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In the

Open Lens GREENVILLE PHOTOGRAPHERS USE PORTRAITURE TO ILLUMINATE OUR HUMAN EXPERIENCE

Arena

ECUADORIAN CHAMPION JULIO MENDOZA WILL RIDE FOR GOLD AT THE FEI WORLD EQUESTRIAN GAMES IN MILL SPRING, NC

Students of Life THREE FURMAN GRADS WORK TO UPLIFT UNDERSERVED COMMUNITIES

S EP TEM B ER 2 018 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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It’s about finding your path to lifelong heath, and helping you stay on it.

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Greenville’s trusted concierge care provider. 12 Maple Tree Ct. Ste 103, Greenville, SC 29615

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TRAVELERS REST

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114 Keowee Club Rd $2,950,689

5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bathrooms

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Six Acres | Over 12,000 sq. ft.

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187 Fisher Knob Road $1,945,676

102 Lakewood Drive $1,700,607

154 Riverplace Dr, Unit 501 $1,629,601

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4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bathrooms

2 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms

2.4 Acres

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149 Duck Hawk Way $1,299,661

117 Upper Ridge Drive $1,200,690

650 Hammett Road $1,075,650

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116 Collins Creek Road $1,049,607 105 Putney Bridge Lane $789,681 329 Pine Forest Drive Ext $769,601 5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms

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4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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TWENTY FIVE QUESTIONS FOR JOAN HERLONG 1. How long have you been selling real estate in Greenville? 25 years, and counting. 2. How long have you worked full time in real estate? 25 years, and counting. 3. Do you prefer working with Buyers or Sellers? Yes. 4. What Muppet character do you most closely identify with? Grover. 5. When do you plan to retire? When this becomes more work and less fun. 6. Do you have a favorite child? Yes, the one who named their child after me. 7. What is your mission statement? “Do the right thing, even when no one is looking.” 8. How did you choose real estate? Real estate chose me. It’s the one thing I could do well, make a decent living, and still be BEST MOM EVER. 9. How do you balance your career with being a great mom? I don’t. 10. Why is it that most new Realtors don’t last long? Probably because they “love houses, and love people,” … and then they realize it’s a real business. 11. What’s the secret to your success? There is no secret. You have to be.... reasonably good with people.... reasonably intelligent.... and you have to work hard, really hard. Two out of three won’t cut it, and most people don’t believe it takes all three. 12. What is the funniest thing that ever happened in your career so far? The time a huge black snake surprised me as I was walking to my car. My reflex was to sling shot my buyer client at the snake, and run away. My client thought it was funny, but it took him a couple of years to realize it. 13. What do you do when you’re not working? Playing tennis or being free babysitter to my three grand babies. Cutest girlies ever. 14. You’ve developed quite a catalogue of unusual ads. Who does your advertising and copywriting? I do. Kudos to Michael Allen and Holly Hardin at the Community Journals. They’re very patient, and they always help me translate a vague idea into a memorable ad. 15. What is the most satisfying aspect of your career? Working only with likable clients. 16. Do you have a favorite client? Yes, and they know who they are; they didn’t even have to name a child after me. 17. Was it fun it to film the HGTV House Hunters episode with your daughter and son-in-law? Barrel of monkeys.

864-325-2112 | www.jha-sothebysrealty.com | Joan Herlong Owner, CEO EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

18. In hindsight, would you do anything differently? I finally learned to treat my family at least as well as I treat my clients. I wish I’d learned that sooner. 19. How do you feel about Zillow? It’s fine, but there’s no substitute for expertise. 20. Who is your celebrit y doppelgänger? I’d like to think a younger Blythe Danner. 21. Do you regard your work as a profession? No one puts real estate on a par with medicine, law, science, architecture, etc., but I’ve always maintained a professional approach, as an advocate for my clients’ interests. 22. Name one thing that sets you apart from other Realtors? Name tags. Won’t wear’em. 23. How do you like your new location at One McDaniel Greene? Love it!! It’s like working in a tree house, and the address is also a perfect fit ;) 24. Describe your recruiting technique in ten words or less. “None.” I didn’t recruit any of our 20+ agents, it’s all been organic. Several are former clients. They’re a fantastic group, I look forward to working with them every day. 25. How do you define expertise? Well, there’s that “10,000 hours” rule of thumb. I’m into about 90,000 hours now, and I share the benefits of those hours with my agents. TOWN_blank page.indd 7

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FIRSTS THAT LAST and the NC design are service marks of the EDPNC.

The first time Andrea overcame her fear of heights, it was from a WATERFALL 2 oo feet in the air.

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Have a Big Vacation in a Small Town

Scenic trips along the Tuckasegee River and into the Nantahala River Gorge in the Great Smoky Mountains

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FIRST

Glance

Family Business: L.C. King Manufacturing Co., founder of the popular Pointer Brand line of workwear, is the oldest cut-and-sew textile mill in America still run by its founding family. Owner Jack King and company craft quality jackets, overalls, vests, and pants from their factory headquarters in Bristol, Tennessee. For more, see “Heir to the Loom,� page 64. Photograph by Eli Warren

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DAMIAN HALL GROUP LUXURY REAL ESTATE

DITCH THE STATUS QUO.

estates | equestrian | lake | town & country

120 Plantation Drive | Woodruff, SC | $649,000 4 BR, 3.5 BA | 3636 sq. ft. Enchantment and grace of a bygone era await you at the 18th century Nicholls-Crook House. Originally constructed in 1793 and now a showpiece remnant of a vibrant 1000 acre cotton plantation. Architecturally a blend of Federal and Georgian styles, the home has been beautifully restored with modern conveniences, all while keeping with period authenticity. Nicholls-Crook spans 2.25 pristine acres overlooking the Three Pines Country Club Golf Course.

We have redefined the way luxury homes are sold, and the results are stunning. We began with the simple, yet powerful belief that luxury homes deserve better marketing. We treat every home like a masterpiece. For each listing, we create custom branding, gorgeous websites, cinematic films, architectural photography, extraordinary events, captivating press and more. We invite you to learn more at www.sellmygvlhome.com

DAMIAN HALL GROUP

Damian Hall

LUXURY REAL ESTATE

864-561-7942 DITCH THE STATUS dh@damianhallgroup.com

QUO.

estates | equestrian | lake | town & country estates | equestrian | lake | town & country

SEPTEMBER 2018 / 7

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LUXURY SERVICE AT EVERY PRICE POINT 23 ACRE ESTATE

275 Montgomery Dr, Spartanburg $2,750,000 | MLS# 1350714 Damian Hall Group (828) 808-8305

MOUNTAIN VIEWS

570 Lawson Fork Rd, Inman $1,895,500 | MLS# 1346112 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918

15 Windfaire Pass Ct, Ridges at Paris Mnt $1,598,500 | MLS# 1369349 Holly May (864) 640-1959 UNDER CONTRACT

136 High Rock Ridge Dr, Cliffs at Glassy $1,295,000 | MLS# 1346118 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918

109 Southkee Rd, Travelers Rest $871,200 | MLS# 1367871 Shannon Donahoo (864) 329-7345

121 Rhett Street, Greenville $724,900 | MLS# 1374027 Cheyenne Kozaily (864) 999-1959

PRICE REDUCTION

100 Spring Valley Rd, Greenville $720,000 | MLS# 1373464 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542 MOUNTAIN VIEWS

1489 Altamont Rd, Paris Mountain $550,000 | MLS# 1373450 Damian Hall (864) 561-7942

120 Plantation Dr, Woodruff $664,900 | MLS# 1362902 Damian Hall Group (828) 808-8305 DOWNTOWN LIVING

155 Riverplace Way, Greenville $499,999 | MLS# 1367879 Nancy King (864) 414-8701

123 Greybridge Rd, Lake Trollingwood $644,900 | MLS# 1368180 Holly May (864) 640-1959 Zach Herrin (864) 990-1761 TO BE BUILT: 4 HOMES

915 Rutherford Rd, Greenville $455,000 | MLS# 1365558 Lonnie Adamson (864) 385-4659

VIEW FULL LISTINGS ONLINE AT BlackStreamInternational.com/s=town

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DAMIAN HALL

SHANNON DONAHOO

NANCY KING

CHEYENNE KOZAILY

HOLLY MAY

KENNIE NORRIS

BLACKSTREAM’S MID-YEAR TOP PRODUCERS

2810 Augusta St, Augusta Road $449,900 | MLS# 1371217 Alex Kessler (864) 414-2174

203 Millstone Way, Stonehaven $389,500 | MLS# 1369899 Kennie Norris (864) 608-0865

2 Heatherbrook Rd, Foxcroft $345,000 | MLS# 1372094 Holly May (864) 640-1959

IN-GROUND POOL

48 Hemingway Lane, Townes at Five Forks $304,900 | MLS# 1372165 Holly May (864) 640-1959

305 Foxworth Ln, Hunters Woods $274,900 | MLS# 1374385 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542

26 Brookdale Ave, Greenville $245,000 | MLS# 1373046 Shannon Donahoo (864) 329-7345

BUYING OR SELLING? CALL US TODAY AT (864) 920-0303

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Contents 12 19

EDITOR’S LETTER THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

27 ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

42

WEDDINGS

47

TOWNBUZZ

Spartanburg’s Johnson Collection honors Southern female artists; Morgan Allen heads Greenville’s favorite food fest; sleep in Queen City chic at the Tryon Park Hotel; Julio Mendoza uncovers the art of dressage; scenic Foothills towns offer horse art and history; Dale Chihuly christens the Biltmore Estate with iconic glass sculptures; and more.

64 BY DESIGN

Tennessee-based clothing company L.C. King Manufacturing has committed to quality crafting for more than a century.

71 TOWN SPORT

The globally anticipated FEI World Equestrian Games makes a second U.S. appearance this month in Mill Spring, North Carolina.

88

82 MS. BEA WRIGHT

September might be full of transition, but Ms. Bea explains that embracing change makes us stronger.

84 MAN ABOUT TOWN

Along with corn hole, moscato, and trite home décor, hot tubs are a cultural craze the germ-averse Man prefers to avoid.

SC Public Radio host Walter Edgar pays tribute to Lowcountry literary giant Pat Conroy in the memorial collection, Our Prince of Scribes.

109

EAT & DRINK

119

DINING GUIDE

130

TOWNSCENE

140

SECOND GLANCE

CENTRAL 77 STYLE Indulge your green thumb with plant-based décor at Savereign; explore a curation of Indie Craft artisan accessories.

TOWN ESSAY

Due South Coffee Roasters couples café with cuisine at its new Hampton Station location; NC-darling Van’s Chocolates sets up shop in the Village; and flaky and sweet apple pandowdy is an easy autumn treat.

Got plans? You do now. Starr Haney bridges old and new in the exhibition Vintage Modern Americana.

2 9

FRAME BY FRAME

Fine art photographers Zane Logan, Polly Gaillard, and José Zurita expose human connection through intimate portraiture. / by John Jeter, Terri Bright & M. Linda Lee

THIS PAGE: Photographer Zane Logan places his subjects in minimal backgrounds, honing in on the person for maximum effect. For more see “Frame by Frame,” page 92. Photograph by Zane Logan

COVER: Local dressage master Julio Mendoza and his horse Chardonnay will compete at this month’s FEI World Equestrian Games. For more see “Ride of His Life,” page 56. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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POWER OF THREE

From curious college kids to successful business partners, Furman grads Joe Waters, Brandon Hinman, and Grady Powell seek to ensure childhood well-being through their think tank, Capita. / by Steven Tingle // photography by Paul Mehaffey

September 8/21/18 12:05 PM


A dream car you can drive. The 2019 CLA 250 Coupe. With show-car design and show-your-friends innovations, the CLA 250 lets you express your style and impress everyone else. Turbo power, sport seats and a tech-rich cabin are backed up by advanced safety, driver assists and connectivity. Starting at $33,100.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com (864) 213-8000 2446 Laurens Road Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter September Highlights Female Gaze

Southern women artists come to light in Central to Their Lives: page 48

Ride of His Life

Dressage master Julio Mendoza and his horse Chardonnay grace the global stage at the FEI World Equestrian Games: page 56

Glass Menagerie

Chihuly at Biltmore pairs the estate’s scenic grounds with lavish sculptures: page 60

Heir to the Loom

Photograph by Chelsey A shford

Bristol-based clothing company L.C. King has been crafting iconic, American-sourced wears for a century: page 64

On the Dot

Parade into the season with leather, gems, and more from these Indie Craft artisans: page 80

The Water’s Not Fine

When it comes to hot tubs, the Man steers clear: page 84

Culinary Brew

Grab a fresh bite to match your favorite brew at Due South Coffee Roasters: page 110

In Sight

T

hese days, our brains are under attack. We’re constantly swiping and tapping and liking and crowding our minds with visual clutter. This addictive and fractured mental assault has weakened our ability to focus. We aren’t really seeing. Seeing involves intention and thought. While we look at a million things each day, we actually see very few of them. Toward that end, in this month’s issue we highlight photographers in our community who are working to illuminate and elevate those who usually go unseen: homeless individuals, children, minorities—people of every walk. Three Greenville-based fine art photographers explore the human condition through their stunning portrait work. They encourage us to see rather than scroll past, while their subjects expand our perception of community (“Frame by Frame,” page 92). Photography allows us to explore the complexities of our world. We aren’t intruding; we are observing. We aren’t gawking; we are dissecting. We are exposed to, maybe for the first time, the experience of another. The act of seeing is an exchange, a silent conversation. Seeing equates to where we put our mind energy, where we place our focus. Three Furman sons began their college careers with insatiable desires to learn, discuss, and ultimately transform the world through their work. Today, these men—husbands, fathers, and executives—continue to influence each other’s paths. Together, they are building a transformative ideas lab called Capita, whose purpose is to uplift families and children by bridging worlds of social justice, technology, and the arts and design. They began a conversation almost twenty years ago and haven’t stopped talking (“Power of Three,” page 102). To see is not to believe—it is to act. This month, in the midst of the excitement and energy of a new season, let us open our eyes.

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief

I’d love to hear from you.

Have a story idea, comment, or question? Write to me at blair@ towncarolina.com.

@towncarolina

@towncarolina

facebook.com/towncarolina

bit.ly // towniemail

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THE MORE YOU LOOK THE MORE YOU SEE.

“A broad education in the arts helps give children a better understanding of their world. . . . We need students who are culturally literate as well as math and science literate.” –Paul Ostergard, chairman, Citicorp Foundation (retired)

NOW ON VIEW AT THE GCMA: Art and Artists of South Carolina: David Drake, Jasper Johns, William H. Johnson, and Grainger McKoy Sampling the Old Masters: Highlights from the Bob Jones Museum Andrew Wyeth Watercolors: Selections from the Greenville Collection Presented by

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org

For a complete listing of exhibitions on view this month, visit gcma.org

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Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

admission free

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r

October 12,13 & 14 Featuring 26 dealers from across the country exhibiting the best antiques, fine and folk art, and design in the Southeast! n Meet designer and stylemaker Danielle Rollins! n $10 admission, good for all three days n To learn more, visit gcma.org/antiques n

Presented by Greenville County Museum of Art Greenville, South Carolina

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Mark Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FORWARD TO ABOUT THE START OF A NEW SEASON?

Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR Abby Moore Keith ASSISTANT EDITOR

Lower humidity, local Honey Crisp apples, and everything pumpkin!

Fall leaves, gorgeous color in the Upstate, and pumpkin spice lattes.

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Kathryn Davé RUTA FOX M. LINDA LEE Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Terri Bright, Walter Edgar, Allison Futterman, John Jeter & Sarah Polite CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Chelsey Ashford, Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, David & Sarah Bonner, Crystal & Keith Carson, WILL CROOKS, Ian Curcio, Jivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, Polly Gaillard, Zane Logan, Jason Massey, ALICE RATTERREE, Eli Warren & José Zurita Nicole Grumbos EDITORIAL INTERN

Not drowning in a pool of my own sweat on photo shoots.

Better hair days.

Andrew Huang EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Holly Hardin VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS

Returning to my screenedin porch after a hot, wet summer. I’ll be here until it gets too cold.

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen Amanda Walker EMILY YEPES DIRECTOR OF SALES

Ed Ibarra & Donna Johnston MANAGERS OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES HEATHER PROPP, Meredith Rice, Caroline Spivey & Liz Tew

SHOES HANDBAGS

JANE ROGERS MAGA ZINE ADVERTISING SPECIALIST

ACCESSORIES September means football, warm days, and cool nights.

Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS

The start of college football season—go Tigers!

Susan Schwartzkopf EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

2222 AUGUSTA ROAD, GREENVILLE 864.271.9750 | INSTAGRAM @ MUSESHOESTUDIO

TOWN Magazine (Vol. 8, No. 9) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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What Boxes Do You Check When Selecting Your Realtor? ✓Certified Real Estate Appraiser ✓Real Estate Broker ✓Five Forks Resident / Downtown Specialist ✓Expert Negotiator ✓Greenville Native ✓Top Producer

✓ Alta Vista resident ✓ Speaks RENOVATION fluently ✓ Relocation/ New Comer Specialist ✓ Responsive, returns all calls promptly! ✓ Top Producer ✓

New construction and land contracts expertise

✓ We check ALL the boxes.

Matt Crider 864.444.1689

Team

The

Leah Grabo 864.901.4949

—— Premier Listing ——

Augusta Circle - 103 Waccamaw Avenue - Greenville, SC 29605 - $669,605 Wonderful opportunity to own a custom newer built home perfect for entertaining. In sought after Augusta Circle school district. This 4 bedroom home is move-in ready. Rare full 2-Car, attached garage, with additional 3rd covered parking spot (perfect for storing your golf cart or boat). The yard space is ample. Basement level with a media room/man cave. Large dining room, modern kitchen, & HUGE screen porch with stone stacked fireplace. Tons of storage and closet space. Big master bed/bath with a dream shower. Large 4th bedroom, playroom, & living room. A must see home.

www.jha-sothebysrealty.com Each office independently owned and operated.

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BELLA GROVE

COTTAGE noun / cot•tage / \’kä-tij\

A small home with a big life. Maintenance Free Lawns • Cottage Homes from the High $400s • Walking Trail to Legacy Park Custom Built by Exclusive Preferred Builders • Close to Future Swamp Rabbit Trail Extension

Visit the Sales Office for a Personal Tour 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 • Greenville

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List z

THE

THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

VINCE GILL

z

Vince Gill has worked alongside top acts like Earl Scruggs, Carrie Underwood, Alison Krauss, and The Eagles. However, the singersongwriter’s most prominent achievements have been garnered through his solo work, a 34-year stint that has led to 19 studio albums, 21 Grammy Awards, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Blending country, Americana, bluegrass, and classic rock, Gill proves that he’s still got the chops to touch your soul through standards like “When I Call Your Name,” “Go Rest High on That Mountain,” and “If You Ever Have Forever in Mind.”

TOP OF THE

List

Photograph by J. Wright

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Wed, Sept 26, 7:30pm. $55-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

September 2018 SEPTEMBER 2018 / 19

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List

SIPPIN’ SAFARI

HORSESCAPES

GROOVIN’ IN THE GROVE

While we don’t necessarily recommend sharing a beer with an orangutan (we’ve heard they get a little sappy), we will put our stamp of approval on this annual event that supports the Friends of the Greenville Zoo program. Now in its 12th year, the Sippin’ Safari is upping the ante with a new VIP area offering early event access, exclusive wines, and oysters courtesy of the Blockhouse. There will also be zoo tours, live music, and a raffle loaded with plenty of must-have items. Party with the animals or party like an animal—the choice is yours.

It’s all about horses this month as the FEI World Equestrian Games gallops off at the Tryon International Equestrian Center. In keeping with that spirit, Upstairs Artspace is hosting a solo exhibit of work by celebrated equine photographer Monica Stevenson. Renowned for her compelling images of horses, the show features portraiture, landscapes, still life, abstract, and conceptual styles. Stevenson will be one of the official photographers at the World Equestrian Games.

Clear your calendars—we’ve got your Friday night plans covered for a while. Each week, the fine folks at Upcountry Provisions are presenting a free outdoor concert starring an eclectic outfit of folk, country, Southern rock, and blues musicians. Set against the charming, rustic vibe of The Grove venue, September’s plate of tunes includes local favorites Darby Wilcox, the Jef Chandler Duo, Angela Easterling, and the Jaguar 4. Grab a cold drink, one of Upcountry Provisions’ signature brickoven pizzas, and get to groovin’. Upcountry Provisions Bakery & Bistro, 6811 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. Fridays, Sept 7–28, 5–9pm. Free. (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com

Photograph by Monica Stevenson

Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr. Fri, Sept 7. 6:30–9:30pm. $23– $81. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

Upstairs Artspace, 49 S Trade St, Tryon, NC. Thru Sept 21. Free. (828) 859-2828, upstairsartspace.org

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Photograph courtesy of Euphoria

THE

Photograph of Angela Easterling and Brandon Turner by Coke Whitworth

z


zWhat-Not-To-Miss / EUPHORIA

FEI WORLD EQUESTRIAN GAMES

There are some things that go hand-in-hand in the Upstate: robust wines seem to taste their best when complemented by delectable cuisine. Add a little live music to the cocktail, and there you have it: Euphoria. In addition to numerous guest chef experiences, cooking demos, and tastings, the festival has plenty to sate your palate for delicious food, drink, and entertainment: Songwriter’s Recipe, Taste of the Trail: Swamp Rabbit Ride & Lunch, Big Easy Bash, celebrity chef dinners, and The Sunday Supper are all part of the lineup that you shouldn’t pass-up.

Skirting the Blue Ridge Mountains, the city of Tryon is known for its charming arts scene, picturesque views, and vital equestrian community. So it only makes sense that the esteemed Fédération Equestre International—aka the horse experts—would choose this North Carolina town as the host for its eighth annual World Equestrian Games. Held on the grounds of the prominent Tryon International Equestrian Center, the schedule of events includes individual and team competitions in categories of dressage, para-equestrian dressage, reining, endurance, jumping, vaulting, eventing, and driving.

Locations, times, and prices vary. Sept 20–23, Thurs–Sun. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com

Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. Sept 11–23. Times, prices vary. tryon2018.com

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT

It’s been nearly 50 years since the musical’s 15-minute opening in London, but this classic crafted by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice hasn’t lost any steam on stage. Based on the story from the Book of Genesis, Dreamcoat recounts the plight of Joseph, a kid tricked into slavery by his jealous brothers. Through a series of life-changing events, Joseph soon finds himself at the top of the totem pole under the Egyptian pharaoh, and learns that the only things brighter than his coat of many colors are the dreams that light his way. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St. Sept 7–30. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

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Food tastings from downtown chefs and local farms, craft beer and wine tastings, plus local art and products.

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List z

THE

Quick HITS

COUTURE FOR A CAUSE

z This annual fashion event features repurposed wear modeled by cancer fighters. The American Cancer Society hosts this year’s Couture for a Cause to raise funds for the ACS’s lifesaving research. The evening will feature a runway competition with recyclable fashions, heavy hors-d’oeuvres, fundraising auctions, and more. Cancer survivors of all ages will strut their stuff on the runway, guaranteeing guests a knockout night. Southern Bleachery, 250 Mill St, Greenville. Thurs, Sept 6. $75-$125. coutureforacausesc.org

INDIE CRAFT PARADE

z The Indie Craft Parade exposes the creative expression of craft artists from around the South, with offerings ranging from paper goods to prints and unique wearables. You’ve never seen so much artistry under one roof, so drop that needlepoint you’ll never finish (even IF you had the time) and join the Parade. Southern Bleachery at Taylors Mill, 232 Mills St, Taylors. Sept 14–16. Fri, 6–9pm, $20; Sat, 9am–6pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. $5. makerscollective.org/ indiecraftparade

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW

The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St. Thru Sept 22. Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 7pm & 11pm. $40. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

SHREK THE MUSICAL

z Oh, you thought a film that starred a talking donkey, a giant green ogre, and a Smash Mouth cover of The Monkees’ hit “I’m a Believer” couldn’t possibly get any better? Think again! With music and lyrics crafted by Jeanine Tesori and David LindsayAbaire, the family-friendly production chronicles the life of one bitter Shrek as he journeys from the swamp to the kingdom of the overcompensating Lord Farquaad in order to save his home from a host of fairytale squatters. With a chatty donkey in tow, Shrek discovers the power of true love, friendship, and a good mid-action ballad.

Photograph by J. Wright

z Let’s do the time warp again. The Richard O’Brien musical has become a cult classic, lending itself to numerous international tours and a smash film starring Tim Curry as the “sweet transvestite” doctor himself. But you have not had the Rocky Horror experience until you see it live; the production relies heavily on audience/actor interaction that includes having “virgins” of the show hop on stage for the time warp dance. Both campy and endearing, you may never want to leave Dr. Frank N Furter’s freaky castle.

