers were coming to folks in the fishing business and offering them a million bucks for their docks and property on the waterfront. The docks disappeared and condos were put in their place. At one time, every little cubby hole had shrimp boats docked in it, and just like that the property was gone,” Craig recalls.

// SHELL GAME

Shrimp boats are laden with large trawl nets, which pull shrimp up from tidal floors. The average shrimp boat can haul several hundred pounds of catch in a day.

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> > MU DDY TH E WATE RS : Craig Reaves (right) and crew wade ankle-deep in local beds to check baskets for oysters.

THE BOOM TIME FOR commercial fishing CR AIG’S FATHER WITNESSED FOUR DECADES AGO IS NOT RETURNING, BUT THAT’S NOT A DE ATH KNELL FOR THE INDUSTRY, NOT EVEN CLOSE, SAYS CR AIG. “No, it’s never going to be what it was in the ’70s and

’80s, but we have a very viable fleet in South Carolina, and it’s still a viable industry. Now, it’s all about niche markets and supplying locally.” And while that statement may sound somewhat reminiscent of the recent farm-to-table trends in the restaurant business, don’t suggest to Craig or anybody else at Sea Eagle that they are riding that particular coattail. “My mother and father were doing farm-to-table—or boat-to-table, I guess—back in the ’70s. They were decades ahead of their time. Now, we’re doing it again.” inding those niche markets and supplying locally is what led Sea Eagle to become a presence at five weekly Saturday farmers markets in the Upstate: Greenville, Travelers Rest, Simpsonville, Easley, and Spartanburg. “It’s all about educating people,” Jana, Craig’s wife, says, and that’s why the Sea Eagle folks (including Craig’s oldest daughter, Melena) make the long haul north every Friday night, in order to be set up and ready to sell fresh fish and shrimp on Saturday mornings. As Melena tells it, there are times when they wait somewhat impatiently on Friday

// FISH

From croaker to kingfish, Sea Eagle Market guarantees its fish are fresh, purchased straight from local docks to help support Beaufort’s local fishing economy.

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afternoons—as the truck idles in the Sea Eagle parking lot—for shrimp and fish to arrive from the docks. “I want people to know that the shrimp they buy on Saturday morning more than likely came out of the water Friday afternoon. It’s that fresh,” she says. The education process is working, according to Craig. “People are starting to ask questions about where the fish came from and when it was caught and how it should be prepared. People are beginning to realize they can have fresh fish pretty conveniently. There’s a faithful customer base out there, and we’re gonna keep bringing them fresh seafood.” To supply that customer base, Craig and Sea Eagle are expanding operations. The existing market in Beaufort is moving to a larger location just up Boundary Street. (And with a nod toward the days when he bussed tables at his mom and dad’s fish camp, this location will feature a small restaurant.) At the new Sea Eagle Market, the Reaveses will continue to supply local customers, as well as the 65 or so restaurants across the Southeast that currently feature their seafood. On St. Helena Island, where the Gracie Belle is tied up, the Reaveses have purchased an existing creek-front dock, and a full-scale shrimp-

packing complex is under renovation, one designed to handle the thousands of pounds of South Carolina shrimp they off-load each week. In other words, Sea Eagle is in it for the long run. And so is the fishing industry, according to Craig. “You’ll hear people say the industry is dying. It is not dying. No way. Sure, we’ve got to keep educating people. And we’ve gotta have support from the community. We couldn’t do what we do without their support. But let me tell you, we are gonna be around. You are gonna have fresh, local seafood.” t Sea Eagle Market back in Beaufort, a steady stream of customers wanders in and out while Craig spreads out pictures of shrimp boats he’s known and pictures of his tight-knit fishing family, three generations of men and women in the business. In every photo, the background is the faded, gray expanse of the ocean. Craig’s youngest daughter, eight-year-old Molleigh, wanders up and studies the images. Someone asks her what it feels like to see all those pictures of her family. She thinks for moment. “Makes me feel like I’m part of history,” she says. Smart girl. She may be too young to realize it yet, but she’s part of the future, too.

A

> > Keeping in line with their boat-totable philosophy, Sea Eagle Market has plans to open a small restaurant with its up-and-coming expansion on Boundary Street. The family-run market will continue providing fresh seafood to 65-plus restaurants across the Southeast.

SEA EAGLE IS A PRESENCE AT FIVE WEEKLY SATURDAY FARMERS MARKETS IN THE UPSTATE: GREENVILLE, TRAVELERS REST, SIMPSONVILLE, EASLEY, AND SPARTANBURG. “I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW THAT THE SHRIMP THEY BUY ON SATURDAY MORNING MORE THAN LIKELY CAME OUT OF THE WATER FRIDAY AFTERNOON. IT’S THAT FRESH,” MELENA SAYS. Sea Eagle Market’s Best Catches

// OYSTERS

// SHRIMP

The Carolina coast boasts an abundance of oyster beds, which are harvested between October and May.

Carolina shrimp typically come in brown and white; smaller brown shrimp are harvested May–August, the latter, September–December.

// SOFT-SHELL CRAB

These clawed crustaceans are in season when they shed their shells between April and June.

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BY THE SEA Greenville H A S L O N G H A D A L O V E Pawleys Island, A N D T H E A R E A O F

A F F A I R W I T H T H E C O A S TA L G E TA W AY S O F THE

Waccamaw Neck.

Litchfield Beach,

W H I L E S E V E R A L U P S TAT E M E N W E R E

I N S T R U M E N TA L I N I T S D E V E L O P M E N T, M A N Y FA M I L I E S C O N T I N U E T O E M B R A C E T H E L O W C O U N T R Y A U T H E N T I C I T Y O F D E C A D E S PA S T.

BY THE SEA G R E E N V I L L E has long had a love af fair with the coastal country near L I T C H F I E L D B E A C H ,

P A W L E Y S I S L A N D , and the W A C C A M A W N E C K . Though the area has changed, many The serene experience of Pawleys U P S T A T E families continue to embrace the L O W C O U N T R Y authenticity of decades past Island is like a timeless ode to foregone beach days.

Dock Time:

b y S t eph a n i e B u rd et t t

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Greenville H A S L O N G H A D A L O V E A F F A I R W I T H T H E C O A S T A L C O U N T R Y N E A R Litchfield Beach, Pawleys Island A N D Waccamaw Neck T H E T H O U G H T H E A R E A H A S C H A N G E D , M A N Y U P S T A T E FA M I L I E S C O N T I N U E T O E M B R AC E T H E L O W C O U N T RY AU T H E N T I C I T Y O F D E CA D E S PA S T

By Jennifer Oladipo

There’s a narrow strip of lush Carolina coastland nestled between the Waccamaw River and the blue-green ocean. It’s quiet lowland country, a place of swamp oaks and beach boardwalks, a place you wouldn’t expect to find Upstate travelers feeling at home.

YET THE LITCHFIELD AREA O F G E O R G E T O W N C O U N T Y, SOUTH CAROLINA, IS THE SITE OF A SUMMER EXODUS, A H AV E N F O R C O U N T L ES S G R EE N V I L L E FA M I LI ES W H O’ V E H A D A ST R O N G H A N D I N SHAPI NG THE L A ND SI N CE THE 19 5 0 s.

1

Coach Jessica Clohessy performs a box jump at Swamp Rabbit CrossFit.

