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ART, CULTURE, STYLE OF THE PROGRESSIVE SOUTH

THE PEOPLE ISSUE

W O N D E R B O Y UFC CHAMPION STEPHEN THOMPSON COACHES A NEW GENERATION

SEP TEMBER 2020 TOWNCAROLINA.COM


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and euphor

SEPTEMBER ��-��, ����

FOR THE LAST FOURTEEN YEARS,

WE’VE COME TOGETHER OVER SHARED EXPERIENCES. THIS YEAR WON’T BE ANY DIFFERENT.

Tickets on sale now // Lunch & Learns, Guest Chef Dinners & euphoria Classrooms

euphoriagreenville.com


���� SCHEDULE

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER �� TH

CHEF’S TABLE

venue:

The Cook’s Station

HOPPED UP

As we look ahead to the 15th year of euphoria presented by Lexus, we are thankful for each and every community partner and supporter who’s made our food, wine and music festival possible. We are incredibly proud of the impact we’ve had on Greenville’s hospitality & tourism industries, as well as its economic development and quality of life. This year, we are more determined than ever to stay focused on our mission: to shine a spotlight on Greenville’s thriving culinary and music arts scene, while also raising money to give back to the community.

We are a community event, and our community needs us now more than ever.

venue:

The Whale

time:

time:

2:30pm

11:45-4:30pm price:

price:

$45

$40

GIN JOINT in partnership with AC Hotels

venue:

Oak & Honey

time:

2:30pm

price:

PALATABLE REACTIONS

venue:

Urban Wren Winery

time:

4pm

$45

price:

$50

GOOD ROOTS:

AN ORGANIC, PLANT-BASED DINNER Topsoil Kitchen & Market time: 6:30pm

venue:

GOOD FOR THE SOUL

venue:

Oak Hill Café

time:

6:30pm

price:

price:

$155

$155

SEEING STARS: A MICHELIN-STARRED DINNER

venue:

Soby’s New South Cuisine

LAISSEZ-FAIRE

venue:

Stella’s Southern Brasserie

time:

6:30pm

time:

7pm

price:

price:

$400

$155

FEEDING THE FOLK

venue: Southern Culture Kitchen & Bar time: 7pm price: $115

DINNER ON THE ILLINOIS LOUISIANA LINE

venue:

The Loft at Soby’s

time:

7pm

price:

$155

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER �� TH

ROSÉ & GRAZE

venue:

Restaurant 17

time:

12pm

Fork & Plough

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER �� TH

$70

RIGHT ON ‘CUE

venue:

VITTLES & VINO

venue:

price:

time:

7pm

price:

Avenue

time:

7pm

price:

$255

LOOKING SHARP

Wine House

time:

12pm

CRUS CRAVINGS

venue:

Urban Wren Winery

price:

time:

4pm

STARS OF GREENVILLE

venue:

Restaurant 17

time:

6:30pm

THE STARS ALIGN

venue:

Jianna

time:

7pm

price:

The Cook’s Station

SUNDAY SUPPER

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER �� TH venue:

price:

$275

price:

$40

Suites

time: 1pm

& 3pm

price:

$40

in partnership with Certified SC

venue: The Barn at Sitton Hill Farm time: 5:30pm price: $185

$70 price:

12pm

venue: Residence Inn/SpringHill time: 2:30pm price: $45 venue:

BIRDS & BUBBLES

time:

HOT MESS in partnership with AC Hotels

$155

INDULGING IN THE NARRATIVE

venue:

Larkin’s Sawmill

$50

$155

The health and safety of our guests and participants is our number one priority, therefore we will be bringing people together to eat, sip, listen and learn in smaller groups this year. This allows us to provide an authentic euphoria experience, while still following, and even exceeding, all recommended protocols and procedures. euphoria is a registered 501(c)(3)


First Glance

Photograph courtesy of Louisville Tourism

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Contents

SEPTEMBER 2020

74 BEYOND THE BELT

Considered one of the UFC’s foremost strikers, Stephen Thompson packs more than a one-two punch. His humility and leadership shine at Upstate Karate, where he teaches kids the essence of character. by carolyn adams

“I learn more about myself in a loss. And I think these kids, these parents, use that as well when things don’t go their way. And to me that is what it is all about.”

Cover: Mixed martial arts champion Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson; for more, see page 74; photograph by Paul Mehaffey Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Drive further. Ride higher. Live better. From a tight corner of the city, to a tight corner of a back road, the GLA is agile and easy to maneuver. Turbo power and a solid stance make it quick on its feet, confident in your hands. The 2021 GLA 250 SUV

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Base MSRP excludes transportation and handling charges, destination charges, taxes, title, regitration, preparation and documentary fees, tags, labor and installation charges, insurance, and optional equipment, products, packages and accessories. Options, model availability and acutal dealer price may vary. See dealer for details, costs and terms.


SACRED SPACE At OYÉ Studios, a renovated church building becomes home and haven for local artists. by charlotte ward

LIFE CHANGER Business coach and author Sallie Holder wants to free you from “rock middle.” by jac valitchka

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ESCAPE

SPORT

STYLE

EAT + DRINK

A diverse group of creators sets up shop in an old church; Sallie Holder helps women see success; Dr. Brian Chad Starks works to dismantle systems of oppression.

We know—it’s odd for Derby Day to be in September, but make the most of Kentucky’s bounteous fall charm with an exploration of the Bourbon Trail.

Celebrating its 125th anniversary, the Greenville Country Club has journeyed far from its humble beginnings on Piney Mountain.

Embrace bright, handcrafted earrings and bracelets from Wild Ice Jewelry; ME Speak Design’s minimalist housewares are excellent additions to your autumnal table.

Nikki Evangelista’s Takam dinner popup takes the (ube) cake; savor new sips at Poe West’s Unlocked Coffee Roasters; fall aromas abound in this apple spice dessert.

S E P TE M B E R 2 0 2 0 I t o w n c a r o l i n a . c o m

Photograph by Will Crooks

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12 EDITOR’S LETTER 19 THE LIST 25 WEDDINGS 64 MAN ABOUT TOWN 68 MS. BEA WRIGHT 88 DINING GUIDE 94 TOWN SCENE 100 SECOND GLANCE

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Artwork courtesy of Rey Alfonso

Contents


OF THE WES T EN D 103-A Augusta St. Greenville, SC (864) 239-0788

Shop Online monkeesofthewestend.com Shop Instagram @monkeesofthewestend


Editor’s Letter

Photograph by Blair Knobel

Though the future compels us, we allow the past to hold us.

THE TRANSFORMERS

C

hampion UFC fighter Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson has spent more than half his life in the ring, following the moves of his celebrated father, Ray Thompson. Unlike rugby or football, where getting hurt is a probable, though indirect, part of the game, mixed martial arts demands it. It’s also a battle of wits: psychology, as Thompson sees it, is paramount to winning. Training isn’t only physical. Success is, first and foremost, a mindset. It is envisioning the goal and settling for nothing less. The key to transformation is the willingness to step into the ring, to a place where we anticipate the punches, even potential defeat. But to elevate our game, we must face what scares us. Transformation requires us to be uncomfortable. It demands vulnerability. We cannot be our best without a clear look at our present—what is working for us, what is holding us back. As author and entrepreneur Sallie Holder reminds us, we stand in the way of our best self and allow limiting thoughts to keep us in “rock middle”—a comfortable, but disappointing, place. Though the future compels us, we allow the past to hold us.

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Holder herself experienced an awakening, a call to take a long look in the mirror. She felt unhappy and unfulfilled, and she knew that living this way would eventually suffocate her. Feeling a pull to business coaching, she decided to transform her own life, seek guidance, and push herself to a career passion of helping women unlock their potential. Like Holder, Dr. Brian Chad Starks leads others to a higher plane by challenging racial barriers, bias, and negative perceptions. His goal? To transform systemic oppression through diversity training. His ring? Companies striving to be informed and more inclusive. This work will feel disconcerting at times, and certainly challenging. Yet transformation is not a one-way experience. To help others change their lives usually means that the teacher has also been dealt the blows—and yet, like Thompson, Holder, and Starks, still willingly steps into the ring. Blair Knobel, Editor in Chief blair@towncarolina.com


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Jasper Johns (born 1930) Flags 1, 1973 Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

GCMA-20-08-JJohns WTW Ad TOWN 2Pg 20X12 Aug7.indd 1


WORTH THE WAIT. Jasper Johns (born 1930) is the world’s most critically acclaimed living artist. While his reputation is international, Johns has deep roots in South Carolina. He grew up in Allendale, the Columbia area, and Sumter, and he attended the University of South Carolina for three semesters before moving to New York to pursue his career in art. The GCMA collection of works by Jasper Johns began with several gifts from the artist when the Museum opened in 1974. Today, the GCMA collection is one of the ten largest institutional collections of his work in the world.

Corporate Partner

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Temporarily closed for construction

8/7/20 4:25 PM


Mark B. Johnston

PUBLISHER mark@communit yjournals.com

Blair Knobel

EDITOR IN CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

ymcagreenville.org

Paul Mehaffey

ART DIRECTOR

Abby Moore Keith

MANAGING EDITOR

Laura Linen

STYLE EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka Ashley Warlick

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Carolyn Adams, Ronnie Musselwhite, Melissa Reardon, Charlotte Ward & Susan Zurenda CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS, ILLUSTRATORS & DESIGNERS

Robin Batina-Lewis, Will Crooks, Jivan Davé & Eli Warren Andrew Huang

EDITOR AT LARGE

Kathryn Norungolo

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Hardin

VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Kristy Adair, Michael Allen & Kim Collier Donna Johnston

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES

Sangeeta Hardy, Mary Hill & Heather Propp Meredith Rice

SALES OPERATIONS MANAGER CLIENT SERVICE MANAGERS

Lizzie Campbell & Georgia Gay Kristi Fortner

ACCOUNTING & HUMAN RESOURCES

FOR A LIMITED TIME:

Join the Y with

Sue Priester

CONSULTING MEMBER

Susan Schwartzkopf

GENERAL MANAGER

Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

#REDISCOVERY TOWN Magazine (Vol. 10, No. 9) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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THE LIST THE MONTH’S MUST-DOS

EUPHORIA Though it won’t have its large signature events this year, the good news is that Euphoria will go forward with more intimate ones: lunches, classes, and wine dinners starring guest chefs and vintners— including the wildly popular Sunday Supper. Tickets are limited, so grab yours soon. Various locations in Greenville. Thurs– Sun, Sept 17–20, times vary. Tickets range from $40-$400. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com Editor’s Note: Some events may have been canceled since our press deadline.

Photograph courtesy of Euphoria

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BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF KWAME BRATHWAITE An iconic figure of the second Harlem Renaissance, Kwame Brathwaite coalesced his compelling portraiture with the Black Is Beautiful campaign in the 1950s and ’60s. Braithwaite and his brother founded the African Jazz Arts Society and Studios, and also Grandassa Models, whose members Kwame captured in a series of “Naturally” fashion shows. The Black Is Beautiful exhibit, organized by Aperture and Kwame S. Brathwaite, pays tribute to this creative collective and its work to shift a cultural narrative. Columbia Museum of Art, 151 Main St, Columbia. Thru Sept 6. Free with museum admission. (803) 799-2810, columbiamuseum.org

TD ESSENTIALS MARKET

INDIE CRAFT PARADE: SHOP EDITION

In its 18th year, the TD Saturday Market has changed its name and pared down its size to allow for social distancing and safe shopping. Many of the vendors alternate weeks, but rest assured you’ll have access to a bounty of local farm products including organic vegetables, grass-fed beef, and SC-caught seafood.

Rather than cancel the Indie Craft Parade this year, the Makers Collective is reimagining the event for 2020 as a hybrid of their popular annual fall festival and their holiday pop-up shop. The Indie Craft Parade Shop will be open weekends through December 20, so there’s plenty of time to find that perfect handmade gift by one of the 100 artists whose work will be featured. 2909 Old Buncombe Rd, Greenville. Sept 18–Dec 20. Fri–Sun, 11am–5pm. makerscollective.org/ indiecraftparade

Carolee Prince headpiece, 1968, photograph by Kwame Brathwaite

Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. Thru Oct 31. Sat, 8am– noon. saturdaymarketlive.com

Photograph courtesy of The Makers Collective

The List

hair makeup nails accessories men women children beards color and, more... 20

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a


NIGHT OUT: INTRO TO WHEEL TURNING If you’ve always wanted to take a spin on the potter’s wheel, this class at the Spartanburg Art Museum is your chance. Accomplished potter Christina Dixon will guide you through the fundamentals and help you create a piece of pottery or two to take home. Feel free to bring a friend, and be prepared to get your hands (and your clothes) dirty.

Photograph of ceramics by Darin Gehrke

Spartanburg Art Museum at the Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri, Sept 11, 7–9pm. $45. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

SPARTANBURG SOARING! INTERNATIONAL KITE FESTIVAL The next time someone tells you to “go fly a kite,” head to Spartanburg for this international festival that celebrates kites in all their colorful glory. Launched by the Chapman Cultural Center in 2014, Spartanburg Soaring! is just the thing to get the whole family out of the house. In addition to kites filling the sky, there will be live music, food trucks, an artisan makers market, and activities for the little ones. Barnet Park, 248 E St John St, Spartanburg. Sat, Sept 26, 11am–5pm. Free. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter. org/spartanburg-soaring

THURSDAYS ON THE PATIO The theater may be dark for now, but you can still support Centre Stage and its upcoming season by purchasing tickets to their new fundraising event, Thursdays on the Patio. Your ticket includes reserved seating on the theater’s outdoor patio, where you can listen to live music and nosh on the evening’s featured food, plus enjoy beer and wine. Owing to social distancing, tickets are limited, so don’t wait to order yours. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs, Sept 3, 7–9pm. $10–$30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org/ thursonthepatio

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. . ow w d i a s ll a y e h t d an Greenville’s Salon

WILSON’S ON WASHINGTON

794 E Washington Street | 864.235.3336 wilsonsonwashington.com | @wilsononwashingtonsc SEPT EM B ER 2020 I

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The List

Quick HITS GCCA ANNUAL SHOWCASE

z Arranged in the 2,000-square-foot Main Gallery of the Greenville Center for Creative Arts in the Village of West Greenville, this year’s Annual Showcase spotlights some of the best artwork of the year, including works from the 2020 Member Show, the 2019–2020 Brandon Fellows, and the Summer Art Camp Showcase. The Member Show highlights current GCCA artists, while the Brandon Fellows include Jaz Henderson, Julius Ferguson, and Nick Burns. Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St, Greenville. Thru Sept 25. Open during gallery hours. Free. (864) 735-3848, artcentergreenville.org

SERVICE FOR ALL

Photograph courtesy of The Beach Boys

z It was 60 years ago this month that Greenville’s public libraries were integrated. To honor the sit-ins and the determination of the city’s African-American community who helped open our libraries to all of the city’s citizens, the Hughes Main Library is sponsoring an expanded version of its exhibit Service for All. Come see the historical photographs first-hand, or visit virtually through December 31st. Hughes Main Library, 25 Heritage Green Pl, Greenville. Thru Oct 1. Open during library hours. Free. (864) 527-9258, greenvillelibrary.org/service-for-all

SOOIE MAULDIN BBQ COOK-OFF

z Featuring nearly two dozen pitmasters from around the Southeast, Mauldin’s 10th annual BBQ CookOff launches on Friday night with the Anything Butt competition that tantalizes taste buds with dishes other than barbecue. At the main event, the BBQ Cook-off, on Saturday, entries are evaluated by a panel of tasters from the SC Barbecue Association. Who has the best ’cue? You be the judge by casting your vote for the People’s Choice Award. Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 E Butler Rd, Mauldin. Sept 18–19. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 11am–3pm. Free. (864) 335-4862, mauldinculturalcenter.org

BEN RECTOR: THE OLD FRIENDS ACOUSTIC TOUR

z Fans of Emmy-nominated singer/songwriter Ben Rector will clamor for tickets to the Old Friends tour, a soulful acoustic recap of favorite songs from a catalog that includes seven studio albums. Rector, who started writing songs at 16, rocketed to the top 10 of the Billboard charts with his albums Brand New (2015) and Magic (2018). On his 2020 tour, Rector shares the stage with his special guest, Nashville-based singer/ songwriter Cody Fry. Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, Oct 16, 8pm. $25-$45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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The Beach Boys 2020 Classic-rock fans have been pickin’ up good vibrations from the California sound of the Beach Boys since the ’60s, and there’s no reason to stop now. So rev up your 409 and head over to the Peace Center, where you can catch the Rock and Roll Hall of Famers performing some of their most beloved songs. Count on having fun, fun, fun, even after Daddy takes the T-Bird away. Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mon, Sept 28, 7:30pm. $60-$90. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Photo by Chris Isham Photography

Photo by Mel Knocks Photography

Photo by Jessica Hunt Photography

Celebrate your love in a space you love! CEREMONIES | WEDDINGS | RECEPTIONS | COCKTAILS | BIRTHDAY PARTIES

BOOK A TOUR AND DATE TODAY! 864.679.9274 | specialevents@peacecenter.org LEARN MORE AT peacecenter.org/specialevents


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weddings C O U P L E S & C E L E B R AT I O N S

KAREN LOPEZ JORDAN & CARL SOBOCINSKI’S joyful celebration featured breathtaking views and exquisite food.