Brandi Carlile Self-taught on both the piano and the guitar, singersongwriter Brandi Carlile has struck gold with fans for her big vocals and commanding lyrical narratives. Carlile’s masterful blend of folk, country, and rock continues to flourish with each album; this year’s release By the Way, I Forgive You is the musician’s most successful yet, climbing to the number-five spot on the Billboard 200 chart. Carlile will be accompanied by Boston indie folksters Darlingside. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Tues, Sept 25, 7:30pm. $55-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Sept 8–23. Sat, 10am & 1:30pm; Sun, 1:30pm & 5:30pm. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

DREAMGIRLS

z Ladies and gentlemen, the divas have entered the building. Drawing upon the rise-to-fame stories of The Supremes, The Shirelles, and other notable R&B artists, Dreamgirls spins the tale of a fictional female trio from Chicago—the Dreamettes— with their sights set on fame. But as their star begins to rise, so too does the drama, splitting the former friends at the seams over decades of musical evolution. With powerhouse numbers like “And I Am Telling You I Am Not Going” and “One Night Only,” it’s easy to see why this hit musical has been a “dream” for audiences the world over. Centre Stage, 501 River St. Sept 13–30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

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NONSTOP PANDEMONIUM.” ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MURPHY

“HILARIOUS!

OCTOBER 2-7

2018 2019

EXPERIENCE THE EXCEPTIONAL EDWIN MCCAIN: CELEBRATING 20 YEARS OF “I’LL BE” with special guests ROSCOE & ETTA SEPTEMBER 18 NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE: TERRY VIRTS – VIEW FROM ABOVE SEPTEMBER 24 BRANDI CARLILE SEPTEMBER 25 AN EVENING WITH VINCE GILL SEPTEMBER 26 Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month with MARCEL PORTILLA BAND SEPTEMBER 27 BUDDY GUY SEPTEMBER 28

LATE NIGHT TAILGATE OCTOBER 16

SIERRA HULL JANUARY 12

ANASTASIA OCTOBER 23-28

MISS SAIGON JANUARY 15-20

BEN RECTOR NOVEMBER 5

A BRONX TALE FEBRUARY 5-10

BÉLA FLECK, ZAKIR HUSSAIN, AND EDGAR MEYER WITH RAKESH CHAURASIA NOVEMBER 6

BERLIN PHILHARMONIC WIND QUINTET Peace Chamber Concert Series FEBRUARY 13

STEPHEN STILLS & JUDY COLLINS NOVEMBER 9

JERRY LEE LEWIS FEBRUARY 16

TAP DOGS MARCH 22

RUSSIAN NATIONAL ORCHESTRA with Kirill Karabits, conductor; George Li, piano FEBRUARY 18

AVITAL MEETS AVITAL Peace Chamber Concert Series APRIL 11

VOCES8 Peace Chamber Concert Series NOVEMBER 13 ROY ORBISON: The Hologram Tour NOVEMBER 14

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG OCTOBER 2-7

BALLET FOLKLÓRICO DE MÉXICO NOVEMBER 15

RANKY TANKY OCTOBER 9

DORRANCE DANCE NOVEMBER 18 HAMILTON DECEMBER 4-16 (ON SALE TBA)

I’M WITH HER: Sara Watkins – Sarah Jarosz – Aoife O’Donovan FEBRUARY 19

SYBARITE5 Peace Chamber Concert Series FEBRUARY 24 CURRENTS BY MAYUMANA FEBRUARY 26 THE BOOK OF MORMON MARCH 5-10 (ON SALE TBA) CELTIC WOMAN MARCH 15

COME FROM AWAY APRIL 16-21 (ON SALE SEPTEMBER 21) THE ILLUSIONISTS MAY 4 & 5

THEPIANOGUYS FEBRUARY 20

DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM MAY 11

LARA ST. JOHN Peace Chamber Concert Series FEBRUARY 21

HELLO, DOLLY! MAY 28-JUNE 2 (ON SALE TBA) DEAR EVAN HANSEN JULY 2-7 (ON SALE TBA)

@peacecenter Untitled-9 1

8/22/18 9:34 AM


Your Home’s Best Friend. W e help people like you sell your house and find a home . Yes, we’re recognized for resources, innovation, and agents that go above and beyond... but what really matters is you.

A good friend listens. Why? “Because dad wanted us to be our best... for you.” – Danny Joyner, Son of our Founder, President & CEO

ALTA VISTA 514 Watts Avenue — Located in the heart of Alta Vista, undoubtedly,

one of the most desirable neighborhoods in downtown Greenville, and within a few minutes walk to Cleveland Park, the Swamp Rabbit Trail, the NEW Cancer Survivors Park, the Liberty Bridge, the Peace Center and all that Main Street and the surrounding downtown area has to offer in restaurants, shopping, entertainment and convenience. This lovingly renovated 4 bedroom/3 bath home with master on main also offers a detached, perfect “tiny house” guest/nanny or mother-in-law cottage fully equipped with all the bells and whistles including a covered patio and deck area...and that’s not all... the professionally designed, landscaped and fully fenced and gated back yard offers a fire pit patio, oversized deck and amazing man -cave or she- shed that has enough space to create whatever you can imagine! Plenty of yard and garden area for kids to play and VERY private. This is a hidden jewel that must be seen to appreciate. Call for more details and your appointment to see this one of a kind home in downtown Greenville.

$895,000

MLS#1371894 Susan Dodds • 201.8656

COBBLESTONE 804 Brixton Circle — NEW PRICE! This home boasts an outdoor living

package equal to your best vacation! Among its features is a resort style gunite pool complete with its own slide as well as a gorgeous covered porch with cedar accents and a pool bathroom lined in cedar walls. Outside the fenced area of the pool, there is a large fire pit with flagstone pavers and bench seating under the privacy and comfort of the mature trees. MLS#1368957 $829,900

Melissa Morrell • 918.1734

Industry-leading technologies A global referral network Smart working and inventive agents

AVONDALE HEIGHTS 209 Stonebridge Drive — Stunning Custom Built home in popular Avondale Heights! 5 Bedrooms 3.5 baths EVERY upgrade imaginable!!

One of the nation’s most recognized and trusted brands © 2018 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

$599,500

MLS#1372230 Jo-Ann Rutledge • 293.3320

8/19/18 10:00 PM


www.CDanJoyner.com

SPAULDING FARMS

HIGHWAY 14

14 Hitchcock Lane — Situated on a nearly 2 acre cul-de-sac lot with lush grounds,

152 Pearson Road — Over 13 Acre Estate! Fully-Finished Basement Home! Just minutes from Hwy 14, Pelham Rd and Interstate 85. Perfect opportunity for multigenerational living or the ideal setting for a large family looking for a place to call home. Many custom details including Brazilian cherry hardwoods, coffered ceiling treatments and professional grade kitchen appliances! The lower level offers over 2000 finished Sf with a private bedroom & full bath, large recreational space, craft room with wall to wall built-ins, fully operational kitchen, home office area and another full bath and a secondary laundry room.

this finished basement home boasts a robust set of interior AND exterior features with a chef’s dream kitchen appliance package including Viking, SubZero and Jenn-Air, a luxurious owner’s suite with fireplace and a master bath with radiant heat tiled floors. The lower level (basement) showcases a full guest bathroom, secondary kitchen (minus cooking source) and rec space with fireplace. The exterior has brand new decking, koi pond, mature trees & beds; all backing up to a creek.

$849,900

MLS#1369447

Melissa Morrell • 918.1734

$829,900

MLS#1370385

Melissa Morrell • 918.1734

KILGORE PLANTATION

MAHAFFEY PLANTATION

5 Archers Place — Situated on an over one acre wooded cul-de-sac lot with

31 Griffith Creek Dr — Stunning 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath home located on one

immense privacy, this home features a sprawling rear covered porch with wood burning fireplace and large patio that you will use year around. Custom interior features including a keeping room with fire place, main level owners retreat, and large bonus room over the three car garage make this home complete.

$724,900

MLS#1366889 Melissa Morrell • 918.1734

of the most beautiful lots in desirable Mahaffey Plantation. The two story foyer features cherry hardwood floors, extensive moldings and attention to detail. The main level features a spacious great room, dining room, kitchen, keeping room, breakfast room, laundry room and the master suite. The great room has a vaulted ceiling and fireplace with gas logs. The chef style kitchen features custom cabinetry, granite countertops, a 5 burner induction cooktop, Advantium double oven/microwave, and a center island.

$619,000

MLS#1372427 Margaret Marcum • 420.3125 | Debbie Levato • 380.9150

FOXBROOKE

TERRA PINES

512 Fox Croft Road — Welcome home to 512 Foxcroft Road in Foxbrooke, a quiet gated community

220 Terramont Drive — Look no more at this fabulous brick ranch in

nestled in a prime Eastside location. This fully brick home boasts spacious rooms, over sized windows, and beautiful architectural details throughout. Enter into the Living Room with a cathedral ceiling and an open staircase. The Master on the main level is accessed through the office, offering private entry to this welcoming room with a double tray ceiling. Enjoy the exquisite kitchen adorned with custom cabinets, a 5-burner gas cook-top, built in microwave and convection oven. Around the corner you will pass the first floor laundry room to the main level bedroom and full bathroom. The Great Room has a large stone fireplace flanked by built in custom cabinets and a 5.1 channel surround sound. Windows line the back of the main living areas allowing a flood of natural light and a gorgeous view of mature landscaping. Enjoy the beautiful back yard off the screened porch listening to your favorite music or enjoy time on the outdoor patio. Upstairs there are two generously sized bedrooms, two full bathrooms, and an expansive bonus room with 5.1 channel surround sound. All this and storage too!

$599,000 TOWN_blank page.indd 7

MLS#1371819 Nichole W Moore • 804.9463

the heart of Greenville. Location, Location! 3BR, 2BA plus 2 car garage and additional detached garage and workshop!! Beautifully renovated brick ranch with HUGE screed porch! Terra Pines is a hidden gem of a neighborhood- quiet and established with larger lots. Come fall in love with all the updates the current owners have done and move right on in.

$510,500

MLS#1368637 Susan Dodds • 201.8656

8/19/18 10:00 PM


Expanding our horizon

Corporate office now open in Downtown Greenville! 110 E. Court Street, Suite 101 / 864-448-1020 Bound only by our commitment to stellar customer service and backed by over 130 years of solid financial performance, we are pleased to announce the opening of our new corporate office in Downtown Greenville.

Come visit us today!

G R E E N V I L L E www.iberiabank.com

*All products and services are subject to approval, incluading credit approval.

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Town

ON THE Norm & Mona Dellosso with Megan & Michael Thacker

Lisa & Carter Dodd

Tapas & Tinis July 20, 2018 TOWN Magazine presented Euphoria’s Tapas & Tinis at Zen in downtown Greenville. More than 420 guests delighted in the catering services provided by Chef Tony Schmidt of Performance Food Services alongside cocktails and drinks from Tito’s Vodka, Larceny Bourbon, and Beckon Wines, with music by Steel Toe Stiletto.

Morgan Fields & Josh Swatzell

Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Carl Sobocinski & Karen Lopez Jordan Mark & Linda Pollard with Turner Hill

Halle Elliott & Jennifer Springer

Karla Mendiola & Emily Neal

Mary Weinberger, Jamarcus Gaston & Moody Behery

Chandler & Lauren Van De Water

Hannah Elgin & John Alexander Robert & Phyllis Schrage

Stephanie Rohe, Joseph Rohe, Kurt Rozelsky, Amy Vanderwerff & Megan Early-Soppe Debbie Lamoureux & Patrick Kuchevar

Stacy & Chris Bizzell Yasha & Anand Patel Steve & Cara Sinicropi

Caroline Jeffords, Stephanie Freitag & Chloe Jeffords

Lara & Ken Shaw

Mary Frances McAlister & Ellis Burnett SEPTEMBER 2018 / 27

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MAConnect Mod Fête June 8, 2018 More than 90 guests gathered at Art Up Studios at Hampton Station to enjoy the work of Greenville’s creative talents. Hosted by MAConnect, the Metropolitan Arts Council’s group for young art enthusiasts, the event highlighted works from Hollowed Earth Pottery, Tanya Stiegler Designs, Gerry Wubben, Nicole Kamb, Lou Koppel, and Ric Standridge. Reeves Catering provided dinner, with entertainment by The Note Ropers.

Elijah Vazquez & David Schaedel

Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Melissa Stroud, Liz Rundorfff Smith & Marta Lanier

Erin Turner, Kacee Lominack & Phillip Livingston

Andrew & Nikki Phillips

Patti Brady & Elaine Bouse

Vicki Maddox & Patti Crawford Mike Bagwell, Joe Cash, Chris Craft, Chris Harrison & Don Hunt Jr.

James & Renee Merriam

Azim & Lucy Surka

Emma & Keith Hunter

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Pinot’s Palette Grand Opening July 13, 2018 Pinot’s Palette held their grand opening event at The Gallery Shopping Center on Haywood Road, where fifty guests wielded brushes at the celebration. Artist Stacy Parish led a two-hour painting tutorial on her piece, Good as Gold. Supporters enjoyed hors d’oeuvres from Seasons Café and Catering, along with wine.

Nancy Devinney & Amber Maefs

Nikki Jordan & Chris Wrobel

Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Lindsay Polowczuk & Nancy Burkard Randy Lee, Melissa Lee, Taffy Odom, Lee Odom, Nikki Jordan, Michael Seal, Lisa Seal, Chris Wrobel, Jerry McCall & Doug McCormick

Diane Maefs & Lisa Seal

Lainee Craft & Miranda Lee

Chet & Beth Smith SEPTEMBER 2018 / 29

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8/20/18 5:43 PM


ON THE Garry & Jamie Bryant

Town

TOWN’s Mix & Mingle at the GCCA August 3, 2018 Jennifer Childs & Jenny Woods

Hayes Abernathy & Liz Tew Abby Moore Keith, Laura Linen, Paul Mehaffey & Blair Knobel

Lenzi Waits & Emily Infinger

Anne & Seabrook Marchant

In partnership with the Greenville Center for Creative Arts, TOWN Magazine hosted a mixer to celebrate the launch of its August issue, along with the opening of the GCCA’s 2018 Annual Member Show. More than 100 guests sampled food from Good Life Catering while enjoying tunes by rockabilly band Little Lesley & The Bloodshots. Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Sarah Shoemaker, Annalaura Cranford & Marlowe Whitmaker

Ron & Kym Petrie Will Crooks, Sarah Teal & Meredith Rice

Linda Lee & Joe Augello

Konrad & Heidi Nyblom Chelsey Ashford & Zach White Cherington Shucker & Charis Jackson Barrios

Randy Armstrong & Jim Gorman

John Mello & Aida Mello

Little Lesley & The Bloodshots

Abby & Sam Keith

30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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T Y L ER BO E TRUNK S H OW O C TO BER 1 1 t h - 1 4 t h

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@monkeesofthewestend

monkeesofthewestend.com 8/23/18 9:45 AM


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SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9-6, SATURDAY 9-5, SUNDAY-HOME WITH FAMILY!

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8/22/18 9:36 AM


Ideas don’t just happen. That’s why they happen here. Coworking for Creatives • Meeting/Event Venues • Corporate Memberships Schedule a tour today at EndeavorGreenville.com

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GREENVILLE’S FINEST IN-TOWN LIVING Julie Fowler & Morgan Alford

CLEVELAND FOREST

Woodland Park

Coldwell Banker Caine Real Estate Meet The Artist: Kate Furman July 19, 2018

CLEVELAND FOREST

at

CLEVELAND FOREST

Coldwell Banker Caine hosted guests and art enthusiasts at its Meet the Artist reception featuring Kate Furman. The Main Street Real Estate Gallery was adorned with black-and-white charcoal drawings inspired by a handmade, minimal, and natural aesthetic. The night also featured Furman’s handmade jewelry, created with careful attention to concept and materials.

Premier location across from Cleveland Park and walking distance to Downtown, Swamp Rabbit Trail and Caine Halter YMCA. Lots from the high $300s

Susan & Britt Bridgers with Caroline Shroeder

By Chelsey Ashford Photography Chris & Virginia Hayes with Ginger Griffith

Incredible location within two short blocks of Greenville’s historic West End and Downtown Greenville. Lots from the low $200s Home packages from the low $800s Master on main plans now available! Brent & Betsey Varnadoe Ellis & Jane Harrison Fisher

PARK PLACE — ON HUDSON —

Adjacent to the new Unity Park site. Walk to Downtown Greenville, Kroc Center, Swamp Rabbit Trail.

Lyle Bridgers, Kate Furman & Shannon Humphries

Townhomes from the high $400s

TOM MARCHANT, REALTOR

864.449.1658 | Tom@TomMarchant.com

TRUSTED. RESPECTED. CONNECTED.

Jonathan Coneaux, Tara Leary, Sarah Gilley & Nick Gilley

34 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Town

ON THE

Ron Esposito & Freda Chambers

Joel Deweese, Phil Ziqanto & Christina Glass

Shannon Humphries with Denise & Emory Stapleton

Felicia Page & Greg Rogers

Peace of Mind Jennifer M. Henseler

Funeral Director, Senior Advisor of Advance Planning Mackey Funerals & Cremations

J Kiersten Bell, Tara Leary, Stephen Edgerton & Hilary Hurst

Heather & David Durbin

ennifer Henseler is focused on helping families find peace of mind. As funeral director and senior advisor of advanced planning, she is experienced in all facets of funeral service, and is especially adept at starting families on their journey through grief and handling services with compassion and care. A mother of two and a graduate from the Univeristy of Minnesota, she has been licensed since 1995 and has called Greenville home since 2002. Jennifer often helps plan funerals before they are needed, which she says is one of the greatest gifts people can leave their families, allowing loved ones to focus on their hearts and their journey instead of finances and decisions. “It gives you the peace of mind that your wishes will be followed and that your family will be taken care of after you are gone,� she said.

311 CENTURY DRIVE (291 BYPASS AT I-385) GREENVILLE

1 PINE KNOLL DRIVE (OFF WADE HAMPTON) GREENVILLE

864-232-6706

864-244-0978

Offering affordable, compassionate care to the Upstate since 1872.

NOW IN TWO LOCATIONS.

Amanda Jones, Virginia Hayes & Kristen McLean

Marta Lanier & Jorge Palacio

MackeyMortuary.com SEPTEMBER 2018 / 35

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ON THE

Town

USC School of Medicine at the Metropolitan Arts Council July 24, 2018 Stephen Moorhead, Spence Taylor & Alan Ethridge

Tracy Oyugi & Lindsay Grasso Emily Winchell & Maja Grzejdziak

Hunter Jackson & Madhuri Martin

Charlotte Leblang & Haritha Pavuluri

Alex Stevens & Maggie Oliver

Courtney Fant, Asia Edwards & Shiannea Gathers

Emily Northey, Matt Wessinger & Susan Orr

Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Katherine Brown, Michelle Shugart, Eliza Huey & Alison Sansone

Gabby Boniface, Ashley Snell & Dillon Graham

Mackenzie Carlson, Daniel Coster & Spence Taylor

Anna & Coen Hasenkamp

Shea Keeler & Erin Turner

Kate Muscarella, Daniel Lee & Lindsay Grasso

Science and art mixed for a casual evening at MAC’s downtown gallery. The annual event invited the incoming freshman class of Greenville’s medical school to connect with fellow classmates, MAC members, and other Greenville residents. During light appetizers and drinks, the future MDs learned about Greenville’s thriving arts scene as well as MAC’s schedule of events from executive director Alan Ethridge.

Shivani Desai & Sarah Shepard

Ben & Susan Orr

36 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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WHERE EXCELLENCE LIVES THE GLOBAL LUXURY DIFFERENCE

ColdwellBankerCaine.com/Luxury

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Greater Women’s Business Council Tables of 8 Luncheon June 27, 2018 Harriet Gray & Rhonda Riley

401 Eagle Nest Court – $2,595,000 Lake Jocassee | 6 BR, 6.5 BA Million Dollar View. An hour to Greenville.

Yacine Thiam, Carmen Gilstrap & Kinsey Biggins

The Westin Poinsett hosted the Atlanta-based Greater Women’s Business Council for a working luncheon called Tables of 8: P.O.W.E.R. (Procurement Opportunities for Women Exploring Rules and Regulations). The council seeks to empower female entrepreneurs and business leaders in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia. Photography by Bonfire Visuals

502 Round House Point – $1,695,000 Lake Jocassee | 5 BR, 3 BA Full Basement.

David Tye & Justin Force

Mindy Tobin & Tina Stevens

4105 Weatherstone Way – $949,500

Rare opportunity, Lake Hartwell home located in Anderson’s TL Hanna HS District- 4 BR, 5BA 30 min to Greenville

Kittie Watson & Rhonda Stokes

Covering the Upstate for 15 years From Lake Jocassee and Lake Hartwell to Augusta Road and North Main John Neil Realtor

864-918-7129

John.Neil@AllenTate.com JohnsSCHomes.com

Patti Payson & Gigi Ward

38 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

DP3 Architects Grand Opening Reception May 24, 2018 Local building firm DP3 Architects celebrated the grand opening of their new office on South Main Street with a drop-in reception. Guests enjoyed drinks and light refreshments, as well as a chance to enjoy the company’s updated space.

Kasey Fay with Jerry & Brenda Cooper

By Dove Light Photography Mike Zibert & Roy Pinckney

Alex Parks, Mike Pennington & Brianna Faris

Shelby Dodson & Lisa Dwight

Kathy Meyer, Marilyn Meyer, Mike Zibert, Kunal Patel & Nikita Patel

Mary Douglas Hirsch & Eric Vinson

Jessica & Ross Clements

Your wedding

Jackson, Jared & Claire Sang

modern & timeless

Ben Wofford & JJ Nemetz

Heidi Burmeister, Ben Urueta & Meg Terry

120 south main street, greenville, sc 29601 864.421.9700 | westinpoinsettgreenville.com SEPTEMBER 2018 / 39

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11/17/17 10:42 AM 8/20/18 5:49 PM


ON THE

Town

Robin & Matt Murphy

Camperdown Academy Annual Auction Gala April 27, 2018 Blueprints, blue jeans, and bubbly defined Camperdown Academy’s annual auction gala at their brand-new facility with more than 350 supporters in attendance. Third-grade students served as excited tour guides for guests as DJ Scientist spun tunes in the background. Good Life Catering served gourmet barbecue, with special cocktails for VIPs and sponsors. The auctioned items raised funds for Camperdown’s efforts to assist dyslexic students.

(Back) Steven Wood, Jen Belshe, Ric Standridge & Brad Pine; (front) Robert Gagnon, Tammy Propst & Llyn Strong

Bill Pelham & Dan Blanch

Dana Newell & Alice Davis

Lauren & Paul Russell, Matt Lombardi & Sarah Gledhill

By Red Apple Tree Photography

Tammy Propst Charles Riser, Sharon Riser, Pam Foster & Lee Foster

Nathan Luginbill, Brenda Luginbill & Nolan Merritt

Robert Gagnon & Steven Wood

Hannah Elgin & John Alexander

Bill & Laura Pelham

Amelia & James Rush Wilson, III

Leigh & Sean Turner, Jim & Kim Barrett Dan Blanch & Allison Rogers

Deborah & Lamar Jordan

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8/20/18 5:49 PM


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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Nicole Grumbos

Ashton Caroline Lee & Timothy Clay Pearson June 23, 2018

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hen Ashton and Tim went to work for former South Carolina governor Nikki Haley, they had no idea they’d be campaigning for the future. But their professional success easily translated into a political win when the two started dating. Fast-forward a year and a half, when Ashton’s girls trip to Austin, Texas, held a little more in store than popcorn and pink moscato. More discreet than a ballot box on voting

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day, Tim sent Ashton a note requesting her presence in a room at her hotel. When she arrived, Tim was fully equipped for the surprise of a lifetime with Champagne, chocolate-covered strawberries, and a marriage proposal. Faithful friends and sweet tokens of luck accompanied the pair during their special day at The Reserve at Lake Keowee. The bride walked down the aisle in a silk Anne Barge ball gown with lace from her mother’s wedding

Political Party: Under the expert planning of Upstate I Do, the Pearson wedding included florals by Kate Asire Flowers, a sixtiered cake by Kathy & Company, and reception tunes by Steel Toe Stiletto.

veil stitched to the inside, as well as her birthstone ring sewn alongside it. The couple lives in Chicago, Illinois, with plans to return home to South Carolina in the near future. Ashton is a graduate student at the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy Studies, and Tim works as a political and communications consultant. BY ANNA SHACKLEFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

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Weddings Morgan Leigh McClure & Corey William Golding January 27, 2018

Morgan McClure and Corey Golding can testify that “opposites attract” is a truthful statement—opposite ends of the world, that is. With Corey hailing from Melbourne, Australia, and Morgan from Greenville, it was surely fate that brought the two together in Cape Town, South Africa. Morgan happened to be on a trip looking at the local missions organization Corey worked for, but it wasn’t until Morgan’s return later in the year that they hit if off. Eight months of definitive bliss inspired Corey to hatch his master plan, and he sent Morgan on a wild scavenger hunt through town leading her to the top of their favorite mountain, Lion’s Head. There, Morgan looked out at the city where it all began, the view made complete by Corey’s kneeling figure. The couple wed at Grace Church Downtown. Morgan’s uncle was head officiate aided by Corey’s pastor from South Africa, with the Golding family making their U.S. debut for the festivities. The two currently reside in Australia—Morgan is a pediatric nurse, and Corey is a missionary. BY GABRIELLE GRACE PHOTOGRAPHY

Sarah Grace Pirovitz & Alex Sackett Humphreville April 14, 2018 It took an empire state of mind to bring Sarah Pirovitz and Alex Humphreville together, despite the fact they both attended the same university. While in New York City, the Wake Forest grads crossed paths at the apartment of a mutual friend, where cupid soon made sweethearts out of them. The two became a package deal with four and a half years flying by before they knew it. On an unassuming Sunday in the chilly autumn air, Alex requested Sarah’s schedule be cleared for a stroll through Central Park. The groom put his all into finding a private spot—no easy feat on a gorgeous day in NYC— and popped the question amidst the park’s fiery foliage. The ceremony and reception took place at the Westin Poinsett Hotel with Sarah’s childhood pastor, Reverend Susan Leonard, officiating. Sarah personally requested the downtown venue, knowing her out-of-town guests would revel in its beauty. The couple resides in Brooklyn, New York; Sarah works as an editor for the Oxford University Press, and Alex works for RIA & Family Office Coverage, Neuberger Berman. BY JENNIFER STUART PHOTOGRAPHY

Caroline Cope & Khal Khoury April 15, 2018 Summer loving didn’t happen so fast for Caroline Cope and Khal Khoury. The pair met on the same swim team when they were eight, but sparks didn’t fly until high school. The lovebirds were tested time and time again, surviving three proms, different colleges in different cities, and separate jobs in separate countries. With ten years under their relationship belt and finally sharing the same zip code, Khal shot cupid’s final arrow. On a trip to Colorado at the top of a mountain summit, he dropped to one knee and, surrounded by a stunning view of the Rockies, asked Caroline to marry him. The couple wed at The River Road & Jasmine Houses in Columbia, South Carolina, where the skies opened up providing a torrential downpour. A historic house on site served as the perfect backup venue—and made for the dreamiest surprise. The pair lives in downtown Greenville, with Caroline working as a travel and marketing coordinator for Explore Up Close, LLC, and Khal as a sales rep for Women’s Choice Pharmaceuticals. BY HALEY GEORGE PHOTOGRAPHY HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 44 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Africa by Loïs Mailou Jones, 1935. Oil on canvas; artwork courtesy of the Johnson Collection

Feminine Lines: African-American artist Loïs Mailou Jones is featured in Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists of the Johnson Collection.