In the last half-century, towns up and down the Lowcountry coast have taken to the ground like kudzu. But Litchfield’s roughly 12-mile stretch—south of Murrells Inlet down to Pawleys Island—has developed at a different pace. For decades, the area has been labeled laid-back, even charmingly primitive in parts like Pawleys Island and the Waccamaw Neck. It was this relaxed quality that beguiled the McKissicks and Stones, Greenville families who enjoyed the area for leisure. But they also saw the business potential. In the mid-to-late twentieth century, they were at the forefront of developing what has come to be known by some as “Greenville by the Sea.” As the McKissicks and Stones courted homeowners from outside the region, they prioritized maintaining the character of the area. Greenville buyers often held fast to the Litchfield way of life, favoring cottages without air conditioning and waterways over roadways. But they weren’t the first outsiders. An earlier wave of northerners had purchased plantation homes in the early twentieth century, organized formally as the South Carolina Plantation Society.

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Through the decades, development came in spurts. These days, Miller says, it’s a spate of grocery stores. Their services used to be provided only by the Big Top gas station flanked on either side by a small grocery and corresponding liquor store. While neighboring seaside communities expanded with high-rise hotels and carnival-esque attractions, Litchfield has remained a haven for those who favor unobstructed views and unplanned hours. Instead of a row of beachfront distractions, locals would rather view a row of motorboats floating down an inlet in a come-as-you-are Fourth of July parade. “Brookgreen Gardens is sort of like our Mason/Dixon line: you go past there, and it gets too commercialized,” he says. Even as growth has made living more convenient, Miller relishes the things that haven’t changed. “I live back on the Waccamaw, and the waterway still looks like it did in plantation days with the wetland and lowlands, the oak trees and the moss.” To the south, evidence of humans is wonderfully scarce for more than 20 miles, where protected waterways are nearly pristine. The South Carolina Environmental Law Project housed nearby has been protecting the area since 1987, and incorporation, a legal maneuver which allows for easy transfers of land ownership, has been utilized to keep development at bay. One argument

to t

The last wave of land buys followed the 1929 stock market crash so that “by 1931 there was scarcely a planation left in the hands of native South Carolinians.” In his History of Georgetown County, South Carolina, George Rogers Jr. records that though socially disengaged with the community, northern owners spurred the local economy. Their seaside and inland homes needed staff and construction workers, jobs that helped the county survive the Depression. The end of World War II and the arrival of the International Paper Company brought prosperity back to the area. Soon ownership moved back into the hands of South Carolinians, and—according to Rogers—a shift toward recreation and tourism brought the Litchfield area’s biggest boom in modern times. Greenville businessmen took note, and they began investing in the same no-frills way as the place they were developing. In 1956, the Litchfield Company was created, its founders including James Moore and partners A. Foster McKissick and Bill Miller Sr. The real estate development company grew from a holding in Pawleys Island to include resort communities such as Litchfield by the Sea, Willbrook Plantation, the Reserve at Litchfield, and Prince Creek in Murrells Inlet. The cohort didn’t have fancy offices at first, and consequently several deals were done across a card table. “Dad set up an umbrella at a fork in the road going into Litchfield Road,” says E. Stone Miller or “Stoney.” The Litchfield Company Real Estate broker-in-charge, Stoney comes from real estate royalty. “My dad put together packages to sell ocean and canal lots and company stock for $5,000. He would go and get two or three different families to meet together and pre-sell.” The Millers are closely associated with the Stones, a prominent Greenville family associated with an eponymous textile manufacturing operation and the restored Cherrydale house, which they donated to Furman University. Stoney Miller moved to Georgetown County when he was in the fourth grade, but his connection to Greenville remained strong, even while living in his literal backwater town. “Schools were in Georgetown, so kids in the winter commuted by boat in the canal. In the summer, lots of people came from Greenville, so you got to grow up with them,” Miller says. “A lot of people call the area ‘Greenville by the Sea.’” (left to right) text here text here

Ocean View: These two-story villas (shown here circa 1960), the first condo development in SC according to Stoney Miller, still exist north of and adjacent to what is now the Litchfield Inn on Litchfield Beach.

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While neighboring seaside communities expanded with high-rise hotels and carnivalesque attractions, Litchfield has remained a haven for those who favor unobstructed views and unplanned hours. Instead of a row of beachfront distractions, locals would rather view a row of motorboats floating down an inlet in a come-as-you-are Fourth of July parade.

against these efforts is that threats aren’t pressing, since people are choosing developments with protected covenants. Miller also explains that the latest wave of homebuyers seeking multi-million-dollar constructions is interested in older, simpler homes. “The beach is a little older now, so the beach houses are older. For a while, they would tear them down and build these big boxes. But now they’re coming back. They’re fashionable. People like the way they’ve grown up coming here, and are looking for that still,” Miller says. The old-fashioned structures and laid-back lifestyles that have kept the area unique are perhaps its best billboards for slow change, but change still happens. Many of today’s newcomers to Litchfield are people who have been successful in other parts of the world, now giving their talents to help sustain and propel the local economy and culture. The area’s popularity grew further recently when Alice Flagg, the first opera penned by a Pawleys Island native, opened at the Kennedy Center in New York City in April. Locals were treated to the Lowcountry debut the following month. In the opera, composer Joseph Katz reaches back to local lore and his own childhood, telling a well-worn antebellum ghost story in an entirely new way. It’s the kind of approach that makes sense when you consider where Katz grew up: take a long look at something old and figure out how to keep its spirit alive, well into the future.

By Land: Litchfield Beach and Pawleys Island are part of a strip of land in Georgetown County known as the Waccamaw Neck, a narrow peninsula between the Waccamaw River and the Atlantic Ocean, just south of the Grand Strand.

Photographs (this page) courtesy of E. Stone “Stoney” Miller

Good Fellas: (from left) a SC federal judge, Fritz Hollings (former SC governor and U.S. senator), E. Stone Miller Sr., Billy Goldberg, and Jimmy Moore Sr. gather at the Litchfield Plantation House in 1958 to discuss opportunities for development of the area.

))) SEE MORE PHOTOS OF GREENVILLE’S “WHO’S WHO” BEHIND THE DEVELOPMENT OF LITCHFIELD TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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BEST Perrone’s TASTES 13302 OCEAN HWY, P.I./LITCHFIELD OF THE perronesmarket.com WACCAMAW NECK

The restaurant and tapas bar is popular for its meltin-your mouth meats and vegetables cooked sous vide, in airtight pouches submerged in hot water for as long as 72 hours. Top it off with the chef’s choice of wine pairings.

Pawleys Island Tavern 10635 OCEAN HWY, PAWLEYS ISLAND

pawleysislandtavern.com

Also known as “The PIT,” it’s an ultra-casual beach shack. Ceilings, walls, and even support beams are papered with one-dollar bills stapled by patrons over the years. Expect steak, shrimp, pizza, beer, and live music four nights a week.

Friends & Family: Pawleys Island has long been a Carolina coastal destination, largely free of big commerce and retaining a timeless feel. Greenville's prominent Hipp family (below left) are among several Upstate locals who've made Pawleys a special summer place; (above left) friends enjoy beach time circa 1915; (below right) the famous Tip Top Inn in 1950, which Hurricane Hugo unfortunately destroyed in 1989; (right) two women take in the view, circa 1958.

T

his is how you do Pawleys Island. Or, here’s how Greenville’s Hipp family has done it for three generations over 65 years. Stock up on groceries before you take the causeway onto the island. Consider this a luxury, because for many years there weren’t any grocery stores within three or four miles. Should you turn on the air conditioning at the house, pause and know that this, too, was a late arrival among Pawleys Island amenities. As late as the 1990s, most folks had only wind, water, shade, or drinks to cool them off, and they liked that just fine. The Hipps were (and still are) happy to bask in all of the above. Hayne and Anna Kate Hipp bought their home, Newcastle, in 1982, staying at the Tip Top Inn before that. They took their children Mary, Reid, and Tres for the same three-week stint each summer, forming a tribe of sorts with other upland families who arrived at the same time. Phone numbers were just five digits, but they weren’t really needed anyway. “There were no street addresses,” says Mary, the oldest of the children. “We didn’t even know what the road was named. We just knew a house

HOW TO BE HIPP ON PAWLEYS ISLAND

t MURRELL S INLE T MARSH WALK The Marsh Walk is a halfmile wooden boardwalk along a natural saltwater estuary. The waterfront dining is a must, and establishments have matching glassware so revelers can take drinks from one spot to another as they stroll. 4025 US 17, Business, Murrells Inlet. marshwalk.com

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Frank’s Restaurant & Bar 10434 OCEAN HWY, PAWLEYS ISLAND

franksandoutback.com

Known for its fine dining fare, Frank’s offers internationally inspired dishes and steaks in its elegant dining room; for a more casual feel, try Frank’s Outback, with similar cuisine served under the stars at its comfortable patio space.