By Angela Zion Photography, with Emily Wilson

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Weddings

KAREN LOPEZ JORDAN & CARL SOBOCINSKI JULY 11, 2020

I

t’s tradition for Carl to have drinks with his friends on Christmas Eve— an event that would result in meeting his future wife. Nearly seven years ago, Karen was having lunch at Smoke on the Water with her mom. She was told to be festive and put on lipstick. It seems the festive vibes worked, because Carl sent over a glass of wine, which sparked the pair’s first conversation. About six months later, Karen’s sister, Olivia, proposed a Table 301 partnership to Carl for a well-known Greenville favorite, Southern Pressed Juicery. He agreed, along with a counter proposal to take Karen out on a date. Karen and Carl dated long-distance, but she ultimately found her way back to Greenville for good. The day of the marriage proposal found the pair at their lake house,

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set to have their usual sunset cruise after dinner. Their three girls— Bella, Lexie, and Camila—were all in on the surprise and sent the pair off on the boat alone. As Carl got down on one knee, Karen could see the girls spying from the shore. During the wedding at Pretty Place chapel, Carl’s children, Bella and Lexie, read passages, and Karen’s daughter, Camila, sang a song from The Greatest Showman. As a fitting touch for the founder of Table 301 and his lovely bride, their reception included a grand feast. Guests swooned over an Italianthemed smorgasbord and danced (socially distanced) into the evening with a band led by Shakira’s lead percussionist. Karen and Carl continue their work in Greenville, and look forward to raising their family as husband and wife. —Kathryn Norungolo By Angela Zion Photography, with Emily Wilson


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Weddings

MORGAN HARMS & JACKSON BOYD MARCH 27, 2020 Morgan and Jackson were good friends all four years of high school. Not technically high school sweethearts, they started dating the summer after graduation and have been together ever since. Jackson planned the evening of his proposal to Morgan under the guise of a work party. He suggested arriving downtown a little early to enjoy dinner and take a walk through Falls Park, a special place that they love. It was there in the midst of the lovely scenery Jackson asked Morgan to be his wife. The day of their wedding was unique in regard to the pandemic circumstances, but it all came together in Morgan’s backyard. Only immediate family were involved in the ceremony, and in her BHLDN “last-minute-bride” gown Morgan said “yes” to forever. The couple was surprised with a drive-by reception where many friends and family members drove by to wish the couple a happy wedding day. Morgan and Jackson are now living in Kentucky, where she works as a registered nurse and he as a territory representative at Veran Medical Technologies.—KN By Anna Duncan Photography

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rare and admirable milestone these days, Fletcher Kirkland recently celebrated more than 50 years with Mackey. And you will still see him at Mackey doing what he does best – serving families. His father started his career working there back in the 1930’s; Fletcher then followed in his footsteps. Like his father before him, Fletcher is a former owner of Mackey, funeral director and an integral part of the Greenville community. Although he is semi-retired, he continues to enjoy helping families whenever there is a need. He remains passionate about being able to help someone when they are at a loss as to what to do or when they have questions. His extensive experience, friendly personality and calm demeanor are exactly what families are looking for when they place their trust in Mackey. A graduate of Furman University, he has been actively involved in the community for decades.

ELIZABETH FOLK & MITCHELL MOORE JUNE 20, 2020 Elizabeth and Mitchell met through mutual friends while attending North Carolina State University. Three years of dating later, Mitchell knew he didn’t want to spend a second more of his life without Elizabeth and planned a surprise trip to Yosemite National Park to do what the two love most: hike. Certain this bucket-list location would be the perfect place to ask Elizabeth that all-important question, Mitchell led his bride-to-be on a 6-mile trek up to Eagle Peak, where two of their friends had made a heart out of pinecones. Elizabeth couldn’t help but say “yes.” As is the case for many couples, the COVID-19 pandemic drastically changed the course of their wedding day. Instead of a big gathering, they celebrated their love at the bride’s parents’ home in High Point, North Carolina, with immediate family and a few members of the bridal party. The highlight of the day was a surprise car parade of many friends, and a bridesmaid in her dress, with balloons and signs to welcome the couple into this next chapter. The two live in Raleigh, where Mitchell is a customer success manager for Even, and Elizabeth is a supplier relationship manager for IBM.—KN By Siobhan Lorraine Photography

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Weddings

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Eleni and Ian met by chance. Just like every May previous, Eleni attended the United Greek American Memorial Day Beach Party in her hometown of Clearwater, Florida. A recent college grad, she was preparing to go on a summer-long sojourn to Europe with her family. Ian had traveled to Clearwater from Greenville with friends and boldly introduced himself to Eleni. The connection was instantaneous, but, alas, Eleni left for Europe soon after. Knowing he had met someone special, Ian texted her every day she was gone, and when she returned stateside, the pair began dating longdistance. The following summer, Ian accompanied Eleni on a trip to Greece and wasted no time dropping to one knee in front of the idyllic St. George Chapel at Lykavittos, overlooking the city of Athens and the Acropolis. The pair hosted their big, fat Greek wedding at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Clearwater, where Eleni wore a stunning gown designed by Jodi Moylan. The couple now lives in Greenville.—KN By Marissa Moss Photography


RACHEL HIPPS & AUSTIN DENEROY MARCH 28, 2020 Rachel and Austin first met at a lunch with friends at Chipotle, where Austin learned that Rachel was a vegan. He cracked a vegan joke, but Rachel wasn’t amused. However, Austin couldn’t stop thinking about her, and lucky for him, she let the joke slide. Just six months after they started dating, Austin was ready to propose, and he knew the perfect time. Rachel’s roommate was planning a surprise party for her birthday, and since all of her best friends were going to be in town, he thought, “why not then?” That evening, the unsuspecting Rachel was told to be ready for a nice dinner. Austin took her on a stroll through Falls Park, and when they reached the spot where they first said, “I love you,” he dropped to one knee. When the couple’s traditional wedding plans were dashed by the COVID-19 shutdowns, they decided to elope, and all of their family and close friends said, “let’s do it.” With all hands on deck, they headed to Black Balsam Knob where everything went off without a hitch, complete with locally grown flowers, cupcakes from their favorite baker, and decorations donated from friends. The picturesque celebration was the perfect way for the couple to start their lives together.—KN By Anna Duncan Photography

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Weddings

RACHEL JOSEY & JACK KELLEY JUNE 13, 2020

We all know there’s wisdom in the advice “marry your best friend.” Luckily for Rachel and Jack, that’s just what they did. The pair met at the University of Virginia and became good friends. After graduation, their college cohort gathered to celebrate at Austin City Limits in Texas, and whether it was the good food or the good music, sparks were definitely flying. The next three years were filled with adventure, including a move to New York City, and on a cold winter day in February, Jack asked Rachel to marry him in their cozy apartment on the Upper West Side. They had dreamed of a ceremony in Charlottesville, Virginia, the city where they met, but the COVID-19 pandemic forced a change of plans. Deciding all they required to celebrate was their wedding party and immediate family, the couple said their vows in Rachel’s parents’ backyard in Spartanburg. Each detail was provided by someone special to the couple, from the catering to the bride’s vintage veil, purchased in Brussels by her grandmother. The two now reside in Atlanta.—KN By Sposa Bella Photography

JENNY NESMITH & ZACH PANCOAST JULY 25, 2020 In 2010, long before a global pandemic shocked the world, Jenny met Zach at Furman University. After graduation, Zach moved back to his hometown of San Diego, but with his heart still in Greenville, he returned and purchased a charming home downtown. Jenny had moved to Atlanta to pursue her career, but distance didn’t matter. Countless days were still spent in Greenville walking their puppy, Tripp, in Cleveland Park and shopping at local markets. Finally, on one fateful November evening, Zach proposed with the ring his father had picked for his own wife in 1987. When their original wedding plans fell through due to COVID-19, they put their Highlands, North Carolina, celebration on hold and opted for a small ceremony in Atlanta. A true Southern thunderstorm, quick, but merciless, struck just before the ceremony at Jenny’s parents’ home, destroying the perfect décor. In no time, however, the entire neighborhood was out to help fix the damage, and the wedding went on without a hitch. The two will contine to live in Greenville.—KN By Harwell Photography

KATHERINE HUEY & SCOTT DAVIS JUNE 7, 2020 Spartanburg is a small city, which seems even smaller if you grow up in the same school district. Katherine and Scott spent their childboods in this Upstate locale, but as Scott was five years older, they continued to miss one another throughout elementary, middle, and high school. And although they both attended Furman University, they didn’t meet until a family friend set them up. Nearly two years later, Scott began plotting with Katherine’s family to orchestrate a proposal over Easter weekend. Even though they were never Paladins at the same time, Scott staged the big moment at the bell tower on Furman’s campus—an important landmark of their relationship. Despite the rain, Scott got down on one knee and asked Katherine to be his wife. They planned an extravagant spring wedding, but when COVID-19 hit, they rescheduled their special day for June at the Country Club of Spartanburg. Resplendent in a Romona Keveza gown, Katherine married Scott in a small, intimate ceremony and started their lives together in Greenville.—KN By Sposa Bella Photography hearing wedding bells? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed.

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With twelve Greenville artists, OYÉ STUDIOS opens in a revitalized North Main neighborhood church.

Artwork by Genna & Signe Grushovenko, courtesy of OYÉ Studios

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TB • OUTSIDE THE BOX

SACRED SPACE A FORMER CHURCH IN NORTH MAIN IS TRANSFORMED INTO A CREATIVE HAVEN by Charlotte Ward • portrait by Will Crooks

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n a mild winter day, eight months ago, artists Genna Grushovenko and Rey Alfonso sat on the steps of a disused church, determined to make it theirs. They lit cigars and bid in an online auction. When they stepped, triumphant, off the stoop, the former Daybreak Church in the North Main neighborhood was destined for a new celestial path. Grushovenko and Alfonso, and their artist spouses, Signe Grushovenko and Patricia DeLeon, have socialized for years, traveling the art festival circuit. Their mutual need for a new studio collided with serendipitous timing, resulting in a shared vision to revamp the quaint residential church into a vibrant art space. “It felt like a lot of things converging at the right moment,” Signe recalls. Since March, the studio has been home to 12 diverse artists, aged

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23 to 74. Collectively, they named the place OYÉ, which means “listen up” in Spanish. Residents include Christopher Rico, who creates pensive abstracts, delicate thread-and-ink artist Taylor Adams, and Michelle Jardines, known for her bright, psychological landscapes. The gifted dozen were largely curated by the elder of the studio, Jeffrey Leder, a New York–born painter who finds a meditative calm in color and straight lines. The creative energy flows from floor to floor. Sometimes big and bold. Sometimes soft and reflective. Extrovert Genna has set up home in the 4,000-square-foot sanctuary. “I feel the presence of other people around,” he says. “It’s inspired me to experiment with techniques.” His colorful conceptions are completed by his contemplative spouse, Signe, in her quiet turret studio. There, she adds detail based on


Artwork courtesy of OYÉ Studios

(above) Genna Grushovenko paints the base for the artwork that he creates with his wife, Signe. The Grushovenkos share studio space with 10 other artists at the new OYÉ Studios in a former North Main church; (opposite, left to right) works by Christopher Rico, Glory Day Loflin, sculptor James McSharry, and Patricia DeLeon are a few examples of OYÉ ̓s diverse offerings.

vernacular photography from the twentieth century. Rey occupies the other half of the sanctuary—a workspace as bold as his personality with “a lot of junk” to inspire him. An assembly of paint pots frame a backdrop of photos and keepsakes. He is painting a ’57 Chevy—a car from his childhood—as footage of his native Cuba plays on a screen. “It’s soothing to paint my people’s history,” he says. “I’m not lost, but I need to do this for myself. It’s an image of familiarity.” In her private studio, a short walk away, Rey’s wife Patricia DeLeon is working on a lotus flower painting, an homage to resilience and beauty. It features the Leaves of Grass poetry collection by Walt Whitman. “I’ve been inspired to use symbols of optimism and hope,” she says. “The lotus flower is born out of the dirtiest waters, and it produces this beautiful flower. It’s the perfect analogy for the human condition, especially at the moment.”

Mixed-media artist Shannon McGee has the basement to get lost in his work. He shares the space with young striving artist James McSharry, who uses metal, wood, and ceramics to create free-form sculptural pieces. Landscape painter and mom Jessica Fields juggles homeschooling with time in the studio, and Glory Day Loflin, who helped to repurpose OYÉ and shares her social media skills, considers it a haven where she can complete her sculptures, drawings, and paintings. “I have this little room where I can kick the dust up and let it settle where it may,” she says. “I’m grateful.” At the heart of the OYÉ vision is to make studio space affordable for emerging artists. While they mostly work alone, together, the 12 artists have found a shared companionship. “We’re pulling together to use all our skills,” Patricia explains. “Where can I help you? Where can I pull some of your talents out if you don’t have the money to be here?” “The through line is a seriousness of purpose,” Signe adds. “Everyone is very diligent and dedicated to their craft. It’s an excellent cross-pollination.” A Virtual Grand Opening is scheduled for October 10 at 10am. The opening event will include an online release of new collections by all artists and a Facebook gallery tour featuring a live sale of one small work by each artist. For more on OYÉ Studios, go to oyestudiosgvl.com.

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TB • UPTOWNER

From your book to your social media posts, you’re very candid about your former life as an attorney. Although it looked like you had it all—the big job, marriage, two kids—you were quite unhappy. So how did you make this big sea change in your own life that you now, as a business coach, help others to make? I had this voice in the back of my head all the time saying, ‘This is not what you’re supposed to do,’ and I think a lot of other people have that if they stop and pay attention to it. They don’t want to because they don’t want to have to go through the pain to change. They look at change and say, ‘What if I fail? So I’ll just stay the same.’ But eventually what happens is that the pain of staying where they are becomes too great, and they can’t turn the volume down on that voice anymore. That’s when they tend to seek me out. I want people to wake up from that rock-middle place and say, ‘I deserve more than this.’

What wasn’t fulfilling you, and made you want to make the leap? I was a people person who loved business development and sales and staying behind a desk reading and writing all day. I realized that my zone of genius wasn’t being utilized at all in the position I was in.

So how did you do it? I sought out every practitioner that I could

LIFE CHANGER AUTHOR AND BUSINESS COACH SALLIE HOLDER ENCOURAGES WOMEN TO GET OUT OF ROCK MIDDLE by Jac Valitchka • photograph by Will crooks

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aybe you know one. Maybe you are one. Or, like Sallie Holder, maybe you were one—somebody who found themselves in, at what Holder has coined rock middle: the comfortable misery zone that’s oh-so-hard to leave. You’re successful by society’s standards, but deep down you feel like an imposter who wants to do anything other than what you’re doing now. Holder’s account of how she changed her trajectory out of that place is in her book published in January and aptly titled, Hitting Rock Middle: The Roadmap from Empty Success to True Fulfillment. When current events (read: global health crisis) upended her book tour, Holder’s drive to encourage other women to wake up from what she calls the “I’m fine coma” held firm. She relaunched her 90-day interactive program called The Brimm (The Beyond Rock Middle Movement), which strives to move you out of your own way so you can, like Holder, become a Female Founder of your making in a career you truly love.