Woman’s Work

Discover the genius of Southern female artists in the Johnson Collection’s extensive primer SEPTEMBER 2018 / 47

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Female Gaze The book Central to Their Lives explores Southern women artists of Spartanburg’s Johnson Collection / by John Jeter // portrait by Eli Warren

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Artwork courtesy of the Johnson Collection

Art History: Published by University of South Carolina Press, Central to Their Lives showcases noted women in Southern art, including African-American painter Loïs Mailou Jones (page 47), whose works connected with her ancestral legacy and contradicted pervasive racial stereotypes.

Southern Sisters: Central to Their Lives, a new book on female Southern artists in the Johnson Collection, includes, among others, (clockwise opposite far left) Sarah Mabel Pugh, The Champion; Mary Alice Leath Thomas, Red, Gold and Black; Elizabeth Verner, Shem Creek; Eunice Dusti Bongé, Untitled; and Wenonah Day Bell, Peach Packing, Spartanburg County. Susu Johnson (opposite above) has stewarded this collection that she and her husband, George Dean Johnson Jr., have amassed since 2002; she sits in front of an Ida Jolly Crawley painting at Converse College. For more information on the artists, visit thejohnsoncollection.org.

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ne Mississippi artist signed her paintings with a pseudonym to obscure her gender. A portraitist born on a Tennessee plantation left her husband and son for Paris to devote herself to her art. Yet another painter also earned more fame in France than she did in the South, but she also helped other African-American artists as a teacher in North Carolina. These are among the 42 stories of women whose paintings and sculptures, spanning the late 1890s to the early 1960s, are showcased in a masterful new book, Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection. “We focused in on those artists that we felt had the most significant careers, but with a twist, too,” says Lynne Blackman, the book’s editor and the Johnson Collection’s communications director. “We also wanted to look at artists who’d been perhaps overlooked. We’ve got the whole red-headed stepchild going on a little bit with Southern art.” To address that, the collection’s staff spent four years gathering some two dozen art historians, museum curators, and other experts to contribute to the oeuvre. Not only do the 250 pages include 96 color and 52 black-and-white illustrations, but the book also features powerful profiles of each artist. One of them, Loïs Mailou Jones, who died in 1998, is among several African-American women featured. “There was a double handicap: being a woman and being a woman of color. I kept going on, with determination,” she’s quoted as saying. “As I look back, I wonder how I’ve done it.” Susu Johnson, a 1965 graduate of the all-female Converse College, and a former Spartanburg city councilwoman and teacher, prides herself as a fierce advocate for women, past and present. Sitting in the lobby of her Spartanburg alma mater’s Phifer Hall, the science building that bears her maiden name, she says, “You would be amazed at what a lot of women, particularly Southern women, went through, where they were so restricted and their behaviors were so proscribed for them. It’s amazing that they were able to do their art at all.” The book also serves as a companion to seven exhibitions running through 2021 in seven Southern states. All the displayed works are on loan from the 16-year-old Johnson Collection, which comprises some 500 artists, of whom nearly 150 are women. The collection continues adding works, especially from women, as Johnson did while her staff combed through mountains of scholarship to cull down artists to feature in the book. “Through the research, if we were missing a piece from a really important woman who painted in the South and is very important to that movement in the South, then we tried to go get one, find one, and to be able to buy it and be able to afford it.” Art aficionados, especially in the South, can’t afford to miss Central to Their Lives. Published last summer by the University of South Carolina Press, the book is available at independent bookstores and online from USC Press and retails for $50.

8/21/18 8:49 AM


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Food for Thought Morgan Allen heads up Greenville’s Euphoria food and music festival as its new executive director / by Jac Valitchka // photograph by Ian Curcio

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he little festival that could, Euphoria is back for its 13th year with a new executive director. Morgan Allen, who previously served as event director, has taken the festival reins, helping host the food-fabulous weekend this September 20–23. Before coming back South, the Georgia native worked in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, at the Mahogany Run Golf Course as the food and beverage manager. With stellar chefs, music makers from Greenville to Nashville, and the nearly $300,000 the non-profit has raised since it began in 2006, Euphoria shows it’s fired up about fine food. True, Greenville will always have pimiento cheese, but the Michelinstarred chefs? They’ll be gone after four days.

So about St. Thomas. I must ask, did you island hop and ever run into Kenny Chesney at Woody’s Bar? >> I actually get that question a lot. My husband ran into him a couple of times on St. John, but I never did. I went to Woody’s quite a bit . . . when we would make it to St John, it was kind of your escape for the day. I think the hardest thing is that everyday life sets in so I would come home and people would say, ‘I thought you’d be tanner,’ and it’s like, well, when you work 50–60 hours a week, all you want to do is just sit down on a Saturday and not do anything.

“We are an intimate festival, and that’s what makes us stand out.” —Morgan Allen

Chef’s Table: Morgan Allen steps up to the plate as the new executive director of Euphoria Food, Wine, and Music, Thurs–Sun, September 20–23. To buy tickets to the festival’s fare-focused events, visit euphoriagreenville.com.

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What is setting Euphoria apart this year? >> I think just staying true to who we are. Keeping that at the forefront through everything that we do. We are an intimate festival, and that’s what makes us stand out. Just making sure that everything that we decide to do is thoughtful—how do we make it more engaging between the chefs and the attendees? Are there any chefs coming this year that you are particularly excited about? >> I’m definitely excited about the Michelin chef lineup this year. We’ve had three Michelin-starred chefs in the past, and this year we’re bringing in six, which is really exciting for me. I don’t like to call myself a foodie—I admire chefs, and growing up in that industry I think it’s really rare not only to have Michelin here, but to have six Michelin-star chefs here, and see how humble they are and excited they are to come to our festival. It’s really amazing. When you travel do you go to their restaurants? >> Anytime that we travel we try to either go see a chef that’s participated or someone that we’re hoping to get to the festival in the future. Just to always keep up with who is up-and-coming and again, it’s great whenever you can travel regionally and you always have a spot. You can make a decision pretty easily on where you’re going to go eat based on who you want to go see. Who would be your dream chef? >> That’s a tough question. I’m a huge Michelle Bernstein fan. Who is she? >> She’s in Miami. She’s an amazing, talented chef and came up when the industry was really starting to get popular in the sense of reality TV. I mean, nowadays it’s all about the female empowerment, but Michelle Bernstein is kind of an old-school chef, and all these talented chefs came after her that are Michelin-starred chefs now. I’m dying to get her to the festival and it’s my mission to get her here. Actually, Chef Wilberto Sauceda, the new chef at Lazy Goat, cooked under her for a long time. So there’s a connection there. I’m hoping to use that connection to get her here (laughs). What are the top three must-dos for the festival this year? >> I think if you have the means to do it, definitely the Michelin-starred dinner. I know it’s expensive but it’s so rare to have four Michelin-starred chefs cooking for you all at one time. I think Feast by the Field is probably one of my favorite events now, and anytime there’s a new person that’s never experienced Euphoria, I always say Feast by the Field because it’s a tasting showcase event and you get so much bang for your buck. The other event that I would—oh, gosh, this is hard—I’m torn between two, but the Sunday Supper is quintessential Southern and being down on the Reedy River and the Wyche Pavilion just screams Greenville, and unfortunately it’s probably the last year that we’re in the Wyche with the renovations they’re doing. It’s hard to think down the road where are we going to have this ambience, this natural beauty that Greenville has to offer.

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ymcagreenville.org 864.412.0288 SEPTEMBER 2018 / 51

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Bunk

Rest in understated luxury at the Queen City’s Tryon Park Hotel / by M. Linda Lee

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ou get your first taste of the Tryon Park Hotel, in Charlotte, North Carolina, when you pull up to the bell stand and spy the sleek black Maserati SUV parked in the valet circle. This is the car the staff uses to ferry guests around the city within a three-mile radius of the 217-room hotel. It’s meant to impress, as is the design of the airy, three-story lobby, with its clean lines and subdued palette of gray, white, and black enlivened by bright pops of color from contemporary artwork. “The Tryon Park is a luxury hotel that reflects the regal heritage of the Queen City,” says General Manager Robert Hannigan. Located in the Third Ward, the most modern of Charlotte’s neighborhoods, or wards as they are known, that ring Uptown, the first hotel here by Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants (opened November 2017) boasts a sophisticated aesthetic that echoes this modern city and its high-tech, banking, and automotive industries.

A key card is required to access the elevator, and, for extra security, it is keyed only to the third floor (meeting rooms), the fourth floor (fitness center), and the floor on which your room is located. Inside the elevator, there are no buttons to push. The futuristic computerized system automatically takes you to the floor you indicate on the keypad outside the elevator. Our spacious corner room overlooks Romare Bearden Park, named for Charlotte’s native son and renowned African-American artist, through a high window wall. Just beyond, we have a great view of BB&T Ballpark, home field to the Charlotte Knights. The lobby’s color scheme continues in the guest rooms, with sparks of purple, blue, and silver to lend majestic notes of what Hannigan calls “understated luxury.” A clever design element, a freestanding wall in the middle of our room holds a flat-screen TV on both sides. One side, outfitted with drawers and a mini-bar, faces the bed; the other side offers a work desk. The marble-tiled bathroom contains a deep soaking tub and shower all in one glass enclosure.

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Photographs courtesy of Tryon Park Hotel

Urban Posh


Photographs courtesy of Tryon Park Hotel

Dwell Chic: Modern touches and elegant simplicity define the Tryon Park Hotel’s lobby Living Room (opposite left), rooftop bar (above), and Angeline’s restaurant (right), where the delectable cuisine trends Italian.

“Luxury without the attitude” is how Hannigan describes the hotel’s service. Indeed, every staff member we have contact with is warm and authentic, without any hint of stuffiness. The desk staff assumes the role of concierge, filling most any request from giving directions and recommending the best local haunts to making theater reservations. Top-flight amenities include pet-friendly accommodations (no additional fee or size restriction) and a 24/7 fitness center with an outdoor yoga deck. Every evening at 5pm, the hotel hosts a wine and hors-d’oeuvres reception in the elegant living room space adjoining the lobby. Expect mixologist-crafted cocktails and a wraparound outdoor seating area with a city view up at the hotel’s rooftop bar, Merchant and Trade, which can only be accessed via a dedicated elevator—with security staff to check IDs. Off the lobby, Angeline’s chic dining room tenders a taste of Italy. “Our restaurant is not just a hotel amenity,” says Hannigan. “It’s designed to compete with the best restaurants in Charlotte.” And it does. House-made pappardelle with a guancialestudded Bolognese sauce and a perfectly roasted whole branzino with red pepper coulis exemplify the exceptional cuisine. All around, it’s a courtly experience fit for a Queen City. Kimpton Tryon Park Hotel, 303 S Church St, Charlotte, NC. (704) 445-2626, tryonparkhotel.com. Average rates for a standard room range from $159 to $259. SEPTEMBER 2018 / 53

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High Horse: From Landrum to Mill Spring, five Foothills towns northwest of Greenville celebrate the area’s equine heritage with the Art of the Horse outdoor exhibit.

Head for the Hills Known for gorgeous mountain vistas, wineries, and equine culture, these Foothills towns are worth a stop / by Laura Linen // illustration by Timothy Banks

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f the idea of an open road, wind in your mane, 32 art horses, and five mountain towns makes you giddy (up), then this venture is for you. The Art of the Horse Outdoor Exhibit, hosted and created by Our Carolina Foothills, offers a tour of the Foothills area while showcasing artistic talents through creative horse displays.

LANDRUM, SC

Begin your journey up scenic Highway 11 to grab an Art of the Horse map from The Cliffs at Glassy guard station. Here you’ll glimpse the first art horse, designed by Spartanburg artist Barbour Bordogna. Catch six other horses at places like Whimsical World Gallery or Stone Soup, which offers scratch-made baked goods, sandwiches, salads, brick-oven pizza, and more. If you tour on Saturday, check out the farmer’s market in full swing, where you’ll find the art horse Constellation: The Stars Shine for Everyone.

T RYO N , N C Tryon may be tiny, but it’s the location of eight art horses and many interesting must-stops. Grab a coffee in St. Luke’s Plaza at Tryon Coffeehouse, and if you’re getting hungry—don’t say you could eat a horse—check out Katie D’s NY Deli for authentic bagels. Tryon was the birthplace of jazz sensation Nina Simone, and she is honored here with a bronze statue. Sit on the bench across the street from the plaza for a good view of the art horse that pays tribute to her.

SA L U DA , N C

Continue north on Highway 176 into Saluda. Although only two art horses stand here, you won’t be disappointed with the town’s offerings. Grab a meal at Caro-Mi Dining Room (check their hours first), and if you feel like stretching your legs, head to Pierson’s Falls for a quick and relatively easy hike in this beautifully preserved park by the Tryon Garden Club. When you’re ready to hang your boots for the night, check in at the Blue Firefly Inn and view the Carolina horse by Greenville artist Hamed Mahmoodi. For dinner, don’t miss the The Purple Onion, which usually has live entertainment on its picturesque patio. On your way out of town, spot the Dream Weaver horse by Gigi Dover.

COLUMBUS, NC

Wind your way to Columbus and be sure to get a caffeine boost at Openroad Coffee just off I-26. There are four art horses in this town, including one by artist and equestrian Laurie Sullivan, who brings light to all eight disciplines of the FEI World Equestrian Games this month. Go winery-hopping at Overmountain Vineyards and Mountain Brook, then finish the day at Italian stand-out Giardini Trattoria.

MILL SPRING, NC

Mill Spring is the next stop made notable for the formidable Tryon International Equestrian Center, full of restaurants, shops, and real horses. During September 11–23, TIEC will be home to the FEI World Equestrian Games (to learn more, turn to page 71). As you take in the area, locate the four art horses near TIEC, Caitlyn Farms, and Brights Creek, especially Ode to WEG, Barbour Bordogna’s anchor art horse stabled at TIEC, as well as Forces of Nature by renowned artist Jagadish Pradhu.

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Ride of His Life Ecuadorian dressage master Julio Mendoza and his horse Chardonnay lead the charge at the World Equestrian Games / by Stephanie Trotter // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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ach morning as Julio Mendoza pulls on his polished riding boots, he knows he’s living two dreams—the American Dream and his dressage dream. He came to the States with $20 in his pocket, and now he’s heading to the biggest horse competition known: the World Equestrian Games. “If you believe in yourself and in your horse, it’s very hard to make it, but if that can happen, it’s a dream coming true,” says the Grand Prix rider, his Hispanic-tinged English a proud pointer to his past.

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Julio’s great-grandfather was a rancher in Spain. The 39-year-old grew up a fourth-generation horseman in Ecuador. He summons a story he’s heard many times. “My father said the minute I saw a horse, for me, that was the more happy moment of my life. I don’t really remember, I was three, but he said I was crying until I could sit on the horse.” Life kept Julio centered in a saddle. He tried jumping, but found far greater satisfaction in dressage, a discipline originally designed to train military horses. “You develop this relationship between you and the horse. I have a lot of respect for people who jump, but it’s not for me.” The counter-cantering horseman’s seamless harmony with his steed is undeniable. That connection is what caught the eye of his wife when she saw him for the first time. “He was teaching students, and I loved his partnership with his horse,” she recalls. “They looked like one. He was beautiful to watch.” Jessica is from Ohio, but one college semester in Ecuador grew into years abroad after meeting the congenial equine instructor. “I didn’t really speak much Spanish, and he didn’t speak any English,” she shares with a hearty laugh. “Everyone says we must have been speaking a love language.” The couple shares a love of each other—and horses. In 2007, they moved to the States in search of steady equestrian opportunities for their family— they have three children. In 2016, they bought their 20-acre farm in Columbus, North Carolina. Julio competes and teaches, while Jess runs Mendoza Dressage operations, which includes training, boarding, and breeding. “I don’t ever see this

Field of Dreams: Julio Mendoza and his Oldenburg gelding, Chardonnay, are poised for dressage greatness as they contemplate Mendoza’s dream of competing in the World Equestrian Games at the Tryon International Equestrian Center later this month.

changing, really,” the 31-year-old mother predicts. “It’s something we both love so much and it’s neat to be able to share it with each other. Dressage is also one of those sports that you can do well into old age, as long as you’re healthy enough to ride.” In middle age, there’s no reining in success for Julio. This past spring, he and his Oldenburg gelding, Chardonnay, became the first dressage duo from Ecuador to qualify for the world championships. And the fact the competition is ten minutes beyond his barn makes him optimistic. “I don’t have to travel. I don’t have to go to another country in the airplane,” he explains excitedly. “Chardonnay knows that ring, and he’s home. He’s competed in that ring before.” The two were contenders at the Pan American Games in Toronto in 2015, and the Bolivarian Games in Bogotá, Colombia, last November. Julio’s greatest wish is to take Chardonnay to the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. “My first time I saw Chardonnay, I saw the kind eyes that he have, the good brain, and he tries so hard every time. So, it was my goal for him to compete with him and go to the Olympics.” When the pair takes to the ring near Tryon this month, Julio hopes their ride, with its serpentines, pirouettes, and flying change of leads captivates spectators. “Dressage is like people dancing in a ballet. It’s very beautiful, very elegant. I try to be as still as possible. Chardonnay knows what to do.” Afterward, Julio will give his trusted mount some small apples. He’ll press his forehead against the Oldenburg’s blaze, and whisper a mix of Spanish and English. “I tell him he’s a good boy, it’s a good day, and I love him.” Man and beast will ride off into the sunset, hopefully, with gold glistening from a ribbon around Julio’s neck. For more on the FEI World Equestrian Games, Sept 11–23, turn to page 71.

“Dressage is like people dancing in a ballet. It’s very beautiful, very elegant. I try to be as still as possible. Chardonnay knows what to do.” —Julio Mendoza

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QUICK AND EASY CITRUS LAVENDER SODA:

1. In a pot, combine a cup of sugar and a cup of water. 2. Add a tablespoon of culinary lavender. 3. Bring to a boil, and then let steep for 30 minutes. 4. Strain the lavender for lavender simple syrup. 5. Add seltzer and either lemon or lime juice for citrus lavender soda.

Purple Rain Mary and Tim Bergstrom bring lavender fields to Greer at Southern Hills Farm / by Allison Futterman // illustrations by Alice Ratterree

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hen one envisions beautiful, bright fields full of lavender, Greer, South Carolina, probably doesn’t come to mind. But husband and wife duo Tim and Mary Bergstrom have created a lavender lover’s paradise with their farm, Southern Hills Lavender. After their first crop became available for public picking in the summer of 2016, Southern Hills has steadily gained in popularity. The Bergstroms had been living up north when they decided to pursue their dream of owning a small business. With Mary’s background in technology and Tim’s degree in forestry, combined with a mutual love of gardens and plants, a small farm seemed like an ideal fit. After exhaustive research, Mary and Tim

picked lavender as their crop of choice. They read all the books they could get their hands on, went to conferences, and visited and volunteered at lavender farms. Wanting to be closer to their families, Mary and Tim made the move to South Carolina and began the land hunt for their new venture. “It took three years to find the land. We knew we wanted something that would work for plants, but also for us to have a house, be close to stores, and work for agrotourism,” says Mary. Mary runs the farm full time, while Tim works for the USDA and helps Mary on nights and weekends. Their enthusiasm for Southern Hills Lavender is palpable, not just as a business, but also because of the community connection. People flocked to the farm from the beginning. During the mid-May to mid-June “uptick” season, the public can pay a small fee and pick from the lavender available at the farm. Plants are also for sale, as well as a variety of products at their retail shop, including soaps, lotions, candles, essential oils, sachets, chocolate, and more. While local artisans craft many of the products, the Bergstroms make several themselves and sell at farmer’s markets and craft shows. Although Southern Hills has been a success, the journey hasn’t been all sunshine and, er, lavender. Mary and Tim had to contend with diseased soil, a major challenge for plant growers. Fortunately they’ve worked with Clemson professor of plant pathology Dr. Steven Jeffers to address this industry problem, and their purple-hued fields have continued to flourish, leading to a special partnership with Seasons Café & Catering. Southern Hills grows two types of the aromatic herb, including the culinary kind that’s used for food and drinks. With the expertise of Seasons, the team has developed a lavender-based, seasonal menu for the farm’s “Feast in the Field” event held each October. With the success of curated culinary events and a hopping uptick season, the Bergstroms feel embraced by the greater Greenville community. “We recognize that businesses . . . aren’t as lucky as we are,” Mary says. “We recognize that it’s the lavender that people love. We’re grateful.” Southern Hills Farm, 2132 Edwards Lake Rd, Greer, SC. southernhillslavender.com Feast in the Field This October, Feast in the Field guests will sample a lavenderinfused local menu, carefully curated by Southern Hills and Seasons Café & Catering—all enjoyed on the farm. The cost is $50 per person with vegetarian and gluten-free options available. Registration required. Thursday, October 11, 6–9pm, rain date: Oct 18; Tuesday, October 16, 6–9pm, rain date: Oct 23; Sunday, October 21, 1–4pm, rain date: Oct 28. For more, check out southernhillslavender.com.

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FIELD

Guide

Glass Menagerie An escape to Biltmore Village offers sculptural delights at the famed estate’s Chihuly exhibition / by Abby Moore Keith While you’re in Biltmore Village, check out these must-stops: Mountain Magic: Dale Chihuly’s glass creations sparkle throughout the Biltmore Estate, including Burnished Amber, Citron, and Teal Chandeliers (above left) in the garden’s conservatory, and Sole d’Oro (above right) on the front lawn. With the exhibit, explore Biltmore Village’s shops and restaurants, then enjoy an overnight stay at the Grand Bohemian Hotel, Asheville.

EAT / DRINK Catawba Brewing Considered the craft beer of the Carolinas, this brewery sits on the southern side of Biltmore Village. Try a White Zombie pale ale or Friki Tiki IPA after browsing the area’s extended retail offerings. 63 Brooks St, (828) 424-7290; catawbabrewing.com

Corner Kitchen Situated in a century-old Victorian cottage, this farm-focused foodie joint offers an ever-rotating menu, depending on what’s in season. Expect to find the likes of corn-fried oysters or white-wine-poached barramundi alongside craft cocktails, with a kids’ menu to boot. 3 Boston Way, Asheville, NC. (828) 274-2438, thecornerkitchen.com

Photographs courtesy of the Biltmore Estate

A

sheville in September is a dream to be sure. But this fall, Biltmore Estate steals the show with its Chihuly at Biltmore exhibition. Already a Disneyland for adults with its winery, restaurants, and mountain vistas stretching forever—the estate couples its gorgeous grounds with sculptor Dale Chihuly’s large-scale kaleidoscopic glass creations. Sixteen installations feature throughout, varying from colorful snake-like curvatures in the pergola, to prismatic glass balls among the lily pads in the fountains, to a lagoon-themed masterpiece constructed inside the 250-room house’s winter garden. While Chihuly’s ribbons and curly cues and tentaclelike structures are a sure sight during the day, an evening pass will have guests gasping at the glass exhibit’s exclusive nighttime lighting. Set against a Blue Ridge backdrop, the historical home’s exquisite architecture combined with Chihuly’s genius creates a profound effect not easily forgotten. Chihuly at Biltmore, thru October 7; starting at $55. One Lodge St, Asheville, NC. (800) 411-3812, biltmore.com/chihuly

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ns in the policy itself and in any The value you want

Life’s simpler with State Farm. But we understand that you’re looking for value as well as convenience. That’s why we offer plenty of opportunities to save on your auto and homeowners coverage. Do you have a good driving record or a home monitoring system? Have you recently taken a defensive driving class or updated your home’s utility systems? Those are just a few of the potential discounts available. We’ll discuss which ones you’re eligible for and apply them when preparing your quote.