Should you turn on the air conditioning at the house, pause and know that this, too, was a late arrival among Pawleys Island amenities. As late as the 1990s, most folks had only wind, water, shade, or drinks to cool them off, and they liked that just fine. linens into airy frocks for multifamily toga parties. It means paying homage to the generation before you with, as Anna Kate says, “the incredible taste of an icy vodka and tonic in a rocking chair at the end of the day.” It means prepare thyself for lunch. It’s a big to-do nearly every day on Newcastle’s screened porch. As many as 14 people sit around a spread of crab cakes, green beans, shrimp creole, fresh corn, peach cobbler, and more, and wine. Then, an epic nap. As you settle in, expect things to be different, yet somehow just the same. “I still followed my older sister Betty around, but it was to the Pavilion instead of the soda shop,” says Hayne. “My parents seemed more relaxed. I remember seeing them sitting on the porch with vodka tonics, which obviously was not an event in Greenville. I enjoyed holding my younger brother under the water in the ocean instead of the swimming pool at home: more dynamics.” For Mary, on the other hand, the island was so different that she considered settling there. “It’s my happy place,” she says, but a wise friend convinced her that was the very reason it needed to remain a retreat, not a full-time home. Still, the pull of Pawleys is strong, so visitors will find the Greenville home Mary built in 2015 undeniably beachy with its retractable window-walls that let breezes through, and a large yet intimate porch that looks suspiciously like the one at Newcastle, right down to the big dining table and color scheme. In other words, expect to leave the island, but don’t expect it to leave you. “Pawleys Island relationships are eternal,” says Tres Small, the youngest of the siblings. “Experiences with family and friends are unforgettable. Every single one of my friends who has been to Pawleys Island says it is one of the best places they have ever been to and that there is no way to put into words the time spent there.”

Photograph (the Hipp Family) courtesy of the Hipps; other photographs provided by the Georgetown County Digital Library; courtesy of Pawleys Island Civic Association

as t

t HOBCAW BARONY NATURE PRESERVE This 17,500-acre wildlife

refuge serves as a site for research, education,and conservation. Boat tours are available along with ecology programs through hikes at the beach, marsh, and forests. Both Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt stayed at the Hobcaw House. 22 Hobcaw Rd, Georgetown, SC. hobcawbarony.org

was Landcastle, or the Boyd’s house, or Tip Top Inn.” At age 18, Mary cast her first public vote on Pawleys. The local newspaper from that day in 1985 has a snapshot of Anna Kate and Mary leaving the chapel where they’d voted to incorporate—an effort to keep “the island of quaint beach homes and weathered bungalows out of the hands of high-rolling developers who might raise a forest of high-rise condominiums.” That’s how the paper put it. Anna Kate had visited Pawleys with her family annually since 1949, making a two-day pilgrimage from Arkadelphia, Arkansas. The ritual left such an impression that she sought her own home on the island as soon as the Hipps moved to South Carolina. Her mother, however, continued to stay at the Tip Top Inn until Hurricane Hugo brought it down in 1992: traditions matter at Pawleys. As traditions go, consider a game of “Spoons” to pass the time. Match card suits, pass your discards fast, and snatch a spoon before you’re left empty-handed. In Mary’s day, it was all quick hands, sharp elbows, and hysterical laughter. Inevitably, a conflict would ensue and the game would end abruptly; girls marched off in one direction, boys in another. For a while. Embrace the rituals. That means wearing matching patriotic T-shirts with your entire family on the Fourth of July. It means turning bed

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Shell Shock

Photograph courtesy of the Darling Oyster Bar

Catch a break with the Darling Oyster Bar’s bounty of the sea

Don’t Move a Mussel:

Appease your oyster appetite—fresh or fried—at this Charleston-based seafood haven.

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PIT

Stop

Coastal Gem Charleston’s Darling Oyster Bar elevates the experience of seafood classics / by M. Linda Lee

Frying Game: From shrimp and grits to the chef’s inventive take on clam chowder (in the style of poutine), the Darling Oyster Bar offers updated and refined takes on seaside favorites.

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Shell of a Good Time: Fresh oysters from both the West and East coasts are on offer, depending on the season. Enjoy them—and a view— at the restaurant’s 14-stool raw bar.

STANDOUT DISHES

Beyond the raw bar, these dishes light up the main menu:

Photography courtesy of the Darling Oyster Bar

Clam Chowder / Chef Joe DiMaio’s chowder is good on its own, but his take on poutine is a must-try. The clam chowder is studded with potatoes and bacon, making a luscious coating for French fries. Shrimp and Grits / The Darling does this Lowcountry staple one better by topping the dish with crispy fried Brussels sprouts leaves tossed with cubes of country ham. Creole Shrimp / Kicked up by zingy Creole mustard sauce and curling up to Anson Mills rice cakes, local shrimp will spark your taste buds for the main course.

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orget about the third time. The second time seems to be the charm for this handsome latenineteenth-century building on the corner of King and Morris streets in Charleston. Recently home to Union Provisions—which closed its doors less than a year after it opened—the space now buzzes as the Darling Oyster Bar. Opened in late February by Bobby Young and Ben Russell-Schlesinger, the same team behind Union Provisions, the Darling dove into the upper King dining scene with fresh seafood and Southern charm. The space has been reimagined with seafoam-green bar stools and banquettes, and seashells and fingers of coral nestling among books in the back-wall nooks. It all nets a retro-nautical ambience—a nod to the restaurant’s name, which pays homage to a circa-1900s Charlestonbased shrimp trawler that the owners came across while researching concepts for the restaurant. “We were going for a comfortable neighborhood oyster bar feel,” says operating partner Bobby Young. “We’ve always enjoyed oyster bars, and thought it would fit this location.” The menu, conceived by Charleston restaurant consultant (and former chef at the Sanctuary on Kiawah Island) Nathan Thurston and Executive Chef Joe DiMaio, leans on Southern tradition but with a side of fun. “Joe loves to make people happy with his food,” Young notes. Take the “clam chowder” for example. This is the heading on the menu, but look under the description for the option: “Served over house fries.” By all means, go for this version, which is Chef Joe’s take on poutine. The favorite Quebecois dish, a plate of French fries napped with cheese curds and brown gravy, is whimsically interpreted here with creamy clam chowder standing in for the gravy, and scant bits of goat cheese replacing the curds. The best seats in this casual seafood house are the 14 stools surrounding the U-shaped marble raw bar facing the front window. Here, chefs shuck and plate the day’s selection of oysters, sourced from the East and West coasts, depending on the season. They’re priced by the piece; order a dozen and you can sample two of each from as close as the Ace Basin of South Carolina and as far afield as the James River in Virginia and Puget Sound in Washington. They marry perfectly with the accompanying Champagne vinegar mignonette. From the playful food and friendly staff to the electric energy in the dining room, the Darling is making a big splash in Charleston. No take-three necessary. The Darling Oyster Bar 513 King St, Charleston (843) 641-0821, thedarling.com

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KITCHEN

Aid

If there’s a care in your world, hushpuppies can cure it. All fried food has the magical ability to dim the lights on ordinary troubles for a bit, but hushpuppies have something more.