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possibly find to tell me what I should do. They were all telling me, ‘Oh, you should be an entrepreneur,’ and I would say, ‘Great, now what?’ I wanted someone to tell me how to do it, and I couldn’t figure that out so I always said, ‘If I ever figure out the process of how to do this, I’ve got to go back and teach more women because there have got to be a lot more of us trapped.’ So I started by first seeking a lot of outside advice and realizing the position I’m in doesn’t fit the greatest parts of myself.

What do you tell others so they go ahead and take the leap? There are two things I find really critical and one is to begin with the end in mind. If you put your toe in the water and you’re scared to death, then all you’re missing is the clarity of a plan. You have to start with the end in mind and work your way backwards. That’s what I help people do. And that keeps them so much more attached to their future rather than staying stuck where they are because they want that future vision. The second is that we all have a ton of limiting beliefs that tell us we are incapable of creating what it is that we really want. Throughout the 90 days, I reiterate what those limiting beliefs look like, how they show up for us, and how they talk us out of taking the necessary steps. Did you have people try to tell you, ‘Hey, I don’t know, Sallie, maybe don’t quit your day job?’ (laughs) I still have people come up to me at Starbucks on Augusta Road and say to me, ‘I am so sorry to hear you’re not practicing law anymore.’

oh my goodness . . . That is hilarious. But I also know it has nothing to do with me. It has everything to do with them and the personal growth they haven’t done. And so when we challenge other people’s stories of success, if we’re not oftentimes ready to make the change ourselves, we’re not going to like it and that’s okay. So, yes, it does end up being very psychological as well


Sallie Holder summoned all her fortitude to make the leap from lawyer to business coach. Now she shares her wisdom and experience to help other women find their career bliss.

as tactical. Your mental game is 50 percent of it. And so to ignore that like so many people do, to me, was entirely ignoring all of the roadblocks and hurdles I had to jump over to get where I wanted to go—and those are harder than just executing. If it were just execution, then we could all read a self-help book and be done. It’s the psychological side, and you just can’t ignore that.

Right. What were some of your hurdles? My therapist back in the day used to say to me, ‘Your willingness to endure pain and misery is unmatched by any client I have ever seen.’ Ouch. Oh wow. I looked at her and said, ‘Thank you!’ I was so far on the other side of the spectrum of what I preach and teach and really believe in now. And then, yeah, that got me a ticket right to rock bottom. So I stayed in the misery. I have true belief that we are either moving closer to or further away from our dreams every day. I was moving away because I wasn’t choosing the path of personal growth and challenge. I was staying the same and staying in that comfortable misery of rock middle, and I ended up needing to get sober. In a few days, it’ll be four years. That’s so fantastic. I feel like we’re all going to make that choice to stay in the ‘I’m fine coma,’ or we’re going to wake up one day and say, ‘This is not who I want to be.’ That’s what happened to me. I woke up one day and I thought, ‘This is not who I know I am supposed to be, and what do I need to do to get started creating that? What is standing in my way?’ And I knew the very first thing was alcohol. I knew if I could remove that roadblock then I could get started on the others, but there was no way I would get started on the others until I solved the first one. Slowly but surely I started walking through those fears, and I failed a million times along the way.

in one of your Instagram posts you talk about the joy you feel in getting to turn on the light for other women in helping navigate the roadblocks to their success. What a gift you have to share. I think I have always had this

“Eventually what happens is that the pain of staying where they are becomes too great, and they can’t turn the volume down on that voice anymore.”

intense feeling of curiosity, and I am so curious about how it can be better and easier, for not only myself, but for other women, too. I’m so curious about them and what’s stopping them, and why they haven’t yet manifested what they want and created that. I think I approach all of the coaching with that level of curiosity and a sincere desire to see women be able to give their genius to the world. I know that sounds ambitious, but why not? For more, go to sallieholder.com or @sallieholder on instagram.

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TB • VISIONARIES

BIAS BREAKER DR. BRIAN CHAD STARKS SEEKS TO DISMANTLE RACIAL BARRIERS THROUGH STRATEGIC CONSULTING WORK by Stephanie Trotter • photograph by Will Crooks

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his conversation is going to be uncomfortable. We have to get uncomfortable to get comfortable.” B. Chad Starks delivers the caution right off the top without pretext. “I am genuine, authentic, and honest,” he states. “I need you to care about my identity, and my experiences, and how we got here. This isn’t a feel-good story. I am talking about 401 years of oppression. We have a lot of work to do.” The Simpsonville-based critical criminologist references the year enslaved Africans landed in the colonies. The selfdescribed “fixer” has spent most of his 48 years trying to rebuild the respect and liberties lost 401 years ago, while tearing down the structural racism erected since. “This work is about coming from different perspectives. This takes all voices, and identity is so important,” he explains. “Folks say, ‘I don’t see race, we should think the same.’ That is ridiculously disrespectful. Do you see all this beautiful blackness right here? You don’t want to see it because you don’t want to take what comes with it. You don’t want to take my pain.”

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That pain first surfaced growing up the grandson of a sharecropper in metro Columbia. His mother worked as a domestic servant and custodian, his dad disappeared, and the family frequently moved one step ahead of cops carrying eviction notices. Yet he found love with his church, sports, and siblings. “My brothers used to say all the time, we didn’t know we were poor until somebody told us,” the youngest of five jokes. The avid student knew he wanted to help his community gain equal footing for opportunities and resources, but realized he would need an education to get the job done.


Through his social justice consulting firm, BCS and Associates, Dr. B. Chad Starks works with business leaders to change thinking about racial equity.

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“We’re here to create change. We’re here to transform minds, transform hearts—to make a society where everyone feels inclusive in that love.”

Four degrees later, including a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Wofford, a master’s in criminal justice from USC, and a doctorate in criminology from the University of Delaware, Starks uses a multi-prong approach of advocacy, education, and business. Unlike those who protest publicly for social justice, Starks works on the inside, from the top down. “That’s what my firm does,” the businessman and speaker explains. “We are going to challenge you. I’m going to say, ‘Bring your leaders here and let’s understand their way of thinking about equity and what social justice looks like to them.’” The NAACP Award winner’s social justice consulting firm, BCS and Associates, works with companies, schools, and municipalities from the Carolinas to California. Requests for training, workshops, and assessments have increased 100 percent since the death of George Floyd. “If you want to just check a box on diversity, don’t call us,” he warns. “We are not going to make you feel good about systemic oppression. We’re here to create change, we’re here to transform minds, transform hearts—to make a society where everyone feels inclusive in that love.” The committed academic also teaches at Clemson, while trying to spread his message of diversity, inclusion, and equity in Greenville. “I’m hopeful. The time to strike is now. We need to change structures. We need to change policies. I’m very fortunate to have these opportunities, so I’m working with my purpose. I feel like the skies have opened up.” May they rain down equality and inclusion.

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8/10/20 9:48 AM


ESCAPE R E G I O N A L P L A C E S & G L O B A L D E S T I N AT I O N S

The KENTUCKY BOURBON TRAIL leads whiskey lovers through gorgeous pastures to tasting tours.

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Escape • GET AWAY

SIP A ND SAVOR THE SIGHTS, A ROM AS, A ND FL AVORS A LONG THE KENTUCKY BOUR BON TR A IL by Melissa Reardon

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he definition of bourbon is an argument I’ve had many times, inevitably over a glass of the spirit. “Bourbon can only be made in Kentucky,” they’ll argue. Not true. But I can understand where the point derived, seeing as how 95 percent of the world’s bourbon is produced in Kentucky, praised for its limestone-filtered water and climate conducive for aging, allowing the liquor to absorb the caramel, vanilla, and spice notes inherent in the wood. It is, in fact, an $8.6 billion industry for the state.

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It is considered whiskey, but to be called bourbon, it has to be made with at least 51 percent corn; aged at no more than 125 proof in new white oak barrels for no less than two years; and bottled at a minimum of 80 proof. And unlike other whiskeys, there cannot be any additives, like honey. But I didn’t come to know the finer points of bourbon just out of curiosity. I discovered a taste for bourbon and a deep fascination for its history and nuanced production through various excursions along the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. Of the state’s 68 distilleries, 38 are members of the Bourbon Trail, most of which are concentrated between Lexington, Bardstown, and Louisville (that’s LOO-a-vul in native speak). Distillery tours, tastings, and experiences like cocktail classes nurture a deeper appreciation for the spirit. In close proximity are bars and restaurants serving a dizzying array of labels and bourbon-tinged bites. There are museums detailing the history, cooperage tours focused on the art of barrel-making, and a handful of companies offering safe transport. Factor in the opportunities for exploring Lexington as the Horse Capital of the World, Louisville’s vibrant urban offerings, and the rural countryside in between—particularly lovely in autumn—and it’s hard to know where to begin an excursion.

Photographs (clockwise from left) courtesy of James E. Pepper Distillery, Alltech, Inc., Bulleit Distilling Co., and Kentucky Distillers’ Association

BOURBON STRAIGHT

More than 30 distilleries including (clockwise from left) James E. Pepper, Town Branch, Bulleit, and Four Roses dot the Kentucky Bourbon Trail throughout Lexington, Bardstown, and Louisville.


Thankfully, the official Bourbon Trail website is a wellorganized resource. Though speaking from experience, I like approaching the trail over a long weekend, or up to a week if time permits. In any case, tackling three distilleries per day is manageable, and it’s nice to mix up visits to the larger heritage brands—names like Jim Beam, Wild Turkey, and Maker’s Mark—with some of the smaller craft distilleries. Though the process of making bourbon doesn’t vary widely, the tours and knowledge gained at each is individual, as are the hours and fees. I begin my trip, a four-day girls’ getaway, with two nights in Lexington. More time would allow exploration of the expansive Kentucky Horse Park to learn about the history of horses and meet retired Derby winners, or hone my betting game—mint julep in hand—at Keeneland, a handsome, historic stone track that, in a normal year, hosts horse races for three weeks every April and October. Arriving in the afternoon, we check into the chic 21c Museum Hotel and set off for the in-town distilleries. There are four in the city proper, all in close proximity. The James E. Pepper Distillery is a fitting place to start, as its storied history is as old as bourbon itself. Founded in 1780 by the Pepper family, it was once the country’s largest whiskey distillery, and the Old Fashioned cocktail is rumored to have been invented in honor of Colonel Pepper himself.

Armed with a foundation on production and short on time, we opt to skip the Barrel House Distilling Co., located in the same historic complex, to head a mile away to Town Branch, named for the limestone-rich waterway that once drew distillers to its banks, but has been buried under the city for more than 100 years. This one’s a shorter tour, only 30 minutes, though an hour would’ve included insight into their brewing operation, which produces bourbon-barrel-aged ales. Primed to sample more bourbon, we dine at Lockbox, located inside our hotel, which is also a museum. Amid the contemporary art hanging on stark white walls and ultra modern décor, we dine on elevated seasonal Southern fare while sampling flights from a menu of 170 bourbons. Some 25 distilleries are represented, so we take our server’s recommendations, opting to sample from those not on our itinerary. Day two involves several distilleries in the countryside west of the city. We start at Buffalo Trace, which is not a member of the trail, but unlike other distilleries, the tours here are free. The sprawling brick complex reminiscent of the industrial era is the oldest continuously operating bourbon distillery in the country. Take in one or more tours here to learn how its many fine

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Escape • GET AWAY

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Treats along the Bourbon Trail start in Lexington with a meal at Lockbox (above) and a drive through horse country (above, right); (below, left to right), be sure to sample some of the bars on Louisville’s Urban Bourbon Trail, tour historic Buffalo Trace distillery in Frankfort, then kick back with a flaming cocktail at Proof on Main in Louisville’s 21c Museum Hotel.

STAY

EAT

21c Museum Hotel

Lockbox

A boutique hotel group that houses a contemporary art museum and restaurant. Even the public restrooms push the boundaries of art. 167 W

This modern, artful restaurant serves elevated seasonal Southern fare and a bourbon menu topping out at 170 labels.

Main St, Lexington; 700 W Main St, Louisville. (888) 234-3300, 21cmuseumhotels.com

The Brown Hotel This gilded Georgian-Revival hotel is a historic landmark with a AAA Four Diamond rating. 335 W Broadway, Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, some distilleries are currently closed or operating on a reduced schedule, with safety measures in place. Reservations for tours (operating at a lower capacity) are highly recommended and in some cases required. Most tours, which include a tasting, cost around $10–$20 and take an hour. Visit kentuckybourbontrail. com for trip planning essentials, but be advised to check individual distillery websites for upto-date hours and details.

Louisville. (888) 888-5252, brownhotel.com

PLAY Kentucky Bourbon Festival

167 W Main St, Lexington. (859) 899-6860, lockboxlex.com

The Stave This relaxed restaurant and bourbon bar serves Kentucky standards like burgoo, a stew with chicken, pork, beef, and veggies, as well as Hot Brown Tots, a twist on the traditional Kentucky sandwich doused in savory cheesy Mornay sauce, along with a lunch and dinner menu of tasty Southern dishes. 5711 McCracken Pike, Frankfort. (859) 879-0101, thestavekentucky.com

Normally held in midSeptember in Bardstown and currently scheduled for October 15–18, 2020, this festival presents dozens of events centered around bourbon.

Bourbons Bistro

Urban Bourbon Trail

Frankfort Ave, Louisville. (502) 894-8838, bourbonsbistro.com

kybourbonfestival.com

Louisville boasts just over 40 bourbon bars and restaurants on the Urban Bourbon Trail—a chance to put your taste buds to the test. bourboncountry.com

Housed in an 1870s building, Bourbons Bistro offers a selection of 130 bourbons and a seasonal menu that’s locally sourced and inspired by its namesake beverage. 2255

Photographs (clockwise from top left) courtesy of 21c Museum Hotels, Louisville Tourism, Buffalo Trace Distillery, and 21c Museum Hotels

bourbons, including Pappy Van Winkle, are produced. Blanton’s Bottling Hall, where each single-barrel whiskey is bottled by hand, is particularly memorable. We grab lunch at the on-site Firehouse Sandwich Shop before heading on. Unique in its Spanish Mission-style architecture, Four Roses was built in 1910 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The tour here covers the romantic marriage proposal that inspired the name as well as the fermentation and distillation process. (The aging and bottling facility is an hour away and also offers tours.) We bypass Wild Turkey—worth visiting for its awardwinning visitor center—and head on to Woodford Reserve, which is idyllic, as is the drive there, past white-fenced horse farms and rolling hills. From fermentation and distillation to storing and aging to bottling and tasting, the tour of the historic stone distillery is top-notch and the products exquisite. Ending our day of small sips, we fill up at the Stave Restaurant and Bourbon Bar nearby, sampling the pulled pork with bourbon-peach barbecue sauce. Heading on to Louisville for two nights, we take in Bulleit distillery, discovering the virtues of their bourbons and spicier rye whiskey (made from at least 51 percent rye grain) before heading into the city to check into the graceful historic Brown Hotel—within walking distance of many points of interest and where the sinfully decadent Hot Brown sandwich was invented. Louisville’s Whiskey Row is a block-long stretch of Main Street that was once the thriving heart of the city’s bourbon industry. Many of the Revivalist and Chicago School–style buildings from the mid- to late-1800s have been restored, and, today, in and around the district are a plethora of distilleries, restaurants, and bars. We take in Old Forester Distillery, which is unique in that it houses an on-site cooperage where you can watch the barrels being made and charred. Savor small-batch bourbon truffles at Art Eatables, and gawk at the impressive displays—including one on the history of Whiskey Row—at the Evan Williams Bourbon Experience. Our final day on the trail, we make the 30-minute drive south to Jim Beam. Guests can tour and taste in downtown Louisville at their small distillery and bottling line Urban Stillhouse, but we opt to see the main operation for the full tour as well as a cocktail class, where we learn the art of an Old Fashioned and enjoy a lunch at the on-site smokehouse. Back in town, we can’t decide between a tour of Angel’s Envy or the new and very modern Rabbit Hole distillery, but opt to rest up instead before venturing out for a bar crawl along the Urban Bourbon Trail, which encompasses more than 40 bars and restaurants. From the Old Seelbach Bar, where the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Al Capone were known to frequent, to the underground Pin + Proof speakeasy and vintage bowling alley, we savor flights, cocktails, and snacks, glad not to worry about driving. Dinner at Bourbons Bistro is the highlight, where we crown our meal and weekend adventure with an amazing bourbon bread pudding and smooth glass of Noah’s Mill from Kentucky Bourbon Distillers in Bardstown. Though we must head home in the morning, we savor our nightcap with a toast, promising to return for more bourbon exploration.