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Hi-Wire Brewing Known around brew-town for its balanced and approachable beers, Hi-Wire’s Big Top location sits at the northside of Biltmore Village. The circusthemed brewery sports a varied selection, though the mosaic IPA and house gose are definite showstoppers.

7 statefarm.com

®

Photographs courtesy of the Biltmore Estate

2 Huntsman Place, (828) 738-2448, hiwirebrewing.com

Red Stag Grill Part mod décor, part hunting-lodge chic, Red Stag Grill brings out the best local flavors with its fresh food focus. While a filet from nearby Hickory Nut Gap Farm will certainly tame a beef craving, try the Sunburst mountain trout with sweet pea and mushroom farro accompanied by an Asheville Mule signature cocktail. 11 Boston Way, Asheville, NC. (828) 398-5600, kesslercollection.com/ bohemian-asheville

STAY Grand Bohemian Hotel, Asheville Sign off your Chihuly experience with an evening at the Marriott Rewards– affiliated Grand Bohemian in Biltmore Village. Settled directly

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and is not a contract. Details of coverage or limits vary in some states. All coverages are subject to the terms, provisions, exclusions and conditions in the policy itself and in any Do you have a good driving record or a home monitoring system? Have you recently endorsements.

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across from the estate’s entrance, this Tudor-inspired boutique hotel flaunts 104 rooms and suites in luxe European-lodge style. Opt for naturopathic treatments at the in-house Poseidon Spa, or draw your own bubble bath in your suite’s full-sized tub. 11 Boston

Way, Asheville, NC. (828) 505-2949 kesslercollection.com/bohemianasheville

SHOP The Compleat Naturalist Some of us deserted him or her a long ago, but there’s a galaxy gazer, rock rummager, and insect identifier still inside us all. Reembrace your inner nature nerd at this local purveyor of nature study tools, providing outdoor enthusiasts with bird feeders, bat boxes, microscopes, and even computerized telescopes. 2 Brooks

St, Asheville, NC. (800) 678-5430, compleatnaturalist.com

For full list of retail stores, visit historicbiltmorevillage.com.

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IT’S A GREAT DAY TO

BE A CAVALIER

Find out why at our OPEN HOUSE.

October 4 at 9:30 am & 6:00 pm. Register at www.cces.org or 864.331.4223. CCES is a co-ed, independent college prepartory day school serving students in K5-12th grade.

Christ Church Episcopal School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

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BY

Design

Heir to the Loom In a withering textile market, Jack King continues his family’s legacy with American-made clothing manufacturing company L.C. King / by Steven Tingle // photography by Eli Warren

I

f you ask Jack King if he ever thought he’d wind up in the clothing business, he’ll answer you with two curt words: “Absolutely not!” It’s true, but it’s also hard to believe; the business seems to run in the King blood. In 1913, Jack’s great-grandfather, Landon Clayton (L.C.) King, and a pattern-maker named Lockwood, started a cut-and-sew factory in downtown Bristol, Tennessee. The following year the company trademarked the “Pointer” brand for its line of workwear. The business expanded, and over the next ninety years, L.C., then his sons, and then his grandsons, managed the operation. But Jack wasn’t interested. “I didn’t want to be in that factory,” he says. “I wanted to open up a food import-export business in Singapore.” Today Jack is not in Southeast Asia. He’s in eastern Tennessee, serving as the president and sole owner of the L.C. King Manufacturing Company, the oldest cut-and-sew textile mill in America still run by the

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founding family. Instead of contemplating the logistics of importing French fries into Singapore, Jack spends his days considering how to best produce and market chore coats and overalls. And while L.C. King is a company he never intended to join, it is a business he is proud of and a legacy he is committed to preserving. In the winter of 1997, Jack’s father Riley King was managing the L.C. King factory. Riley’s brother Richard, who was in charge of production, had retired in 1993 and Riley needed help. At the time, Jack was in Atlanta working for a successful food broker, which he considered a dream job. But when Riley called and asked his son to come work for him, Jack reluctantly agreed. In November 1997, he walked through the door of the factory that had provided a living for three generations of Kings as well as countless numbers of families in Bristol. It did not go well. “My dad had a strong personality,” Jack says. “It was the typical father and son relationship where you

Timeless Pieces: For decades L.C. King provided outdoor wear for big brands, but the exodus of American manufacturing in the ’90s after the North American Free Trade Agreement forced the company to focus on their Pointer label. Today, the manufacturer is the oldest cut-andsew textile mill in the States still run by the founding family.

don’t get along because you’re both strong individuals.” So rather than argue with his dad, Jack focused his attention on finding his place in the company. At the time the Internet had just come on the scene, and Jack felt his first job at L.C. King should be getting the company up on the web. He designed a website that far surpassed what most companies were doing at the time and created a social media loyalty program long before social media even existed. “We had a page on the website called Pointer Brand People,” Jack says. “If a person sent us a photograph of them wearing our stuff—now, this was before cell phones, so an actual photograph—we would scan it and upload it to the website. Then we would send them a free T-shirt. What was really great was looking at what was in the background of the picture because it told you the life the people were actually leading while wearing our jeans or overalls, and to me that was what I liked the most. A lot of the great pictures were of fathers and sons. It was a nice wholesome way to promote the brand.” The nineties were a boom time for the L.C. King Company. The factory was producing its own Pointer brand of workwear, as well

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BY

Design

as providing outdoor wear for several other companies, including Sears, Wal-Mart, Cabela’s, and Bass Pro Shop. But the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) ended that fruitful run. It happened so suddenly it was as if someone had flipped a switch. “In 1999, our business disappeared overnight,” Jack says. “I mean gone. It just stopped. All of the sudden we had to figure out what to do, and all we could do was start to promote ourselves on the Pointer brand label.” The Pointer brand has been a mainstay of American-made workwear for more than a hundred years. The iconic label featuring L.C. King’s beloved pointer breed of dog has been worn by generations of farmers and outdoorsmen, and more recently hipsters, all who appreciate well-made, American-sourced, long-lasting clothing. In fact, the overalls last so long they come with a lifetime repair guarantee. Pointer is more of an icon than a brand, and its customer base is loyal and somewhat predictable. You can often discern where someone is from just by the type of Pointer overalls they’re wearing: low-back in Kentucky and South Carolina, high-back in Georgia. And even though he is president of the company with a slew of responsibilities, if you’re wearing a pair of Pointer low-back overalls purchased within the last twenty years, you should know that Jack King himself sewed the suspenders. “That’s how I was able to get the men and ladies who work here to be on my side when I first started,” Jack says. “They didn’t really know me, so one day I went up to see Mary, who was in charge of the parts room, and told her I wanted her to teach me a sewing job. I wanted to make something that we were actually delivering to the customer. She taught

That’s a Good Point(er): Crafted to last a lifetime with 100-percent American-sourced materials, L.C. King’s Pointer overalls and shirts have been worn by generations. In 2016, the company unveiled the L.C. King brand, a line of jeans, coats, and vests that double as work and street wear. Fourthgeneration owner Jack King (opposite, bottom right) not only leads the company, but he also works on the floor sewing suspenders for the low-back overalls.

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me how to make the suspenders for the low-back overalls. You use four different machines to make these suspenders. I soon learned why the ladies were always complaining about the mechanic not fixing the machines. I developed a personal relationship with the people sewing upstairs. Being part of what the workers were experiencing gave me compassion to what they are going through. And I still make the low-back suspenders to this day.” But no matter how well made and how beloved they may be, the harsh reality is the market for overalls is limited. So, in 2016 the company unveiled the L.C. King brand, a line of workwear that doubles as streetwear: jeans, chore coats, barn coats, and vests. “It’s a more refined product,” Jack says. “New patterns, updated fits, new sewing applications, and like Pointer it’s 100-percent American-sourced.” The commitment to American sourcing is something Jack is proud of, but it’s also a cause of concern. The American textile industry is now almost non-existent. The abandoned and repurposed textile mills that

dot the South are a reminder of how a once-burgeoning industry moved overseas at a rapid pace, taking its ancillary businesses with it. “America is not in the textile business anymore,” Jack says. “There is only one fabric mill left in America—Mount Vernon out of Trion, Georgia. So, challenge number one is to continue offering a 100-percent Americansourced product.” Jack took over full management of L.C. King in 2005 and purchased the company from his father two years later. And while the American textile industry continues to wither, the L.C. King Manufacturing Company persists, in large part due to Jack’s dedication and the talent of the men and women who work there, some for as long of forty-five years. The factory has been a vital part of downtown Bristol, Tennessee, for more than a century, and Jack says just about everyone in the region has a family member who has worked at L.C. King at one time or another. Whether Jack knows you or not, if you happen to run into him while wearing an L.C. King product, he’ll most likely approach you and thank you for your support. He wants to develop a personal relationship with the people who wear his products because the garments his factory produces require a commitment. “When you buy workwear, it’s typically not broken in,” he says. “So the customer has to commit themselves to wearing this garment and it being a part of their life for a substantial time. If you buy something we make, you’re going to have it for a long time because of the construction and the quality. Look, we’re not fast fashion. We’re not a fad. We’re just a little factory in downtown Bristol, Tennessee, in rural Appalachia, that just happens to make great clothing.”

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©Paul de Hueck

Happy Birthday, Bernstein September 22 at 8pm / September 23 at 3pm / The Peace Center Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor YUN-CHIN ZHou, Piano You’re invited to a birthday party, one hundred years in the making! Join us as we celebrate the 100th birthday of the legendary composer and conductor, Leonard Bernstein. Bernstein’s musical genius is on display in the spectacular opening concert of our 71st season. The GSO performs several of his greatest hits including music from West Side Story and Candide, as well as one of his most innovative works, his Second Symphony, starring the young piano virtuoso, Yun-Chin Zhou.

For tickets call (864) 467-3000 or visit www.greenvillesymphony.org This program is funded in part by the Metropolitan Arts Council which receives support from the City of Greenville, SEW Eurodrive, BMW Manufacturing Company, LLC, Michelin North America, Inc, and the South Carolina Arts Commission with support from the National Endowment for the Arts. This organization is funded in part by the South Carolina Arts Commission which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

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TOWN

SPORT THE BEST STORIES OF LAND & WATER

Make It Rein: Tryon, North Carolina, welcomes the FEI World Equestrian Games September 11–23, showcasing the best horse-and-rider talent from across the globe.

Saddle Up

From dressage to show jumping, riders and their steeds contend for gold at the FEI World Equestrian Games SEPTEMBER 2018 / 71

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Sport

Mane Event Tryon International Equestrian Center plays host to the grand FEI World Equestrian Games / by Stephanie Trotter

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harlotte may have the Panthers, and Raleigh the Hurricanes, but Polk County is poised to host what could be the largest sporting event in North Carolina history. Thirteen days this September, just under a half-million spectators are expected to attend the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) World Equestrian Games. That’s right. You’ve probably never heard of it, but the largest horsing event in the world is heading for the Tryon International Equestrian Center in Mill Spring, just under an hour north of downtown Greenville. Like the Olympics, these games are held every four years. This will be only the second time they’ve moved from Europe—the first was in Lexington, Kentucky, in 2010. The 2014 games in Normandy, France, lured 984 athletes, 1,234 horses, 1,900 media from 52 countries, while delivering $400 million in revenue to that region of France. “We’ve sold tickets in all 50 states and 27 countries,” shares TIEC’s chief operating officer Sharon Decker. “This is such a marvelous opportunity for us to host the games right here in the Carolinas.” Construction crews have galloped across Tryon, which raced to bid on the games two short years ago, after original host city, Quebec, Canada, backed out with funding issues. A village to house the world has popped up around TIEC’s 1,200 stables, 13 rings, and Rolex Clock Tower. It’s difficult to walk the grounds and not hear rumors of big names that may be in attendance, including the Duke and Duchess of Sussex—better known as royal newlyweds, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. Those hoping to rub elbows with elite riders and fans can grab a Grounds Pass for $20. Tickets are also available to individual events, as well as one- and twoweek passes, the latter running at $1,380. FEI World Equestrian Games, September 11–23. 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC; tryon2018.com

COMPETITION 101 // When the FEI World Equestrian Games come to Mill Spring, spectators will have the opportunity to view the eight core equestrian disciplines. Don’t make it look like it’s your first rodeo—because it’s not a rodeo at all. Here’s what the Olympiccaliber horses and riders will be running:

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Familiar Fences: The FEI World Equestrian Games feature eight equine disciplines of competition, while the Olympic Games only offer three: dressage, show jumping, and eventing. For tickets and more informaion, visit tryon2018.com.

Dressage

Driving

Endurance

Eventing

Think ballet on a horse, with a scoring system similar to ice-skating. Each team covers the ring in a series of intricate patterns, showcasing the bond between rider and animal.

The adrenaline-shot of the games. This highoctane spectacle features thundering hooves as teams of riders guide four horses pulling a carriage across three phases of competition .

A 100-mile race against the clock, testing speed and stamina through the Foothills surrounding the center.

The triathlon of riding, with the same horse and rider competing in dressage, cross-country, and jumping across three days.

Para-equestrian Dressage

Reining

Show Jumping

Vaulting

Showcasing the true, human spirit, the same dressage guidelines apply, with competitors grouped by functional abilities.

The only Western discipline at the games, featuring flying lead changes, 360-degree spins, and sliding stops.

Courage, control, and technical maneuvers showcase each pair’s ability to clear a series of fences that can be five feet tall, with a six-foot gap.

Gymnastics on top of a horse, with individual, team, and freestyle events.

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ENCHANTING

by DESIGN

PelhamArchitects.com

Tiny Patient, HUGE DREAMS! Join the Fight!

Help turn their aspirations into reality during Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. Suppport our efforts to ensure Carolina children get to the care they need to survive by providing funds for transportation, meals and lodging associated with treatment. Visit ChildrensCancerPartners.org and put BIG smiles on little faces by giving today. The difference you’ll make will be immeasurable!

“I wanna be a princess!” Flash, 3 years old

Childhood Cancer Awareness 864-582-0673 | info@ChildrensCancerPartners.org | To Join the Fight, Text CCPCHILD to 41444.

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Changing Minds about Mental Illness Suicide is the third largest killer of teens, and suicide rates have jumped 70 percent from 2006 to 2016. Why? In part, it’s due to a serious lack of access to mental health care. 50% of all mental illness begins by age 14, and 75% begins by age 24. Yet the average time between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of treatment is 10 years. NAMI Greenville is working to change these statistics with innovative programs such as Ending the Silence. We are giving high school students an opportunity to learn about mental illness, warning signs, and how to help themselves, friends, or family who may need support.

Ryder Banks, Sarah Swoap, and Gaby Boada of the Students in Action Team from Hillcrest High School

SEPTEMBER IS NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH. To learn about risk factors, warning signs, and to donate, visit www.namigreenvillesc.org. NAMI Greenville – Join us in our fight to bring hope and help to millions of Americans.

2320 E North St. L, Greenville, SC 29607 • namigreenvillesc.org • 864-331-3300 TOWN_blank page.indd 7

8/22/18 9:43 AM


MAC invites you to

GET CARDED for buy-one-get-one-free tickets to the best shows in town.

SC Children’s Theatre

ARTCARD VENUES Centre Stage Greenville Chorale Greenville Little Theatre Greenville Symphony Orchestra The Peace Center (select shows) SC Children’s Theatre The Warehouse Theatre

GET YOUR ARTCARD TODAY!

With a donation of $50+ to the Metropolitan Arts Council you will receive an ArtCard valid for buy-one-get-one-free tickets for one time at each of the locations above for one full year.

LEARN MORE:

(864) 467-3132 greenvilleARTS.com/donate @macARTScouncil #gvlARTS

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY / EDITED BY LAURA LINEN

Headline Here

Photograph by Will Crooks

Text here

A New Leaf

A.J. Arellano sets roots in The Village of West Greenville with plant-design shop, Savereign

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THE

SHOP Alive & Well: A.J. Arellano (right) fills his plant shop, Savereign, with a jungle of greenery, including ferns, terraria, and succulents, as well as artwork from friends and local artists.

Rooted in Love New plant store in the Village of West Greenville nurtures an inspired space for community and collaboration / by Sarah Polite // photography by Will Crooks

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ust like our human lives, every plant has a journey. The success of its growth depends on the care it receives, and in turn the one who cares often benefits, too. For A.J. Arellano, owner of new botanicals boutique Savereign in the Village of West Greenville, plants have given him a sense of purpose, requiring his devout attention and care in order to thrive. A.J., 27, has discovered a kind of self-appreciation through growing botanicals. “I discovered a love for myself that I didn’t know I had, to care for something, someone else. They needed me, and I didn’t ever have to question if they did,” he says. Now, he’s created a space for others to feel the same peace and purpose while connecting community. The words Love First are visible on the letter-board in the front window. Music fills the air and so does a sense of comfort and ease. The front door is left open to welcome foot traffic off Pendleton Street and the sounds of the neighborhood. One of the first plants that A.J. loved and cared for was the Staghorn fern, which now hangs on homemade wooden mounts in his shop. Arellano restocks his shop weekly, filling his space with both familiar and exotic greenery. Fiddle leaf fig plants stand tall in corners, while monstera deliciosa arch toward sunlight. Golden pothos hang from the ceiling in baskets. Fuzzy asparagus ferns are displayed on shelves inviting to be touched. Natural light bounces off a mirrored disco ball and dances on the walls and across the small jungle A.J. has created. The leaves shimmer, blowing in the breeze. The shelves are stocked with art of local artists and friends, such as Claire Oliver, Julius Ferguson, Katie Fenske, K.C. Christmas, Daniel Crawford, Liz Oveson, Hollowed Earth

Pottery, Elemental Ceremony, Geminii Moon, Jocie Pots, and Aaron Hodges. These artists are a reflection of the creative community coming alive in the Village. A.J. also specializes in plant installations for the home and workplace and creates happy, green spaces for people to enjoy. You can spot his plant installations in the Village at coworking space Atlas Local. A young man walks by and curiously peeks in through the glass. A.J. invites him in; the man lives nearby and grew up only a couple of blocks away, having spent his entire life living in the neighborhood. He immediately walks to a large plant on one of the shelves, an Imperial Red, and touches its leaves in his hands. This young man makes macrame planters for plants just like the ones A.J. sells in the shop. They exchange information. He flashes his excited smile and looks around the room, eyes wide in awe and appreciation for all that is there, and says gratefully, loudly to A.J., “It’s about time, Greenville!” A reminder that more is growing here than only plants. Savereign, 1256 Pendleton St, Ste B, Greenville. Instagram: @savereign

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THE LOOK 1

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On the Dot Find handmade leather bags and one-of-a-kind accessories at the Indie Craft Parade at Taylors Mill // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

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GRAB BAG: (1) McGuire denim with cropped valetta and Elliatt Bianca top from J. Britt, Praire nude 01 and moth eucalyptus kerchiefs (tied into headband) from Jamie Bourgeois, brass cuff from Caroline Linen, everyday tote bag from Hand+Built Leather Goods, Dolce Vita Renly bootie from Muse Shoe Studio; (2) Sundays Blake sweater from J. Britt, crossbody bag from H+B Leather Goods, botanical 14k gold vermeil elderberry necklace (worn as ring) from Cameoko Handmade Jewelry; (3) Bronx and Banco Majorka minidress from J. Britt, russet leather clutch from H+B Leather Goods, and Brooklyn earrings in turquoise from Cameoko Handmade Jewelry.

Special thanks to model MaKenzie Divina / Millie Lewis Greenville; hair & make-up by Isabelle Schreier / Belle Maquillage

Indie Craft Parade, September 14–16. Southern Bleachery Marketplace at the Taylors Mill. makerscollective.org/ indiecraftparade

SEPTEMBER 2018 / 81

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MS. BEA

Wright

Starting Over September’s seasonal shift brings the opportunity for personal growth and change

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s the calendar flips to September, memory-driven anticipation builds as I work hard to quash the urge to buy a new Trapper Keeper notebook and a box of No. 2 pencils for school. I recognize fully that I am not always in the majority on this, but I love change. The idea of starting something new and the transformation and adjustment that are part of that process set me atwitter. I also know that there are situations when change is thrust upon us with little to no warning. You’ve lost your job or some tragedy has befallen you. Yet, while those adjustments are slower and likely painful, you simply must keep on plugging or else you will get stuck in a stagnant state of grief, misery, and self-pity. Boo-hiss on that. One foot in front of the other—even if you are only taking baby steps, at times—is the only way to move forward through trials and challenges. Choosing to reset or to embark on a new path can be thrilling. When I hear the Southern colloquial phrase, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” I feel like someone has thrown down a challenge. “Yeah, yeah,” I will say aloud, but inside, I have started a conversation with myself about some tiny tweaks or major overhauling that would enhance whatever the unbroken thing is that has captured my attention. This quote from scientist turned Episcopal priest William Pollard is one of my favorites: “To change is difficult. Not to change is fatal.” I don’t know about you, but I am not ready to accept defeat, so bring on some invigorating changes, a surefire

way to keep us on our toes and at the top of our game. Our willingness and ability to welcome change are essential to our happiness and success, both in our personal relationships and in our careers. Consider the most successful person you know. I have no doubt that even a quick conversation with her about what her life was like five, ten, fifteen years ago will reveal a pattern of embracing opportunities to change, grow, and flourish. Consider also someone whom you imagine has the most winning personal relationships. I guarantee those relationships have evolved over time, with mutual respect and love as the glue that binds through growth. Whether we elect to make a change, or it is imposed upon us, change is about new beginnings. I will leave you with these wise words of master poet and songwriter Bob Dylan: “If your time to you is worth savin’, then you better start swimmin’ or you’ll sink like a stone, for the times they are a-changin’.” I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.

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About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Illustration by Timothy Banks

MAN

The Water’s Not Fine Far from pools of pleasure, hot tubs leave The Man questioning physical closeness

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few years ago I was sitting by the pool at a swanky resort in Palm Springs, California, when a man with a hairy back and tribal tattoos walked past me and slowly descended into the hotel’s hot tub. I was eating a club sandwich at the time, and it was all I could do not to gag. Not because of the man’s hirsute back or his questionable tattoo choices but because of a sign I noticed hanging nearby. The sign warned that anyone who had, and I quote, “currently active diarrhea, or had experienced active diarrhea within the past fourteen days” should not get into the hot tub. I myself have never experienced diarrhea that couldn’t be described as “active,” or at least “lively.” But the fact the hotel felt it necessary to warn guests that getting into the hot tub while having the runs was frowned upon told me a lot about the type of people who hang out in such places. As startled as I was by the sign, reading it did not lead to an epiphany. I’ve always considered hot tubs to be simmering cesspools of bacteria. Any time I see one I shudder with queasiness—the swirling foam, the rising steam—it’s like a 500-gallon chlamydia cappuccino. The idea of soaking in one is as attractive to me as having tiny fish eat the dead skin off of my feet, which, believe it or not, is another activity some people seem to think is a good idea.

But it’s not just my germaphobia that keeps me out of these boiling bastions of bile. It’s also the social intimacy that these communal cauldrons facilitate. I’m uncomfortable rubbing elbows with the person sitting next to me on a plane much less brushing ankles with a halfnaked stranger in a tub of foamy, hot water. There’s also the ribald reputation that seems to surround these pleasure pools. If I’m at a party and see a hot tub lurking on the host’s back deck, I can’t help but wonder if I’m going to be asked to place my car keys into a bowl. Of course not all hot tubs are seething with germs and not everyone who owns one is a swinger. But like moscato, corn hole, bluetooth headsets, and home décor bestrewn with inspirational quotes, some things are best avoided for the mere sake of retaining one’s dignity. After a few minutes of soaking, the man in the hot tub in Palm Springs was joined by several of his friends. For an hour they chatted and laughed and sipped cocktails topped with tiny paper umbrellas. They were having too much fun to notice the man sitting alone a few yards away. The man eating a club sandwich while coated in sunscreen and covered in a layer of towels that concealed his own hairy back and dubious tattoos. The man with the pen and the notebook and the smug look on his face. The man silently questioning his superiority.