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he hushpuppy has no lack of fantastic origin stories, including tales about nuns, Civil War soldiers, and a pack of howling dogs. The true birth of hushpuppies, however, is more humble. It can be traced to a small town in South Carolina at the turn of the twentieth century, where a cook named Romeo Govan—famous for his fish-frys—first dropped balls of cornmeal batter into hot lard. He christened the result “red horse bread” after the local fish species he served it with. Word of the crispy, cornmeal balls spread rapidly across the state, and soon, red horse bread became a standard accompaniment to fried fish and barbecue across the South. I was not thinking about history when a waitress plopped a basket of hot hushpuppies in front of me early this summer. I had arrived at the coast for vacation just as a tropical storm did too, and the driving rain sent us into the comforting arms of a local fish-fry shack. Rain hammered on the tin roof and the beach forecast looked dismal, but tbe hushpuppies were perfectly crisp on the outside, faintly sweet on the inside. If there’s a care in your world, hushpuppies can cure it. All fried food has the magical ability to dim the lights on ordinary troubles for a bit, but hushpuppies have something more: a soft, cornbread interior that reassures as it recalls cast-iron skillets, Southern tradition, and home.

HUSHPUPPIES WITH SORGHUM BUTTER Yield: 25–30 hushpuppies INGREDIENTS

Carolina Gold Crisp-fried hushpuppies are a Southerner’s favorite / by Kathryn Davé

// photograph by Jivan Davé

1 ½ c. good-quality yellow cornmeal 1 ½ c. all-purpose flour 2 Tbs. baking powder 2 Tbs. sugar 1 Tbs. baking soda 2 tsp. kosher salt ¾ tsp. cayenne 1 ¼ c. buttermilk 2 med. yellow onions, grated 2 eggs Canola oil, for frying 8 Tbs. butter 2 oz. sorghum Sea salt

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Whisk together all dry ingredients in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, stir together buttermilk, eggs, and the grated onions with their juices. Pour over the dry ingredients, mix until just combined, and let the batter rest for about 30 minutes. 2. Meanwhile, using a mixer, whip 8 Tbs. butter until smooth and fluffy. While continuing to whip, slowly drizzle in sorghum and a pinch of sea salt. Transfer to a small serving bowl and set aside. 3. Heat 2 inches of canola oil in a cast-iron Dutch oven over med-high heat until the oil reaches 350°. You will need a deep-fry thermometer to periodically check the oil’s temperature. Make sure to keep the temperature consistent; if it’s too hot, the hushpuppies will burn: too cool, the hushpuppies will be greasy. 4. Using a tablespoon, carefully slide rounded balls of batter into the hot oil. Do not crowd the pan. Fry, stirring to flip once, until crisp and golden for about 3–4 minutes. Remove from oil and drain on paper towels. Serve immediately with the sorghum butter.

))) FOR MORE RECIPES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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SWEET

Spot

Split Seconds The classic banana split gets a sophisticated makeover / by Kathryn Davé

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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ou’d be hard-pressed to find a better symbol of blissful indulgence than a banana split. The classic ice cream treat is an American icon—and a staple of childhood—but it’s not a dessert adults enjoy often. This summer, however, is your chance to change that. As it stands, the sundae offers a near perfect balance of flavors, but with a few grown-up tweaks, the banana split might become the most sublime dessert you serve all season.

Start where the banana split’s inventor, a young pharmacist named David Strickler, began: the ice cream. His 1904 creation combined single scoops of vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry flavors, but yours will be improved with a little restraint. Limit your base to a quality vanilla ice cream in order to allow the toppings to do the real grooving. A pint of Jeni’s vanilla is a sure delight, but for big dinner parties or tighter budgets, Breyer’s Natural Vanilla does the job quite handily. Consider the banana. Fresh is just fine, as evidenced by banana-split fans across the decades; however, caramelizing the split fruit under the broiler for a few minutes will bring out complex flavor and beautiful color. Your real chance to improve on a classic comes with the toppings: swap crushed pineapple for pineapple compote, maraschino for bourbonsoaked cherries, peanuts for pistachios, and Hershey’s for handcrafted chocolate sauce. Finish with a sprinkle of fancy salt and slide a spoon in to taste. The ingredients may have grown up, graduated, had a heartbreak or two, and come out for the better—but the taste of a banana split is still 100 percent unbridled, childlike bliss.

PINEAPPLE COMPOTE INGREDIENTS

1 c. cubed pineapple 4 Tbs. sugar Juice of 1 grapefruit Juice of ½ lemon 3.5 oz. water

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Heat sugar until it begins to liquefy in a sauté pan over medium heat. Quickly add pineapple and sauté while stirring until caramelized, about 8–10 minutes. Be careful that it doesn’t burn. 2. When the pineapple is golden brown, add the grapefruit juice, lemon juice, and water and simmer until the liquid is reduced by half. 3. Remove from heat and allow to cool before storing in refrigerator or serving.

Matured Taste: This grown-up version of a classic banana split will leave your taste buds happily satisfied, from the crunch of pistachios to the flavorful pineapple compote and a dash of salt to balance and amplify the sweetness.

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

AMERICAN AMERICAN GROCERY

American Grocery offers refined American cuisine and a changing menu that emphasizes quality ingredients from local and regional producers. Begin with the charred octopus with gigande beans, grilled spring vidalia onions, flatbread, romesco, salsa verde, and toasted almonds; next, have an entrée of salt-crusted grassfed ribeye with pomme purée, onion soubise, and red wine jus, and finish with pastry chef Ben Snyder’s s’mores torte. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 732 S Main St. (864) 232-7665, americangr.com AUGUSTA GRILL

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek-stuffed chicken breast. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s flavor profiles extend to cocktails, which heavily feature whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com BRAZWELLS PUB

Channeling the fun-loving legacy of the original Billy “Braz” Brazwell, this pub is an optimal pick for your next food memory. Brazwells steps up game day with an appetizer of thinly sliced, sesameencrusted tuna seared to perfection— along with crowd favorites like spicy buffalo wings (available by the pound) and, of course, a mile-long list of burgers.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

$$, L, D. 631 S. Main St. (864) 568-5053, brazwellspub.com

The Trappe Door Tucked away beneath Barley’s Taproom & Pizzeria on West Washington Street, a rathskellar vibe infuses this underground tavern with a rustic and intimate energy. The Europeaninspired restaurant and drinkery features Belgian specialties including waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew) and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer) alongside other European chef d’oeuvres, such as steak frites and a Flemish twist on French onion soup. Perhaps the restaurant’s most impressive attribute is its formidable beer program, with more than 10 on tap and exceeding 150, mostly Belgian-style, bottles. If you’re hankering for seafood, you won’t be disappointed (though possibly stumped by indecision) with the six possible flavors seasoning the classic moules frites, ranging from the traditional marinière to the more exotic Vietnamese, which lends a sensational spicy kick. Upon reaching the conclusion of your dining experience très européen, be sure to save room for dessert—warm and crispy Belgian waffles topped with vanilla ice cream, powdered sugar, and fresh fruit—for your after-dark sweets craving. —Olivia McCall $$, L, D. Closed Monday. 23 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 451-7490, trappedoor.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sunday Brunch = SBR J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 9 3

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DINING

Guide

BREAKWATER RESTAURANT

A hotspot serving drool-inducing food (pan-seared scallops with butternut squash risotto) and creative drinks, Breakwater’s candy-apple-red accents (the bar, dining room chairs, and wall decor) meld with mirrors and glass to produce a unique New York City-meets-Lowcountry vibe. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 802 S Main St. (864) 271-0046, breakwatersc.com HALLS CHOPHOUSE

REAL HEALTHCARE for REAL PEOPLE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

NO DRUGS • NO SURGERY • JUST RESULTS! Come visit Dr. Mary Frances Duncan at 922 North Church St., Greenville 29601 (864) 501-2360

$, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio, and polish off your meal with a selection from the extensive wine list.