text here

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LU XURY S E RVIC E AT E VE RY PR ICE POI N T MOUNTAIN TOP VIEWS

43 EAGLE ROCK ROAD THE CLIFFS AT GLASSY $4,500,000 | MLS# 1396366 Holly May 864.640.1959

CUSTOM BUILT BESPOKE PROPERTY

201 LONG VIEW COURT PICKENS $847,000 | MLS# 1423986 Kim Crowe 864.888.7053

209 MOUNTAIN SUMMIT ROAD THE CLIFFS VALLEY $2,250,000 | MLS #1417882 Shannon Donahoo 864.329.7345

RENOVATED NORTH MAIN HOME

290 STABLE GATE DRIVE MOTLOW CREEK EQUESTRIAN $1,100,000 | MLS# 1404547 Meg Atkinson 843.601.4191

EQUESTRIAN TRAINING FARM

25 HINDMAN DRIVE GREENVILLE $759,000 | MLS# 1424071 Damian Hall 864.561.7942

1896 E GREEN CREEK DRIVE TRYON $625,000 | MLS# 1419641 Debra Owensby 864.404.8295

1 ROSE THORN COURT CLIFFS VALLEY $599,500 | MLS# 1402811 John “Clark” Kent 864.784.9918

144 YACHT DRIVE LAKE RABON $584,900 | MLS# 1412389 Jolene Peddicord 864.905.1815

107 ANNANDALE AVENUE MOUNT VERNON ESTATES $537,500 | MLS# 1423207 Michael Mumma 864.238.2542

341 BELCHER ROAD CAMPOBELLO $525,000 | MLS# 1424341 Anna Workman 304.646.9515

LAWN MAINTAINED BY HOA

302 TANOAK COURT CHESTNUT POND $614,900 | MLS# 1413441 Robbie Randolph 864.567.6805

EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

104 NOKOTA DRIVE SADDLEHORN $539,000 | MLS# 1419594 Shannon Donahoo 864.329.7345

(864)-920-0303 | 20 Overbrook Ct, Ste 400 | Greenville, SC


LU XURY S E RVIC E AT E VE RY PR ICE POI N T

235 SCOTTS BLUFF DRIVE COACHMAN PLANTATION $444,500 | MLS #1408342 Kennie Norris 864.608.0865

410 KENMURE COURT CONAMARA FARMS $429,900 | MLS# 1422418 Holly May 864.640.1959

54 BARLOW COURT KELSEY GLEN $304,900 | MLS# 1418484 Jordan Surrett 864.923.6140

UNDER CONTRACT

214 HOLMES DRIVE DELLWOOD $299,500 | MLS# 1424613 Rex Galloway 864.630.1111 Kary Galloway 864.901.2204

900 N MAIN STREET NORTHGATE TRACE $279,900 | MLS# 1424162 Julie Ghareeb Debruin 703.618.3600

5 YORKSHIRE DRIVE CHEROKEE FOREST $269,900 | MLS# 1423868 Maggie Laterza 864.243.7424

110 HOLLY HILL LANE HOLLY TREE $249,900 | MLS# 1422798 Jolene Peddicord 864.905.1815

1013 RUTHERFORD ROAD GREENVILLE $249,000 | MLS# 1421638 Kendall Keir 864.430.0301

115 DOGWOOD DRIVE DOGWOOD ACRES $245,000 | MLS# 1424064 Philip Romba 864.349.7607

UNDER CONTRACT

UNDER CONTRACT

716 CHARTWELL DRIVE CHARTWELL ESTATES $239,000 | MLS# 1423958 Jolene Peddicord 864.905.1815

3 RIVERS EDGE CIRCLE SIMPSONVILLE $199,950| MLS# 1412759 Cheyenne Kozaily 864.999.1959

1463 RICE ROAD PICKENS $189,900 | MLS# 1423826 Sara Davis 904.813.4768

(864)-920-0303 | 20 Overbrook Ct, Ste 400 | Greenville, SC


Plan The Event of Your Lifetime Photography: Noveli Photography sarah.blasingame@westingreenville.com

864.250.7901

sarah.blasingame@westingreenville.com

864.250.7901

Plan The Event of Your Lifetime

Photography: Matthew Pautz Photography

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SPORT T H E B E S T S T O R I E S O F L A N D & W AT E R

The GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB celebrates a milestone 125th anniversary.

Photograph courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society

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Sport • HISTORY Scenes from the early days of Greenville Country Club (clockwise): Pro golfer Dave Ferguson hits one off the third tee, c. 1923; golfers lounge at the Riverside clubhouse in 1934; Robert Trent Jones, architect of the Chanticleer course, in the mid-1960s; members enjoy a summer supper on the club’s terrace.

ON THE GREEN GREEN V ILLE COUNTRY CLUB A ND ITS CHA NTICLEER COURSE HIGHLIGHT THE FORESIGHT OF EA RLY MEMBERS by Ronnie Musselwhite

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he origins of golf in Greenville can be traced to the spring of 1895, when a gaggle of aspiring hackers struck shovel to dirt on a 50-acre parcel of land in the Piney Mountain region of the county. It was there that the eponymous “Piney Mountain Pioneers” carved out a rudimentary nine-hole course, which historians consider to be the very humble birthplace of Greenville Country Club (GCC). Much has changed at GCC in the 125 years since those sporting trailblazers brought the game to the Upstate, not the least of which is its physical location. After spending a decade at the original venue, members of Piney Mountain moved their burgeoning golf club to the former estate of Governor Benjamin Franklin Perry located north of downtown. There, they designed a “short but sporty” nine-hole course, built two tennis courts, and transformed the three-story Victorian mansion known as Sans Souci (“carefree” in French) into a clubhouse replete with dining facilities, locker rooms, and guest suites. Fittingly, they dubbed the new locale Sans Souci Country Club to reflect an increasing focus on activities and amenities for golfers and non-golfers alike. Another relocation, this one in 1921 to 158 acres of land flanking the Reedy River adjacent to Augusta Street, set the stage for construction of Riverside, the club’s first 18-hole course. The 1923 opening of Riverside, as well as an accompanying clubhouse, tennis courts, and aquatics center, bolstered Sans Souci’s position among the South’s esteemed golf and social establishments, prompting members to adopt the permanent moniker of Greenville Country Club.

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Name changes, property upgrades, and facility enhancements notwithstanding, the strategic move that solidified GCC’s place in the annals of golf took place in 1970. It was then the club unveiled Chanticleer, a sister course to Riverside that was designed by the man considered to be the most esteemed golf architect of his time: Robert Trent Jones. “In the mid-1960s, the club wanted to see how they could improve Riverside and make it a championship golf course, so they enlisted the services of Robert Trent


Photographs (top left, top right, and bottom left) courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society; photograph (Robert Trent Jones) courtesy of the Greenville Country Club

Jones and brought him to Greenville,” explains Greg Hobbs, who’s served as general manager and chief operating officer of GCC since 2006. “After Jones visited [Riverside], he said [to members of the steering committee], ‘I’m not sure I can deliver what you want on this piece of property. Have you ever considered building another golf course?’” Blessed with a sound financial ledger and the resources afforded by a waiting list to join, the club purchased 155 acres in the nearby Chanticleer subdivision to give Jones the tapestry he text hereneeded to bring that vision to life. The designer utilized the site’s

gently rolling terrain to weave the course in and out of towering hardwoods while intermittently traversing creeks and skirting other natural and manmade hazards. When he laid his tools to rest, Jones had created a masterpiece that 1935 Masters champion Gene Sarazen proclaimed was “one of the finest courses in the South.” Sarazen, who served as the celebrity golf professional at the grand opening of Chanticleer in 1970, also declared that the course would “rival Pinehurst No. 2, and in two or three years, be as good as or better than Augusta National.” Chanticleer never achieved the level of greatness predicted by Sarazen; however, it has long been recognized as one of the Southeast’s best layouts in terms of design, challenge, and conditioning. The course is consistently ranked among the top 10 golf venues in South Carolina by national and state organizations, and at one point reached No. 57 on Golf Digest’s list of the top 100 courses in the United States. Throughout its history, Chanticleer has also attracted some of the best amateur and professional players. The club has hosted numerous state and regional golf championships, as well as the Korn Ferry Tour’s (formerly known as the Nationwide Tour) BMW Charity Pro-Am. Meanwhile, PGA Tour star Bill Haas, who lives near Chanticleer, practices and plays out of GCC when he isn’t competing, and PGA Tour member Ben Martin and Charles Warren, a Clemson alum and former touring professional who won three times on the Korn Ferry Tour, are active members. No one knows definitively if the Piney Mountain Pioneers ever dreamed that their crude golf course and makeshift clubhouse would eventually give rise to GCC and Chanticleer. What’s certain, however, is that their efforts and foresight did more than introduce the “country club lifestyle” to Greenville; they dovetailed with the evolution of the game as a whole and the city in particular.

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STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE/ EXTRAORDINARY

WILD ICE JEWELRY crafts one-of-a-kind pieces inspired by the wonder of travel. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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STYLE • THE FIND

Donna Adams (far left), owner of Wild Ice Jewelry, designs a variety of fun, colorful pieces, like those in her Island collection (left and below).

NOMADIC NICHE DONNA A DA MS CREATES ECLECTIC EA R R INGS UNDER HER BR A ND, W ILD ICE JEWELRY BY Kathryn Norungolo • PHOTOGRAPHY BY Paul Mehaffey

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ewelry designer Donna Adams used to be a dancer. As a young girl, she perfected the art of bead weaving taught to her by her adopted Chippewa grandmother. It’s a skill she often used to embellish her own costumes and that she now utilizes in her diverse jewelry collection. Adams has traveled to all 50 states and countless other destinations around the world, so when it came time to name her business, she pulled inspiration from her childhood trips to Alaska. “You could see all of the wild ice, and when it

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would fall off or get cut you never knew what you were going to get,” she recalls. “You would see a whole other pattern, and that’s why I called the business Wild Ice, because I really don’t ever know what I’m going to design next.” Though her earrings receive raves, her most popular design is the GVL bracelet, made with a Caribbean hook, that she hopes will become a traveler’s memento for this thriving city. Find Wild Ice Jewelry online at wildicejewelry.com, along with a list of retailers. Contact Adams at wildicejewelry@gmail.com.


Style • THE HOME

EASTERN STANDARD LORI AND ERIC WRIGHT CRAFT FUNCTIONAL WARES INSPIRED BY JAPANESE ARTISTRY by Abby Moore Keith photographs courtesy of ME Speak Design

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he is the eyes, and he, the hands. Craft couple Lori and Eric Wright combine a wealth of travel and life experience into their housewares studio, ME Speak Design. Both from the South, the Wrights pull inspiration from their rural home in North High Shoals, Georgia, along with Lori’s Japanese heritage, to create inspired, handcrafted pieces. Minimalist vibes emanate from a variety of materials and textures—charred white-oak ramen spoons, copper chopsticks, brass cheese knives all reflect a functional, rooted aesthetic. The duo’s elegant hand-forged cocktail spoons snagged the runnerup spot in the Home division of Garden and Gun’s 2017 Made in the South Awards.

For more, visit mespeakdesign.com.

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(clockwise from far left) Various cocktail spoons, strainers, and bottle openers on an extralarge cocktail tray in charred white oak; contrast curated set, chopsticks in charred white oak with ceramic rests; serving spoons in charred beech wood; cocktail plate in charred white oak & cocktail cutlery in stainless steel; arch plates in brass and copper; chopsticks in charred white oak and chopstick rests in copper and white oak. All available at ME Speak Design, mespeakdesign.com

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Classic Carolina Home

Greenville’s Transitional Home Furnishings Superstore 1175 Woods Crossing Road, Greenville, SC 29607 (864)281-9797 www.ClassicCarolinaHome.com


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864-325-2112 • Call her, she always calls you right back. Joan Herlong, Greater Greenville’s Number One Realtor of the Decade. Source: MLS Sales Volume 2010-2019. Each affiliate independently owned and operated.

LOVE IT TILL THE COWS COME HOME!


Man About TOWN

IT TAKES TWO ACCOR DING TO THE M A N, TACK LING HOUSE PROJECTS IS A SUREFIRE WAY TO TEST COMPATIBILIT Y

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ormally I would be the last person on Earth to give relationship advice. I’m just not adequately qualified. But since getting engaged earlier this year, I believe I’ve stumbled onto a big idea that could save couples years of struggling to hold together relationships that may have been doomed from the start. So here it is: if you’re in a romantic relationship and wondering if you and your partner are truly compatible, place an order at Ikea. Back in the spring, when my fiancée, Jess, and I started looking for a house to purchase, one of the amenities on our wish list was a large walkin closet. We found what we were looking for in a home perched on the side of Paris Mountain. The closet was huge but full of those white wire shelves that etch pinstripes into your clothes. Jess surveyed the space then pulled out a tape measure. “We could remove these shelves and install an Ikea closet,” she said. At the time, it didn’t occur to me that she meant “we” literally, so I enthusiastically agreed with the idea. A few weeks after closing on the house, we received an email from Ikea letting us know our dream closet was on its way. Reality finally hit me when the delivery truck arrived. After it was unloaded, we had enough cardboard boxes in our foyer to open a U-Haul franchise. “This is going to be fun,” Jess said, while checking the packing lists against our order form. I felt the sudden urge to fake a stroke, or even have a real one if it meant avoiding what was sure to be a backbreaking debacle. When Jess suggested we start immediately, I concocted a looming article deadline. “Maybe tomorrow,” I said. “Or sometime after Thanksgiving.”

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While I would have eventually opened up a random box and started haphazardly bolting things together, Jess, who has a PhD in economics and likes to curl up at night with a good spreadsheet, carefully unpacked all of the parts, separated each screw, bolt, and washer into neat little piles, then went through every page of the instruction manual twice. Ikea instructions contain only drawings, and for me comprehending them is like trying to decipher the hieroglyphics on a pharaoh’s tomb. “I think we should hire a professional,” I said, while looking over Jess’s shoulder. Before I could mention feeling lightheaded, she handed me a screwdriver. During the next two days I cursed, sweated, pulled my shoulder, shook my fist at the heavens, and became convinced Ikea designers are Swedish sadists that enjoy torturing middle-aged men who are not known as being handy. Meanwhile Jess quietly constructed drawers and shelves with the confidence and patience of a surgeon performing her thousandth appendectomy. In the end, we got exactly what we’d hoped for, a functional, streamlined closet. But we also gained some valuable insight into how, as a couple, we accomplish tasks and divide responsibility. I calculate Jess completed seventy-five percent of the work, and I completed one hundred percent of the complaining and self-pity. And while I know that deep down Jess feels it was not that big of a deal, she still nods empathically when I rub my shoulder and compare the closet project to the construction of the Taj Mahal. “We did it together,” she’ll say without the slightest hint of condescension. Together. I really like the sound of that.


“Purveyors of Classic American Style” 864.232.2761 rushwilson.com 23 West North St. Downtown Greenville


Concierge Medicine vs. Traditional Primary Care: 3 Differences Highlighted by COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has made healthcare the focus of the world for the last few months. From hospitals to primary care offices to parking lot testing sites, the value of access to quality healthcare has never been greater. That has many people considering concierge medicine. Concierge medicine is not about serving the richest of the rich or providing whatever members want on demand. It’s about providing doctors with more time to see fewer patients so that they can truly know each patient as a whole person and provide the best care possible to each one. It’s about not settling for an existing broken system that forces traditional primary care doctors to see thousands of patients just to keep their businesses afloat. As we’ve learned during the coronavirus pandemic, when it comes to healthcare, three things are more important than ever.

1. Having a personal relationship with your doctor is vital. A recent study found that as much as 25% of US residents don’t even have a primary care doctor. The ones who do likely don’t have a close relationship with them. So, with a once-in-a-lifetime public health crisis staring us all in the eye, who do you have as your partner in health? Do you know for a fact you have someone you can call if you started showing symptoms in the middle of the night? Would they know you on a personal level and understand what your lifestyle was like? COVID-19 has taught us the importance of having a doctor who offers more than a place to go for medicine when you’re sick. It’s equally important to have a doctor who knows you and can be a trusted resource for you to rely on, especially during a global pandemic.