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86 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Essay

Carolina Son: Public radio historian Walter Edgar (left) interviews late author Pat Conroy at the Township Auditorium in Columbia. Portions of this essay were first delivered at a public memorial service on May 14, 2016, at Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park, Beaufort, South Carolina. The complete essay appears in Our Princes of Scribes: Writers Remember Pat Conroy, edited by Nicole Seitz and Jonathan Haupt and published by the University of Georgia Press.

Pat Conroy’s NotSo-Secret Love Affair

In Our Prince of Scribes, the University of Georgia Press presents a collection of odes to Lowcountry son Pat Conroy. Here, public radio historian Walter Edgar recalls the writer’s affection for the Carolina coast / by Walter Edgar // printed with permission by The University of Georgia Press

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n August 11, 2009, Pat signed a copy of South of Broad: “To Walter and Nela Edgar, For love of words and books and South Carolina.” It was through words that I first came to know Pat Conroy in 1976 when I read The Great Santini. While many readers focus on the dysfunction of the Conroy family, I was intrigued by his lyrical descriptions of the South Carolina lowcountry. The setting was not a mere backdrop—it was a critical piece of the story. As a historian who studied, wrote, and taught about South Carolina, I was captivated. Conroy’s words grabbed me. Here was a contemporary who truly understood the special, almost mystical, world of the lowcountry. And because he was a

contemporary, I thought his work might be useful in my teaching. That led me to The Water Is Wide, which had been published four years earlier. Over the following years, each new Conroy book found a place on my bookshelf. It was not until Pat found his home back in South Carolina, however, that our paths began to cross. And then he married Cassandra. I had just begun Walter Edgar’s Journal on South Carolina Educational Radio when I received a copy of The Sunday Wife. After reading it I booked her for an interview, and she asked could she bring her husband along to listen in. The conversation the three of us had after taping the show lasted quite a while as she and I touted the beauty of L.A. (Lower Alabama)—especially its sugar-white sandy beaches. Pat countered every one of our comments with one about the lowcountry. That was October 10, 2002. After that date I knew that not only did Pat adore Sandra, but he also was truly in love with South Carolina.

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The best way I know how to talk about Pat’s love of the Carolina lowcountry is to let the man speak for himself. “My wound is geography,” he wrote in the opening sentence to Prince of Tides. “It is also my anchorage, my port of call.” Prince of Tides was Pat’s fifth book, but it was fourth in what I would call Conroy’s Lowcountry Chronicles. So let’s start with The Water Is Wide and listen to the rhythm of his words as he captures the spirit and soul of the lowcountry. Yamacraw is an island off the South Carolina mainland not far from Savannah, Georgia. The island is fringed with the green, undulating marshes of the southern coast; shrimp boats ply the waters around her and fishermen cast their lines along her bountiful shores. Deer cut through her forests in small silent herds. The great southern oaks stand broodingly on her banks. The island and the waters around her teem with life. There is something eternal and indestructible about the tide-eroded shores and the dark, threatening silences of the swamps in the heart of the island. In the second chronicle, The Great Santini, his focus is on Beaufort— the town he claimed as home and that came to claim him as its adopted son. The setting is early in the novel as Santini drives his family into Beaufort and to their new home. They had entered a neighborhood of splendid quiet, hushed gardens, and columned houses. The houses were not as spectacular as those that lined River Street, but many of them were older and more tastefully understated. The river had curved around to the boundary of this neighborhood. Four large houses sat at the farthest extremity of this point of land, each of them overlooking the water. Each house was almost hidden by huge oak trees that hovered over them. The third volume of the Lowcountry Chronicles is The Lords of Discipline. From the prologue: My approach to Charleston is always silent and distracted, but I come under full sail, with hissing silk and memories a-wing above me in the shapes of the birds I love best: old brown pelicans, great blue herons, cowbirds, falcons lost at sea, ospreys lean from dives, and eagles over schools of mullet. I am a lowcountry boy. My entrance to this marsh-haunted city is always filled with troubled meditations. I’ve already mentioned the opening lines from Prince of Tides, but I think they bear repeating in context: My wound is geography. It is also my anchorage, my port of call. I grew up slowly beside the tides and marshes of Colleton; my arms were tawny and strong from working long days on the shrimp boat in the blazing Carolina heat. . . . I was born and raised on a Carolina sea island and I carried the sunshine of the low-country, inked in dark gold on my back and shoulders. As a boy, I was happy above the channels, navigating a small boat between the sandbars with their quiet nation of oysters exposed on the brown flats at the low watermark. Beach Music is the fifth of the chronicles. The story often takes us far from the lowcountry, but the lowcountry is not forgotten. Returning to South Carolina, Jack McCall is driving to “Mepkin Abbey, a small city of prayer hidden deep in a semitropical forest thirty miles from Charleston, South Carolina. Its isolation was intentional.” As McCall nears the monastery he spies a small red fox pup and its mother. “Wildness, I thought, that’s what I’ve missed in Italy, that intimate connection with the inhuman and untamable.” Shortly thereafter he leaves Waterford for the Isle of Orion. The next morning I drove out in sweet sunshine, taking the two-lane road through the marshes and forests and over the tidal creeks that gave way to the Atlantic Ocean ahead. A black man was throwing his shrimp net from a bridge at low tide. It webbed out, spinning like a ballerina’s skirt, a flawless circle of hemp, hitting the water and sinking rapidly to the bottom. I imagined its weights sinking to the silty floor, trapping every mullet, shrimp, or crab passing through that circle’s arc, and wondered where my own cast net was, if I still had the patience to fill a beer cooler with shrimp when they were running strong and fast in the spring. South of Broad, the sixth and final volume of Pat’s Lowcountry Chronicles, ends in Charleston, a Charleston that would be battered by Hurricane Hugo.

Copies of Our Prince of Scribes will be available at M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers later this month.

I carry the delicate porcelain beauty of Charleston like the hinged shell of some soft-tissued mollusk. My soul is peninsula-shaped and sun-hardened and river-swollen. The high tides of the city flood my consciousness each day, subject to the whims and harmonies of full moons rising out of the Atlantic. I grow calm when I . . . hear the bells of St. Michael’s calling cadence in the cicada-filled trees along Meeting Street. Deep in my bones, I knew early that I was one of those incorrigible creatures known as Charlestonians. And after Hugo, Leo King reminisces about the Charleston of his youth, of his days as a paperboy: I ride past concealed gardens flush with morning glories, ligustrum, white oleanders, and lavender azaleas galore. The morning birds sing a concerto for me in my swift flight beneath them. The forgotten music of a city awakening comes back to me. . . . It is Charleston. I hear the bells of St. Michael’s ring out on the four corners of the law. It is Charleston, and it is mine. I am lucky enough a man that I can sing hymns of praise to it for the rest of my life. There you have it—in six wonderful volumes—Pat Conroy’s public confession of his love for the Carolina lowcountry. Now, Pat never grouped these six books together. Nor has any literary critic. That’s my doing, and I am a historian. Historians are as familiar with annals and chronicles as others are with novels. While each one is independent, they are indelibly linked. That’s my historical analysis. I’d like to close by doing something that literary critics do all the time—regardless of whether they come from the Robert Penn Warren school of traditional critics or from today’s deconstructionists. Literary critics like to put words into the mouths of authors, as in “he/she really meant to say this or that.” I am going to close with a slight paraphrase from Pat’s sixth lowcountry chronicle, South of Broad, which we might imagine in Pat’s voice: “It is the Carolina lowcountry, and it is mine. I am lucky enough a man that I can sing hymns of praise to it for the rest of my life.” And Pat did, bless him. And we are the lucky ones because he did so. SEPTEMBER 2018 / 89

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T H R E E S T Y L E S . T H R E E WAY S O F S E E I N G . O N E S U B J E C T. G R E E N V I L L E - B A S E D F I N E A R T P H O T O G R A P H E R S Z A N E L O G A N , P O L LY G A I L L A R D , A N D J O S É Z U R I TA C H O O S E P E O P L E A S T H E I R M U S E , S E L E C T I N G C A R E F U L LY, B U T N O T E X C L U S I V E LY, A M O N G O U R H U M A N L A N D S C A P E .

WO R D S BY JOHN JETER, TERRI BRIGHT & M. LINDA LEE

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his Van Dyke facial hair, named after a seventeenth-century painter, to his portraiture evocative of Johannes Vermeer, yet another Dutch Golden Age painter, Zane Logan and his photography both appear timely antidotes to the age of Instagram. “My portraiture—and not on a small screen—gives you time to do things you normally wouldn’t do in an everyday interaction with another person,” Logan says. As an example, he shows one image as compelling as Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring, which inspired a novel, a movie, and Logan. “I can look at her nose and her eyes without scaring her, intimidating her, or being really weird.” Yes, you can get to know a person by looking at her for more than just the time it takes to snap a selfie. Though creepiness isn’t cool in these #MeToo days, Logan says he hopes his work connects people without and within his hand-built frames; he’s old-school that way, too. Posing his subjects only in front of a white wall with natural light or against a black studio background with minimal lighting, he asks them to “negotiate” with viewers, too. “‘I want you to just empty out or think about people who are looking at you,’” he tells them. “‘What would you want them to read from your face?’” You see a lot in Logan’s face, a quick smile, easy connectivity. Sitting in a tiny photography studio deep in the cavernous Taylors Mill, he flips through images on his decidedly contemporary laptop. While he does make some environmental portraits—a subject in, say, a field of flowers or posing outside a mountain chapel—he mostly eschews them. “Those objects, either consciously or subconsciously, start to influence the way we read the individual, and I think by doing that, our reading happens faster: ‘Okay, this person has had these experiences, they’ve had this type of life,’ partly because of what we read on their face, but also because of the setting they’re in. “What I’m trying to do with these is to rid them of that setting, of all that information, so it’s just you and the subject, and what I hope happens is that there’s a pause, and you ask, ‘Well, why do I think this guy has maybe had a hard life or he’s worked really hard?’” Perhaps getting twenty-first-centurions to stop long enough to exchange silent gazes with a picture is a big ask these days. He asks anyway. “How many of those opportunities do you actually have? With a photograph, you can create a body of work, and multiple people can have that same kind of interaction.” His body of work is exhibited frequently—some 50 exhibits so far. His portraits appear at the One Building in downtown Greenville. While he says he appreciates Instagram and the like—“some of the best work I’ve ever seen comes from photographers on some of those social media sites”—he still shoots for lingering connections. Says Logan, “It’s a completely different experience to slow down sometimes.”

EYE FOR AN EYE Zane Logan

teaches photography at Greenville Technical College. His portrait style encourages the viewer to look intently at the subjects, themselves, without environmental elements to distract or influence perception. Logan took Polly Gaillard’s portrait (opposite, bottom right) for this feature.

—JOHN JETER

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“MY PORTR AITURE—AND NOT ON A SMALL SCREEN—GIVES YOU TIME TO DO THINGS YOU NORMALLY WOULDN’T DO IN AN EVERYDAY INTER ACTION WITH ANOTHER PERSON.”—ZANE LOGAN

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photographers, using a camera is a method of understanding the unfamiliar, of knowing the unknown. For photographer Polly Gaillard, this discovery process is frequently a two-way street that encompasses both herself and her subject. Portraiture is Gaillard’s language of choice. It is the genre that she has consistently circled back to throughout her twenty years as a photographer. And while no single picture can reveal all, her portraits offer moments of vulnerability from friends, neighbors, a Take 5 Oil Change attendant, a student from her Mosaic After School Program, a man she met at the Triune Mercy Center. Gaillard admits that there is something cathartic about getting out of one’s skin, and inhabiting someone else’s world. “People want to be heard, want to share, and I’m a naturally curious person.” A native of Greenville, Polly became interested in photography while a journalism student at the University of South Carolina. Inspired by the work of Richard Avedon, Mary Ellen Mark, and Diane Arbus, Polly headed west in the early 1990s for an unintended nine-year trip that proved to be a fertile time for the photographer, who completed her first major project (Moment of Inertia) about teenage girls in the San Francisco Bay area. Of this project, Gaillard explains, “I started the project as an investigation in issues facing teen girls—body image, self-esteem, teen pregnancy . . . . I was trying to discover if self-esteem is something we are born with or something we gain through maturity.” Working with interviews and photographs, Gaillard began a working method that has been the hallmark of her photographic practice ever since. Gaillard’s images are frank, direct portraits that alternate between color and black and white. Says Gaillard, “Black-and-white portraits rely on expression and gesture to convey meaning . . . . I use color when it doesn’t distract from the face or the eyes, which are the most important part of the portrait to me.” Her subjects seem to know and trust her. Much of this is due to the time spent with them, hearing their stories and history. Says Gaillard, “I want to know about people . . . their lives. There’s no need to create fiction when life itself is so diverse and challenging to so many people.” Since returning to Greenville in 2000, Polly has completed a number of projects that have garnered her national recognition,

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SEEING BEYOND Greenville native Polly Gaillard has been photographing since the 1990s, turning her lens toward teen women in the San Francisco Bay area, the homeless of Greenville, her dying mother, and her own daughter. Gaillard took José Zurita’s portrait (opposite, bottom left) for this feature.

“I WANT TO KNOW ABOUT PEOPLE . . . THEIR LIVES. THERE’S NO NEED TO CRE ATE FICTION WHEN LIFE ITSELF IS SO DIVERSE AND CHALLENGING TO SO MANY PEOPLE.”—POLLY GAILL ARD

most notably the series about her daughter (Pressure Points) and her mother’s end of life (December and Everything After). Part storyteller, part documentarian, Gaillard jokingly refers to herself as a voyeur, but perhaps that designation can be given to anyone who spends years behind a camera trying to communicate a kind of truth. These days, Polly wears many hats: as communications director for the Emrys Foundation, as an adjunct photography professor, as a contributing writer for various photography websites. She does all this while making stunning images of people who typically go unnoticed as we move through our everyday lives. While looking suggests a cursory act, photographic seeing involves a deeper dive, an attempt to get beyond surface description. Polly Gaillard sees clearly, and we are the beneficiaries. —TERRI BRIGHT

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are pensive, some are defiant, yet most are smiling. The faces that José Zurita captures through his camera lens lay out a diverse cross-section of the Greenville community. When he is not teaching life skills to mentally ill adults at Gateway House (his day job), Zurita often strolls the streets of Greenville looking for a pose to strike him. When I ask the handsome Bolivian-born photographer what brought him to Upstate South Carolina, he answers in one word: “love.” He came to the United States in 2005 and attended college at the University of Southern Alabama. There, he met his future wife before graduating with a degree in international relations. She was from Spartanburg, and the couple ended up moving to her hometown. Though Zurita has been fascinated by cameras since he was a child, his first real foray into photography was with an old Canon Rebel that belonged to his late mother-in-law, a retired newspaper journalist and his biggest fan. Sadly, the marriage did not last, and Zurita moved to Greenville in 2015. Lonely and in a new place, he employed his camera to process the pain of his divorce. “I told myself that once I pressed the shutter, I was going to filter all those emotions and pain into something positive.” The camera, he soon found, was a tool that helped him to overcome his natural shyness. Zurita, who was raised by his grandparents, is driven to connect with his subjects. He always introduces himself and asks for permission before taking a photograph. In the process, they often share details of their lives. “The picture is secondary to the whole experience for me,” admits the 37-year-old. Case in point is a man named Hal, who Zurita has seen for years in downtown Greenville. “I always ask to take a picture of him because he looks awesome, but he always says ‘no.’” One day, Zurita noticed the skin on Hal’s face was peeling. They got to talking and Hal finally revealed that he had cancer and was undergoing chemotherapy, which was causing the peeling. “You may not get the shot,” Zurita muses, “but you may share a coffee and talk to that person, and it makes you see life from a different perspective. That’s the beauty of the camera.” He approaches his work these days equipped with a Nikon D750, a 35mm lens, and a compassion that manifests itself in his powerful images. Yet it’s not easy finding the perfect shot. “Sometimes I walk for hours and don’t find a single shot, and then I’m walking back to my car and I see it,” he explains. It might be someone on the corner smoking a cigarette, an arresting piece of clothing, or a compelling expression on someone’s face. Zurita takes many of his photos in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods, where he sees beauty in every smile. When he posts his portraits on Instagram, he includes the subject’s first name. “I want people to know who this person is,” says the photographer. “I hope people will see the humanity in my photos.” Going forward, Zurita wants to document social issues through photojournalism. “But portraits will still be my passion,” he insists. “I’m always trying to find that human connection.” — M . L I N DA L E E

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“YOU MAY NOT GET THE SHOT,” ZURITA MUSES, “BUT YOU MAY SHARE A COFFEE AND TALK TO THAT PERSON, AND IT MAKES YOU SEE LIFE FROM A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE. THAT’S THE BE AUT Y OF THE CAMER A.”

ONLY HUMAN Though José Zurita

calls himself a “humanistic street photographer,” he is not a street photographer in the strict sense of the term. Street photography by definition involves candid images, while the majority of Zurita’s photographs are posed. Zurita took Zane Logan’s portrait (opposite, bottom left) for this feature.

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JOE WATERS

BRANDON HI NM AN

GRAD Y P O W ELL

THEIR CONVERSATION BEGAN IN THE HALLS OF FURMAN UNIVERSITY ALMOST TWENTY YEARS AGO. NOW, THESE FRIENDS HAVE INTERTWINED THEIR PROFESSIONAL LIVES TO WORK FOR THE COMMON GOOD AS A

POWER OF THREE boys TO MEN:

INSPIRED BY THEIR TIME AT FURMAN UNIVERSITY, JOE WATERS, BRANDON HINMAN, AND GRADY POWELL CONTINUE TO WORK ON EACH OTHER'S PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS, THE LATEST BEING AN IDEAS LAB CALLED CAPITA TO HELP FAMILIES FLOURISH. OW WN N // tt oo w w nn cc aa rr oo ll ii nn aa .. cc oo m m 11 00 22 TT O

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DR. ROBINSON’S

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MI

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A NEW WAY TO FUNCTION

by STEVEN TINGLE photogra ph y by PAUL MEHAFFEY

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FOR ALMOST TWO DECADES, BRANDON HINMAN, GRADY POWELL, AND JOE WATERS HAVE BEEN ENGAGED IN SERIOUS DIALOGUE. IT BEGAN AT FURMAN UNIVERSITY WHERE THE THREE FIRST MET AS UNDERGRADUATES. After Furman, the three friends went their WHILE MANY OTHER STUDENTS WERE SPENDING THEIR WEEKENDS separate ways but continued to talk and ponder. Now they have come together and connected in a CRUISING MAIN STREET OR way that seems almost inevitable. Through Capita, SNEAKING CASES OF CHEAP BEER a non-profit ideas lab, Brandon, Grady, and Joe INTO DORM ROOMS, BRANDON, are working together to ensure a future in which GRADY, AND JOE WERE READING children and families flourish. Here, the friends tell THE CLASSICS, CONTEMPLATING their own story. THE PARADOXES OF SPIRITUALITY, AND PONDERING THE MYSTERIES GRADY POWELL Brandon and I both came to Furman OF THE UNIVERSE. THEY WERE in 1999. We met on our first day. We were on the TEENAGE PHILOSOPHERS NOT JUST same freshman hall. We had breakfast together and CURIOUS ABOUT THE MEANING talked about the fact that our fathers’ fathers died OF LIFE BUT DETERMINED TO when they were pretty young. Our fathers grew UNDERSTAND HOW ONE COULD up without fathers basically. That was our very first conversation, and I thought, okay, this is going to BEST LIVE A LIFE OF MEANING. be good because at least we are going to be able to have some good conversations about who we are.

BRA N D O N H I N MA N

It was good to connect right from the start on a fairly deep level.

GR A D Y

I studied economics and stayed with it the whole time. But I did it in a very liberal-artsy way, so I took philosophy, and history, and geology, and religion.

BR A N D O N I came in with a very small scholarship for art, but I ended up shifting my major to philosophy.

GR A D Y

Brandon and I didn’t have cars, so we were often on campus on the weekends, reading, hiking, going for long walks. It was a different world because we didn’t have social media. I think I came into downtown maybe twice the whole time I was at Furman.

BR A N D O N I remember thinking, wow, the world is wide open because on a Friday night I could go read or take a walk. Then I thought is this good or is it sad. It was lonesomeness mixed with possibility. GR A D Y

Brandon and I were both part of a group at the chapel that was an ecumenical group exploring faith and life. That’s the context we were in because there were a lot of people asking really big questions.

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could choose who we wanted to work with. We had a season of life where it was necessary that we were doing things quite separately. Now we are in a season of life where we have been able to direct our careers into collaborative projects.

“WHAT’S EXCITING IS GETTING PEOPLE TO THINK D I F F E R E N T LY A B O U T T H E GR A D Y I think one of the reasons we get along so FUTURE OF CHILDHOOD well is the amount of dialogue we have about our AND NOT JUST OF THE existing work and new ideas we have. All of our PROBLEMS CHILDREN work is very integrated. FAC E TO DAY. ” JO E I’m the chair of Brandon’s board. Brandon — JOE WATERS and Grady are both on my board. We co-founded Capita together. Openfields is a corporate sponsor of Air Serenbe. was a lot of seriousness in our college lives. Not necessarily studiousness, but seriousness. GR A D Y The more we work together the closer we get.

GRADY

We were all connected to the Mere Christianity Forum, and the tagline does it the best justice: Faith, Reason, and Tomfoolery. I felt like Furman was a place with a very narrow religious experience, and we were more interested in something more intellectually robust. The tomfoolery piece could handle the paradoxes and humor of life.

JOE At Furman, Brandon and I worked very

Brain trust:

(LEFT TO RIGHT) BRANDON HIMNAN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF ATLANTABASED ARTIST RESIDENCY AIR SERENBE; GRADY POWELL, FOUNDER OF OPENFIELDS CONSULTING FIRM; AND JOE WATERS, PRESIDENT OF CAPITA.

closely on this program called Vista House (created by Furman student and Mere Christianity co-founder Shawn Plunkett). Shawn purchased a house on eight acres of land in Travelers Rest. This is a college senior who is purchasing a house and basically turning the keys over to us to live at the house to do programming around weekly meals and weekly conversation series with professors and guest speakers, and a variety of other cultural programs.

GRADY BRANDON I didn’t grow up in a church and there was this certain pressure that I felt at Furman to identify myself with some sort of religious practice. JOE W ATE RS

Can I insert my story here?

BRANDON When I first met Joe Waters, I really didn’t like him. JOE

It’s still an open question.

BRANDON

Joe introduced himself to me as the future governor of South Carolina. He may have been joking, I’m still not sure. Joe did run for the South Carolina State House of Representatives as a Democrat at twenty-six years old.

JOE Actually, I first announced my desire to run for governor of South Carolina when I was in sixth grade and had bumper stickers made. I came to Furman as a music major. I dropped that after my encounter with music theory. So I became a history major. I wanted something much broader than history was allowing me. Grady and I lived across the hall from each other my freshman year. He was one of the first people I met at Furman. I grew up Roman Catholic and still am Roman Catholic. So I arrived at Furman as a bit of a misfit. That’s how I got involved in some of these conversations. There

It was meant to be a little bit provocative. The core of it was to find something that everyone is not questioning and that’s what we’re going to question.

BRANDON After Furman, I went and worked for a year at Vista House and from there got a live-inchef job in Boston that launched a better part of ten years working as a private chef. Then I went to work for my family’s company in Georgia. Now I’m the executive director at Air Serenbe (a nonprofit artist residency program near Atlanta). JOE

I went to work at St. Mary’s in Greenville, then did a master’s in divinity at Duke University. I came back to Greenville, ran for the State House, then transitioned into the vice-president role at the Institute for Child Success, which is a think tank based here in Greenville. I was there until last February (Joe launched Capita in May of this year).

GRADY

I worked at Erwin Penland. Then I got married, moved to Maryland, and had three kids. I would see Joe maybe once or twice a year. Then, when I moved back to Greenville in 2014, Joe and I started spending a lot of time together. (Grady is the founder and CEO of Openfields, a Greenvillebased social innovation consulting firm.)

JOE

By 2014, we got to places in our careers where we were a little bit more self-directed and

JO E

Capita exists to catalyze ideas and strategies, to help organizations, people, and policy makers ensure that all children flourish. Flourish is a word that evokes so much more than what we typically think of when we think of how we are going to solve the problems of the poor. We are now living in a post-industrial society. There’s a new set of challenges, but there are not new policies or new systems to support families. This is a conversation Grady, Brandon, and I were having. What are the futures that we would prefer for children and families ten or fifteen years from now? That was the context in which we started talking about an organization, an ideas lab, a think tank, that would be focused on catalyzing more of these conversations, broadening the cultural understanding, ensuring that all families flourish. That is why Capita exists.

GR A D Y

What motivates us is the question, ‘How do you stay free?’ A lot of people are afraid, a lot of things are changing. They don’t have a lot of sense of freedom about their lives. How do you stay free in the way that you think and the things that you care about, the relationships that you build so that you can serve this common good? It’s not freedom so that we cannot have attachments; it’s freedom so that you can be the kind of person we feel we need to be and invite other people into it.