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Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven.

1/14/16

$$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, 2:13larkinsontheriver.com PM NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and craft cocktails complement an ambitious menu of “urban comfort food.” Look for an elevated gastropub experience at every meal, from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood hangout, in one.

Where Atlanta Comes to Play!

$-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 3737300, thenosedive.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides; the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and the way God intended. $, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com RESTAURANT 17

Surrounded by the lush Smoky Mountains, speciality shopping, delicious dining venues, romantic vineyards, and many rustic lodging options! Come walk

under the swaying trees of Downtown, breathe in the fresh mountain air and learn about the culture of our unique mountain community.

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Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with the Blue Ridge foothills. Pick up freshbaked bread from the café (open daily) or peruse the market’s wine selection. The menu changes daily, but expect expertly prepared dishes like line-caught rainbow trout and pork crepinettes. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1715, restaurant17.com

RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The

day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the fried lobster bites with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or post-Peace Center performance. Ideal for group dinners or quiet date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 5463535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beerbutt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. Sides vary from mac ’n’ cheese to a bowl of greens. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE SHUCKIN’ SHACK

Sailing down the Eastern seaboard on a fresh beach breeze, the Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar has made its way to Greenville. Explore the heart of the sea with their signature oyster sampler, served raw, steamed, and chargrilled. If shellfish aren’t your thing, grab another quintessential coastal delight like the Shack’s lobster roll. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd, Ste 4. (864) 335-8975, theshuckinshack.com

BEER AND PUBS DIVE ‘N’ BOAR

A traditional dive-bar with an inventive menu, Dive ‘N’ Boar caters to barbecuelovers. This neighborhood gastropub has 25 different local beers on tap, specializing in house-infused liquors and locally-sourced cocktails. Stop by on the weekend for live music and a meal, or meet up with friends for drinks on their screened-in patio. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 2541 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 509-0388, divenboar.com LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from classic burgers and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 50 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Taproom, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the post-Drivebaseball crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With

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$-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St, (864) 239-0286 macsspeedshop.com THE PLAYWRIGHT

The Playwright’s hearty dishes—homemade lamb pot pie or a classic Reuben—are perfect soul-warming remedies. Designed to transport guests to Ireland, the pub features Dublin-crafted bar and booths, famous literary figures that adorn the walls and menus, and a warm spirit of hospitality. $$-$$$, L , D, SBR. 401 River St, Greenville. (864) 241-3384, theplaywrightpub.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer (or heckle mercilessly) with your friends? This hangout is walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub sits right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126, Greenville. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave, Greenville. (864) 242-2535, marybethsatmcbee.com MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday & Tuesday. 615 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try the lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crepe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.”

Sunday Brunch both locations 11 am - 2:30 pm GREAT Burgers, Crab Cakes, Shrimp & Grits, Cubans, Salads, Nachos, Cold Beer, Sunday Brunch, and More! Book your private party with us! Up to 75 people in Greenville • Up to 100 people in Mauldin • No rental fees on Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday

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$, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

Hours: Sunday Brunch 11 am till 2:30 pm; Tuesday–Saturday 11:30 am ‘til late; Closed Monday

TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

BREAKFAST/LUNCH THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café with an international flair serves curry and pasta, and for Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com THE GREEN ROOM

The Green Room’s changing menu features standout dishes for any time of day. Enjoy brunch on the weekend with eggs Benedict or stuffed French toast with raspberry cream cheese. For dinner, the sweet chipotle meatloaf is the ticket. Wash it down with selections from the tap and a premium Belgian/German leaning beer list. $$$, B, L, D, SBR. 116 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 335-8222, highstreethospitality.com/ the-green-room/

www.ChicoraAlley.com

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maple-peppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Suite T, Greenville. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CAFÉS

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COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info

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METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for Instagram. Tastemaker Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, housemade shrub sodas, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L, D. 101 N Main St, Ste D, Greenville. methodicalcoffee.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton St, the Village Grind is essential for Greenville coffee lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse uses all things local—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee. Enjoy drinks with friends on the mid-century couch or solo at the pallet-inspired window bar. $, B, L. 1263 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 915-8600, facebook.com/ thevillagegrind

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DINING

Guide

DELIS & SANDWICHES SOBY’S ON THE SIDE

Located around the corner from Carl’s Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast.

$$. B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St, Greenville. (864)-271-8431, sobysontheside.com SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh.

$, B, L, D (closed Sunday evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St, Greenville. (864) 509-6061, sullyssteamers.com TWO CHEFS DELI & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the daily menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 104 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 370-9336, twochefsdeli.com

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BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room.

$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), Closed Sundays. 1440 Pelham Rd, Ste M. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with choices that change daily. Try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, and dessert. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864) 241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net

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IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modern-American elements into his menu.

Contact us today and let us help you…live life!

$$, L (Closed Sat), D (Daily). 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more.

Drs. Michael and Kelsey Nelson

$$-$$$ L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com

16 Mills Ave. Suite 3, Greenville | 864.881.2242 | CarolinaActiveHealth.com

MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances

of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. For textural variation, try the broken rice platter: julienned pork, grilled pork chop, and steamed pork omelet over broken rice. $, L, D. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantsc.com PURPLE INTERNATIONAL BISTRO & SUSHI

A stone’s throw from Fluor Field, this sushi haven serves an Asian mix with Japanese, Korean, Thai, and Asian-fusion entrées. The udon with Prince Edward Island mussels, mahi-mahi with a spicy crawfish glaze, or roasted duck are worthy options. The latter, perfumed with star anise, is roasted to order—and well worth the wait. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 933 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-3255 YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

From the savory sweet curry of the chicken rendang to the fresh, updated take on shrimp lo mein, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soul-satisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp married together with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce, then topped with a fried egg. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. Greenville. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville favorite. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glace, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A, Greenville. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl, Greenville. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying mouthwatering French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy lighter dishes like the arugula salad, or go for the bistro burger with its caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), BR (Sat– Sun). 601 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 5090142, passerelleinthepark.com PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for

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baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration.

$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S. Pleasantburg Dr, #B, Greenville. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

FOOD TRUCKS ASADA

The vibrant Latin culture of San Francisco’s Mission District comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote relleno de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with sautéed shrimp in a creamy spicy ChipotleGuajillo sauce); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw.

$-$$, Closed Sunday & Monday; food truck schedule varies. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. See your average mac n’ cheese transformed when owner Nick Thomas stuffs this country comfort inside a mild poblano pepper. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $. Schedule varies. (404) 372-2266 CHUCK TRUCK

Like the paint splatters on the truck, the Chuck Truck’s burgers explode with intense flavors delivered by local ingredients. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a freshly ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewoodsmoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $. Schedule varies. (864) 884-3592, daveschucktruck.com J.B. TINGLE’S

J.B. Tingle’s “Farm to Fender” mantra puts local farms first. This food truck bases their weekly menu on the freshest ingredients available from surrounding Upstate farms. Next time, try the hurricane veggie-buttered panini: grilled Great Harvest white bread, melt-in-your-mouth havarti cheese, Thai basil aioli, and farm-fresh veggies. Or, if you can find JBT around brunch, grab the shindig

breakfast taco—the perfect companion to a mimosa. Follow JBT’s Twitter account for weekly schedules. $. Schedule varies. Twitter: @jb_tingles THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. With your tots, try a meatloaf sandwich: a thick slice of meatloaf topped with homemade pimiento cheese and served between two slices of grilled ciabatta bread. $. Schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

PIZZA

• Italian & International

• Choose your own recipes - pick your country

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com MELLOW MUSHROOM

Greenville’s West End outpost of this beloved pizza joint is perfect for families, parties, duos, or flying solo. Try the kosmic karma with sundried tomatoes, feta, and pesto, or the house special, stacked with three meats, veggies, and extra cheese.