2. Guaranteed access to physician care gives you peace of mind. No matter the time. As COVID-19 spread, we all heard the horror stories. The crowded emergency rooms. The fruitless trips to try and get tested. And the difficult dilemma people faced trying to figure out when it was time to get treatment if they started showing symptoms. And because we all know illnesses don’t follow standard business hours, what’s your plan if you start showing symptoms in the middle of the night? Or a weekend? Would you be able to reach your primary care doctor in a timely manner? Or would you be forced to risk and pay more for a trip to an urgent care facility or the emergency room? With concierge medicine, your access to physician care is guaranteed. No matter the time and no matter the day, you can call someone and get the physician care you need when you need it. During this pandemic, your concierge physician could tell you if it’s time to head to the ER, if you’re a strong candidate to get one of the few tests available, or if you should just quarantine at home. You get the peace of mind from knowing that, in the event you do get sick, you’ll have guaranteed access to physician care – 24/7/365 for most practices – so you can make an informed decision for you and your family.

For a long time, many people have been doing lots of little things to improve their health from exercise to eating habits. Now more than ever, health-conscious people are shifting their attention to the big things, such as concierge medicine. While this virus lingers, it’s important to do everything possible to go on the offensive and strengthen your immune system ahead of time. Finally lose those extra pounds. Control your blood pressure. Get your sugar level down. Eat healthier. Exercise more. Sleep better. Then, if you do contract the virus, your immune system will be in the best shape possible to ward it off. Concierge medicine gives doctors the time to provide the personalized, preventive care that helps people address all three of these issues. Most concierge practices guarantee at least 30 minutes per appointment. That extra time gives your doctor the ability to discuss your longterm goals and suggest a long-term strategy to improve your health. Some concierge medicine practices, like PartnerMD, offer additional resources like access to certified health coaches to give you the tools you need to pursue lifelong health. With a concierge doctor at your side, it’s not about just being there to prescribe a medication when you get ill. It’s about diving beneath the surface to find the root of the issue, so you can prevent getting sick in the first place. And at a time like this, there’s no better strategy for your health.

3. A primary care experience focused on improving health over the long term is more important than ever. As we move to the next stage of the pandemic – one with our economy slowly reopening and life returning to our new normal – personalized, preventive care focused on improving your health now and over the long term has never been more important.

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You do lots of little things to improve your health.

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Ms. Bea Wright

HOLD TIGHT

THE WEIGHT OF SECRETS CA N TA KE ITS TOLL

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ean in a little closer. I need to whisper something to you, but promise not to tell anyone . . . keeping secrets can endanger relationships, is draining emotionally, and can be bad for your health. To be clear, I am talking about keeping someone else’s secrets, though there is little doubt that we each have our own treasure trove of things we are hiding from people. That’s a topic for another day. When it comes to being entrusted with top-secret information, my instinct is to wonder about the teller’s motivation. Is he simply sharing gossip? Shifting the burden of something on her conscience? Seeking absolution with me serving as a confessor? No matter the answer, secret sharing often invites trouble and should not be taken lightly. I will admit that it is fun to be in the know about a happy and exciting event that is about to happen. Like when your friend tells you his plan to propose to his girlfriend over the upcoming weekend. Or if a work colleague has been selected for a yet-to-be-announced award you nominated her to receive. These types of confidences are the ideal. The hush-hush information is joyful and positive. The best part—you only have to avoid spilling the beans for a limited time. Yet not all secrets are equal. Positive secrets, such as marriage proposals and pregnancy or other good news, don’t impose the same burden as secrets that involve something unpleasant. Secrets that relate to infidelity or theft or some unusual preference are much more onerous. Revealing these types of skeletons can be haunting to the hearer.

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When a secret is burdensome, it is no longer just about keeping your friend’s confidence. The trick turns into living with the information. Even when you are not together, you may be rethinking and revisiting the conversation and worrying about letting information slip out. Then, for example, just try not to remember that the wife confessed to having an affair every time you are with the couple or see the husband. It is not easy. Living with this kind of secret can make you feel inauthentic and disingenuous. At a minimum, it is stressful and draining. Not all secrets bring such drama. But keeping something private can be very challenging and is often in conflict with human nature. Being in the know about something branded confidential makes us feel important, elevates our standing, and boosts our perception of our social collateral. And yet, possessing insider knowledge is an out-and-out test of our trustworthiness. Puffed up by our au courant status, we can be tempted to divulge a secret, if only to show advantage. But turning confidential information into gossip also reveals you may not be reliable. Even if you mean no harm and your motives are pure, it is not up to you to decide whether or not a secret should be told or kept. Many a relationship has suffered permanent damage when a secret has been revealed. Life is simpler and happier the more we avoid being the keeper of others’ secrets. I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.


South Carolina Children’s Thetatre

SUPPORT

Artisphere

Help Support Greenville’s Arts Scene The arts have suffered greatly due to COVID-19. Financial losses could exceed over $20 million by the end of the year. Please support your favorite arts groups during this time so that they have the resources to provide outstanding programs and services to you once the pandemic subsides. If you would like to support the Metropolitan Arts Council, please go to greenvilleARTS.com/donate.

Scan the QR code with your smartphone camera.


Word Count

YOUNG HEARTS FROM WR ITER SUSA N ZURENDA’S DEBUT NOVEL , THE TR AJECTORY OF T WO COUSINS IS A LTERED FOREVER ON A FATEF UL SUMMER DAY by Susan Zurenda

This excerpt, “Ch. 1, June 1959” is from Bells for Eli by Susan Zurenda. Copyright © 2020 by Susan Zurenda. Used by permission of Mercer University Press.

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JUNE, 1959

he day before Eli’s third birthday, in early morning with the heat yet bearable, Mama and I dug in the soil along the stepping stones to our front door. She wielded a spade and I dug with a spoon. On June 4, it was late in the season to plant summer flowers, but I wanted them, and my mother surrendered. The day before—Mama has told me the prophetic story many times—I picked a stalk from white, feathery wildflowers in the corner of our lot and walked across the street to show Mary Lily. My aunt was working among her flowering perennials—phlox, columbine, and salvia—the names exotic and the blossoms alluring. “Oh, Adeline,” she exclaimed, “you have Queen Anne’s Lace blossoming early this year. There’s not a wildflower that grows more beautiful.” I imagine her sweeping her arms open in that way she has, as though she is gliding through water. She told me then a legend of the dark purplish red in the center of Queen Anne’s Lace. That it formed when a magic queen spinning lace petals onto the flower pricked her finger and spilled a single drop of blood. I was sad that such a lovely creation bore this stain, and she soothed me by saying the blemish was the heart of the flower’s beauty. I want to grow flowers like you, I told Mary Lily. That evening, she called my mother, and the next morning we made a trip to the garden store.

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Some people can retain early memories, but for me, this is not true. For me, the day of the marigolds is my only detailed memory during the year when I was just over midway to my fourth birthday. I can close my eyes and still see the half-planted row of robust orange plants laid out along the stones—the only flowers I’ve ever known my mother to put into the earth. The other half remained undisturbed in their little plastic cartons. I am exactly seven months older than Eli. My birthday is November 5. Had I been born several days earlier, I would have been a grade ahead of my cousin. Instead, by missing the November 1 deadline, I was the oldest in my class. Those few days connecting Eli and me according to grade we thought a fortune of fate. It was our parents who put the idea in our young heads, for they knew how a moment changed everything. How devotion might be born from catastrophe. I was patting dirt around a seedling while Mama held the fragile stalk steady when a loud and alarming cry shook us from our task. We looked up to see Pot—he’d been working in the yard—run from the side door of the Winfield house with Eli in his arms. Mary Lily stood on the front porch watering ferns, and I watched her wide skirt fan out into a circle as she nearly stumbled in her haste down the white wooden steps toward Pot. Her straw hat flopped down low over her forehead. Mama pulled off her gardening gloves, and I tried to dash across the street, but she caught me. “No, Delia,” she said. Her hands were tight on my shoulders. “Something’s wrong with Eli,” I wailed. “Whatever it is, we don’t need to hamper them,” she said. My mother shoved the new gardening gloves into the waist band of her blue, checked pedal pushers. I liked seeing my mama relaxed in her pedal pushers because in those days she nearly always wore a dress. She wasn’t so fixed up as June Cleaver, but she did wear, perpetually, the same shirtwaist dresses, cinched with a narrow belt, coupled with an apron around her middle. Mama took my hand. Hers was damp. Together we hurried to the edge of our front yard, close enough to hear, but we did not cross the street. Pot had caught up to Mary Lily at the bottom of the steps. We were in hearing range, but he talked so fast I had to grasp at phrases. Pot Hawkins works for the Winfields, but to say he’s their gardener hardly begins to identify his place in their world. His family has been connected to Mary Lily’s family maybe since the end of slavery. All I know is he and his mother Caro have lived in their little house out in the country on Lauderdale land all my life. “That Red Devil Lye in the Coca-Cola bottle Mr. Gene done left on the back stoop,” I heard him say. “For them balloons.” And then for a while I could not follow the


Susan Zurenda is a former creative writing instructor and a current book publicist for Magic Time Literary Publicity. Her debut novel, Bells for Eli (Mercer University Press, March 2020), was selected as a Winter 2020 Okra Pick by the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance. Zurenda has won a number of regional short fiction awards, including the South Carolina Fiction Prize (twice), the Porter Fleming Competition, and The Southern Writers Symposium Emerging Writers Fiction Contest. For more, visit susanzurenda.com.

words until I heard, “Mister Eli drunk some of it.” I heard Eli breathing, even from across the street. I thought he was choking because his face was contorted, his cheeks sucking in. “My God. Oh, God. Help me, Pot. Get Ellison into the house. Milk. He needs milk,” Mary Lily screamed. My mother began to run toward our house, pulling me by the hand. “What is Red Devil Lye?” I sputtered as I slipped and staggered alongside her, trying to keep my arm in its socket. But she didn’t answer. Inside the house, she made a call and I heard her say the name of our street. Then she sat with her head in her hands. “What is Red Devil Lye?” I asked again. “It cleans drains, but my brother must have been using it to blow up balloons for the party.” “Did Uncle Gene hurt Eli?” I asked. “I’m sorry, baby,” she said, and smoothed my hair. “I can’t explain it. I have to be quiet and think what to do.”

She picked up a pencil and paper and began to write. The next thing I remember was the deafening shriek of the ambulance siren and Mama jolting from her chair. Again, she grabbed my hand and began to run. I kept up better this time, and unlike before, we crossed the street. Yet, we stood back, waiting. I watched terrified as two men in white, waist-length coats brought Eli out on a stretcher. His arms bent in at the elbows and stuck out like wings. I saw his mouth opening and closing and then he vomited on himself. I heard him heaving. One of the men took the bottom of the sheet covering Eli and wiped away the yellow spew. Mary Lily hurried behind the stretcher but before she climbed into the ambulance, she looked toward Mama. She was crying while she talked. “Call Dr. Crawford and tell him we are on our way to the hospital in Columbia, not Green Branch.” My mother and about everyone else in town worshipped Dr. Crawford. He had stayed with my mother the whole twenty-four hours she was in labor with me, napping on a cot nearby. As a child I loved our doctor, but I feared him, too, for visits to his office often resulted in a painful shot of penicillin. Even with a temperature of 103 degrees and a throat so swollen with pus I could hardly swallow without tears, I was never so sick that I didn’t dread the needle burning into my hip. So at the mention of Dr. Crawford, I knew Eli must be very sick.

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6

YEARS IN A ROW

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DO YOU SEE WHAT WE SEE? Fear. Anxiety. Sadness. The same emotions that many of us are experiencing in these uncertain times are what those who have a mental illness live with every day. As we face the future with courage and optimism, we ask you to rethink your attitude toward mental health. From stigma and shame to support and understanding. From fear and despair to empathy and hope. This is what we at NAMI Greenville see as we change minds about mental illness. There is hope – and help – at NAMI.

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World-renowned mixed martial arts champion Stephen

“Thompson W onderboy” trains a new generation at Upstate Karate to embrace the lessons of the ring BY

CAROLYN ADAMS

/

PHOTOGR APHY BY

PAUL MEHAFFEY

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STEPHEN THOMPSON IS ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS MEN ON THE PLANET. A MIXED MARTIAL ARTIST WITH A FOUNDATION IN KICKBOXING AND KARATE, HE HAS FOUGHT FOR THE UFC WELTERWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP BELT TWICE AND IS WIDELY CONSIDERED ONE OF THE GREATEST STRIKERS IN UFC HISTORY. His toughness is unquestionable—in his most recent fight, a decisive win over Vicente Luque last November, Thompson broke both his hands. It would be understandable to assume that achievement in combat sports is Thompson’s singular goal, an all-consuming passion that overshadows all else. It would be understandable, but incorrect. Son of Ray Thompson, founder of Upstate Karate in Simpsonville, Stephen Thompson was born into a martial arts family—a family that keeps on expanding. Uncle to thirteen nieces and nephews, he jokes that they are “building an army.” Thompson is the head coach of the children’s program at Upstate Karate, where he teaches students from age three to thirteen. “That,” he says, “is my first love.” Upstate Karate prides itself on instilling values of respect, self-control, perseverance, modesty, and integrity into its students. “When they come see us, the parents learn real quick what we’re about,” Thompson says. It is a way of being that he illustrates on the biggest stage in the sport. “When our students see me inside of the Octagon, they learn a little bit about who I am and I think that makes an impact. How do you act in a loss; how do you carry yourself in a win? There’s no bragging or showboating. You win in good manner, and you lose in good manner.”

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(above) Between training for UFC fights and teaching students at Upstate Karate, Stephen Thompson also models for Hollywood talent agency WME-IMG.

(opposite) Founded by Ray Thompson in the early 1980s, Upstate Karate in Simpsonville instructs hundreds of students in mixed martial arts, while also instilling virtues of self-control, respect, and integrity.


Thompson has had more than one opportunity to +demonstrate the sort of grace under pressure that Upstate

It would be understandable to assume that achievement in combat sports is Thompson’s singular goal, an allconsuming passion that overshadows all else. It would be understandable, but incorrect.

Karate teaches. In his first fight against then-champion Tyron Woodley at UFC 205 in 2016, the judges declared the contest a draw—although many felt the win should have been awarded to Thompson. A rematch the next year once again saw Woodley retain the title, with the majority of MMA media believing Thompson was once again the rightful winner. “I learn more about myself in a loss. And I think these kids, these parents, use that as well when things don’t go their way. And to me that is what it is all about. That puts a smile on my face. It makes everything I do worth it.” While Thompson did not wind up with the UFC Welterweight belt at UFC 205, he did come away with an unexpected bonus from that trip to New York City. After owning the UFC for sixteen years, Lorenzo and Frank Fertitta had just sold the promotion for $4 billion to Hollywood talent agency WME-IMG. Spotted by IMG talent agents, Thompson was offered a modeling opportunity. “I said, ‘I don’t know what you’re going to do with a 35-year-old, but I’ll give it a shot.’” An elite competitor for more than twenty years now, Thompson’s first experiences in front of the camera kickboxing left him nervous. “Oh, I was terrible,” he says. “But I’ve learned to love it, and I’m very comfortable doing it.” Thompson’s best shot for the IMG talent agents has resulted in a high-profile campaign for Van Heusen, along with other modeling work. He is featured on the IMG models website and finds himself in front of the camera pretty regularly these days. GQ created a web series featuring Thompson humorously breaking down action sequences in martial arts movies. “It’s fun for me,” he says. “I don’t see it as work.” In a sport chock-full of brash and brutal personalities, Thompson stands apart. An intellectual fighter, his assessment of his competitors is always a calm and cool analysis. The trash talking and personal insults sometimes used by others in the UFC are markedly absent from his rhetoric, and Thompson is not impacted by the trash talking of others. “I know what these guys are trying to do—they’re trying to get a rise out of you, they’re trying to beat you mentally before you’re even out there.” But with his firm grounding in the martial arts and his years of experience in competition, Thompson is able to stay anchored in his own process. “I’ve really honed in on it in the last seven years, fighting in the UFC. I can’t say it’s perfected; it’s something you can’t perfect. But some guys will pace for two hours before a fight. It wears them out and affects them negatively.” As for Thompson, “I know my body. I know I can sleep right

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“When our students see me inside of the Octagon, they learn a little bit about who I am, and I think that makes an impact. How do you act in a loss; how do you carry yourself in a win? There’s no bragging or showboating. You win in good manner, and you lose in good manner.”