BR A N D O N We really like new projects. There’s excitement around an idea and putting frame around it then working on it. There’s a certain entrepreneurial spirit there. We’re not motivated typically by personal financial gain. We’re excited about winning an $800,000 grant for a project or an idea. JO E

What’s exciting is getting people to think differently about the future of childhood and not just of the problems children face today.

GR A D Y

It’s the process of having an idea and bringing it to life. We are very idealistic about having some type of impact that goes beyond the material. It’s about freedom, it’s about flourishing.

JO E I think it’s compelling how we’ve been able to turn a friendship and a commitment to collaborative projects at Furman into part of our careers. To learn more about Capita, visit capitasocial.org.

SEPTEMBER 2018 / 105

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Toast to That: Creative combos like Buffalo mozzarella and speck, cashew butter and peach, and avocado and green apple dress up Due South’s new food menu.

Daily Bread Due South Coffee rolls out chef-driven bites to pair with your brew SEPTEMBER 2018 / 109

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CITY

Dish

Culinary Brew Due South Coffee’s fresh take on food makes it a wellness destination at Hampton Station / by Andrew Huang // photography by Paul Mehaffey

D

ue South Coffee Roasters has always been dedicated to high-quality, sustainably sourced coffees, and its original location in Taylors Mill was an ode to that philosophy. The café became a showcase for how those coffees could taste at their best—although it wasn’t a focus like the roasting and wholesale aspects of Due South’s business. Since moving to Hampton Station, Due South has expanded that showcase to include edible offerings that measure up to their roasts. “We see coffee as a culinary ingredient,” co-founder Patrick McInerney says. “Offering complementary food is something we’ve always dreamed of and talked about.” With the new space in Hampton Station, Due South is able to accommodate a small kitchen, in addition to the roasting and production areas, an educational area for private and public coffee cuppings, and a specialized cold brewery. “We wanted this to be the most perfect experience to showcase how coffee works within a culinary setting,” says McInerney.

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Adam Cooke, formerly of Restaurant 17, was brought in to manage the culinary experience and come up with a menu that would complement, not overpower, the coffees on offer. “I want the food to be healthy, clean, and well-sourced,” says Cooke. “I want things people can eat comfortably, relatively quickly, with their coffee, and feel good as they get down the trail or get on with their day.” “Our goal is unique, delicious, healthy,” says Cooke. Take, for example, the sardine toast, a punchy, light, and savory combination of sardines, caraway-horseradish crème fraîche, pickled peppers, mustard seed, red onion, and dill. Or the grapefruit brûlée, which offers a progression of sweet and crispy caramelized sugar, tart creamy yogurt, acidic juicy grapefruit, and the crunch of cashew crumble. The rest of the menu takes a similar bent: familiar healthy options (like muesli and granola), composed with fresh produce and textural delights. It’s a fitting addition to Hampton Station’s burgeoning reputation as a mecca of active lifestyles. But if the mood strikes for something a little less healthy, there’s always the ice cream. Due South Coffee Roasters, 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext 4B, Greenville. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com; 7am–7pm, 7 days a week

Rise & Shine: Chef Adam Cooke (opposite right) heads Due South’s cuisine team with experience from his time at Restaurant 17. His culinary creations, like the sardine toast (far right) or the grapefruit brûlée (opposite left), are designed to complement the roasters’ unique blends.

// GR A PEF R UI T B R Û LÉ E Greek yogurt, lavender, lime peel, and cashew crumble.

// I C E C R EA M Due South has an extensive selection of the cold sweet stuff, with housemade versions to come.

// T HE JO E L EE Housemade ginger beer and cold brew classic, garnished with fresh mint.

// SA R DI N E TOAST Spanish sardines, carawayhorseradish crème fraîche, pickled peppers, mustard seed, red onion, and dill.

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SWEET

Spot

Dark Desire

2

Van’s Chocolates debuts in the Village of West Greenville

3

/ by M. Linda Lee // photograph by Paul Mehaffey 1

T

hey entice you from behind the glass, neat rows of milk and dark chocolate truffles, some with decorative drizzles of colored icing, some capped with nuts or other hints of the flavors that lie beneath their chocolate coating. This is the scene at the new Van’s Chocolates in the Village of West Greenville, which opened in July. Founded by the Vanderlois family in 1968 in Hendersonville, North Carolina, the original Van’s has a long tradition of creating handmade, high-end chocolates. Will Ralston, who purchased the Hendersonville-based business three years ago, sticks to that spirit by honoring the original family recipes—and adding a few new ones of his own. Before immersing himself in chocolate at Van’s, Ralston ran Grimaldi Candy Company in Melbourne, Florida, for six years. During that time, he and his wife, Celeste, had vacationed with their children in Western North Carolina and fell in love with the area. In 2015, he and Celeste were looking for a new business when they got wind that Van’s was up for sale. Ralston contacted the owners immediately, but found, to his dismay, that a sale was already underway. As fate would have it, that sale fell through, and Ralston made an offer. “After that, everything just fell into place,” the entrepreneur recalls, “like it was meant to be.” Ralston’s background in the restaurant industry fits the mold for chocolate-making. Though he doesn’t make bean-to-bar confections, he does use a special chocolate blend—which he buys in 50-pound cases— from Barry Callebaut, one of the world’s leading suppliers of high-quality chocolate and cocoa products. With the help of his staff, Ralston tempers the chocolate, whips up the ganache with butter and cream, adds the flavorings, and hand-rolls the truffles. The pieces are then put through a machine that enrobes the bonbons in a milk or dark chocolate coating. As the pièce de résistance, toppings are placed by hand. Van’s is known throughout the region; Ralston proudly supplies Biltmore with the majority of the chocolate they sell on the estate. If you’re sweet on chocolate, Van’s is irresistible.

4

6

7

5

Instant Gratification: Van’s Chocolates hails from Hendersonville, NC, crafting handmade bonbons for the perfect gift or craving. In addition to the display case, shelves in the shop lay out jars of bread-and-butter pickles, as well as jams (think bourbon peach vanilla and brandied cherry). Van’s Chocolates, 1264 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 729-8520, vanschocolates.com

1 CHA MPAGNE APRIC OT TR UFFLE Fruit-forward flavor of aromatic apricot characterizes this confection.

caramel is the best of the bunch.

2 CA R A MEL Van’s is known for their soft, creamy caramels; the plain ones are best-sellers.

5 PIÑA C OL ADA JEL LY All the tropical flavors of the frozen summertime cocktail— pineapple, banana, coconut—shine through in this chocolate-coated jelly.

3 POME GRANATE TRUF F L E Ralston distills a syrup from pomegranate juice to flavor the tart-sweet darkchocolate-robed truffles.

6 L EMON ZEST TRUF F L E Fresh lemon zest provides the zing in the sunny yellow filling inside these refreshing citruscharged chocolates.

4 SE A - SA LT CARAMEL Crowned with a crunch of sea salt, the dreamy sea-salt

7 AMARET TO TRUF F L E A bite of this bonbon reveals warm, nutty notes of almond liqueur.

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KITCHEN

Aid

Comfort Casserole: Caramelized apples and flaky puff pastry deliver us into autumn on a late-summer breeze.

Let the overflow of apples from your annual applepicking trip prompt you to open your home on an ordinary night.

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I

n our culture, hospitality has evolved from a routine act to a celebratory one for a hundred reasons, all of which prove that sharing your table feels hard. It’s easier, isn’t it, to manage hospitality by concentrating it like a laser on the occasional dinner party, a performance of effort and care and thought. I love a grand gesture and the sparkle of silver catching candlelight around a full table as much anyone. But hospitality only exercised one way feels hollow. Apples return to the trees just when kids return to school—a season where it’s all too easy to be swallowed by busyness and find the thought of guests impossible. Do it differently this year. Let the overflow of apples you bring home from your annual applepicking trip prompt you to open your home on an ordinary night. Open your cabinet and set out your baking dish. Open your oven and let the fragrance of warm apples and cinnamon forgive any real-life clutter your guests might see. Open your hands and offer the simplest apple dessert of all, the pandowdy. It’s not fancy—far from it, this treat that was invented by “dowdy-ing” up apple pie. A large casserole dish filled with warm, caramelized apples topped by golden, flaky scraps of pastry, the pandowdy is perfectly sized for a party. Plonk the dish in the center of the table with a fistful of spoons, a stack of plates, a carton of vanilla ice cream. No performance here—just humble, homey apple pandowdy and all the warmth genuine hospitality brings.

4. Stir apple mixture until combined, and then transfer to a shallow 3-qt. baking dish. Drizzle all but 2 Tbs. brown butter over apples.

APPLE PANDOWDY Yield: 6–8 servings

INGREDIENTS: 6 Tbs. unsalted butter 4 lbs. Pink Lady and/or Granny Smith apples, peeled and cut into 1-inch-thick slices 2/3 cup dark brown sugar 3 Tbs. all-purpose flour 1 Tbs. vanilla extract 2 tsp. ground cinnamon ½ tsp. kosher salt 1 lemon 1 tsp. ground ginger ½ tsp. nutmeg 1 package frozen puff pastry (2 sheets), thawed Granulated sugar (for sprinkling)

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Cook butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, swirling often, until bubbling and golden brown, about 5 minutes; set aside.

Big Apple The party-sized pandowdy is perfect for hosting a relaxed fall gathering / by Kathryn Davé

// photograph by Jivan Davé

2. Add apple slices, dark brown sugar, 3 Tbs. flour, vanilla, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and salt to a large bowl.

5. Dust cutting board with a light coating of flour and unfold puff pastry on floured surface. Dust top with flour. Cut puff pastry into irregular 1-inch squares. 6. Arrange pieces of puff pastry over apples randomly, overlapping but spreading to cover almost completely. (You may have some unused scraps of leftover pastry.) Brush pastry with remaining brown butter. Sprinkle with granulated sugar. 7. Bake pandowdy until pastry is puffed and golden around edges, 25–30 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F and continue to bake until juices are thick and bubbling and pastry is brown all over, 30–35 minutes longer. 8. Let cool slightly and serve with vanilla ice cream. Recipe slightly adapted from Claire Saffitz ))) FOR MORE RECIPES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

3. Grate zest of half of the lemon over apples. Cut lemon in half and squeeze juice from zested half over apples, catching any seeds.

SEPTEMBER 2018 / 115

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

AMERICAN ADAM’S BISTRO

The Adams family opened their bistro’s doors in February of 2008 and have been serving up flair and flavor ever since. Expect classics like a burger with a chargrilled certified Angus beef patty, as well as out-of-the-box picks like the Jack Daniel’s Pork Chop, charbroiled in a sweet and tangy Jack Daniel BBQ glaze. Be sure to visit the outdoor patio during the warmer months—weather permitting of course. $-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 221 Pelham Rd, #100. (864) 370-8055, adams-bistro.com THE ANCHORAGE

With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. Sample dishes include grilled Greenbrier Farms hanger steak, octopus carpaccio, and Chinese red shrimp and BBQ cabbage steamed buns. The “For the Table” option offers housemade charcuterie, Blue Ridge Creamery cheese, Bake Room bread, and pickled veg. Don’t miss the outstanding cocktail program at the gorgeous bar upstairs, or brunch, which is served on Sunday. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com AUGUSTA GRILL

Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution of upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D.

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

FORK & PLOUGH

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

This newcomer is the quintessential farm-tofork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly. With its casual, familyfriendly feel, Fork & Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes such as Panko-crusted Greenbrier Farms pork shoulder and blackened Carolina catfish. $$$,

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 2976000, baconbrospublichouse.com

L, D, SBR. 1629 E North St. (864) 609-4249, forkandplough.com

BLOCKHOUSE

GB&D

The Augusta Road crowd frequents the dark, cozy dining room here to knock back raw Gulf Coast oysters and happy-hour drink specials after work. An oldie but a goodie—35 years strong and still kicking—Blockhouse offers a full menu of freshly prepared items including signatures like seafood gumbo and prime rib slow-roasted for eight hours. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1619 Augusta

Rd. (864) 232-4280, blockhouse.net

The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites, such as well-crafted salads and sandwiches—like the killer burger on a housemade brioche bun— fill the menu. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of the restaurant’s best dishes. $$, L (Tues–

BRICK STREET CAFÉ

Sat), D (Thurs–Sat), SBR. Closed Mon. 1269 Pendleton St. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

You’ll likely have to loosen your belt after chowing down at this Augusta Street mainstay that serves all the comforts of home. Try mom’s spaghetti, Miss Sara’s crab cakes, or the signature fried shrimp with sweet potato fries. But do save room for made-from-scratch sweets like the sweet potato cake, peanut butter cake, and apple pie (available for special-order, too). $$-$$$, L, D (Thurs–Sat). Closed Sun–Mon. 315 Augusta St. (864) 421-0111, brickstreetcafe.com

HALLS CHOPHOUSE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. Don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri– Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com

Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Jianna

Photograph by Andrew Huang

With stellar views of Falls Park from its wraparound terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli with local tomatoes, corn, and chanterelle mushrooms (right). $$-$$$, L

(Sat–Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR S E P TM EM AR BC EH R 2018 7 / 11 09 5

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DINING

Guide

HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com HUSK GREENVILLE

Husk Greenville delivers legendary farm-totable concepts under Chef Jon Buck, who champions Southern fare by resurrecting dishes reminiscent of great-grandma’s kitchen. The ever-evolving menu offers starters—like the crispy pig ear lettuce wraps—then dives into heftier plates like the coal-roasted chicken, sorghum-flour dumplings, and shishito peppers. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 6270404, huskgreenville.com HARE & FIELD

SEASON KICK OFF SEPTEMBER 7 th

Sister restaurant to Farmhouse Taco, Hare & Field serves up comfort fare with upscale elegance. While the fried chicken skins in sorghum sriracha sauce are a sure starter, make your main meal the big mater sandwich slathered in basil aioli with a thick cut tomato, rosemary fries on the side. Pair with the Hare & Field Trail Ale, crafted specially by Brewery 85 for the gastropub.

$$. L, D, SBR. 327 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0249, hareandfieldkitchen.com KITCHEN SYNC

A straight farm-to-table concept and a certified-green restaurant, Kitchen Sync’s eco-focus extends to its menu, sourced by local farms. Start with the gritz fritz, with Hurricane Creek fried grits, collards, and pepper jam. The banh mi salad comes loaded with fresh veg and rice noodles, topped with pulled pork or tofu, or try the local rib pork chop. Don’t miss the pizza! $$, L, D. Closed Sun–Mon. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 568-8115, facebook.com/kitchensyncgreenville/

LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the she-crab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$,

L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

LTO BURGER BAR

October 12th, 5-9 pm @ THE GROVE 6811 State Park Rd. Travelers Rest, SC, 29690

Steve Borklund

Chef Brian Coller has crafted a menu that steers the beefy American staple into unconventional (but totally delicious) territory. Take the Piedmont mullet ’85, with sloppy joe chili, bomb mustard, American cheese, and “phat” onion rings. For you Elvis enthusiasts, the King of Memphis is a hunk of burnin’ love concocted with banana jam, peanut butter, and bacon. $$, L, D. 2451 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 214-1483, ltoburgerbargvl.com

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR-B-QUE

Founded by three Alabama sons, this new ’cue joint hits the West Stone area with Bama-style barbecue and traditional Southern sides. A fast-casual environment, grab a seat indoors or out—roll-up garage doors allow access to a pet-friendly patio— and enjoy a pulled pork platter or the fried catfish, all while cheering on your favorite football team on the flat screens. $-$$, L, D,

SBR. 109 W Stone Ave, Suite B (864) 5201740, moesoriginalbbq.com/greenville/ MONKEY WRENCH SMOKEHOUSE

Monkey Wrench Smokehouse comes by

its name honestly, taking up space in a long-standing hardware store in Travelers Rest. This BBQ joint from the folks behind Sidewall Pizza and Rocket Surgery serves everything from ribs, wings, and veggies— all wood-fired. Steven Musolf wears the title of head chef and is the mind behind the menu. $$-$$$. D. Closed Monday. 21 N

Main St, Travelers Rest. (585) 414-8620. NORTHAMPTON WINE & DINE

Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar. Choose a bottle from the thousands for sale, open it for a corkage fee, and enjoy with a selection of cheese or small plate. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a decidedly relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$. L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864)

271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

THE NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and cocktails at its upstairs bar CRAFTED complement an ambitious menu of urban comfort food from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is a downtown hotspot. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides: the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and God intended.

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com RESTAURANT 17

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Nick Graves like smoked scallop crudo with crème fraîche, grapefruit, hot sauce pearls, and Meyer lemon oil, and pork belly agnolotti with chestnuts, rapini, and saffron cream.

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or chef-designed. Ideal for group dinners or date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 546-3535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com

RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimi-grade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com ROCKET SURGERY

The Sidewall team trades slices for sliders with this craft concept, whose low-key bill of fare features snackable burgers like lamb topped with feta, spinach, and tangy harissa, and fried soft-shell crab with creamy paprika aioli. If you plan to drink your dinner, go for the Typhoon, with rum, dry curaçao, lime, lemongrass, curry, coconut

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cream, or The Prospector with bourbon and bitters. $$, D (Mon, Thurs–Sat), SBR. 164-D S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0901, rocketsurgery54321.com

ROOST

This fashionable restaurant lends a modern, tasty addition to North Main. Whenever possible, Roost sources food within a limited distance from producer to consumer; ingredients are often procured from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L,

D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beer-butt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202.

(864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S

Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE STRIP CLUB 104

Whether you’re a red-blooded meat eater or prefer a little pork, the Strip Club has it seared, grilled, basted, or blackened for your pleasure. Keep it simple with the “plain Jane” dish— house-aged Black Angus USDA prime strip—or spice it up with the carpetbagger, a filet mignon masterpiece paired with fried oysters, smoked bacon collards, and garlic mashed potatoes. $$$$$$, D (Tues-Sat). 104 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 877-9104, thestripclub104.com

B ARS & BREWERIES 13 STRIPES BREWERY

Providing patrons and patriots alike with a wide porch area and spacious interior bar, 13 Stripes rotates a loaded arsenal of aptlytitled suds—including the rise & fight again IPA and the Sgt. Molly American wheat— and rolls out session beers, IPAs, porters, and other seasonal kegs that pair perfectly with one of 13 Stripes’ “ration plates,” laden with fresh-cut meats and cheeses. Taylors Mill, 250 Mill St, Ste PW 3101, Taylors. (864) 349-1430, 13stripesbrewery.com BIRDS FLY SOUTH ALE PROJECT

With a focus on farmhouse saisons and sour beers, Birds Fly South Ale Project has come home to roost in Hampton Station. Though closed for production Monday through Wednesday, the open-air taproom is the perfect end-of-week place to drain a cold glass while noshing on local food truck fare. Expect to find flavor-filled concoctions, such as the biggie mango, Eldorado saison, or the 2hop session IPA. Thurs–Sun. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext. (864) 412-8825, bfsbeer.com

BREWERY 85

Named for Greenville’s favorite freeway, this microbrew is attracting outsized attention with its eclectic collection of craft brews. From the crisp GVL IPA to the malty howdy dunkel, Brewery 85 combines Southern style with the best of German brew techniques. Trek to the taproom for their latest lagers; well-mannered kids and canines welcome.

6 Whitlee Ct. (864) 558-0104, brewery85.com THE COMMUNITY TAP

Convenience, expertise, and great atmosphere collide at the Community Tap, Greenville’s

neighborhood craft beer and wine shop. Choose from a wide selection—180 local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864)

631-2525, thecommunitytap.com FIREFORGE CRAFTED BEER

Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The small-batch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885, fireforge.beer GROWLER HAUS

The franchise’s West Greenville addition is its newest, rounding out the total to four Upstate watering holes. Growler Haus’s drafts rotate seasonally to bring you the best in local and national brews, so whether you’re a fan of IPAs, pilsners, ciders, pale ales, or wheats, they’ve got a cold one waiting for you. Just remember to throw in a homemade pretzel with beer cheese or a pork belly bao bun in between pints. $-$$,

L (Fri–Sat), D (Mon–Sat). Closed Sunday. 12 Lois Ave. (864) 373-9347, growlerhaus.com

IRON HILL BREWERY

Hailing from Delaware, this award-winning brewhouse has planted roots in Greenville. Chef Jason Thomson turns out an ambitious menu, while head brewer Eric Boice curates craft beer. Take on evenings with the summer seasonal Clock Out Lager, an American lager with notes of grapefruit and pine. $-$$$, L, D. 741 Haywood Rd. (864) 568-

2018

7009, ironhillbrewery.com/greenville-sc

LIABILITY BREWING CO.

United by a passion for Star Wars and craft brews—there may or may not be a storm trooper mural inside—fun-loving founders Dustin and Terry bring solid staples to the table at Liability Brewing Co. Located in an old electric company building in the new Weststone development, this new taproom pours creative flavors with even funkier names. Sip on a Carl von Cloudwitz, a New England IPA with a crisp finish. Thurs–Sun.

OCTOBER 13+14

109 W Stone Ave, Suite D. (864) 920-1599, liabilitybrewing.co LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill satisfies as both pre–Greenville Drive game watering hole or after-work hangout. Inventive and hearty apps, such as the “Old School” chicken nachos, start things off before the main event of fish ‘n’ chips, the Liberty Club, or even a Signature Steak. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 72 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St. (864) 7707777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Tap Room, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the Greenville Drive crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabascofried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S

Main St. (864) 239-0286, macspeedshop.com PINEY MOUNTAIN BIKE LOUNGE

Part taproom and part full-service cycle shop, the Piney Mountain Bike Lounge offers the perfect pit stop after a long day of riding the trails. Local craft brews, wine, and cider complement a daily food truck schedule of popular mobile eateries. Kids (and adults) can enjoy the pump track out back. 20 Piney Mountain Rd, Greenville. (864) 603-2453, pineymtb.com

CHILDREN’S FUN ZONE

BIKE PARK Sugar Mountain Resort Sugar Mountain, North Carolina 828-898-4521 skisugar.com/oktoberfest SEPTEMBER 2018 / 121

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DINING

Guide

QUEST BREWING CO.

Eco-minded Quest guarantees to satisfy your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville.

(864) 272- 6232, questbrewing.com SIP WHISKEY & WINE

True to its namesake, this rooftop tasting room is all about liquid refreshment. While the full-service bar offers fine wines and whisky, there’s no better end to an evening than an easy-drinking glass of sangria (or a signature cocktail). SIP’s open-air patio complete with cushioned couches accentuates the laidback atmosphere, and a collection of small plates is a quick answer to an alcohol-induced appetite. $-$$, D. 103

N Main St #400, (864) 552-1916, sipgvl.com SWAMP RABBIT BREWERY & TAPROOM

Located off Main Street in Travelers Rest, this local brewhouse gives you one more reason to cruise (responsibly!) down the Swamp Rabbit. With a taproom offering classics (try the easy-drinking American pale ale) and fresh brews (the Belgian-style farm ale is a golden dream) as well as frequent food truck visits, this brewery is sure to become a favorite spot to cap off an afternoon. 26

S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2424, theswamprabbitbrewery.com TASTING ROOM TR

Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale in-house, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite from the weekly wines or happy hours hosted Wednesday–Friday. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D

(Wed–Sat), Closed Mon–Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com THE 05

Priding itself on being Greenville’s neighborhood gathering place, The 05, so named for the iconic Augusta Road zip code, offers seasonal cocktails and spirits as well as a variety of tasty tapas—like the roasted red pepper hummus or the chorizostuffed dates braised in Rioja wine and topped with whipped goat cheese. If you’re bringing the whole gang, opt for the cheeses and charcuterie, or nosh on the fabulous flatbread as a party of one. $-$$$, D. 3016 Augusta St. (864) 412-8150, the05.net THOMAS CREEK BREWERY

The Thomas Creek brand has been a familiar feature on the Greenville brew lineup for more than ten years, but a visit to the home of the River Falls Red Ale or Trifecta IPA is well worth the trip. Fill up on your favorite Thomas Creek brew in the tasting room, or soak up some sun (and hops!) on the brewery’s patio. Tours available by appointment. 2054 Piedmont Hwy. (864)

605-1166, thomascreekbeer.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer with your friends? This hangout is within walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com

UP ON THE ROOF

We all know a well-crafted cocktail can make your spirits soar, but a glass at this dignified drinkery will leave you nine stories high, literally. With its classic cocktails, local craft brews, and unique wine varieties, this rooftop bar brings a heightened experience to downtown’s Embassy Suites. Graze on small plates and soak in some of the Upstate’s most scenic vistas. $-$$, L, D. 250 RiverPlace. (864) 242-4000, eatupdrinkup.net UPSTATE CRAFT BEER CO.

Housed in the old Claussen Bakery on Augusta, Upstate Craft Beer Co. is hoppy hour heaven. Not only does it feature the best local and national brews on tap, but this beer joint offers home brewsters all the gear and ’gredients needed to craft their own ale-inspired inventions. Make sure to try a naan pizza from the in-house kitchen. 400 Augusta St. (864) 609-4590, upstatecraftbeer.com VAULT & VATOR

Named for a former vault elevator in the underground expanse, this hip downtown joint puts a twenty-first-century spin on fashionable speakeasies of yore. Small plates of charcuterie, hummus, and cheese are simple yet refined, providing enough bite to not overpower the establishment’s true star— the cocktail list. The menu includes both signature and traditional libations; your only task is picking your poison. $$, D, Closed Sun–Mon. 655 S Main St, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 603-1881, vaultandvator.com

THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub is right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR.