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• Learn how to prep for a party

$

• Sautée techniques & more

p er p a

• Wine Tastings and meal pairings

• 5 Dishes, Saturdays from 11 am until 2 pm

BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

$-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 101, Greenville. (864) 233-9020, mellowmushroom.com/greenville

Cooking Training for Food Lovers rt ic ipa

nt

• Class can be at your home or in our studio

BOCCA

PURE ITALIAN RISTORANTE 2660 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville * BoccaPureItalian.com

Wine List • Nightly Chef Specials • Open Mon.-Sat. at 5pm

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SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located in a renovated tire shop on the main drag of Travelers Rest, and now at a new, second location near Cleveland Park, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pizzas made from local ingredients. Try a signature pie like the Tommy, with creamy roasted garlic sauce, mozzarella, pecorino romano, caramelized onions, mushrooms, spinach, and peppadew peppers. Don’t neglect dessert, either. The homemade ice cream (in a bowl, or in a float) is a throwback treat that’ll make you forget about those fellas named Ben and Jerry.

$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-1406; 99 Cleveland St, Greenville. (864) 5580235, sidewallpizza.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously. ))) FIND MORE RESTAURANTS TOWNCAROLINA.COM J U LY 2 0 1 6 / 9 7

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Scene JULY

3 SLATER-MARIETTA MOON BOOM

The perfect way to start the Fourth of July festivities! Due to last year’s high attendance, this year’s event has moved to a larger venue near Beechwood Farms, and more room means more great bands, tasty food vendors, regional crafts, and familyfriendly activities. South Carolina’s own East Coast Pyrotechnics will set off the evening with a brilliant firework display. 205 Bates Bridge Rd, Travelers Rest. Sun, 6pm. Free. mariettasmiles.org

WELLS FARGO RED, 4FESTIVAL WHITE AND BLUE Nothing says the Fourth of July like a few fireworks bursting through the warm summer sky. Sponsored locally and presented by AT&T, this display is one of the largest in the

Palmetto State. Even better—it’s free. The celebration will feature live music, a kids’ fun zone, and plenty of bites and brews provided by local vendors. Pick your spot in Falls Park and watch Greenville light up. Downtown Greenville. Mon, 5–10:30pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov/246/WellsFargo-Red-White-Blue-Festival

4

RED, WHITE AND BOOM!

Hot dogs? Check. Ice cream? Check. Fabulous fireworks? Double check. Looks like Spartanburg has everything covered at its annual Fourth of July soiree, which takes place in scenic Barnet Park. Live tunes will be provided by the Spartanburg Community Band as well as Nashville-based Love and Theft at the Zimmerli Amphitheatre, followed by a dazzling display courtesy of Zambelli Fireworks. Barnet Park, 248 E St John St, Spartanburg. Mon, 5-10pm. $5. (864) 562-4195, cityofspartanburg.org/redwhite-and-boom

Photograph (Biscuit Miller) courtesy of the SC Festival of Discovery

TOWN

DASH 5 SUPERHERO While it may be true that not all heroes wear capes, it’s safe to say that you’ll feel a lot cooler running

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26 Rushmore Dr., Greenville, SC 29615 864-268-8993

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS in one. Sponsored by Clayton King Ministries, the event encourages racers of all ages to don their best crime-fighting attire and make a run for it at Anderson University. Proceeds raised from the fun run will benefit the Calvary Home for Children in Anderson. Anderson University Athletic Campus, 431 Williamston Rd, Anderson. Tues, 6:30-8pm. $15; 12 & under free. claytonking.com/ superhero

Photograph (Biscuit Miller) courtesy of the SC Festival of Discovery

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SC FESTIVAL OF DISCOVERY

Since its inception in 2000, Greenwood’s Festival of Discovery has become a staple on the Upstate calendar, providing a unique way to experience the many great things we have to offer in a single weekend. Slated for this year is a hot-dogeating competition sponsored by Skins’, a local arts and crafts show, and a “Blues Cruise,” featuring performances by Biscuit Miller, Clam Chop Etheridge, Packrat’s Smokehouse, and many more. 120 Main St, Greenwood. Thurs– Sun. Free. uptowngreenwood. com/events/sc-festival-ofdiscovery

SC FESTIVAL OF DISCOVERY Thurs–Sun, July 7–10 120 Main St, Greenwood Musician Biscuit Miller, 2012 Blues Music Award WinnerBassist of the Year, will be in good company alongside other blues artists at the SC Festival of Discovery in Greenwood. This weekend-long experience showcases a sampling of the Upstate, with music, arts and crafts, food, and more.

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LONE BELLOW WITH 8 THE AOIFE O’DONOVAN

It might seem unusual for a band formed in Brooklyn to bring an earthy, folk vibe to the table. But the story of The Lone Bellow isn’t your typical musical fodder—the idea for the band was conceived in the emotional journal entries of its founding member Zach Williams, who documented life after his wife’s horseback riding accident. Therefore, it seems only natural to join forces with O’Donovan, a poignant and affecting songwriter in her own right. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. $35-$50. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

WARRIOR 9 UPSTATE SOLUTION POKER RUN

DU SOLEIL 13–17 CIRQUE OVO

What these artists are able to do using only their bodies is extraordinary. Premiering in 2009, the OVO incarnation of the wildly popular Cirque du Soleil experience puts a magnifying glass on something we often pass by without a second glance: insects. Complete with dazzling visual effects, magnificent costuming, and the famous Cirque aerials, OVO makes a statement that it is a bug’s life, indeed. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed–Fri, 7:30pm; Sat, 4pm & 7:30pm; Sun, 1:30pm & 5pm. $25-$140. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph: OSA Images Costume: Liz Vandal © 2009 Cirque du Soleil

As we celebrate our independence in the month of July, it is equally as important to celebrate those who continue to help us fight for that freedom. Sponsored by the Bare Bones Biker Church, the run will begin at the Spartanburg Harley-Davidson and continue throughout the afternoon with riders drawing poker cards at each stop along the way. Cash will be awarded to the best, second best, and worst hands at the final location, and all cash will be given to the Upstate Warrior Solution organization for veterans and their families.

Spartanburg Harley-Davidson, 365 Sha Ln, Spartanburg. Sat, 10:30am–4:30pm. (864) 384-1495, upstatewarriorsolution.org

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15–17

A RIDE TO REMEMBER

This race is designed with the spirited cyclist in mind and will take riders on a journey across the state in support of the Alzheimer’s Association. The kickoff ride will cover 64 miles from Simpsonville to Newberry, followed by 89 miles to Orangeburg before concluding with a 99-mile trek all the way to coastal Charleston. All riders will work towards raising funds to meet this year’s goal of $330,000 in support of research programs and patient care. Simpsonville to Charleston. Fri–Sat. $50. (864) 699-0623

Q 15–24 AVENUE If Big Bird and the

gang tackled issues like sexuality and binge-drinking instead of what starts with the letter “A,” the world might be a different place. A recent college grad, Princeton struggles to find meaning in his new life. When he moves to an outer-outer neighborhood of the city, he meets a band of eccentric, oddball characters who turn the world he knows upside down. The award-winning puppet hit is one of Broadway’s longest-running shows and has spawned hit songs like “Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist,” “The Money Song,” and “The Internet Is for Porn.” Spartanburg Little Theatre, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787, spartanburglittletheatre.com

Photograph: OSA Images Costume: Liz Vandal © 2009 Cirque du Soleil

Generously sponsored by Rolling Green Village

TRAIL 5K 18 DOODLE Now in its third year, the Doodle

Trail 5k has been an integral part of promoting fitness and outdoors appreciation in the Pickens community. Taking place on a former railroad track that runs between Pickens and Easley, the newly paved track is ideal for cyclists, joggers, or stroller moms, and this race’s continued patronage will ensure recreational activity for decades to come. Doodle Trailhead, 409 E Cedar Rock St, Pickens. Mon, 7am. $25. go-greenevents.com/ Doodletrail5k

The

Andrews Sisters Musical

JULY 21-AUG 13 FOR TICKETS

864-233-6733 • centrestage.org Centre Stage, next to The Playwright Pub!