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before I go out there. I do a little ritual where I pray with my dad and he tells me, ‘No matter what, I’m still going to love you, your family and friends love you, so go out there and have some fun.’ That always calms me down and keeps me level-headed as I step out there.” When asked if his faith is part of why he is able to + maintain that level-headedness, he says simply, “I think so.” He adds, “Some people ask, ‘How can you be a Christian and go out there and hurt people?’ But it isn’t personal. And there’s just no sense in hating your opponent. I know some guys want to dislike their opponent. They feel they need to get into that headspace. I’ve gone in there and fought my friends. Rory McDonald, Patrick Côté, those guys are my friends, and we went in there and beat the crap out of each other.” (Thompson won both fights.) Thompson has even gone so far as to apologize to an opponent mid-fight. Besides, “I have 600 some students watching every move that I make.” For Thompson, his first love—teaching—is never far from his mind. Although Upstate Karate has changed locations multiple time since its founding in 1983—its current spot is a 20,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art space in Simpsonville—elite UFC fighter Thompson is still known as “Mr. Stephen.” He laughs as he describes the no-big-deal attitude of the students. “‘Oh, that’s just Mr. Stephen, we’ll see him tomorrow.’ It’s a small town, and everybody knows everybody,” he says.

WHEN THOMPSON IS OUT AND ABOUT IN SIMPSONVILLE

(opposite) Although Thompson has failed to capture the UFC Welterweight Championship belt in his two attempts, he’s gaming for a third chance.

(above) At Upstate Karate’s 20,000-square-foot gym in Simpsonville, Thompson serves as the head coach of the children’s program, a training opportunity he considers his “first love.”

or Greenville, he is left largely alone. “As soon as I go to Charlotte, Atlanta, New York, Las Vegas, they recognize you, and when one person asks for an autograph, they’ll all jump in.” Thompson adds, “I don’t mind that at all,” but one gets the feeling he appreciates the peace that his hometown of Simpsonville offers him. As ever, his focus shifts to students. “I grew up here, and I know what martial arts has done for me. Not just in the sense of being a good fighter, but it gives you something back that a lot of these other sports don’t give you.” Thompson is clear on his current goals. He would like to retire later rather than sooner, and his eyes are still on that UFC Welterweight Championship Belt. When he does leave the sport, he likes the idea of working as a commentator and pursuing other opportunities his IMG agents send his way. But one thing is for certain—teaching the children at Upstate Karate will remain his first love. For more on Upstate Karate, go to upstatekarate.com.

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eat drink FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Popular on social media, pop-up dinner concepts like TAKAM amplify our to-go options.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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E D • CITY DISH

At her weekly pop-ups, Nikki Evangelista (right) turns out tasty Filipino fare such as an ube flan cake (left), lumpia (right), and vinegar-braised chicken adobo (far right).

FILIPINO FLAVOR NIK K I EVA NGELISTA CREATES FESTI VE FOOD THROUGH HER DINNER POP-UP, TA K A M by M. Linda Lee • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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rowing up in the Philippines, Nikki Evangelista never had the opportunity to help her mother and grandmother prepare meals. “In the Philippines, we have really small kitchens, so there was no room for more than one cook,” she explains. “My job was to wash the dishes.” Nikki was 13 in 2011 when her family moved to Simpsonville, where, thankfully, their new kitchen accommodated more people. That’s where her passion for cooking took root. Although Evangelista’s background is in visual arts rather than culinary arts, she now puts her creativity where her mouth is through

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dinner pop-ups that spotlight her native dishes. Encouraged by family and friends, Nikki began doing small pop-ups in 2019 under the moniker takám, a Tagalog word meaning “to crave something delicious.” She started out offering Filipino pastries, cookies, and desserts last July at her first event at Savereign in the Village of West Greenville, thanks to the plant shop’s owner, AJ Arellano, who offered his space for the evening. Takam’s first dinner pop-up followed in September at Junto coffee shop in Taylors. With help from her mother and her Filipino friend Elisabeth Watkins, a baker at GB&D, Evangelista hosted a traditional Kamayan-style meal where all the food is laid out on the table and diners eat with their hands. That led to pop-ups at The Whale, Sweet Sippin’, and Bar Margaret, and it wasn’t long before Evangelista’s experiments with Filipino food had won an enthusiastic audience. In March and April, Takam held sway at Bar Margaret until the


text here

pandemic hit. When restaurants reopened in May, Chef Alex George invited Nikki to hold weekly dinner pop-ups at GB&D. Every Monday night for the foreseeable future—until Evangelista fulfills her goal of establishing a permanent base for Takam—she will be taking online orders for pickup at The Commons. Salty, sweet, sour, and funky is how Nikki describes the cuisine she grew up eating. Balancing these flavors is key to Filipino cooking, a mashup of Spanish, Chinese, Southeast Asian, and American influences. “What makes our food Filipino is the funkiness of common ingredients like bagoong (fermented shrimp paste), pinapa (dried fish flakes), patis (fish sauce), and brined eggs,” she says. Garlic, onions, and ginger compose the Filipino equivalent of mirepoix (the diced vegetable base for many sauces in French cooking technique), while vinegar, soy sauce, and coconut milk form the backbone of pork, chicken, and seafood entrées.

Takam’s founder considers chicken adobo, with its pungent braise of vinegar and soy sauce, to be comfort food. The national dish of the Philippines, adobo is served at her pop-ups alongside garlic rice and tasty pork and cabbage lumpia (fried spring rolls). Evangelista’s ube tacos—made from a type of purple yam grown in the Philippines—were inspired by blue-corn tacos she tasted on a trip to Miami. Ube, in the form of jam, also flavors crinkle cookies for dessert. For Nikki, Takam is all about sharing the Filipino way of life through food. “In high school and college, I used my culture as a subject in my art,” she recalls. Now she uses food to make that connection, and her dishes are so good that she often sells out in an hour. “It’s amazing to me that we’re the ones who are sharing this food—and we’re getting so many folks to join in the party.” Follow Takam’s events on Instagram at @takamgvl or at facebook.com/takamgvl.

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E D • OPEN BAR

Colombian couple Andres Camargo and Rocío Salazar (right) opened Unlocked Coffee Roasters in Poe West, where they roast and serve Colombian coffee with traditional Colombian foods, such as pandebono (above). 556 Perry Ave, Ste B116; (864) 263-7695, unlockedcoffee.com

CUP OF LOVE

A COLOMBI A N COUPLE CULTI VATES COMMUNIT Y AT UNLOCKED COFFEE ROASTERS by Andrew Huang • photography by Eli Warren

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hen I walk up to Unlocked Coffee Roasters at Poe West, I am not expecting to find a love letter to Colombia. It’s billed as a specialty coffee shop and roastery, and that makes sense next to a small-batch chocolatier, a European-style brewery, and a gym founded by a former Clemson football player. But Unlocked is most definitely a love letter, too. The coffee is mostly Colombian. The pastries are Colombian. The artwork and mugs are sourced from Colombian artisans. The overwhelming hospitality is most definitely Colombian. Even the coffee roaster is from Colombia. You can credit Andres Camargo and Rocío Salazar for that point of inflection. Unlocked’s husband and wife coowners grew up in Colombia (the world’s largest producer of arabica coffee beans) before immigrating to the United States. “Everything in Colombia is about coffee,” says Salazar. “Every day you have coffee, every day you speak about coffee, and most relationships are built on coffee.” It’s so integral to Colombian identity that even the national soccer team is nicknamed “Los Cafeteros,” or “The Coffee Growers.” But a career in coffee wasn’t a foregone conclusion for Camargo or Salazar. Camargo worked in insurance and graduated from USC Upstate’s business school before Unlocked, while Salazar has a marketing background

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and works in finance. During business school, Camargo realized that entrepreneurship was about more than just making a living for himself. “I understood that having a local business was a way to generate jobs for the community and be a part of the community, as well,” he says. “And during the process of going to school and working, coffee shops became a part of my life. It was just a perfect space to do anything.” Those realizations melded with Camargo and Salazar’s love for their homeland and became the foundation for Unlocked. Camargo began educating himself about specialty coffee—growing, roasting, tasting, serving—with help from local importer Ally Coffee. “Anytime I do anything, I really want to do it well,” says Camargo. “I put myself on a level where I would be a professional at what I’m doing.” Colombians haven’t historically had access to the best coffees their farmers produce. Europeans and Americans are willing to pay more for high-grade coffee, meaning Colombia’s best products have largely been promoted and interpreted by a specialty coffee industry not known for its diversity. There is a measure of righteousness in the fact that Camargo and Salazar serve Colombian coffee as Colombians—an “integrity of culture,” as Salazar puts it. While Unlocked is Camargo and Salazar’s love letter to their homeland, it’s also an invitation to all of Greenville: come, make conversation, do business, have a date, study, or escape for a moment, and do it all over a cup of coffee. It is a welcome invitation, especially in these anxious, uncertain, and tumultuous times. Because if you can’t find refuge or relief over a cup of good coffee, what can you rely on?


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McDaniel Village • 1922 Augusta Street, Suite 109 M-F 9:30-5:30 by appointment

864-271-1812 • GarrisonOpticians.com

864-467-0085 | MARCHANTCO.COM | INFO@MARCHANTCO.COM PHOTO CREDIT: KIM DELOACH PHOTOGRAPHY SEPT EM B ER 2020 I

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E D • KITCHEN AID

HAVE YOUR PICK TUR N A PPLE -PICK ING A BUNDA NCE INTO A FR AGR A NT SPICE CA KE by Kathryn Davé • photography by Jivan Davé

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think we can credit apple-picking’s rapid ascendancy as a Peak Fall Activity to Instagram. The apple orchards with their rows of heavily laden trees, hay bales, and working tractors make a perfect photo backdrop for this early autumn ritual—and in the South, it truly is a performance of fall, as temperatures can hover in the 90s weeks after school has started. Local apples arrive to our farmers markets as soon as they’re ready, so why are we all driving north to join crowds of people in pursuit of the same thing? Rituals root us, bridging the past to the present and connecting us to the bigger picture. September is heavily perfumed with tradition—freshly sharpened pencils, shiny school buses, new beginnings—but the fragrance is fainter this time around. So amid all the change, I’m leaning hard into yearly traditions where I can, even small ones like apple-picking adventures to snag warm apple cider doughnuts from a busy orchard. An essential component of my typical apple-picking trip is coming home with far more apples than we can eat. The resulting glut of apples always inspires new baking projects. This year, I dusted off my Bundt pan in hopes of producing a dense apple spice cake that could make an ideal companion to afternoon coffee. Heavy on warming spices and finished with a brown-sugar glaze, the cake is rich with butter and apples and complements coffee as well as I hoped. There are still apples on my counter, but at the rate I’m baking lately, there won’t be for long. Maybe I’ll take two trips to the apple orchard this year—start a new tradition.

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Heavy on warming spices and finished with a brown-sugar glaze, the cake is rich with butter and apples and complements coffee as well as I hoped.


Apple spice cake brings the easy comfort of familiar fall traditions—and it’s perfect with an afternoon cup of coffee.

GLAZED APPLE SPICE CAKE

Yield: 12 servings

INGREDIENTS: Cake Nonstick cooking spray 3 cups all-purpose flour 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. cinnamon ¾ tsp. kosher salt ½ tsp. nutmeg ¼ tsp. cloves ¼ tsp. allspice 1 ¾ pounds Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, grated 1 ½ cups (3 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature 1 ½ cups sugar, plus more for dusting pan ½ cup brown sugar 1 tsp. lemon zest 3 eggs 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice Glaze ½ cup brown sugar ¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter ¼ cup heavy whipping cream 1 tsp. vanilla extract ½ tsp. fresh lemon juice ½ tsp. kosher salt

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Preheat oven to 325ºF. Spray 12-cup Bundt pan liberally with nonstick spray, making sure to cover all the crevices, and sprinkle pan lightly with sugar (to prevent sticking). 2. Sift flour and the next 6 ingredients into a medium bowl; combine well. Using a clean kitchen towel, squeeze out excess liquid from apples and measure 2 cups grated apples. 3. Using an electric mixer, beat butter, both sugars, and lemon zest until fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Mix in vanilla and lemon juice. Carefully beat in flour mixture. Mix in grated apples. Spoon batter into prepared pan (it should be thick). Bake cake until a tester inserted near the center comes out clean, about 50 minutes to one hour. Cool in pan on rack 20 minutes. 4. Meanwhile, to make glaze: stir all ingredients in a small nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until sugar dissolves and mixture comes to boil. Reduce heat to medium; whisk until glaze is smooth, about one minute. Remove from heat. 5. Invert cake onto a rack set over baking sheet. Using a small skewer, pierce holes all over the top of the warm cake. Pour glaze slowly over top, a little at a time, allowing it to be absorbed before adding more. Cool cake 30 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature. FOR MORE RECIPES: TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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Dining Guide

T HE BE S T B A R S, C A F É S & RE S TAUR A N T S

AMERICAN The Anchorage With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. A hoard of fresh harvest arrives daily from area growers, like Horseshoe Farm in Travelers Rest, which informs McPhee’s creative dishes. The restaurant’s menu and stellar cocktail program are beloved dining experiences, and now The Anchorage is offering a weekly online market featuring pantry items, wine, and more. $$-$$$, D, SBR.

Closed Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

Augusta Grill Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution featuring upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 2420316, augustagrill.com

Bacon Bros. Public House You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Bacon Bros. Public House gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a specialty sandwich, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

The Burrow The comfort of a home-cooked meal, plus the ease of an elevated dining experience: the newest restaurant from Josh Beeby of Barley’s and Trappe Door fame does it all. A cozy setting encourages conversation and gathering, while artful dishes and cocktails serve a sense of indulgence. You can’t miss with the chargrilled octopus or the whiskey sour. $$, D, SBR. 2017A Augusta St. (864) 412-8677, theburrowgville.com

Fork and Plough The quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly, with its casual, familyfriendly feel, Fork and Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes. $$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Tuesday. 1629 E North St. (864) 609-4249, forkandplough.com

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Foxcroft Wine Co. Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and pan-seared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass. $-$$, D (Tues–Sun), shop open 10am– 11pm (Tues–Sat). Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 906-4200, foxcroftwine. com/greenville

GB&D The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites— like the killer burger on a house-made brioche bun—star at lunch. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of creative dishes, from its new location at The Commons.

$$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Tues. 147 Welborn St, Ste B1. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

Halls Chophouse The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots along the Reedy River with a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers). Try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash, and don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri–Sat), D,

SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com

Larkin’s on the River Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily),

SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

Northampton Wine + Dine Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar, where elegant bar bites accompany wines by the glass or bottle. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$, L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

Oak Hill Café & Farm A former faculty member in Furman University’s environmental science department, Lori Nelsen blazes a new trail in the restaurant world with co-owner

S E P TE M B E R 2 0 2 0 I t o w n c a r o l i n a . c o m

Chef David Porras. The duo fulfills a long-time dream of creating a healthy, sustainable, and quality dining experience with an on-site farm and culinary research lab. Lovers of food innovation will not want to miss their Saturday night multicourse tasting, an ode to nature’s bounty. $$-$$$$, B, L, D, SBR. Mon–Sat. 2510

Poinsett Hwy. oakhillcafe.com

Restaurant 17 Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Haydn Shaak (formerly of The Cliffs) like the woodfired octopus with pine nut romesco, baby beets, and Georgia olive oil or the Johnny Cake with country-style prosciutto. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées from Chef Scott Kroener range from sashimi-grade tuna and panseared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Soby’s Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D,

SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

Topsoil Kitchen + Market If they can grow it, locally source it, or make it in-house, they will. Located in the former Williams Hardware space in Travelers Rest, and just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, this restaurant and market combo serves up fresh and modern veggie-driven dishes. Find unique wines and cocktails on the menu, too. $-$$$, D. Closed Mon–Wed. 13

S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 517-4617, topsoilrestaurant.com

Tandem Creperie & Coffeehouse Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest.