1 Augusta St, Ste 126. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com YEE-HAW BREWING

Beers that celebrate good times with good company? Count us in. This Tennessee native serves up a mix of fine ales and lagers, including a World Beer Cup-Winning Dunkel dark lager. Diverse seasonals crop up with every change of the temperature giving guests a taste of something new. Gather with friends to find out which flavor fits your fancy. $-$$, L, D. 307 East McBee Avenue, Suite C. (864) 605-7770, www.yeehawbrewing.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH BISCUIT HEAD

The queen bee of all things fluffy and delicious, Asheville-based Biscuit Head comes to Greenville with a wide array of home-cooked biscuits. Whether slathered in gravy or smothered in sweetness—the jam bar is slammed with fruity preserves— you can’t go wrong with the GreenVillain topped with fried pork steak, jalapeño cream cheese, bacon gravy, a sunny side egg, and pickled jalapeños. $-$$. B, L. 823

S Church St, Greenville. (864) 248-0371, biscuitheads.com/menu-greenville THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café serves a wide-range of globally inspired dishes for lunch and dinner. For Sunday brunch, try the Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Mon. 2 W Stone Ave. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com

CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy to Pattyo-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St. (864)

520-2005, eggsupgrill.com HAPPY+HALE

Based out of Raleigh, the healthy eatery’s first SC location offers diners a diverse menu of made-to-order salads, bowls, smoothies, juices, and breakfast items crafted from wholesome, all-natural ingredients. Try the “incredibowl” packed with pumpkin seeds, black beans, avocado, golden quinoa, dino kale, and lemon tahini dressing, paired with an almond brothers smoothie. $, B, L, D. 600 S Main St. happyandhale.com MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crêpes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the mega breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave. (864) 2422535, marybethsatmcbee.com

MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday. 615 S Main St. (864) 2980005, fallscottage.com

RISE BISCUITS DONUTS

Fresh buttermilk biscuits. Hot-from-the-oven maple bacon doughnuts. Debuting its first SC outfit, Rise Biscuits Donuts pumps out biscuit sandwiches and hush puppies, to apple fritters and confection-bedecked doughnuts. While the spicy chickaboom sandwich is a crispy punch of fire, satisfy your sweet side with the crème brûlée doughnut, flametorched and filled with custard. $, B, L. 1507

Woodruff Rd, Suite D, Greenville. (864) 4028240, risebiscuitsdonuts.com TANDEM CRÊPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maplepeppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Ste

T. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CAFÉS BARISTA ALLEY

Looking for that midday pick-me-up? Pop over to Barista Alley, where exposed brick walls and wide wooden tables create the perfect ambience to converse with a warm mug in hand. Satisfy your caffeine cravings with a fresh espresso, cold brew, or chai tea, but don't miss out on Barista Alley’s colorful array of green, berry, peanut butter and chocolate smoothies. $, B (Mon–Sat), L,

D (Mon–Sun). 125 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 655-5180, baristaalley.com BEX CAFÉ AND JUICE BAR

Healthy and hearty join forces at this West End joint. Find fresh fare in organic salads as well as fruit and veggie-rich juice varieties; or sink your teeth into something a little more solid. Their sausage, egg, and cheese bagel will not disappoint, with gluten-free options available, of course. $, B, L. 820 S Main St #104. (864) 552-1509, bex.cafe

COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info CRÊPE DU JOUR

Much more than offering “really thin pancakes,” this downtown establishment brings a taste of Europe to the Upstate with delicate, delicious French fare. The diverse menu includes breakfast options like the bacon, egg, and potato, and for lunch and dinner, the tomato pesto. Crêpe du Jour also serves up specialty cocktails, coffee beverages, and wine. $$, B, L, D (Tues–Sun). 20 S Main

St, Greenville. (864) 520-2882

DUE SOUTH COFFEE ROASTERS

Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. In their new digs, the coffee shop sports a café vibe, with breakfast pastries, ice cream, and cold lunch items complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com GRATEFUL BREW

A brew joint where you can enjoy both varieties—coffee and a cold one—Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order espressos or pour-overs, all from Counter Culture coffee. Celebrating our area, and that it’s always five o’clock somewhere, half of the beer taps are locally crafted brews. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com KUKA JUICE

If you’re hard-pressed for a fresh fix—Kuka Juice has just the ticket. Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out cold-pressed craft with healthminded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into the taco ’bout it bowl with romaine, walnut meat, salsa fresca, black beans, avocado, and pepitas with cilantro lime vinaigrette. Paninis, bowls, smoothies, toasts, and more also available. $, B, L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

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METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, wine varieites, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D.

RICK’S DELI & MARKET

For a filling, gourmet lunch on the go, the artisanal sandwiches and salads at this West End deli hit the spot. Try the classic Reuben, with corned beef piled high on toasted marbled rye with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing, or the Rick’s chopped salad, with turkey, bacon, and ham. For dinner, fish and chips, herb-crusted salmon, and chicken piccata make the cut.

methodicalcoffee.com

$-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 101 Falls Park Dr. (864) 312-9060, rickerwins.com

O-CHA TEA BAR

SULLY’S STEAMERS

A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 2836702, ochateabaronline.com SOUTHERN PRESSED JUICERY

A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W. Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

SWAMP RABBIT CAFÉ & GROCERY

Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is woodfired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds. $, B, L, D.

205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 255-3385, swamprabbitcafe.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by Due South and serves flaky treats from Bake Room. $, B, L. 1263

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh. $, B, L, D (closed Sunday

TABLE 301 CATERING & KITCHEN

Located around the corner from Carl Sobocinski’s restaurant, this operation adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St. (864) 271-8431, sobysontheside.com TWO CHEFS CAFÉ & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

UPCOUNTRY PROVISIONS

Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade stecca bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormonefree meat on just-baked white focaccia bread. Don’t miss The Grove on Friday nights—live music, a rotating tapas menu, and craft beer and wine. $, B, L, D. Closed

Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com

DELIS

ETHNIC

CAVIAR & BANANAS

ARYANA

L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com

shopjbritt.com

evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St. (864) 5096061, sullyssteamers.com

Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

A Charleston-based fresh-food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourmet prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. But don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T.: bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, and black pepper aioli, on grilled sourdough bread. $-$$, B,

203 N. MAIN STREET

The enticing aroma of Afghan cuisine delivers savory satisfaction at this local lunch spot. Chef Nelo Mayar brings her favorite fare from hometown Kabul to Greenville eaters—think succulent lamb kabobs and meat-filled steamed dumplings, sweet potato burhani, and root-veggie rich soups. To spice things up, the menu changes daily, but expect to find two plates of rice, meat, and veggies offered. $, L. 210 E Coffee St. (864) 2367410, aryanagreenville.com

FARM FRESH FAST

While “fast food” and “healthy” aren’t often synonymous, Farm Fresh Fast might change your mind. The restaurant’s mantra is simple: build sustainable relationships with local farms and provide nutritionbased, customized meals. We suggest the almost heaven burger with a fresh patty from Providence Farm, or the seasonal cobb salad—featuring Kaland Farm eggs and a house-made apple pie moonshine vinaigrette. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Saturday.

860 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 518-1978, eatfarmfreshfast.com

ASADA

Vibrant Latin culture comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote rellenos de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes peppers stuffed with sautéed shrimp in creamy spicy chipotle-guajillo sauce); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw. $-$$. Closed Sunday &

Monday. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

MCGUIRE, MISA, JADE & MANY MORE!

@shopjbritt 864-240-7366 SEPTEMBER 2018 / 123

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FREE BBQ Monkey Wrench Smokehouse in Travelers Rest is giving away FREE BBQ to TOWN Readers! Purchase a pulled pork or brisket sandwich and you’ll receive another sandwich absolutely FREE. Includes a side dish too! Expires 9/30/18. Limit one per table. Please present this voucher prior to ordering. Dine-in only and not valid with any other offers. Hours and Address @ monkeywrenchsmokehouse.com

Be Your Healthiest You!

DINING

Guide

BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L, D. Closed

Sunday. 605 Haywood Rd. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com

BASIL THAI CUISINE

Elegant comfort is hard to come by, but the Eang brothers have created an empire out of the concept with Basil Thai in the Aloft building downtown. Try the Chicken Coconut Tureen: a simple dish of chicken, mushrooms, and galanga roots in coconut milk packed with herbaceous flavors. You’ll probably have enough for leftovers, but the best comfort meals usually do. $$-$$$, D. 9 N Laurens St. (864) 609-4120, eatatbasil.com/greenville

FONDA ROSALINDA

For almost 20 years, Rosalinda Lopez has been serving up fresh renditions of Mexican recipes across from Bob Jones University. Her repertoire lists a wealth of tasty beef, pork, chicken, seafood, and vegetarian dishes— including the ever-popular chile rellenos—but don’t pass up a starter of chips and Rosalinda’s homemade tomatillo salsa. $$, L, D. 1124 N. Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 292-7002, facebook. com/rosalindasrestaurantgreenville/

GOLDEN LLAMA

Lomo saltado, ceviche, rotisserie chicken, and other Peruvian classics form the core of the menu at the Golden Llama, but you won’t regret the bistec a lo pobre—beef tenderloin, plantains, and potatoes, topped with a fried egg. The eatery’s two no-frills storefront locations (the second one in Five Forks) sport golden-hued walls and offer dine-in and carry-out service. $, L, D. 2435 E. North St. (864) 373-9958, goldenllama.net

IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modernAmerican elements into his menu. Soleil Moon Frye fans should try the Punky Brewster roll: tuna, mango, hot sauce, and Panko topped with spicy crab salad and unagi sauce. $$, L, D. 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com

KANNIKA’S THAI KITCHEN

The family-run restaurant serves up exotic recipes direct from owner Kannika Jaemjaroen-Walsh’s native Thai province, boasting traditional dishes like green and yellow curries, pad Thai, and the spicy/ sour Tom Yum soup. Don’t miss Kannika’s specialty items, like the pla pad khun chai, a lightly fried red snapper filet doused in white wine and soy bean sauce, and the savory honey duck with carrots, cilantro, snow peas, onions, and fried shallots. $$$, L,

D. 430 Haywood Rd, Ste B, Greenville. (864) 297-4557, kannikaskitchen.com

topped Greek salad or a classic gyro wrapped with your choice of lamb, chicken, or veggies. At dinner, try something more indulgent like the vegan moussaka. $$, L, D, Closed Sunday. 644 N. Main St #100, Greenville. (864) 3739445, jirozgreenvillesc.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com

MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. Try the Vietnamese crêpes or the Pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from their homegrown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Monday. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

MENKOI RAMEN HOUSE

Can you say umami? Located on Woodruff Road with a second shop now on North Main, this Japanese noodle house offers an exquisite ramen experience that will have you wondering why you ever settled for the dorm room packet version. Start with the rice balls or edamame, then dive into the Shoyu ramen—marinated pork, bean sprouts, spinach, green onions, nori, and a boiled egg bathed in a soy-based broth.

$, L, D. 1860 Woodruff Rd, Ste C, and 243 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 288-5659 OTTO IZAKAYA

Modeled after the informal, after-work drinking holes of Japan, Otto Izakaya is the latest dining concept unveiled by Peter Lieu and Doug Yi—longtime owners of Lieu’s Bistro restaurant. The menu invites guests to embrace familiar favorites—spicy tuna and BBQ eel rolls with assorted nigiri and sashimi—while expanding palates to new tasting territories a la the mac ‘n’ cheese loaded with Panang curry, jack cheese, and radiatori pasta or banh mi sliders with chili pork and spicy mayo. $$, D. 802 S Main St; 15 Market Point Dr, Greenville. (864) 568-5880; (864) 568-8009, otto-izakaya.com SACHA’S CAFÉ

Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on Colombian food at Sacha’s. Arepas are available with ingredients like beans, chorizo, avocado, shredded beef, and more stuffed inside (rellenas) or piled on top (encima). The patacones, or deep-fried plantains, are thick and sweet. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com

KOREAN BBQ

There’s no mistaking what you’re in for at Korean BBQ. This hole-in-the-wall won’t wow you with its simple interior, but its assortment should. A selection of ban chan (side dishes) should spark your palate with snapshots of flavor before you dive into bowls of bibimbap (rice mixed with vegetables, meat, and an egg) or yukejang (a spicy beef and vegetable stew).

SAFFRON

JI-ROZ

(864) 288-7400, saffrongreenville.com

$$. L, D. 1170 Woodruff Rd. (864) 286-0505

Fresh Cold-Pressed Juice, Salads, Smoothies, Paninis, Soup, & More Come visit us!

VILLAGE OF WEST GREENVILLE – 580 PERRY AVE.

True, it would be fantastic if the Greek Festival happened year-round. But until that day, pop into this authentic Mediterranean eatery with modern flair. Take a light lunch on the outdoor patio with a Kalamata olive and feta-

It’s worth braving Woodruff Road to visit this Indian eatery. At lunch, the daily buffet lays out a wallet-friendly selection of curries, rice dishes, and chef’s signatures. The a la carte dinner menu boasts a staggering variety, but the yogurt-marinated chicken tikka cooked in a clay oven or the lamb saag stewed with spinach, ginger, and garlic are excellent options. $, L, D. 1178 Woodruff Rd., Ste. 16. SAIGON FAST FOOD

Contrary to its name, Saigon Fast Food is a sit-down restaurant. Inside, the small room is spiffed up with green-cloth-covered tables

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and a host of condiments in the middle of each. Folks come here for steaming bowls of pho—a fragrant broth made with rice noodles and your choice of other ingredients (meats and vegetables)—and an extensive menu of Vietnamese specialties to wash down with a glass of bubble tea $ -$$. L, D. 1011 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 235-3472 SWAD

Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D. 1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089 YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

Here, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soulsatisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce then topped with a fried egg. $ -$$, L, D. Closed Monday.

2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville mainstay. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glacé, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise.$$$-$$$$, D.

Closed Sunday.1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com DA VINCI’S RISTORANTE

Located in the Forest Park shopping center, Da Vinci’s casual exterior belies the upscale atmosphere within. Executive Chef Carlos Echeverri serves fresh fare, updating menus to showcase new dishes like cold antipasti salad with fresh mozzarella and roasted red peppers, and calamari a​ ffogati featuring a spicy San Marzano tomato sauce. Highlights include the veal shank o ​ sso bucco, butternut squash soup, and the recently debuted black truffle​ burrata. $$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 27

this ristorante serves up Italian cuisine out of the former Playwright space on River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list, curated from award-winning vineyards across the region. After you’ve had your glass, grab a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato.

$$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy the arugula salad or bistro burger with caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D

(Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com

PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B.(864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

PORTOFINO’S

You’ll find Italian-American classics to feed every member of the family at this Greenville icon. For two decades, the familyowned restaurant near Greenville Mall has been pleasing palates with a generous menu of pasta, seafood, and saltimbocca. For the gluten-sensitive, sautéed vegetables can be substituted for pasta in many of the dishes

RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday

& Monday. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed

STELLA’S SOUTHERN BRASSERIE

LIMONCELLO

340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 626-6900, stellasbrasserie.com

Sunday. 170 River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com

The latest addition to the Larkin’s line-up,

Saturday, September 22 • 7:00 PM For tickets visit:

http://www.euphoriagreenville.com/events/greenbrier-farms-dinner/

Sunday. 618 S Main St. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com

KAIROS GREEK KITCHEN

THE LAZY GOAT

Bacon Bros. Public House,

Shawn Kelly of the new Fork and Plough and Craig Kuhns of Greenbrier Farms.

POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

$, D. 30 Orchard Park Dr., Ste. 22. (864) 627-7706, portofinossc.com

St. (864) 520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com

This farm-based feast sings an ode to former Charleston chefs; Anthony Gray of

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarinetiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed

S Pleasantburg Dr, Ste 160, Greenville. (864) 241-8044, davincis-sc.com

This Charleston restaurant makes its Upstate mark by serving up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like made-in-Mount Pleasant falafels next to slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the homemade tzatziki sauce. Turn any meal into a pita wrap or bowl with your choice of fresh spreads like hummus, baba ganoush, or fat-free dill yogurt.$-$$, L, D. 1800 August

Join our Chef Anthony Gray at the Euphoria Greenville Ode to Charleston event. A Culinary Collaboration at Greenbrier Farms.

Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second in Jason and Julia Scholz’s line of quality eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, Chef Jeff Kelly offers a local twist on French staples—blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen—served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR.

& CREATIVE TWISTS ON TRADITIONAL AMERICAN FARE, SERVED ALONGSIDE A WIDE VARIETY OF DRAFT BEER & CRAFT BREWS

72 BEERS ON TAP CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF® BRAND STEAKS & BURGERS

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DINING

Guide

VILLA FROSI

Build Your Own PokÉ Bowl Choose from an array of high-quality, sushi-grade fish and fresh veggies!

A Greek and Italian restaurant with traditional flair, Villa Frosi hits the Wade Hampton stretch with a variety of Southern European staples. Sample specialties like the spanakopita with feta and spinach filling or the seafood fettuccine, or go straight for the pizza. Finish with a slice of limoncello cake, and you’ll be booking you’re Mediterranean dream cruise, pronto. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 2520 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 520-0298. resto. tpsitetesting.info

FOOD TRUCKS AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. Owner Nick Thomas treats the tortilla as a work of art, with the likes of Nashville hot chicken or Thai shrimp with fried avocado stuffed into soft shells. Sides like the street corn are must adds. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $, schedule varies. (404) 372-2266, facebook.com/ automatictaco CHUCK TRUCK

Owner David Allen uses only local ingredients to make his burgers. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a fresh-ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewood-smoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $, schedule varies. (864) 8843592, daveschucktruck.com

CLUCK SQUEAL AND FRIENDS

Owner Jeff Selzer brings an inventive flare to his food truck fare. Expect staples like the fried chicken sandwich and the black & bleu burger, but don’t miss out on fan-favorite crab Rangoon or Jamaican jerk tacos with tropical pico de gallo. Check the Cluck Squeal and Friends Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $, schedule varies. (864) 395-9720, facebook.com/clucksquealfriend ELLADA KOUZINA

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Greenville

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3935 PELHAM RoaD GREENVILLE, SC 29615

1143 WOODRUFF ROAD GREENVILLE, SC 29607

864.516.3867

864.568.5411 OPEN 11am–9pm @eatpokebrosgreenvillewoodruFf @eatpokebros

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Greek cuisine hits the Greenville scene in this big blue traveling kitchen. Traditional treats are always available off the spit, the lamb and chicken gyros are Mediterranean heaven, and their special take on Greek fries are the ideal pre-meal snack. Check social media for weekly schedules and booking. $, schedule

varies. (864) 908-5698, facebook.com/ elladakouzina2013 GRAVY TRAIN FOOD TRAILER

Dive into this over-the-border (no, not that border) delicacy, hailing straight from the land of maple syrup. The Gravy Train puts their own spin on Canada’s signature gravysoaked, cheese-curd-sprinkled French fry dish à la the chorizo fryerito layered with black beans, homemade chorizo, avocado ranch, and cheddar, and the Reuben-style corned beef poutine drizzled with Thousand Island dressing, smothered in Swiss, and doused in sauerkraut $, schedule varies. (864) 326-5708,

hoponthegravytrain.com

Simpsonville

Easley

SPARTANBURG

654 FAIRVIEW Road SIMPSONVILLE, SC 29680

125 ROLLING HILLS CIrcle EASLEY, SC 29640

1450 W. O. EZELL BLVD SUITE 1120 SPARTANBURG, SC 29301

864.962.3445

864.442.6399

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KEEPIN’ IT FRESH

As healthy as it is tasty, Keepin’ It Fresh food truck serves up a diverse menu of locally sourced cuisine guaranteed to please your appetite and your waistline. Catch them at Grateful Brew and the Swamp Rabbit Brewery and Taproom for a crispy fried Brussels sprouts salad, mouthwatering shrimp taco topped with peach slaw and guava crema, or a golden-brown fried fish plate. $$, schedule

KICKIN’ PIG BAR-B-QUE PIG TRUCK

If you’re in the mood for some authentic Southern eats, look no further than the Kickin’ Pig’s on-the-go ’cue truck. Opt for the handheld route with the smoked bologna sandwich seasoned with BBQ rub and finished with cole slaw, or grab a fork and dig into the BBQ Sundae, a non-confectionary concoction of pulled pork, potato salad, slaw, and sauce of choice. $, schedule varies. (864) 608-6187,

kickinpigbbq.com

MEAT’N IN THE MIDDLE

Treat yourself to a plethora of sandwiches from mobile marvel Meat’n in the Middle, each topped with your choice of a mouth-watering sauce. Try their Crystal Pistol Chicken with sautéed onion, jalapenos, pepper jack cheese, and mango-habanero sauce, or go for the bun length dog from Nathan’s. For those with dietary limitations, the vegetarian tacos are an excellent alternative. $, schedule varies. (864) 723-1185, mitmfoodtruck.com ROBINO’S

Chef Robin’s vision of freshly sourced fare with a home-cooked feel comes to fruition in Robino’s Food Truck. Though mainly featuring Italian food, this truck shucks out a wide variety of American classics, such as the chicken potpie with puff pastry or the garden burger. For those with dietary limitations, the vegan lasagna is a great go-to option. $, schedule varies. (864) 621-3064, robinosfoodtruck.com ONE LOVE FUSION

Catch a summertime vibe year-round every time you drop by this Caribbean-inspired restaurant-on-wheels. Wrap your hands around One Love’s take on traditional favorites; the tropical gyro is rolled up with fresh mango slaw, pico, seared lamb and beef, and jerkinfused tzatziki sauce, while the Jinju hero comes topped on a grilled roll with kimchi, Italian sausage, provolone, and tangy Asian sauce. $, schedule varies. (864) 399-9392,

facebook.com/OneLoveFF SMOKIN’ BLUES BBQ

Smokin’ Blues keeps things hot with a smorgasbord of savory sauces and smoked staples—pulled pork, beef brisket, pulled chicken, and ribs—that can be enjoyed solo or packed into sandwiches and tacos. For a treat that’s extra smokin’, go for the glutenfree loaded fries or homemade chips piled high with pork, white BBQ sauce, sour cream, pickled jalapenos, and three-cheese sauce. $, schedule varies (864) 444-4752,

mysmokinblues.com THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. Don’t miss the mahi mahi tacos topped with kale slaw and chipotle aioli. $, schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

WE GOT THE BEETS

Proving that not all street food is created equal, We Got the Beets is Greenville’s very first plant-based food truck. This crueltyfree fare encourages diners to “celerybrate” vegan eats. Favorites include the Philly grilled cheese with marinated portobello mushrooms and cashew mozzarella cheese, and the sushi sandwich with sushi rice, Korean BBQ jackfruit, and more in a nori sheet pocket. $, schedule varies. @wegotthebeetsfoodtruck

varies. (864) 386-5050, @keepinitfreshtruck_gvl

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P IZZA BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$,

L, D. 25 W Washington St. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com COASTAL CRUST

This Charleston-based catering joint graces the Greenville scene with artisan, Neapolitan-style pizza pies. Served out of a turquoise ’55 Chevy tow truck, the pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River farms. Stick with the classic margherita pie, or branch out with the red Russian kale and Gorgonzola, sprinkled with almond pieces and drizzled in olive oil. Location information available on their website.

$, L, D. Location varies. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com D'ALLESANDRO'S PIZZA

Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s Pizza brings its dough lover’s paradise to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. Created with quality ingredients, D’Allesandro’s pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy a variety of savory pizza, calzones, and even signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk Dr, Greenville.

(864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street downtown, and now on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L,

D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com STONE PIZZA

Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, the latest edition to the corner of Stone and Park avenues is no pie in the sky. Ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends (beer, sports, and pizza, amirite?), STONE and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with house-made mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked for a flat minute in their wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat

& Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave. (864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com TOSS PIZZA

Located in the South Ridge Apartment Community, the TOSS menu is loaded with artfully crafted pies that are a far cry from your typical pepperoni. Head far east with the Phuket Thai pie, based with curry sauce and topped with peanuts, arugula, and shiitake mushrooms. The chile relleno is guaranteed to light a fire in the ol’ belly— thanks to a few poblano peppers. $$, L, D. 823 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 2830316, tosspizzapub.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have

entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D.

Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

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TACOS CANTINA 76

Tex-Mex has a new home in Greenville with the addition of Cantina 76, where the tacos shine. Play it safe with classic handhelds like fried tilapia and ground beef with lettuce, tomatoes, and shredded cheese, or turn up the heat with fried chicken doused with jalapeño aioli. $, L, D. 103 N Main St. (864) 631-2914, cantina76.com

FARMHOUSE TACOS

Hand-crafted and locally sourced, this TR taco joint is the love child of Mexican cuisine and Southern soul food. Start the meal with a few small plates—try the fried green tomatoes or the pan-seared crab cakes—then dig into pure taco bliss with the Travelers Rest hot chicken. Go a little lighter with a farm-fresh salad, and end with the campfire s’mores. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 164 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0586, farmhousetacos.com

NEO BURRITO

Hailing from Asheville, North Carolina, this locally owned spot takes—the burrito. Stop in for spicy tacos, cheesy quesadillas, zesty breakfast burritos, fresh salads, and more. Save room for the chipotle BBQ chicken burrito or the farm burrito, packed with rice, kale, hummus, beets, cilantro, cabbage, and more. $, B, L, D. 1268 Pendleton St. (864)

552-1054, neoburrito.com PAPI’S TACOS

Table 301 plankowner Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. Get in, get out, and enjoy Falls Park. $, L, D. 300 River St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com TIPSY TACO

Dishes here bear the creative touch of Trish Balentine, former owner of Corporate Deli. Her made-from-scratch menu items include tamales, burrito bowls, and all the other Tex-Mex suspects. “Tipsy” nods to the bar, where you can swill tequila flights, frozen margaritas, and house-infused spirits. Take your pick of three locations—two in Greenville and one on Fairview Road in Simpsonville. $$, L, D, SBR. 15 Conestee Ave,

(864) 558-0775, and 215 Pelham Rd, (864) 603-1144, tipsytaco.net

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WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP

The new kid on the taco block, White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or Birds Fly South’s crisp bungalow golden ale for the complete taqueria experience. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

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WILLY TACO

Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta! Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the atmosphere pairs perfectly with its festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the crispy avocado—topped off with a house-crafted margarita. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 217

Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

864-346-4669 BIC@ABRrealty.com (Visit ABRcash.com for my rebate videos.) https://www.justice.gov/atr/rebates-make-buying-home-less-expensive SEPTEMBER 2018 / 127

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Between the wedding cake, the bouquet catches, and those special bridesmaid dresses you can definitely wear again, weddings can be a little hectic. Now, imagine if you made a lifetime promise to your friends on prom night that you’d make that walk down the aisle again and again. So kicks off this Jones Hope Wooten original play, featuring four Southern besties who strive to stick together through the thick, thin, and the first dance. As heartwarming as it is humorous, you’ll be saying, “I do!” before you know it. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $20-$52. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

SPIRITFEST 2018 Sept 2nd; Sun, 5pm. $42-$52. Bon Secours Wellness Arena. This gospel-oriented event uplifts spiritual growth and community through music, prayer, and more.

Photograph of Kirk Franklin courtesy of RCA Records

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS

Thru Sept 22

4–8

Photograph of Kirk Franklin courtesy of RCA Records

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW

One a day may not keep the doctor away, but this fruit of many faces is the perfect fall companion for all the pies, cobblers, and salads you can eat. A week-long affair, the festival has as many activities as there are kinds of apples: baking contests, quilt shows, river floats, a parade, rodeo, concerts, and the crowning of one lucky lady as Miss Apple Festival. Times, locations, and prices vary. scapplefestival.com

Let’s do the time warp again. The Richard O’Brien musical has become a cult classic, lending itself to numerous international tours and a smash film starring Tim Curry as the “sweet transvestite” doctor himself. But you have not truly had the Rocky Horror experience until you see it live; the production relies heavily on audience/actor interaction that includes having “virgins” of the show hop on stage for the time warp dance. Both campy and endearing, you may never want to leave Dr. Frank N Furter’s freaky castle. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St. Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 7pm & 11pm. $40. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

2 A winning pair of uplifting

6, 13, 20, 27

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS MOONLIGHT MOVIES

SPIRITFEST 2018

gospel talent and spiritual discussion, SpiritFest emphasizes the strength gained through prayer and acceptance. Aiming to continue the tradition of community inspiration and spiritual growth, this year’s edition will star the Grammynominated gospel octet The Canton Spirituals, Georgia-based musician

SOUTH CAROLINA APPLE FESTIVAL

and pastor Bishop William Murphy, contemporary recording artists the Alabama Gurlz, and more. The annual tradition will also present Spiritfest scholarship funds to local youth in need. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St. Sun, 5pm. $42-$52. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Paying homage to the drive-in days of the past, Moonlight Movies showcases some of the best vintage flicks outdoors in scenic Falls Park. More social than Netflix and less irritating than the sticky floors of the movie theater, it’s the best way to settle under the stars and welcome the fall. Falls Park on the Reedy, 601 S Main St. Wed. Free. (864) 232-2273, greenvillesc.gov/1324/ Fidelity-Moonlight-Movies

7

SIPPIN’ SAFARI

While we don’t necessarily recommend sharing a beer with an orangutan (we’ve heard they get a little sappy), we will put our stamp of approval on this annual event that supports the Friends of the Greenville Zoo program. Now in its 12th year, the Sippin’ Safari is upping the ante with a new VIP area offering early event access, exclusive wines, and oysters courtesy of the Blockhouse. There will also be zoo tours, live music, and a raffle loaded with plenty of must-have items. Party with the animals or party like an animal—the choice is yours. Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr. Fri, 6:30– 9:30pm. $50, general admission; $75, VIP. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

7, 14, 21, 28

GROOVIN’ IN THE GROVE Clear your calendars—we’ve got your Friday night plans covered for a while. Each week, the fine folks at Upcountry Provisions are presenting a free outdoor concert starring an eclectic outfit of folk, country, Southern rock, and blues musicians. Set against the charming, rustic vibe of The Grove venue, September’s plate of tunes includes local favorites

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TWILL TRUNKS A PERSONAL SHOPPING SERVICE Call us for more details.

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PERSPECTIVE: A JARED EMERSON ART SHOW AND AUCTION Sept 13th; Thurs, 7pm. $75–$200. Zen. Catch live-painting performer Jared Emerson at this dynamic presentation, all to benefit the Premier Foundation in support of impoverished communities.

Darby Wilcox, the Jef Chandler Duo, Angela Easterling, and the Jaguar 4. Grab a cold drink, one of Upcountry Provisions’ signature brick-oven pizzas, and get to groovin’. Upcountry Provisions Bakery & Bistro, 6811 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. Fri, 5–9pm. Free. (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com

7–23

DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID

As kids, it seemed like it would be pretty cool to live under the sea and be best friends with a crab that has a Jamaican accent. As adults, we wonder how on earth Ariel managed to keep that flimsy clamshell bra on while she swam. Inspired by the Disney classic and Broadway smash, this nautical musical features King Triton, Flounder, and evil witch-octopus hybrid Ursula as they belt out “Under the Sea,” “Part of Your World,” “Kiss the Girl,” and all those other songs that made you wish you’d wake up one Monday morning with fins for feet. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $20-30. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

7–30

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT

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It’s been nearly 50 years since the musical’s 15-minute opening in London, but this classic crafted by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice hasn’t lost any steam on stage. Based on the story from the Book of Genesis, Dreamcoat recounts the plight of Joseph, a kid tricked into slavery by his jealous brothers. Through a series of life-changing events, Joseph soon

Photograph courtesy of the Premier Foundation

Miss

finds himself at the top of the totem pole under the Egyptian pharaoh, and learns that the only thing brighter than his coat of many colors are the dreams that light his way. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

8–23

SHREK THE MUSICAL

Oh, you thought a film that starred a talking donkey, a giant green ogre and a Smash Mouth cover of The Monkees’ hit “I’m a Believer” couldn’t possibly get any better? Think again! With music and lyrics crafted by Jeanine Tesori and David LindsayAbaire, the family-friendly production chronicles the life of one bitter Shrek as he journeys from the swamp to the kingdom of the overcompensating Lord Farquaad in order to save his home from a host of fairytale squatters. With a chatty donkey in tow, Shrek discovers the power of true love, friendship, and a good midaction ballad. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Sat, 10am & 1:30pm; Sun, 1:30pm & 5:30pm. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

11–23

FEI WORLD EQUESTRIAN GAMES Skirting along the Blue Ridge Mountains, the city of Tryon is known for its charming arts scene, picturesque views, and vital equestrian community. So it only makes sense that the esteemed Fédération Equestre International (FEI), the worldwide governing body of equestrian sport—a.k.a. the horse experts— would choose this North Carolina town as the host for its eighth annual

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Zen, 624 S Main St. Thurs, 7pm. $75-$200. perspectiveartshow.com

13–15

SPARTOBERFEST

Sure, you’ve heard of Oktoberfest. But have you ever been to a SpartOberfest? Serving up traditional German staples like hot pretzels, cold beer, and strudel, the festhalle is also slated to host the Foothills Oompah Band, the Walhalla Oktoberfest Bavarian Dancers, the Wheelbarrows, and more. Peruse the Christmas Market of artisans and crafters and be sure to register for the Pretzel Run—you’ll need some activity to burn off those calories, right? Jesus, Our Risen Savior Catholic Church, 2575 Reidville Rd, Spartanburg. Thurs, 6–8pm; Fri, 5–9:30pm; Sat, 10am-9:30pm. Free. spartoberfest.com

13–30

World Equestrian Games. Held on the grounds of the prominent Tryon International Equestrian Center, the schedule of events includes individual and team competitions in categories of dressage, para-equestrian dressage, reining, endurance, jumping, vaulting, eventing, and driving. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. Times and prices vary. tryon2018.com

13 PERSPECTIVE: A JARED EMERSON ART

SHOW AND AUCTION

Creating under the belief that “art reaches everyone,” Upstate talent Jared Emerson is known for his dynamic live painting performances and vivid, colorful collection of portraits and landscapes. For his sixth annual benefit show, Emerson will once again put paint (and soul) to canvas in support of the Premier Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides crucial empowerment to impoverished communities. The combination auction and art show soiree will be highlighted with heavy appetizers, cocktails, music, and a guest artist act by Detroit native TYP.

DREAMGIRLS

Ladies and gentlemen, the divas have entered the building. Drawing upon the rise-to-fame stories of The Supremes, The Shirelles, and other notable R&B artists, Dreamgirls spins the tale of a fictional female trio from Chicago—the Dreamettes—with their sights set on fame. But as their star begins to rise, so too does the drama, splitting the former friends at the seams over decades of musical evolution. With powerhouse numbers like “And I Am Telling You I Am Not Going” and “One Night Only,” it’s easy to see why this hit musical has been a “dream” for audiences the world over. Centre Stage, 501 River St. Times and prices vary. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

14–15 ENCHANTED CHALICE RENAISSANCE FAIRE

Unfortunately, Game of Thrones might have given us all the wrong idea of just how much “fun” the Middle Ages were. The real Renaissance is one of timeless tradition and nobility—you know, except for the whole plague thing. This annual event invites guests of all ages to don their best royal duds and take in a live performance, shop in the marketplace, participate in a sword fighting, and, of course, dig into some old-timey grub. Fresh turkey legs included. Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1135 State Park Rd, Greenville. Fri, 5–11pm; Sat, 10am–6pm. $8-$22. theenchantedchalice.com

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Find new art from old favorites. Discover artists and studios. All while experiencing beautiful Henderson County on a free, scenic driving tour.

TOWN

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Sat - Sun 10am-5pm

GODSMACK & SHINEDOWN Sept 21st; Fri, 7pm; $46-$66. Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

Henderson County

Open Studio Tour hcost.org

14–15

SOUTH GREENVILLE FAIR

There’s so much more to fairs than deep-fried hamburgers and getting trapped in the Gravitron for hours. The South Greenville Fair will showcase prize-winning chickens, horses, cows, and rabbits from around the Upstate, and select a special Fair Queen to reign over it all. There will also be competitions in artwork, engine tractors, and a BBQ rib cook-off. What more could you ask for? Simpsonville City Park, 100 Park Dr, Simpsonville. Fri, 5pm; Sat, 8:30am. Free. southgreenvillefair.com

14–16

ANDERSON GREEK FESTIVAL PLUS+

Love baklava? Does the thought of spanakopita make you weak in the knees? Are you drooling just reading this? Then make your way over to the Anderson Greek Festival Plus+, where a bevy of Mediterranean-inspired delicacies, music, and entertainment await your every indulgence. New

this year, the “plus” version of the traditional fest includes contemporary shows and activities added to the bill, including a Saturday night set by Nashville songstress Julie Roberts. Civic Center of Anderson, 3027 Martin Luther King Blvd, Anderson. Fri, 4:30–9:30pm; Sat, 11am–9pm; Sun, 11:30am– 4:30pm. the-greek-festival.org

14–16

INDIE CRAFT PARADE

The Indie Craft Parade exposes the creative expression of craft artists from around the South, with offerings ranging from paper goods to prints and unique wearables to local food and drink. You’ve never seen so much artistry under one roof, so drop that project you’ll never finish (even if you had the time) and join the Parade. Southern Bleachery at Taylors Mill, 232 Mills St, Taylors. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 9am–6pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. $5. makerscollective.org/ indiecraftparade

A bra buying experience like no other

565 Woodruff Rd., Greenville • b r e a k o u t b r a s . c o m 134 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Photograph of Willow Vane Pottery, courtesy of the Makers Collective

Photograph of Godsmack by Paris Visone

Join these alt-rockers as they churn out hardcore hits like “Simple Man” and “I Stand Alone.”


20–23

EUPHORIA

There are some things that go hand-in-hand in the Upstate: robust wines seem to taste their best when complemented by delectable cuisine. Add a little live music to the cocktail, and there you have it: Euphoria. In addition to numerous guest chef experiences, cooking demos, and tastings, the festival has plenty to sate your palate for delicious food, drink, and entertainment: Songwriter’s Recipe, Taste of the Trail: Swamp Rabbit Ride & Lunch, Big Easy Bash, celebrity chef dinners, and the Sunday Supper are all part of the line-up that you shouldn’t passup. Locations, times, and prices vary. Thurs–Sun. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com

22

OPEN ARMS 5K

If your family is in the midst of a medical crisis, worrying about where you’re going to lay your head down at night should be the least of your concerns. Thankfully, the Open Arms organization helps provide a home (away from home) for families in this exact situation, giving them one less thing to fret over when travelling for treatment. Funding for Open Arms is made possible through events like the 5K, which takes place throughout Mauldin’s scenic Conestee Park. Conestee Park, 840 Mauldin Rd, Greenville. Sat, 8:30am. $15-$25. openarms5k.com

“NEVER” TOUR A LUXURY HOME WITHOUT “THE” EXPERT

COBBLESTONE • 125 Ramsflord Lane, Simpsonville 6,997 sq. ft. • 5 BR/4 BA/2 HLF BA • $1,375,000

& 21 GODSMACK SHINEDOWN

Photograph of Willow Vane Pottery, courtesy of the Makers Collective

Better start practicing that perfect headbang ASAP. Tacking onto their uber-successful joint summer jaunt, alt-rockers Godsmack and Shinedown are making a stop in the Upstate to promote two new albums—When Legends Rise and Attention

KINSGBRIDGE • 6 White Crescent Lane, Simpsonville 6,500 sq. ft. • 5 BR/4 BA/2 HLF BA • $1,375,000

Ty Savage Broker, CEO

Attention, respectively. Half alt-rock, half alt-metal, this hardcore concert promises a smorgasbord of heavy hitters like “I Stand Alone,” “Greed,” “45,” and “Simple Man,” along with a rollicking opener by English metalcore artists Asking Alexandria. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St. Fri, 7pm. $45.50-$65.50. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

21–22

SOOIE

And the last little pig cried . . . beef or pork? Mustard or vinegar? Whole hog or shoulder? Now, you have the chance to decide for yourself at this BBQ competition sponsored by the City of Mauldin. Enjoy plates heaped high with tantalizing cuts on Saturday, but be sure to stop by on Friday for the “Anything Butt” challenge, where rivals will plate to impress with a variety of homemade side dishes. Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 E Butler Rd, Mauldin. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 11am–3pm. Free. (864) 335-4862, mauldinbbq.com

8, 22

WAGGIN’ AT THE WATERPARK

If heaven is a giant field full of dogs, this must be the next best thing. Bring your furry friend to get a little wet n’ wild at the waterpark, where they’ll have the run of the place for the entire day. Both dates will have separate times designated for small dogs, large dogs, and even senior canines. This summer has been a scorcher, and your pups deserve a dip. Discovery Island Waterpark, 417 Baldwin Rd, Simpsonville; Otter Creek Waterpark, 101 W Darby Rd, Greenville. Sat, 9am–2pm. $17-$30. (864) 288-6470, greenvillerec.com

25

864.444.7399 OVER 15 YEARS EXPERIENCE AND $350 MILLION PLUS IN SALES

• Professional Photography/Aerials • Staging Consultation • Buying & Selling Expert • Local Print Ad campaign • Zillow 5 Star Premier Agent / Featured listing on Zillow/Trulia

BRANDI CARLILE

Self-taught on both the piano and the guitar, singer and songwriter Brandi Carlile has struck gold with fans for her big vocals and commanding lyrical narratives. Carlile’s masterful blend of folk, country, and rock continues to flourish with each album; this year’s release By the Way, I Forgive You is the musician’s

KELLER WILLIAMS/GREENVILLE UPSTATE

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Scene z ot Do N

Miss

BUDDY GUY Sept 28th; Fri, 8pm. $45-$65. The Peace Center. Guitar legend Buddy Guy lights the stage with his masterful electric twang in a vibrant performance.

most successful yet, climbing to the number-five spot on the Billboard 200 chart. Carlile will be accompanied by Boston indie folksters Darlingside. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Tues, 7:30pm. $55-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

REGIONAL 25 UPSTATE SUMMIT

Built around the theme of “Winning the Future,” the 2018 Upstate Regional Summit unites impactful leaders and partners with a common goal of addressing, adapting, and improving the current and future issues facing the Upstate community. Take advantage of the networking opportunities, breakout sessions, and an impressive docket of expert speakers to get the full effect of this biannual economic forum. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Tues, 8am–1:30pm. $45-$750. tenatthetop.org/2018-upstateregional-summit

25–29

SOUTH CAROLINA FOOTHILLS HERITAGE FAIR Commemorating the fair’s tenth anniversary and move to a brand-new venue, the SC Foothills Heritage Fair promises to be bigger and better than ever before. It’s back to the old-school days with mountain cloggers, livestock shows, clowns, baking contests, tractor exhibits, and classic carnival rides, as well the high-stakes world of canning competitions.

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center.

TOWN

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Foothills Agriculture Resource and Marketing Center, 2063 Sandifer Blvd, Westminster. Tues-Thurs, 4-10pm; Fri, 4-11pm; Sat, 10am-11pm. $3-$7. (864) 557-4453, carolinafoothillsheritagefair.org

26

VINCE GILL

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center.

Vince Gill has worked alongside top acts like Earl Scruggs, Carrie Underwood, Alison Krauss, and The Eagles. However, the singer and songwriter’s most prominent achievements have been garnered through his solo work, a 34-year stint that has spawned 19 studio albums, 21 Grammy Awards, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Blending country, Americana, bluegrass, and classic rock, Gill proves that he’s still got the chops to touch your soul through standards like “When I Call Your Name,” “Go Rest High on that Mountain,” and “If You Ever Have Forever in Mind.” The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Wed, 7:30pm. $55-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

27

MARCEL PORTILLA BAND

In partnership with the Hispanic Alliance organization and in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Marcel Portilla Band presents this free outdoor showcase. Fusing unique pop, rock, blues, and jazz harmonies with zesty Latin flavor, the authentic Hispanic sextet performs a songbook of original tunes and lively dance covers that are sure to spice up your evening. TD Stage at the Peace Center,

300 S Main St. Thurs, 7:30pm. Free. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

27–Oct 13

THE GLASS MENAGERIE

Crafted by storytelling genius Tennessee Williams as a semiautobiography in 1944, this memorystyle play is told from the perspective of Tom Wingfield, struggling writer who yearns to escape from his tedious life and onerous family. Urged by his mother to find his disabled sister a reasonable suitor, Tom invites a supposedly bachelor coworker over for supper, setting a chain of events in motion that eventually leads to his permanent departure from his home and his familial obligations. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $20-$52. (828) 698-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

28

BUDDY GUY

Hailing from the Cajun State and a pioneer of the Chicago blues movement, musician Buddy Guy has been hailed as one of Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time and “the best guitar alive”—a direct quote from another sultan of the strings, Eric Clapton. Now in his eighth decade of storied life on this Earth, Guy’s influence continues to spread throughout generations of artists and audiences via his vibrant, electric stage shows. Don’t miss your chance to see a true legend bring the masterpieces

to life in an intimate, poignant performance. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Fri, 8pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

29

SPARTANBURG PHILHARMONIC: 90TH SEASON CELEBRATION The fabulous Spartanburg Philharmonic have 90 seasons of music under the belt—so, yeah, it’s time to party. The bash begins with the overture from acclaimed American

composer Leonard Bernstein’s “Candide” operetta, followed by select, aged orchestral arrangements by Ira Gershwin and Maurice Ravel. Drop in an hour before curtain to partake in a “Classical Conversation” with Converse College School of Music director Chris Vaneman and music director Stefan Sanders. Twichell Auditorium at Converse College, 580 E Main St, Spartanburg. Sat, 7pm. $12.50-$45. (864) 948-9020, spartanburgphilharmonic.org

29

KOMEN SC MOUNTAINS TO MIDLANDS RACE FOR THE CURE The race for the cure is on as the largest and most highly funded breast cancer research organization takes to the Upstate. Preceded by the Survivors Ceremony, the early morning 5K kicks off downtown and threads along South Main and through Falls and Cleveland parks, making for a scenic trek with a cause. Funds raised by racers go toward community programs including breast cancer screenings, treatment, and education. Fluor Field at the West End, 945 S Main St. Sat, 8am. (843) 556-8011, komensouthcarolina.org

FALL: A PER FECT TIME TO PL ANT

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Estates Homes as distinguished as our readers.

The Cliffs at Keowee Springs, Six Mile 4BR, 4.5BA · MLS#20188085 · $1,499,000 Cliffs Realty, LLC Ivy Nabors (864) 249-4434 cliffsliving.com/springcove

207 Pixie Moss Way, Lake Keowee 4BR, 4 BA · MLS#20201153 · $1,699,000

4BR, 4 Full 2 Half BA · MLS#1373028 · $1,650,000

Lake Views, Reserve at Lake Keowee

140 Cooper Lake Road, Simpsonville

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Patti Shull (864) 985-2980 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

Wilson Associates Ashley Steigerwald (864) 907-0601

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Libby Zorbas (864) 207-8711 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

4BR, 4.5 BA · MLS#20201068 · $1,175,000

Golf Estate, Reserve at Lake Keowee

204 Sorrento Drive, Greenville

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Patti Shull (864) 985-2980 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

Wilson Associates Sharon Wilson (864) 918-1140

4BR, 4 Full 2 Half BA · MLS#20201775 · $950,000

The Cliffs at Glassy, Landrum Cliffs Realty, LLC Zack Robinson (864) 249-4434 cliffsliving.com/fallingstar

4BR, 3 Full 2 Half BA · MLS#1366133 · $1,099,000

305 E. Hillcrest Drive, Greenville

5BR, 4.5 BA · MLS#1363221 · $899,900

3BR, 2 Full 2 Half BA · MLS#1370028 · $750,000

104 Putney Bridge Lane, Simpsonville

601 Arlington Ave. Unit#5, Greenville

5BR, 4.5BA · MLS#1365129 · $749,900

3BR, 3.5BA · MLS#1373106 · $664,000

106 Fire Pink, Cliffs Vineyards

Wilson Associates Tony King (864) 787-9493

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, Co. REALTORS® Stina Thoennes (864) 304-9475

Wilson Associates Nick Carlson (864) 386-7704

MLS#20201215 · $389,000

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Libby Zorbas (864) 207-8711 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Caroline Spivey at 864.679.1229 or cspivey@communityjournals.com TOWNEstates_Sept18.indd TOWN_blank page.indd 6 2

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Corner of River & Broad Streets, downtown Greenville www.LimoncelloGVL.com social: @LimoncelloGVL SEPTEMBER 2018 / 139

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SECOND

Glance

Past in Present

S

tarr Haney’s artistic cornerstones are color, light, and shadow, which she deftly harnesses in Vintage Modern Americana. The Centre Stage exhibition previews a wistful affection for the past as Haney uses oil and metal leaf to reflect the expressions of American life. Recently returned to the South, Haney blends a love of travel and new cultural experiences with a deep connection to her Southern roots. Attributed to her diverse range of influences, Haney’s vision offers a lighthearted sense of history translated into a hopeful place for the future.—Nicole Grumbos Vintage Modern Americana is on display at the MAC Centre Stage Gallery, 501 River St, Greenville, through September 9. The gallery is open 2–6pm, Tuesday–Friday. For more information, visit greenvillearts.com.

Starr Haney, Buffalo Nickel. Oil and metal leaf on canvas, 48 in x 72 in.

Starr Haney captures vintage Americana in an exhibition at the Centre Stage Gallery

140 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Yeah... that’s what our members said too.

Greenville’s Premier Life Plan Community

10 Fountainview Terrace Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 606-3055 https://Cascades-Verdae.com

Independent Living • Assisted Living • Memory Care • Skilled Nursing • Rehab

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TOWN September 2018  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN September 2018  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...