Livingston Taylor singer, songwriter, storyteller

“... he transforms love, joy and spirituality into something so tangible, that you can carry it home with you when the concert is over.”

Two Performances Sunday, August 7 10:30am Worship in the Sanctuary

— Jean Mudge, fan

11:30am Musical Brunch in the Fellowship Hall

Brunch performance $10 for adults, $5 for children.

Register at www.firstbaptistgreenville.com/livtaylor. Capacity is limited.

First Baptist

G r e e n v i ll e

847 Cleveland Street, Greenville, SC

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2016-2017 Season V L A D A K Y S S E L OV A A R TIS T I C D I R E C T OR

Join us for our Mainstage Productions and other community events in our 13th Season of "Classical Ballet in the Modern World"

Spring 2017: Celebrating International Month  

STORYTIME BALLET Quarterly Presentations at the Greenville County Library

HOLIDAY AT PEACE ARTISPHERE

WWW.INTERNATIONALBALLETSC.ORG FALL CHAMBER

An Intimate Evening of Music and Dance

THE NUTCRACKER the Holiday Classic with

MIXED BILL

Swan Lake,  Act III & Other Works

Sponsored by Graham & Greta Somerville

19–24

THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY The forecast for this musical by Jason Robert Brown calls for a 100 percent chance of crying. Based on the novel by Robert James Waller, the tale follows the story of Francesca, an unfulfilled housewife living in a small Iowa town. But when a young photographer arrives, she suddenly finds herself in the throes of a forbidden affair, forcing

TOUR 20 MY2K Long before Justin Bieber had

anything to be sorry for and Harry Styles’ man bun was a household name, these pop sensations were setting tween hearts aflutter across the globe. Relive the glory days with the hottest groups from an age preBritney breakdown, including Ryan Cabrera, O-Town, 98 Degrees, and Dream. Hopefully, you still have a few butterfly hair clips and a pair of bedazzled jeans lying around. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Downtown. Wed, 7:30pm. $32.50-$78. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

21–Aug 13

APRIL 21-22 Gunter Theatre

SISTERS OF SWING

Who would have ever thought that

THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY July 19–24; Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm $25-$85. The Peace Center Experience the emotional whirlwind of chance encounters, desire, and expectation in this award-winning musical, based on the beloved novel by Robert James Waller.

DECEMBER 9-11 Peace Center Concert Hall

OCTOBER 29 Kroc Center

Ever used the terms “dramatic” and “attention-seeking” to describe your child? It may be time to take a serious look into this summer camp. Over five days of rigorous activities that will sharpen their vocal, dance, and acting prowess, your little rising star will have the opportunity to train with a handful of Broadway legends. The best part? You can check out the final product at the camp’s showcase for family and friends. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mon–Fri, 9am. $575. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

her to make a decision between the one she loves and the ones that she just can’t leave behind. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $25-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Experience dance in Greenville this season!

Images: Jerry Finley Photography (The Nutcracker: Karl Trump Photography)

18–22 CAMP BROADWAY

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

MAXWELL

three sisters from Minnesota would become a singing sensation and legendary icon in the music world? You may have heard their famous vocal stylings a la “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy” and “Rum and Coca Cola,” but you may not know the true story behind their ascension into the halls of superstardom. With equal parts drama, comedy, and song, Sisters of Swing is a can’t-miss summer production. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $15-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

MILE 23 EXTRA HUNGER RUN

It’s time to lace up those sneakers and give hunger in the Upstate a run for its money! Benefitting the local Harvest Hope Food Bank, the event includes a 5K run as well as a one-mile family-fun walk for the less jogging inclined. Get out, breathe some fresh air, and take in the scenery as you hoof your way through Furman University’s beautiful campus. Timmons Arena at Furman University, 900 Duncan Chapel Rd, Greenville. Sat, 7:30–10:30am. Free-$35. (864) 478-4083

25–30 PEACE CHAMBER

SUMMER WORKSHOP FOR STUDENTS

Whether your musical skill level ranks somewhere near Beethoven or closer to that Muppet who plays the drums, the Peace Center’s chamber workshops are here to help. Sessions will be coached by none other than some of Greenville’s most talented musicians, including Furman University professor Christopher Hutton and GSO’s own principal bassoonist Amy Yang Hazlett. Participants will show off their lessons at a special showcase presentation. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mon–Fri, 9:30am; Sat, 11am. $425. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Tues, July 26, 7:30pm $71-$325. The Peace Center

Privacy in Harrison Hills

For those seeking an evening of music and perhaps a tinge of nostalgia, the Peace Center has you covered. Singer-songwriter Maxwell broke into the world of soul music back in 1996, and he’ll bring hits old and new.

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MAXWELL

If you’re going to make the choice to be a one-named artist, you’d better have the chops to back it up. Fortunately, Maxwell has that down in spades, crafting a musical career that has spanned some two decades. With the recent release of his new album, blackSUMMERS’night—his first since 2009—the soul musician has plenty to celebrate, and the evening is set to sizzle with a mix of throwback jams and new hits. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. $71-$325. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

279 Ridge Way, Simpsonville • $608,000 A must see as words are not enough to describe its value! This 4,200+ sq. ft. custom designed home has 4 bedrooms, 3 baths on approximately 8 acres. The long, private drive leads to a spacious courtyard with 3 car garage. Upon entering the large foyer, you will be awed when you experience the dramatic great room with vaulted wood ceiling and large welcoming fireplace. Newly renovated all bathrooms and kitchen, with all the bells and whistles. A large keeping room or additional eating area is part of the kitchen setting. Off of this room is a wonderful screened in porch that overlooks landscaped grounds, a grilling deck, and fire pit. First floor master bedroom is 25 feet by 16.6 feet! The master bath has dual vanities, separate shower, soaking tub and ample closets. The first floor has another guest bedroom, full bath, and a media room. Upstairs are two bedrooms and a full bath with a large walk in attic storage.

Call today to make an appointment to see this beautiful home and make it your own!

864.430.6602 www.ValerieJSMiller.com Award Winning Agent 2007-2015 | Signature Team of the Year 2015

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ALLMAN 27 GREGG Truth be told, you can’t think

of rock n’ roll without thinking of the Allman Brothers Band. Founded by Gregg and brother Duane, the musicians set a precedent for future generations of Southern rockers, paving the way for bands like Gov’t Mule and others to take the national stage. Though currently touring with new accompaniment, Allman proves that even time itself can’t dull the shine of good rock. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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THE WOOD BROTHERS Thurs, July 28, 8pm $25-$50. TD Stage at the Peace Center Live music in downtown Greenville on a summer night will not disappoint. Take a seat in the grass at the Peace Center’s amphitheatre or splurge on the VIP experience at Genevieve’s Theater Lounge— either way, be ready to enjoy an evening of soulful folk music.