(864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

Urban Wren This newcomer in the historic Markley Station fashions a chic city atmosphere where the food takes its cues from the restaurant’s carefully curated wine selection. Round up some friends and share a selection of seasonal small plates, such as cauliflower drop dumplings and rye whiskey beef short ribs. $$$-$$$$. D. Closed Tues. 116 N Markley St. (864) 867-1081, urbanwrenwinery.com

Woodside Bistro Down-home comfort food gets a fresh spin here, where portobello burgers, wedge salads, pesto chicken sandwiches, and rainbow vegan bowls color the menu. A casual go-to spot, Woodside aims to be a welcoming dining destination for all— whether you’re a vegan or meat lover. $, L.

Closed Sunday. 1112 Woodside Ave. (864) 203-2333, woodsidebistro.com

BARS & BREWERIES 13 Stripes Brewery Providing patrons and patriots alike with a wide porch area and spacious interior bar, 13 Stripes rotates a loaded arsenal of aptly-titled suds—including the Rise & Fight Again IPA and the Sgt. Molly American wheat—and rolls out session beers, IPAs, porters, and other seasonal kegs that pair perfectly with one of 13 Stripes’ “ration plates,” laden with freshcut meats and cheeses. Taylors Mill, 250

Mill St, Ste PW 3101, Taylors. (864) 3491430, 13stripesbrewery.com

Bar Margaret This craft-cocktail bar takes over the former Village Grind and GB&D space on Pendleton Street with a funky fresh vibe and an eclectic variety of drinks, paired with bar bites. Try the Damn Good Burger featuring double beef patties, American cheese, onion rings, and Mars mayo on house-made brioche, served with a spicy pickle spear. Mixologists Sarah Cochran and Chris George shepherd the cocktail program, and while curated creations are their speciality (try the cOlá fashioned), patrons can find approachable brews, wine, and non-alcoholic bevs. $-$$.

L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. barmarg.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $ $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR


SWORDFISH COCKTAIL CLUB The term cocktail club calls to mind a time in history when pre- (and post-) dinner drinks were not only expected but revered among friends for an evening of fun. Swordfish resurrects this perspective in downtown Greenville, with a classic collection of handcrafted cocktails and small plates that are as stunning as they are delectable. $$, D. 220 E Coffee St. Thurs–Sat, 5pm–12am. (864) 4349519, swordfishcocktails.com

Photograph by Andrew Huang

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Birds Fly South Ale Project Birds Fly South Ale Project has come home to roost in Hampton Station. Though closed for production Monday through Wednesday, the open-air taproom is the perfect end-of-week place to drain a cold glass while noshing on local food truck fare. Expect to find a rotating roster, such as the Biggie Mango, Eldorado saison, or the 2 Hop session IPA. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext. (864) 412-8825, bfsbeer.com

Carolina Bauerhaus If you’re hoping to beat the summer heat, combat the swelter with good friends and good beer at Carolina Bauernhaus. Now open in the new Poe West area, this brewery sports an impressive tap list, as well as wicker picnic tables, hanging chair swings, and a smorgasbord of yard games. Take a load off in their outdoor patio space while sipping your favorite ale. $, L, D. Closed Wednesday. 556 Perry Avenue. (864) 553-4371, carolinabauernhaus.com

NEIGHBORHOOD BAR & GRILL

Now Serving Lunch 11-2 Come join us inside or on our patio! Daily Specials - Craft Cocktails - 1/2 Off Wine on Sundays Order online theburrowgville.com – Open Sun-Thurs 3pm-9pm & Fri-Sat 3pm-10pm

2017A AUGUSTA ST, GREENVILLE, SC 29605 | THEBURROWGVILLE.COM

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READER’S

LENS PHOTO CONTEST

The Greenville Journal invites you to share your best photos of what the Upstate has to offer. Each month one Editor’s Choice winner will win a $50 gift card to an Upstate business. Three honorable mention photos will also receive a $25 gift card to an Upstate business. Winning entries will be published in the Greenville Journal. SEPTEMBER 2020 THEME:

THINGS WE LOVE ABOUT GREENVILLE For details on each month’s contest, or to submit your photo and vote, visit:

GreenvilleJournal.com/ReadersLens

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The Community Tap / Tap Trailside Convenience, expertise, and atmosphere collide at The Community Tap. Choose from a wide selection of local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. Check out their second location at The Commons and enjoy a glass with food from Automatic Taco, GB&D, or Methodical Coffee. 217 Wade

Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525; Tap Trailside at The Commons, 147 Welborn St. thecommunitytap.com

The Eighth State Brewing Co. Housed in the old Claussen Bakery on Augusta, this brewpub is hoppy hour heaven. Find a variety of craft beers on tap, but branch out with the pub’s select draft cocktails or beer slushies. Live music, local art, and a rotating menu featuring shared plates and charcuterie round out the experience. 400 Augusta St. (864) 609-

4590, upstatecraftbeer.com

Fireforge Craft Beer Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The smallbatch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885,

fireforge.beer

Piney Mountain Bike Lounge Part taproom and part full-service cycle shop, Piney Mountain Bike Lounge offers the perfect pit stop after a long day of riding the trails. Local craft brews, wine, and cider complement a daily food truck schedule of popular mobile eateries. Kids (and adults) can enjoy the pump track out back. 20 Piney Mountain Rd, Greenville. (864) 603-2453, pineymtb.com

Quest Brewing Co. Eco-minded Quest satisfies your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout

(crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville. (864) 272-6232, questbrewing.com

Tasting Room TR Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite from the weekly wines or happy hours hosted Wednesday–Friday. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D

(Wed–Sat), Closed Mon–Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com

The Whale Originating in Asheville, this craft joint comes to South Main with a plethora of whale brews—rare and sought-after beers like the exclusive Bouton De Whale barrel sour, brewed just up the mountain in North Carolina. Having a hard time choosing? Knowledgeable staff are on hand to help you find the beer just for you. 1108 S Main St, Ste #116. (864) 263-7529, thewhalegvl.com

CAFÉS Bridge City Coffee A coffee shop with a mission, Bridge City’s philosophy is all in the name. The local roaster seeks to uphold community values by partnering with area organizations to offer employment opportunities for underprivileged teens and adults. The fresh space offers a variety of drinks crafted with in-house roasted beans. A selection of Chocolate Moose treats is also available. $-$$. B, L. Closed Sunday. 1520 Wade Hampton Blvd. bridgecity.coffee

Coffee Underground Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfastanytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info

Dobrá Tea Tea is the new coffee at this cheery café in the Village of West Greenville, where you can choose among more than 100 different types of tea from around the globe. Pair your favorite cup with a gluten-free, vegan or vegetarian snack from the list of sweets and savories. $-$$. B, L, D. 1278 Pendleton St. (864) 520-1832, dobrateasc.com

Due South Coffee Roasters Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. In their new digs, the coffee shop sports a café vibe, with baked goodies like Swamp Fox Doughnuts complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320

Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com


Grateful Brew A brew joint where you can enjoy both the non-alcoholic and alcoholic varieties, Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order Counter Culture espressos, pour-overs, and locally crafted brews. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com

Kuka Juice Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out coldpressed craft with health-minded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into the Taco ’Bout It bowl with romaine, walnut meat, salsa fresca, black beans, avocado, and pepitas with cilantro lime vinaigrette. Paninis, bowls, soups, toasts, smoothies, and more are also available. $, B, L. 580 Perry Ave,

Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

Methodical Coffee Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, wine varieties, and now a café menu, it’s all worth the rave. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D; 207 Wade Hampton Blvd; 147 Welborn St. methodicalcoffee.com

Mountain Goat Greenville A destination for brews and bikes, Mountain Goat proudly serves Methodical Coffee, along with more than 40 types of beer and wine. The sleek, industrial space provides a friendly atmosphere to sip on your beverage of choice, but be sure to check the food truck schedule. Plus, every purchase helps provide tutoring, mentoring, and job opportunities for at-risk youth in the community. $-$$. B, L, Closed Sunday. 120 Shaw St. mountaingoatgvl.com

O-CHA Tea Bar A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 283-6702, ochateabaronline.com

Southern Pressed Juicery A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

Sun Belly Café The chefs at this health food joint on the Westside plan lunch specials daily, based on what their farmers harvest in the morning. Week by week, the full plantbased menu changes to accommodate seasonal dishes and fresh, wholesome

ingredients. The wild mushroom pho is all the rage, but if you’re on the go, pick up a tasty $6 vegan salad. Options for meal prep and family-sized lasagnas mean healthy cooking is always on the table. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday. 1409 West Blue Ridge Dr. (404) 309-7791

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is wood-fired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds. $, B, L, D. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 2553385, swamprabbitcafe.com

The Village Grind Tucked between art galleries and eclectic shops in the heart of Pendleton Street, The Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by a variety of local roasters and serves flaky treats. $, B, L.

Teahouse and Healthy Café In the Village of West Greenville Mention this ad, get 10% off your next order!

1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

Two Chefs Catering & Café Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday.

644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

Upcountry Provisions Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for breakfast or an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormone-free meat on just-baked white focaccia. $, B, L, D. Closed Sundays. 6809

1278 Pendleton St. Greenville 864-520-1832 dobrateasc.com

We are open and can’t wait to see you!

State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 8348433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC Asada Asada, a brick-and-mortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard, serves traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes, a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy-inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed

Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

Asia Pacific Deemed the largest Asian supermarket in Greenville, Asia Pacific also doubles as a restaurant with a host of authentic cuisine. The menu is pages long, with more than 100 options and a multitude of soups, noodles, and combinations. If you’re planning a visit, be sure your stomach is as big as your eyes. $-$$, L, D, Mon–Sun

The Bacon Bros. B.E.T. Pork belly pastrami, sunny side up egg, swiss cheese, tomato, butter lettuce, green peppercorn mayo, pumpernickle

Proudly offering you the same farm fresh “Powered by Bacon” savory meals. Visit our website for the latest menu and current hours.

10am–9pm. 420 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 603-1377, asiapacificgreenville.com

Kairos Greek Kitchen This Charleston-originated spot serves up heaping portions of traditional

3620 Pelham Road, Greenville | 864-297 6000 BaconBrosPublicHouse.com

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the Modern Way

Mediterranean cuisine, like slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the tzatziki sauce. Their choose-your-own approach leads to creative salad combos, and you can also turn any meal into a pita wrap, bowl, or platter. $-$$, L, D. 1800 Augusta St. (864) 520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com

Lemongrass Thai This Main Street institution’s long, lofty interior sets a calming tone for its authentic Thai cuisine. The menu features standards like pad Thai and outstanding curries, but also chef’s specials like Soft Shell Crab and Clay Pot Seafood. $-$$, L, D. 106

N Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-9988, lemongrassthai.net

Lee B. Vining

Military Veteran | Co-Founder The Modern Family of Companies

864-897-9641 | Lee@ModernRECon.com A few months after the 9-11 attack, Lee joined the Army where he served for almost a decade. As a result of years spent in Iraq medical issues forced Lee to leave the Army and start a new career. Lee began helping Veterans find suitable housing, employment and explore their benefits. Through helping fellow Veterans, Lee realized he had a true passion for sharing the experience of home ownership. Lee delivers superb service by combining technology, passion and Class A customer service with every client he meets. Lee is highly recommended by both buyers and sellers alike and treats every client like family.

Mekong Taste the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, and crispy shallots, and the spring and summer rolls. Also try the Vietnamese crêpes or the pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from the restaurant’s home-grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Monday. 2013

Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

Pita House The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

Sacha’s Café Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on Colombian food at Sacha’s. Arepas are available with ingredients like beans, chorizo, avocado, shredded beef, and more stuffed inside (rellenas) or piled on top (encima). The patacones, or deep-fried plantains, are thick and sweet. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com

Sushi Masa It doesn’t have to be Nobu in L.A. to be great sushi. This Japanese joint boasts a large menu for both lunch and dinner, with plenty of affordable options. Each entrée, such as the shrimp tempura, is packed with protein and comes with soup, salad, and rice. The sushi roll list is extensive (choose from 30 different types), and all rolls are under $10. $ -$$,

L, D. Closed Sunday. 8590 Pelham Rd, Greenville. (864) 288-2227, sushimasa. webs.com

582 Perry Avenue, Greenville, SC 29611 864-236-4111 | www.ModernRecon.com info@ModernRECon.com

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Swad Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding

their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D. 1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089

TruBroth TruBroth is an establishment that takes healing arts and blends them seamlessly into deliciously crafted meals. Appease your curiosity with a visit to this Travelers Rest gem, which offers a detailed mix of Vietnamese staples and health happy bites. $$, L, D. 36A S Main St, Travelers Rest. Sun–Thurs. (864) 6100513, trubrothcoffee.com

EUROPEAN Bake Room The final addition to The Commons food hall, Bake Room provides a tasty touch. Naturally leavened breads and handmade pastries are baked in Wade Taylor’s German deck oven and Swedish rack oven, and are the perfect complement to a coffee at Methodical, strategically placed right next door. $, B,

L. 147 Welborn St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, 8am–3pm. @sc_bakeroom

Jianna With stellar views of Main Street from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli with local tomatoes, corn, and chanterelle mushrooms. $$-$$$, L (Sat– Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com

The Lazy Goat The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. 170 River Pl. (864)

679-5299, thelazygoat.com

Limoncello This latest Larkin’s spot serves up Italian cuisine out of the former Playwright space on River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list, curated from awardwinning vineyards across the region. After you’ve had your glass, grab a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato. $$$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com

Pasta Addict This Italian haven satisfies at West End outdoor food hall Gather GVL. From gnocchi to tortellini, indulging in cheesy goodness is easy out of their iconic cone containers. Pair your favorite bottle of vino with a bowl of fresh spaghetti alla chitarra, featuring San Marzano D.O.P. tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, toasted breadcrumbs, and Addict oil. $, D, Sunday lunch. Closed Monday. 126 Augusta St. (864) 404-0095, pastaddict.com


Ristorante Bergamo Open since 1986, Ristorante Bergamo focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

Stella’s Southern Brasserie Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second of Jason and Julia Scholz’s eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, offering a local twist on French staples—blueblack mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen—served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-

$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 626-6900, stellasbrasserie.com

PIZZA Coastal Crust Now in the Village of West Greenville, these Neapolitan-style pizza pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River Farms. Check out the aptly-named West Village pie, a classic pepperoni pizza punched up with burrata, caramelized onions, sautéed peppers, and sausage. $$,

L, D. 1254 Pendleton St. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com

D’Allesandro’s Pizza Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s brings dough heaven to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. Created with quality ingredients, the shop pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy savory pizzas, calzones, and even signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk Dr, Greenville.

(864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com

Sidewall Pizza Company Located on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street downtown, and now on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brickoven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed

Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com

Stone Pizza Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, this spot at the corner of Stone and Park avenues is ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends (beer, sports, and pizza. Stone and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with house-made mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked for a flat minute in their wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat

& Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave. (864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com

Vic’s Pizza The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this family-run walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles).

$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

REAL ESTATE

the Modern Way

World Piece From the owners of downtown’s beloved Coffee Underground, World Piece brings Chicago-style pizza to Stone Avenue. Offering a line-up of draft beers and menu features like buffalo chicken wings, salads, burgers, french fries, and, of course, savory pies, this pizza joint ensures there’s something for everyone. $-$$. L, D. 109 West Stone Ave, Ste A1. (864) 568-5221, worldpiecemenu.com

TA C O S Automatic Taco Since 2015, Nick Thomas has delivered new wonders and old favorites from his food truck, treating the tortilla as a work of art. From its new brick-and-mortar spot in The Commons, Auto continues to serve up creative takes on tacos, with standout chips and guacamole, salsa, sides, and cocktails. $-$$, L, D. 147 Welborn St. (404) 372-2266, automatictaco.com

Farmhouse Tacos Hand-crafted and locally sourced, this TR taco joint is the love child of Mexican cuisine and Southern soul food. Start the meal with a few small plates—try the fried green tomatoes or the pan-seared crab cakes—then dig into pure taco bliss with the Travelers Rest hot chicken. Go a little lighter with a farm-fresh salad, and end with the campfire s’mores. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 164 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 6100586, farmhousetacos.com

Papi’s Tacos Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. Get in, get out, and enjoy Falls Park. $, L, D. 300 River St.

(864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

White Duck Taco Shop White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or an ale from Birds Fly South’s rotation. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday &

James Akers, Jr.

Co-Founder | Broker-in-Charge The Modern Family of Companies

864-325-8413 | James@ModernRECon.com After living in Charlotte for three years, James moved to Greenville and fell in love with the Upstate. James graduated from The Wyatt Real Estate Institute in 2005. In November 2013, James was named one of the Top 99 Realtors on Twitter by WebsiteBox as well as one of the 32 Most Popular Realtor’s in America by Home Buyer Nation. James served as a Commissioner on the Greenville Municipal Elections Commission from 2015 - 2017 and is currently the Chairman of the Greater Greenville Chamber of Commerce Small Business Policy Council. James also served on the Board of Directors for The Julie Valentine Center, Greenville Forward’s Inclusion Task Force Committee, Greenville Polo Classic and the Buildings & Grounds and Communications Committees at the YWCA. He is a Leadership Greenville Class of 42 Alumnus and a Charter Member of the Greenville Rotaract. James loves serving his community and his clients.

Monday. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

Willy Taco Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta. Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the atmosphere pairs perfectly with its festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the mother clucker—topped off with a house-crafted margarita. $-$$, L, D. Closed

Monday. 217 Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

582 Perry Avenue, Greenville, SC 29611 864-236-4111 | www.ModernRecon.com info@ModernRECon.com SEPT EM B ER 2020 I

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Town Scene

Editor’s Note: Some events may have been canceled since our press deadline.

GCCA Annual Showcase | Thru Sept 25

SEPTEMBER

Columbia Museum of Art, 151 Main St, Columbia. Free with museum admission. (803) 799-2810, columbiamuseum.org

Point of view

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OXFORD BARBER CO.

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Photograph of Main Street Library in 1960, courtesy of the South Carolina Room

BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF KWAME BRATHWAITE An iconic figure of the second Harlem Renaissance, Kwame Brathwaite coalesced his compelling portraiture with the Black Is Beautiful campaign in the 1950s and ’60s. Braithwaite and his brother founded the African Jazz Arts Society and Studios, and also Grandassa Models, whose members Kwame captured in a series of “Naturally” fashion shows. The Black Is Beautiful exhibit, organized by Aperture and Kwame S. Brathwaite, pays tribute to this creative collective and its work to shift a cultural narrative.

Roman Arch by Stan Berry

Thru Sept 6


TD ESSENTIALS MARKET As this event enters its 18th year, the TD Saturday Market has changed its name and pared down its size to allow for social distancing and

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Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St, Greenville. Open during gallery hours. Free. (864) 735-3848, artcentergreenville.org

Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. Sat, 8am– noon. saturdaymarketlive.com

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Photograph of Main Street Library in 1960, courtesy of the South Carolina Room

Thru Sept 25

GCCA ANNUAL SHOWCASE Arranged in the 2,000-square-foot Main Gallery of the Greenville Center for Creative Arts in the Village of West Greenville, this year’s Annual Showcase spotlights some of the best artwork of the year, including works from the 2020 Member Show, the 2019–2020 Brandon Fellows, and the Summer Art Camp Showcase. The Member Show highlights current GCCA artists, while the Brandon Fellows include Jaz Henderson, Julius Ferguson, and Nick Burns.

safe shopping. Many of the vendors alternate weeks, but rest assured you’ll have access to a bounty of local farm products including organic vegetables, grass-fed beef, and SCcaught seafood.

SERVICE FOR ALL It was 60 years ago this month that Greenville’s public libraries were integrated. To honor the sit-ins and the determination of the city’s African-American community who helped open our libraries to all of the city’s citizens, the Hughes Main Library is sponsoring an expanded version of its exhibit Service for All. Come see the historical photographs first-hand, or visit virtually through December 31st. Hughes Main Library, 25 Heritage Green Pl, Greenville. Open during library hours. Free. (864) 527-9258, greenvillelibrary.org/ service-for-all

Service for All | Thru Oct 1

g r e e n v i l l e

THE STRETCHLAB DIFFERENCE Don’t just st r e t ch - get s tretc hed... Our team of highly trained Flexologists will help you achieve a deeper stretch than you could ever achieve on your own ®

50-MINUTE INTRO STRETCH $95 VALUE first time visit only

REDUCE MUSCLE AND JOINT PAIN INCREASE RANGE OF MOTION IMPROVE POSTURE AND FLEXIBILITY REDUCE STRESS AND RELIEVE TENSION

one-on-one assisted stretching • Increase flexibility & range of motion • Improve posture & relaxation • Improve sports performance • Reduce muscle & joint pain

Contact us to book your stretch!

1922 Augusta Street | Suite 111 | Greenville Contact |Us to Book Your Stretch! Greenville@StretchLab.com 864.808.3125 1922 Augusta St., Suite 111

Greenville, SC 29605 StretchLab.com greenville@stretchlab.com | (864) 808-3125

@stretchlabgreenville | stretchlab.com

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INDIE CRAFT PARADE SHOP EDITION Rather than cancel the Indie Craft Parade this year, the Makers Collective is reimagining the event for 2020 as a hybrid of their popular annual fall festival and their holiday pop-up shop. The Indie Craft Parade Shop will be open weekends through December 20, so there’s plenty of time to find that perfect handmade gift by one of the 100 artists whose work will be featured. 2909 Old Buncombe Rd, Greenville. Fri–Sun, 11am–5pm. makerscollective.org/ indiecraftparade

Association. Who has the best ’cue? You be the judge by casting your vote for the People’s Choice Award. Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 E Butler Rd, Mauldin. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 11am-3pm. Free. (864) 335-4862, mauldinculturalcenter.org

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SPARTANBURG SOARING! INTERNATIONAL KITE FESTIVAL The next time someone tells you to “go fly a kite,” head to Spartanburg for this international festival that celebrates kites in all their colorful glory. Launched by the Chapman Cultural Center in 2014, Spartanburg Soaring! is just the thing to get the whole family out of the house. In addition to kites filling the sky, there will be live music, food trucks, an artisan makers market, and activities for the little ones.

Barnet Park, 248 E St John St, Spartanburg. Sat, 11am–5pm. Free. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org/ spartanburg-soaring

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THE BEACH BOYS 2020 Classic-rock fans have been pickin’ up good vibrations from the California sound of the Beach Boys since the ’60s, and there’s no reason to stop now. So rev up your 409 and head

A Child’s Haven • Allen Temple CEDC • Alston Wilkes Society • Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate • Blue Tent • Camp Opportunity • Camp Spearhead • Camperdown Academy • Carolina Family Services • Catholic Charities, Diocese of Charleston • Center for Developmental Services • Children’s Cancer Partners of the Carolinas • City of Greenville Parks and Recreation Department • City of Greenville Police Department • Clarity • Clement’s Kindness Fund for the Children • Conestee Foundation • Diligent Hands Gracious Hearts • FAVOR Faces And Voices Of Recovery •

$6.5

million in grants to 82 organizations in 14 years

Feed & Seed • Foothills Family Resources • Fostering Great Ideas • Friends of the Reedy River • Furman University Bridges to a Brighter Future • Gateway House • Generation Group Homes of Greenville • Girl Scouts of SC, Mountains to Midlands • Graduate Greenville • Greenville Area Interfaith Hospitality Network • Greenville Center for Creative Arts • Greenville County Schools Food & Nutrition Services • Greenville County Schools Lifelong Learning • Greenville Free Medical Clinic • Greenville Literacy Association • Greenville Theatre • Greenville Rape Crisis & Child Abuse Center • Greenville Zoo FoundationHArvest Hope Food Bank • Greer Community Ministries • Habitat for Humanity • Harvest Hope Food Bank • Homes of Hope • Jasmine Road • Julie Valentine Center • Legacy Charter School • Legacy Early College High School • LiveWell Greenville • Loaves & Fishes • Meals on Wheels of Greenville • Mental Health America, Greenville County • Metropolitan Arts Council • Meyer Center for Special Children • Mill Community Ministries • NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness, Greenville • Naturaland Trust • Pendleton Place • Phillis Wheatley Association • Pleasant Valley Connection • Project HOPE Foundation • Project Host • Public Education Partners Greenville County • Rebuild Upstate • Safe Harbor • Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club • SC First Steps to School Readiness • Senior Action • Soteria at Work • South Carolina Children’s Theatre • Speech, Hearing and Learning Center • St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School • Surgeons for Sight • SWITCH • Taylors Free Medical Clinic • The Family Effect • The Frazee Center • The Generous Garden Project • The Music Club of Greenville for Tanglewood Middle School • The Turning Point of South Carolina • The Warehouse Theatre • TreesGreenville • Triune Mercy Center • United Ministries • Upstate Forever • Urban League of the Upstate • Washington Center • Welvista • YMCA Teen Services Branch • YouthBASE • YWCA

Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

For more information or to join Greenville Women Giving, go to our website at greenvillewomengiving.org

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Photograph by Shervin Lainez, courtesy of Shore Fire Media

Spartanburg Art Museum at the Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri, 7–9pm. $45. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

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NIGHT OUT: INTRO TO WHEEL TURNING If you’ve always wanted to take a spin on the potter’s wheel, this class at the Spartanburg Art Museum is your chance. Accomplished potter Christina Dixon will guide you through the fundamentals and help you create a piece of pottery or two to take home. Feel free to bring a friend, and be prepared to get your hands—and your clothes—dirty.

Various locations in Greenville. Thurs– Sun, times and events vary. Tickets range from $40-$400. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com

18–19

SOOIE MAULDIN BBQ COOK-OFF Featuring nearly two dozen pitmasters from around the Southeast, Mauldin’s 10th annual BBQ Cook-Off kicks off on Friday night with the Anything Butt competition that tantalizes taste buds with dishes other than barbecue. At the main event, the BBQ Cook-off, on Saturday, entries are evaluated by a panel of tasters from the SC Barbecue

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Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs, 7–9pm. $10-$30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org/thursonthepatio

17–20

EUPHORIA Just as COVID-19 has crippled restaurants, so has it taken a big bite out of Euphoria. Owing to the surge in local cases, the festival will not able to hold its large signature events this year. The good news is that Euphoria will go forward with more intimate events: lunches, classes, and wine dinners starring guest chefs and vintners— including the wildly popular Sunday Supper. Tickets are limited, so grab yours soon.

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THURSDAYS ON THE PATIO The theater may be dark for now, but you can still support Centre Stage and its upcoming season by purchasing tickets to their new fundraising events, Thursdays on the Patio. Your ticket includes reserved seating on the theater’s outdoor patio, where you can listen to live music and nosh on the evening’s featured food, plus beer and wine. Owing to social distancing, tickets are limited, so don’t wait to order yours.

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Town Scene


over to the Peace Center, where you can catch the Rock and Roll Hall of Famers performing some of their most beloved songs. Count on having fun, fun, fun, even after Daddy takes the T-Bird away.

Ben Rector: The Old Friends Acoustic Tour | Oct 16

Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mon, 7:30pm. $60-$90. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph by Shervin Lainez, courtesy of Shore Fire Media

Oct 16

BEN RECTOR: THE OLD FRIENDS ACOUSTIC TOUR Fans of Emmy-nominated singer/ songwriter Ben Rector will clamor for tickets to the Old Friends tour, a soulful acoustic recap of favorite songs from a catalog that includes seven studio albums. Rector, who started writing songs at 16, rocketed to the top 10 of the Billboard charts with his albums Brand New (2015) and Magic (2018). On his 2020 tour, Rector shares the stage with his special guest, Nashville-based singer/songwriter Cody Fry. Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 8pm. $25-$45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

PASSPORT TO DANCE

Virtual Silent Auction & Gala SEPTEMBER 13-19

International Ballet’s annual fundraising event is taking a virtual twist. Pre-register now to get text reminders for the week-long virtual silent auction. The auction will include exciting international trips, gift baskets, and other wonderful items. The week will culminate with a virtual gala presentation by International Ballet company dancers. Silent Auction: September 13-19 | Virtual Gala Presentation: September 19 at 7:30pm Preview auction items now. Bidding begins September 13.

one.bidpal.net/passport SPONSORS

1018 SOUTH BATESVILLE RD., GREER , SC 29650 | 864-879-9404 SEPT EM B ER 2020 I

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Curious About

Cremation? We are here to answer your questions. Preplanning | Burial Cemetery | Aftercare Mausoleum | Cremation

As the purse is emptied, the heart is filled. With social distancing and the health of our ladies as a top priority, it is with great pleasure we announce the 14th Annual Handbags for Hope Auction is still on! How have we taken our “Best Girls’ Night Out” in Greenville and made it even better?!

A “Girls’ Night In” of Course?! September 24, 2020 Virtual Silent Auction, 12:00 PM - 6:30 PM Virtual Live Auction Starts at 7:00 PM ....................................................................................

Serving Greenville, Pickens, Anderson and Oconee Counties

• Robinson Downtown Easley 864.859.4001

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Robinson Powdersville Road 864.442.1800

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Grab your girlfriends (or join them online) from the comfort of your own home. Pajamas are absolutely welcome as you virtually shop our exclusive and unique selection of handbags! Check out our website at scovariancancer.org to learn more and register for an event to remember!

Duckett-Robinson Central-Clemson Commons 864.639.2411 or 864.654.4495


E S TAT E S

107 Fire Pink Court | Lake Keowee 5 BR | 3 Full + 2 Half BA | MLS#20220670 | $847,000 Patti Shull 864.985.2980 Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living LuxuryLakeLivingRealty.com

528 South Point Boulevard | Lake Keowee 4 BR | 4 Full BA | MLS#20224965 | $735,000 Patti Shull 864.985.2980 Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living LuxuryLakeLivingRealty.com

Locally Connected. Proven Results. As Greenville grows choose a Realtor® you can trust – one who has lived and worked here for more than 20 years. Virginia is continually one of Greenville’s most awardwinning agents for buyers and sellers and was named Coldwell Banker Caine’s Top Two Overall 2019 Producer. Looking for a knowledgeable, passionate, client focused Realtor? Call Virginia today!

864.313.2986

VirginiaHayes.com

121 Rhett St., Unit 202 | Greenville 2 BR | 2 Full BA | MLS#1422015 | $568,000 Jane McCutcheon 864.787.0007 Coldwell Banker Caine 121rhettstreetunit202.com

Advertise your listing in TOWN Estates contact Heather Propp at 864.679.1263

AUGUSTA ROAD • DOWNTOWN • NORTH MAIN PARKINS MILL • GOWER • EASTSIDE SEPT EM B ER 2020 I

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Second Glance

DUAL PERSPECTIVES THE GIBBES MUSEUM PRESENTS THE COLLECTION OF A RTIST JONATHA N GREEN A ND HIS PA RTNER, R ICHA R D WEEDM A N

(left to right) Elizabeth Catlett, New Generation, 1992, lithograph, 91/100, 31¼” x 20”; William H. Johnson, Southern Family Series, 1943, serigraph on paper 17” x 13½”. Artwork courtesy of the Gibbes Museum of Art.

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elebrated as a documentarian of the Southern African-American experience, painter Jonathan Green rose to renown through his chromatic portraiture of Gullah life—imagery he pulled from his childhood in Gardens Corner, South Carolina. Through his decades-long career, Green has amassed an extensive private collection along with his studio director and partner, Richard Weedman, exploring themes of love, identity, family, and spirituality. Featuring the work of Elizabeth Catlett, Charles White, David Driskell, and more, including Green himself, the exhibit Building a Legacy: The Vibrant Vision Collection of Jonathan Green and Richard Weedman is now on display at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston. Join Green for a virtual tour of the collection on Thursday, September 10, as he presents the work that inspired his iconic aesthetic.—Abby Moore Keith

Building a Legacy: The Vibrant Vision Collection of Jonathan Green and Richard Weedman at the Gibbes Museum of Art. 35 Meeting St, Charleston. Thru Jan 10, 2021. (843) 722-2706, gibbesmuseum.org

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Independent Living • Assisted Living • Memory Care • Skilled Nursing • Rehab

Greenville’s Premier Life Plan Community

10 Fountainview Terrace, Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 606-3055 • Cascades-Verdae.com


Happily Ever

HALE’S SIGNATURE BRIDAL COLLECTION 532 Haywood Road • Greenville, SC 29607 864.297.5600 • www.halesjewelers.com

Profile for Community Journals

TOWN Sept. 2020  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN Sept. 2020  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

Profile for cjdesigns