Works, better known simply as GLOW, debuts this summer’s festival season with one of the world’s most familiar tales of star-crossed love—this time with a distinct GLOW spin. The French opera based on Shakespeare’s original play will spotlight the company’s chamber orchestra and also vocal talents from the Upstate and beyond, not to mention stunning visuals that coincide with the romance, conflict, and ultimate tragedy of this timeless piece. McAlister Auditorium at Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Wed, 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $35$85. (800) 745-3000, glowlyric.com

WOOD BROTHERS 28 THE As part of the Peace Center’s “Rock the River” summer concert series, this trio of artfully-blended folk-funk musicians stand at the ready to help you get down. Their debut album Ways Not to Lose was

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

ET JULIETTE 27 & 31 ROMEO Greenville Light Opera

Inspired Confidence Immerse yourself in a sophisticated interior crafted to anticipate your needs and desires.

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2448 Laurens Rd • 864-297-4529 • BradshawInfiniti.com 6/20/16 3:15 PM


useful if they could pour a decent cup of coffee. Such is the challenge presented to three women facing sexism in the office, marriage infidelity, and other growing pains on the homefront. With revenge to men on their minds, the ladies form an unbreakable friendship as well as a plot—and that’s where the fun really starts. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2 & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $15-$40. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

lauded by industry critics across the board, and last October’s Paradise is a standard in collaborative songwriting and fine-tuned harmony for the band. However, the Wood Brothers’ magic is best experienced live, and what better place than down by the river? TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Downtown. Thurs, 8pm. $25-$50. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

28–Aug 4

BIG LEAGUE BASEBALL WORLD SERIES 2016

29–30

Baseball may be America’s pastime, but this yearly tournament in Easley attracts teams from Mexico to New York and Taiwan to Taylors. Throughout a week of tournaments, rival teams will play against one another in bracket-style play, with the final champions taking home the title on Tuesday. It’s the perfect opportunity to take in some upcoming talent—and a few ’dogs. J.B. Owens Recreation Center, 111 Walkers Way, Easley. Times vary. Free-$30. bigleagueworldseries.com

WEST SIDE STORY

In a twentieth-century update of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, GLOW Lyric Theatre’s summer season continues with a work by two classics in the world of stage: Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim. When two teens from rival sides of the block fall for each other, their dueling friends intervene to curtail the romance, with dire consequences. New to the GLOW family is soprano Katherine Sandoval, who will make her debut as the female lead, Maria. McAlister Auditorium at Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2 & 8pm. $35-$85. (800) 745-3000, glowlyric.com

28–Aug 5

DOLLY PARTON’S 9 TO 5 These days, women have sat at the helm of some of the globe’s most successful companies like IBM and Yahoo. But back in the ’70s, females in the workplace were only considered

The QX80 Limited adds an even higher level of craftsmanship to the Infiniti QX80’s undeniable presence. Welcome lighting under stainless steel side steps, unique exterior badge, darkened chrome trim, and a dark-chrome finish on substantial 22-inch wheels all translate into refined ruggedness. Travel in the QX80 and savor comfort that could only come from dedication to each individual.

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Estates

1209 Mountain Summit Rd., Travelers Rest

Homes as distinguished as our readers.

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Wanda Reed (864) 270-4078 wandareedpartners.com

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Laura Burgess (864) 436-2226 cdanjoyner.com/agents/greenville-sc-real-estate-l-burgess/

107 Greenedge Lane, Greenville

100 Woodbine Rd., Lake Greenwood

21 Chestnut Ridge Rd., Greenville

Conservus Realty Kendall Bateman (864) 320-2414 conservusrealty.com

Marchant Company Valerie Miller (864) 430-6602 valeriejsmiller.com

3BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1317134 · $1,259,900

4BR, 5BA, 3Hf BA · MLS#1319855 · $2,725,000

4BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1304750 · $998,000

200 Saxum Way, Greenville

5 Mitchell Spring Ct., Simpsonville

Wilson Associates Nick Carlson (864) 386-7704 wilsonassociates.net

Wilson Associates Barb Turner (864) 901-7389 wilsonassociates.net

3BR, 2BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1320347 · $815,000

4BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1322782 · $785,000

2 Cromwell Ave., Greenville

338 N. Glassy Mtn Rd., Landrum

5BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323932 · $739,000 Wilson Associates Blair Miller (864) 430-7708 wilsonassociates.net

3BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1321489 · $725,000 ARG Realty Group, LLC JoAnn Roser (864) 237-3424 argrealtygroup.com

213 Weatherby Dr., Greenville

4BR, 4BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1322047 · $1,300,000

6BR, 5BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323161 · $965,000 Coldwell Banker CAINE Jane McCutcheon (864) 787-0007 cbcaine.com/Agents/JaneMcCutcheon

312 Chamblee Blvd., Greenville

4BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1320439 · $759,900

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Melissa Morrell (864) 918-1734 www.GreenvilleAgent247.com

305 Breton Dr., Greer

4BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323256 · $589,900

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Granville & Granville (202) 740-1356 www.cdanjoyner.com

TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Annie Langston at 864.679.1224 or alangston@communityjournals.com TOWNEstatespage.indd TOWN_blank July16.indd4 All Pages

6/17/16 10:55 AM


0

11 Toy St., Greenville

5BR, 5BA · MLS#1320653 · $525,000

s/

Coldwell Banker CAINE Cynthia Serra (864) 304-3372 cbcaine.com

le

12 Shadwell Street, Greenville

RS®

3BR, 2 BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1311554 · $519,000 Conservus Realty Debra Owensby (864) 608-4608 conservusrealty.com

10 Hollingsworth Dr., Greenville 3BR, 2BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323854 · $524,500 Coldwell Banker CAINE Jane McCutcheon (864) 787-0007 cbcaine.com/Agents/JaneMcCutcheon

6 Linfield Ct., Simpsonville

4BR, 3BA, 1 Hf BA · MLS#1321704 · $479,000 Coldwell Banker CAINE Virginia Abrams (864) 270-3329 www.cbcaine.com/agents/virginiaabrams

19 Avens Hill Dr., Greer

6BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1316632 · $522,000 Coldwell Banker CAINE Virginia Abrams (864) 270-3329 www.cbcaine.com/agents/virginiaabrams

414 Mount Vernon Rd., Greer

4BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323445 · $460,000

Fall Festival

OF HOUSE & GARDENS

Wilson Associates Susan Burch (864) 346-3864 wilsonassociates.net

Remnants

OF THE RICE CULTURE PHOTOGRAPHS OF DAVID SOLIDAY

OCTOBER 28, 29, & 30

OCTOBER 20 - MARCH 16

RS® Because Everything

RS®

HISTORIC BEAUFORT FOUNDATION

www.historicbeaufort.org | 843-379-3331 | info@historicbeaufort.org JULY 2016 / 107

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SECOND

Glance

Natural Touch

T

he creation is always more important than the creator. Between imitating established styles and inventing new techniques, sometimes an artist can forget the intention of his work. From his career’s inception, renowned plein air realist Horace Day espoused a different philosophy. Consistently emphasizing substance over style, Day modernized the Charleston Renaissance through his painted documentary of rural, post-WWII South Carolina. Day’s contemporary vision of classic Carolina landscapes employs expressive brush strokes and vibrant colors to create a refreshing perspective on Lowcountry subjects—a taste of originality in the world of the established. —Hayden Arrington The Greenville County Museum of Art will be showcasing Horace Day in South Carolina from now until July 10. For more information, please visit gcma.org.

Horace Day, Sanctified Baptist Church, 1953. Watercolor on paper; painting courtesy of the Greenville County Museum of Art

Horace Day’s energetic style offers an original take on Carolina landscapes

108 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN July 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com

TOWN July 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com